Teitl Casgliad: Brecon & Radnor express Carmarthen and Swansea Valley gazette and Brynmawr district advertiser

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
18 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

XMAS NICHT ECHOESI

XMAS NICHT ECHOES I AT LLANWRTYD WELLS. I I MAGISTRATES DISMISS SUMMONS. I At Llanwrtyd Wells, on Thursday, before Dr. W. Black Jones (in the chair), and Messrs. J. T. Evans and Nathaniel Evans, H. Watkins, Penybont-uchaf, T. Davies. Crug, and D. Jones, Llwynderw, Abergwessin, were summoned for being drunk and disorderly. Mr Careless, Llandrindod Wells, represented the defendants. P.8. Edwards stated at 10.45 p.m.. on the 25th December, be was on duty in the Square, and saw the defendants, Davies and Watkins, leaving the Square, going up the Dolcoed road. Wat- kins had a bicycle, and he was dfunk. Davies was walking-i>y his side, and he was very drunk. Jones was fallowing behind staggering drunk. When thev went up the road they began shout- ing, and kept on until near the hotel. Witness, followed up, and when defendants saw him they went up the path. I Mr Careless Did you speak to one of these bov s ?-No. Do you know these bov«?—Yes. You summoned Watkins on someone < 's evi- deikfe. When did you see Davies that night-?— After closing time. He was quite drunk, going in the direction of the hotel. Did you follow him in?—No. Why did you not go and speak to them? —They were 60 yards from me. The only shout- ing they did was for the other boys to stop for them. Are they all respectable boys?—Yes. You are quite sure that Watkins was drunk?—Yes. David Davies. Gellyfelen, was called as a wit- ness for the police, and stated that he saw D. Jones, H. Watkins and T. Davies on Christmas night on the Dolecoed Road. They were not drunk. They could walk alright. Watkins was wheeling a bicycle. Mr 'Careless Were they drunk?—I could not say they were drunk. Did you see a- bottle with them ?—No. I did not see any bottle. They were all sober?—Yes. The chairman, after a consultation, said they had decided to dismiss the case.

lI Rheumatism and Kidney Trouble i

"l Rheumatism and Kidney Trouble, FREE TREATMENT. Rheumatism is due to uric acid crystals in the joints and muscles, the result of excessive uric acid in the system that the kidneys failed to re- move as nature intended, to which every qualified physician agrees, and this add is also the cause of backache, lumbago, sciatica, gout, urinary trouble, stone, gravel, dropsy. The suocesas of Estora Tablets for the treatment of rheumatism ajid other forms of kidney trouble is due to the fact that they restore the kidneys to healthy action and thereby remove the cause of the trouble, and have cured numberless cases after the failure of other remedies, which accounts for them fast superseding out-of-date medicines that are Bold at a price beyond all but the wealthy. To prove Esitora Tablets fully warrant their de- scription—an honest remedy at an honest price— one full box of 40 tablets will be sent to readers of the "Brecon and Radnor Express" as a free sample on receipt of this notice and 3d in stamps to cover postage, packing, etc. Sold by chemists, 1/3 per box of 40 tablets, or six boxes for 6/9. For full box sample address Estora Co., 132, Charing Cross road, London, W.C. Brecon Agent, Walter Gwillim, M.P.S., Medical Hall; Builth Wells Agent, T. A. Coltman, M.P.S., The Pharmacy. 167p

Builth County Court I

Builth County Court. I INTERESTING CASES. Before His Honour, Judge Wm. Evans, at Builth Wells County Court on Thursday, the Caledonian Insurance Company sued Mr F. D. B. George, of Broad Street, Builth, for £ 2, mon- ies due to them. Plaintiffs were represented by Mr Jones-Wil- liams (solicitor, Brecon). Defendant said he only earned 13/9 per week as an auxiliary postman. He would try and pay 10/- per month. His Honour made an order for 10/- per month, and advised defendant to endeavour to pay. Defendant I hope to get some additional work now and have every prospect of being ruble to pay the debt. Dental Services. Mr J. M. Brookes, dentist, Brecon, claimed ze2 5s. from P. Rees, formerly of Builth, for den- tal services. Mr Jones-Williams (Brecon) appeared for plain- tiff and submitted particulars of the debt. Miss Mary Morris, dentist's assistant, proved the claim. His Honour awarded plaintiff judgment for the whole amount. Rent Dispute. I Mr Wm. Moore, Waterloo, Bettws-Dissertb, Hundred House, sued Mrs Mason, Llenelwedd, Builth, for £18 rent in respect to Upper Gilwern, .Which was let to her at £28 per annum. Defend- ant had paid £ 10, and the amount claimed was still due. Since the institution of proceedings defendant had paid X16 into court. Mrs Mason contended the holding had, for part of the time, been occupied by a man named Lay- ton, whom, she said, came to her for the key. Layton denied liability, observing he only acted in the capacity of care-taker. Mrs Mason Layton told me Mr Moore sent him for the key. Mrs Mason claimed R6 10s from Layton for the term she contended Upper Gilwern had been sub- let by Mr Moore to Layton. His Honour The action against Layton must go, and iwliat Mrs Mason has paid into court will meet the case.

LLOYDS BANK

LLOYDS BANK. MR R. Y. YASSAR-SMITH'S REYIEW. STABILITY OF BRITISH FINANCE. At the annual meeting at Birmingham, on the 2nd inst., of Lloyds Bank, Ltd., a profit of £ 1.259,190 was reported, and the directors re- commended a dividend at. the rate of 181 per cent., leaving tlO6,969 to be carried forward. The chairman (Mr R. V. Vassar-Smith) said the finacial precautions and remedial measures taken to meet the difficulties created by the war had proved of great value. Of the bills dis- counted by the Bank of England for the relief of cite accepting houses the amount of 300 millions had been reduced to about 50 millions; the pre- moratorium loans to the Stock Exchange had been to a large extent repaid; many of the minimum prices had been removed; the assist- ance given to the exporting houses had been satisfactory; and the more general use of cur- rency notes had contributed to the maintenance of the reserves of gold. The gold reserves at the Bank were ample, but less than usual, as it had been thought incumbent to keep more with the Bank of England, this strengthening the national reserve, and carrying out the principle that the va lue of gold lay in its being prudently in use and not in being hoarded. Advances to custom- ers were £ 4,430.764 less, due not to any curtail- ment of facilities, but to. prosperity, over-drawn balances being much reduced or converted into credit balances. Home Trades. I With regard to the home trade, reports from all quarters told of the great prosperity of ag- riculture. Colliery owners had suffered much owing to shortage of labour, and the output show- ed a reduction, 'but, generally speaking, results were satisfactory. The iron and steel trades bad done well, and 'the present prices of iron were the highest for nearly 40 years. Notwithstand- ing all drawbacks, our exports had been as high as 385 millions, a higher figure than the value of our exports in 1909, but, of course, much less than in more recent years. Our imports had been very large, the value being 854 millions, and, in- cluding Government stores, the total had been not 'far short of 1,000 millions sterling. The difference between these values was alarming. It was the cause of the difficulty of exchange, and pointed to the necessity of reducing, as far as possible, the unnecessary imports. He claimed that,, with many of their financial theories brok- en down, bankers had successfully met the daily changing course of events, and, in spite of ad- verse exchange conditions, our banks had up- held the credit of the country. Questions affect- ing the financial, commercial and economic posi- tion aifter the war were receiving serious atten- tion, and when the desired 'time came we should not be found unprepared. The connection be- tween finance and industry would have to be con- sidered, and he hoped that wiser and more toler- ant views might be taken of the connection be- tween capital and labour. Mr J. W. Beaumont Pease, in seconding the motion, said that the modern joint stock bank gave greater facilities than those afforded by the smailler banks which they had absorbed, and whereas in seven years, when we were fighting for- our existence in the Napoleonic wars, the bank failures averaged two a 'week, there bad been no failure since the present war commenced, except that of a small bank which was insolvent years before. The report was adopted, and the dividend, as recommended by the directors, was declared.

Last Man to LeaveI

Last Man to Leave. I SENNYBRIDGE BOY IN GALLIPOLI. I Dr. W. R. Thomas, late of Tylorstown, son of Mr Edward Thomas, Bailea, Sennybridge, Breconshire, writes an interesting letter about 'lis adventures on the Gallipoli Peninsula. The letter reads :—"The week before the evacuation we had 15 officers (medical) as reinforcements, and before the week was out one had been killed, one seriously wounded, and three seriously ill. During the last night of the evacuation my hos- pital had to provide 'four officers and 30 men to deal with and bring off the wounded during and after .the departure of the last troops. I was put in charge of this party, and I can tell you we had a lively time, as during the last two hours we had nobody between us and the Turks. After we had got all our wounded and men into a 'barge, I had 3 dead and 10 wounded from some terrific shell explosions. This was while we were on the boat waiting to clear off. I can truthfully say that I was the last man off the Peninsula. We got away at ten past four on the morning of January 9th. We then tried to get alongside a hospital ship, but it was so stormy that we failed, and the barge nearly upset. We had all taken our kits off, expecting to have to siwim for it—which was rather awkward, con- sidering that we had a lot of wounded. A naval officer gave our coxswain orders to go back to the shelter of the beach, but, fortunately, while we were on the way, a large steam tug came up in the dark and towed us to Imbros, 10 miles away. We were in the open boat for 12 hours without food, and I had to take the reserve rations of my men to feed the wounded—or such of them as were not too sea-sick. We had no blankets, every man of us was caked in mud and sea water, and we were jolly glad to get to a ship. We slept in hospital for a few nights and are, most of us, fairly fit again. One of my duties was to bring off a Union Jack, and I had it tied round my waist for 16 hours. Two nights before the eva- cuation, the Turks, thinking that was the final night, put 500 shells on to the beach. I am pleased to tell you I have just been promoted j from lieutenant to captain."

Advertising

Every box of ENGLAND'S GLORY Matches used means MORE WORK for Britian Work-people.-Moreland, Gloacester. 515 ■ Ml !■! !■! '■ s B?am?p

War and Politics 1

War and Politics. 1 The sixth session of the present Parliameait was opened on Tuesday. As predicted the most lively debate on the Address was directed to the subject of precautions against air raids. Such questions as the divided control of our anti-air service, the steps taken for reducing the lighting of various areas, or the policy of is- suing no warning to the public of the approach of zeppelins, are open to legitimate criticism. It is a very different matter with the sensational cam- paign in the Press which seeks, by creating a panic, to force the Government into an enor- mous scheme of buliding against zeppelins. The only result of any value which the enemy could hope to achieve through their air-raids on this country is to set up a panic and thus excite a de- mand either for the withdrawal of many of our aircraft from the front, where they are doing most effective military work, or for the diversion of our means of production to the building of a huge additional air-fleet instead of piling up the munitions by which alone we can bring the war to a successful conclusion. I British sympathy has gone out in amplest 1 measure to our kinsmen in Canada, over the de- struction of the Canadian Parliament House at Ottawa. The suspicion that the disaster may have been caused by an act of German incendiar- ism was increased when another fire broke out shortly afterwards in a Canadian munitions fac- tory. However this may be the documents seized on Captain von Papen, a selection from which has been published in a Parliamentary White Paper, reveal payments made by the ex- Military Attache at Washington to the man who was arrested for attempting to blow up (fifteen days after the date of von Pa.pen's cheque) the bridge crossing the frontier river between the United States and Canada, and to the head of the police service of the Hamburg-Amerika line, who is charged with conspiring to destroy the Welland canal. A payment to the German Consulate at Seattle was followed three weeks later by a dynamite explosion in Seattle harbour. We know from the German War Book tha't the policy of en- couraging and subsidising criminal acts is quite in accordance with the German Imperial Staff's conception of the way in which civilised warfare should be conducted. There are many other points of interest in the von Papen correspondence. Before the Austrian time-limit to Serbia had expired, a letter was sent to Captain von Papen, from Potsdam, telling him that Serbia "had not accepted" Austria's ultimatum. A postscript to the same letter added that "we have never before seen such prepara- tions for war as are being made at present." This was written a whole week before Germany declared war on .Russia, and fire days before the German Foreign Secretary assured our Ambas- sador that "beyond the recall of officers on leave the Imperial Government had done noth- ing special in the way of military preparations. America will be interested to learn that Captain von Papen, who in a letter to his wife last Aug- ust referred to "these' idiotic Yankees," had a, "hyphenate" correspondent last December who spoke of "the extraordinarily idiotic Yankee an- tagonism" to Germany's peculiar war-ethics. In view of the attacks made in the "Morning Post" on our Government for its supposed negligence in allowing German reservists to return to Ger- many, it should be noticed that in December, 1915, a German in New York was writing that "scarcely one per cent. have had luck with their attempts: the British search every corner of every ship. On March 1st the group system for the volun- tary enlistment df unmarried men comes to an t nd, and the era of compulsion will begin on the following day. We must fervently hope that the number of men who still remain outside will all have come in before that date. It is satisfac- tory to find that the Military Service Act, now it is on the Statute Book, has been generally ac- cepted by 'the community as an accomplished fact which is no longer open to controversy. The one ground 'for anxiety was removed when the Lab- our Conference decided that Labour should re- fuse to support an agitation for the Act's repeal. The result was, to a very great extent, secured by the 'tact with which the Prime Minister and Mr Bonar Law 'handled a delicate situation, and their evidently genuine desire to remove the ap- prehensions of Labour that the Bill might be used as an instrument to open the door for in- dustrial compulsion. 3k The Government policy of economising the available shipping tonnage by restriction of im- ports has now received a further application. The Royal Commission on the Sugar Supply has an- nounced that it will be necessary during the com- ing months to restrict the importation of sugar within narrower limits. Though the price of sugar since the beginning of the war has 'never been less than 50 per cent. a-bove normal, and is now practically double, there has been no con- 1 'erable reduction in the amount consumed. i 1 ere is an obvious necessity for war economy in the use of such articks as jam, biscuits, sweet- meats and chocolalte. If due care is exercised and individual consumption reduced within rea- sonable limits, the contemplated restriction of sugar imports should not cause a shortage of ade- quate supplies, or afford any ground for an in- crease in price. General Polivanoff, the Russian Minister for War, in an interview with the correspondent of the Paris "Journal," speaks in the most hopeful terms of the future. The munition crisis, which began to grow acute a year ago, and was the cause of the Russian retirement before the Ger- man Armies, has now been completely mastered. As the war goes on, the forces of the Allies in- crease, and those of the Central Powers diminish "Behind the four Allies are the natural re- sources of the entire world. Behind the arm- ies of the Central Powers the soil is being ex- hausted. There is only one word to express certainty of final success, and that is, 'the war continues.' Not only the Liberal Party, but the whole nation, has suffered a loss in the death of Mr Russell Rea, who has fallen a victim to the pressure of the heavy and extremely important duties which lie discharged, in addition to his nor- mal Parliamentary work, as a member of the Rubber Exports Committee and chairman of the Coal Exports Committee. Mr Russell Rea's great economic knowledge and wide experience of industry and shipping had proved invalauble in those industrial and economic problems of a novel and intricate character to which the war gave rise. His name, too, will always be associated with the legislation which gave us the Miners' Eight Hours Act and a unified Port of London Authority. As chairman of the Liberal Publi- cation Department, his admirable judgment, ripe political wisdom, and fine literary sense were of the greatest service to his party, and he was dis- tinguished 'by a charm of personality which en- deared him to all who knew him.

IA Thoughtful Employer

I A Thoughtful Employer The consideration which Sir Frank Bowden shows for those in his employ has been frequent- ly demonstrated, but the latest development at the great Raleigh works at Nottingham is an in- stance ctf practical consideration which might be copied with advantage in many quarters.. The cycling baronet had noticed that, after a spell of bad weather, colds were frequent amongst his staff. He enquired into the cause, and found that it was largely due to a very simple cause. Clerks, who arrived wet in the morning, had eith- er to sit at their desks in damp clothes, or don wet clothes for their homeward journey. He called to his aid the leading firm of steam- heating specialists, who have designed and built a "drying-room" for the clothes of the staff on wet days. In this room clothes are hung and dried by steam-heat while the staff is at work. Arrangements have been made for the members of the staff to keep spare clothing at the offices, which can be used while the wet things are dry- ing. As an instance of an employer's thought- fulness for his people, this will certainly be wide- ly commended, and, it is to be hoped, emulated, and hundreds and thousands of riders of the all- steel bicycle will hear with interest of such pro- vision made for the comfort of the large staff con- nected with it. <

Advertising

Mothers -try Benger's Food yourselves When you are over-tired and have little appetite, or when feeling unwell and out of sorts, Benger's Food not only gives digestive rest, but provides full nourishment. Those who find milk unpalatable or indiges- tible, will enjoy it as Benger's Food, because this Food changes the milk so that it seldom disagrees, and imparts a most enjoyable biscuit flavour. Or you can flavour with tea, chocolate, coffee, eta Mothers who are nursing children will find iFv o'o'm da )t most beneficial for promoting a full supply of natural milk. Doctors j recommend it for this purpose. Benger' 'q Food and How to Use it.A little work of authority on the feeding of infants, invalids, and tbe aged,-willbe sent, post free, by BENGER'S FOOD, Ltd., MANCHESTER. Branch Offices: N'HWYORK (U.S.A.) go, Beekman St. SYDNEY (N.S.W.): 117, Pitt Street, and Depots throughout CANADA. 2c8 'OIII8ir..

POULTRY

POULTRY. I BREEDING TIME. Those who have not started breeding before this should see about it at once. Nearly everyone knows that the March and April chickens are best—in fact, this seems to be II)e first thought of the novice. Certainly, birds hatched in April ought to 'begin to lay about October and keep right on through the winter. Yet every fowl cannot be hatched then. Most breeders raise as many chickens as their space allows, and it would be an impossibility to have them all hatched in April. Consequently, this must be spread over a longer period, which means starting early and keeping on late. I never favour very late chickens, though, of course, just now are excep- tional times, and we should all produce as many chickens as our ground allows, no matter early or late, because what do not come in for laying will make food, and this is a most important :Iteiii. To raise the number required to stock the place, it may be necessary to begin early and ex- tend the time, and, those who ha I'e not yet start- ed, are already behind and have lost much valu- able time. There are thousands of chickens out ) all over the country, and the mild weather has j done them well and, though we may get a sharp spell later, these birds will be well on with i their feathering before the March winds arrive. As stated so many tunes before, it is not so much the cold as wet-nd damp ground that is to be feared. Unless chickens can be kept in a dry I¡ hoouse or coop, they will soon go o

iBrecon Rural Council I

i Brecon Rural Council. I THE NEW TRIBUNAL.. i At a special meeting of the Brecon Rural Dis- trict Council, on Friday, the following were ap- pointed a. new Tribunal under the Military Ser- vice Act -Mr Owen Price, Mr Jenkin Williams, Mr John Jones, Mr J. F. Ricketts, Mr John SmitJI, Rev. T. Griffiths, Mr W. Morgan fold members), Mr ;Evan Phillips, blacksmith, Pen- pont, Mr Benjamin James, fitter, Groesfford, Mr Phillip Price, carpenter, Sennybridge, Mr John Jones, Macksnyth, Pontybat, Rev T C. Rich ards, Mr Dl. Watkins, Llangorse, Mr Jones Pentre, Merth? Cynog, and Mr Tom Morgan, Libanus (new members).

Advertising

??Por Caka4, Pajtry, Puddings ft [BORWICKSj ?? BAKING POWDER.

I BRECKNOCKS IN GYMKHANA CUP

—— I BRECKNOCKS IN GYMKHANA CUP. ¡ Writing from Mhow, under date 22/1/16. Sergt.- Major Green says :-Tbdra,w for the 1st round Gymkhana Cup Competition took place on Mon- day last and resulted as follows :— "F" Company Brecknock's v. "C" Company, Brecknocks. "A" Company Brecknocks v. 1st Devon Battery, | E.F.A. • "G" Company Brecknocks v. Remount Training > Depot. Byes. I Divisional Staff. "E" Company Brecknocks, "B" Company Brecknocks, "H" Company Breck- nocks, "D" Company Brecknocks. | One of the ruk's of the competition reads that ?N C O s Nten of the teams are to consist, of N.C.O. 's. Men of the Companies as they stood on leaving England. The date of commencing the competition will 'be noti- j fied later. Ca.pt. H. D. Wade Evans is the Hon. Sec., and Hergt.-Major C. Green has been asked to take on the duties of referee.

I REGIMENTALALL LEAGUE i

< I REGIMENTAL'ALL LEAGUE. BlvYXMAWK v. CEFN-COED. This match was played on the Soldier's Gymk- hana Ground on Monday 17/1/16. "G's" luck has at last turned, their winning star was certainly in the ascendant on this occasion. Sorry to relate "B'R" luck was dea.d out. The game opened very evenly, Cooke was tested with a shot from Thomas but cleared. "G'g" forwards opened up an at- tack but Williams and Jenkins were very safe. J The game had been in existence some 38 minutes when D. M. Thomas sent in a centre, all Cottrell had to do' wa.s to touch it in. I think if Parry had liked to have exerted himself he could have saved. Just before half time the same player sent in a ground shot which also found the net. Aldridge had very hard lines in not scoring, the goalie fumbling the ball, recovered in the nick of j time a.nd cleared. Half-time: "G" 2 goals: "B" nil. j The second half was not so fast as the preced- ing half. Early on Ldewellyn had the misfortune j to see his shot go just a little wide. Shortly aifter- wards Edwards robbed Aldridge of a certain goal j by getting offside. From a scramble a yard out of goal Lydford netted the third goal. Another run by "B" came to nought, through Fowler lying I off-side. D. M. Thomas next got down on the 1 right and swung in a good centre, Evans handling I in the area, J. Powell took the kick and made no j mistake. This was the only good goal of the I match. May I venture to remark that had the j goalie put himself a.bout he could have saved four I of the goals. Shortly before the whistle went j Cottrell scored the fifth and last goal of the match. jI Teams.—Cefn-Coed Goal, Cooke; 'backs, Bet- terton and J. Powell; halves, Price, O. C. Evans and Simmonds: forwards, D. M. Thomas, Morgan, Cottrell, Lydford and W. Powell. j Brynma/wr Goal, Parry backs, E. E. Wil- liams and Jenkins: halves, E. Prosser, Evan6 and A. Prosser; forwards, Edwards, Thomas, Ald- ridge, Llewellyn and Fowler. Referee C. Green. I BUIIJTH v. YSTRADGYNLAIS. i Played on the Soldiers' Gymkhana Ground on j Tuesday 18/1/16. Taylor won the toss and de- cided to play with his back to the sun. J. L. J. Williams kicked off, a pass between Davies and Main and back to the former who scored with a high shot. The game was very fast, the ball travelling ifrom goal to goal with great rapidity. 'I' There was no further score in this half. "H" ) missed several chances when well placed. I Half-time: "E" Company 1 goal-, "H" nil. The second half opened with "H" pressing. This was kept up for some time, R. Price and Smith getting in a tremendous amount of work. James only a. couple of yards away from goal and ) when well placed missed his kick, putting wide of the post. A minute or two from time Miller and t Mason failing to clear, the ball going to Steer who put in a cross shot between the backs, completely deceiving the goalie, who thought it was going behind. Full-time score: "E" Company 2 goals; "H", Company nil. Teams.—Builth: Goal, O. T. Evans; backs, jI R. Price and S. Smith: halves, Davies. T. S. Evans' and Lee; forwards, Street, H. Davies, J. L. J. Williams, H. Jones and 'Main. Ystradgynlais Goal, A. Davies; hacks, Miller I and Mason; halves. Farmer, Taylor and Lewis; I forwards, Mochan, James, I. Bevan, Ratcliffe and Edwards. Referee Sergt. Major C. Green. I BRYNMAWR v. YSTRADGYNLAIS. This return league match was played on the Soldiers' Gymkhana Ground on the 21,1111 Teams.—"H" Company: Goal. A. Davies;! backs, Miller and James; halves. Fanner, Taylor, and Jennings; forwards, Ratcliffe, Rees, Bevan, D. W. Davies, Hy. Edwards. "B" Company: GoaJ, Fowler; backs, Jenkins and Williams (Buller); halves, E. Prosser, D. J. I Davies and A. Prosser; forwards, Edwards (Tweedle'um), Thomas, Aldridge, Llewellyn and Bennett. Referee Sergt.-Major C. Green. The previous match ended in a draw of no goals. It was expected that "H" would improve, their goal average on this occasion, and it looked as though this wish was goin, to be fulfilled. Both teams have improved immensely since the com- itien,cement of the season, considering the num- bers who understand or participate in the soccer game in these companies, their performances are very creditable. "B" are very unfortunate in not being able to get hold of a safe goalie, otherwise their team is not at all a bad one, they are. full of grit and are firm believers in pegging away until the whistle sounds. Aldridge makes a good skip- per and keeps his men well in hand. "H" Com- pany, coming from theSwansea Valley, knew more of the game than their opponents, when they came out they brought some very promising jun- iors in their ranks. A. Davies, an old exponent of the Rugby code, makes an excellent goalie, very quick and fairly safe. Bevan is a good centre, but usually forgets that he has some good wing j men in Ratcliffe and Edwards. Taylor's handR | are always pretty full in handling his eleven. I himself quite a good handworking hall', who never seems to tire. The first half was hotly contested, I both goals having very narrow escapes. Bevan got in a run and easily beat Fowler, who seemed ¡ afraid to handle. The same player receiving from Dixie Davies, scored another easy goal. and just j before half-time Bevan registered the third goal. the ball glancing off the goalie into the net. I Half-time "H" 3 goals; "B" nil. The second half was easilv B's", who pressed continually. Davies playing a good game in goal kept them out for some time. Bennett swung the II ball well forward, Aldridge and Thomas raced for the leather, the latter getting it before Davies could gather and clear. Another goal came short- ly after, much the same as the preceding one, the ball coming from the left Aldridge scoring from a mix-up in the goal-mouth. Final score "H" Company 3 goals: "B" Com- pany 2 goals. I

I LEAGUE TABLE

LEAGUE TABLE. rv o 5 Goals <6 Teams ? ? ? g ? g & S 'so o i& —' e3 P-l 3 and 4 Platoons.. 11 11 0 0 ;")2 5 22 (Talgarth). 9 and 10 Platoons ..11 9 1 ] 29 11 19 (Builth) 15 and 16 Platoons 12 6 4 2 24 21 14 :Y stradgynlais) 11 and 12 Platoons 12 5 6 1 27 25 11 (Cefn-Coed). 1 and 2 Platoons 8 3 3 2 lo 14 81 (Brecon). 13 and 14 Platoong 12 1 9 2 14 48 4 (Brynmawr) 7 and 8 Platoons 7 1 5 1 5 20 3 (Hay). 5 and 6 Platoons ,(1 9 0 8 1 o 27 1 (Crickhowell).

No title

The directors of Bovril (Limited) recommend the I following dividends for the second half of the year (sulbject to final audit) :-On the preference shares at the rate of 5t per cent. per annum, and on the ordinary shares at the rate of 9 pea- cent. per an- num (making 7 per cent. for the year), less income tax, and 3 per cent, on the deferred shares for the I year 1915, free of income tax: to add £ 225.000 to the reserve, leaving £ 21,205 to be carried forward.. including excess profits tax reserve. <

Advertising

s i Big cars eat up your income. It takes power to move and carry weight. The Ford Vana- m dium Steel Chassis—strongest yet lightest in the world—re- I duces fuel consumption and tyre wear to a minimum. Its simplicity, light weight and economy have made the Ford the Universal Car. 1M9 Runabouts R125. Five-passenger Tour- ing Car £135. Town Oar R185. 20 h.p. efficiently equipped. All Prices at Works, Manchester. Full particulars from- I RICH & 0 N s Motor Engineers, TeI.23. BRECON. t Welsh Insurance Corporation, Ltd. I HCad °mCe HIGH STREET, CARDIFF. ???????S?V? BRECON AGENTS-MR W. H. Gimaon United Counties Bank; Mr \?????*?/ Jag. R. Probert, CHwhybart; Mr How?ll Powell, 8 Castle Street; Mr H. E. J. Rich, 41, Watton Mr W. Williams, 6, Bulwark; Mr I [ W. Lewis Pritchard, Harddfan. Fire, Consequential Loss Following Fire. All Sickness and Accidents. Burglary. Motor Car, Plate Glass, Workmen's Compensation, Boiler Explosion, etc., etc. I' brass —-— —— i — TEETH PAINLESSLY EXTRACTED by Patent Process. TEETH of the best materials made under per- sonal supervision. Bad Teeth are not only very unsightly, but extremely unhealthy. J. WARD gives his personal attention to all Denta mutters. Advice Free Artificial Teeth,, perfect uSKS mounted on Gold, Platina, Vulcanite, etc. Fillings with any material. Old plates remodelled. Children's Teeth need careful watching. Let J. WARD offer you advice. Charges Moderate. Full particulars given on first visit. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. J. WARD, M.P.S., 8, High St., BUILTH WELLS. To preserve Teeth, use J. WARD'S Antiseptic Formaliue and Mint Tooth Paste, large tubes, 71d., by post, Sid. ° b7 'I .NO PRELIMINARY FEES. jyjONEY L ENT PRIVATELY In large or small Sums (not less than £10), ON BORROWER'S OWN PROMISSORY NOTE. ESTABLISHED 46 YEARS, And now Lending UPWARDS OF ZSO,000 ANNUALLY. Prospectuses, Terms for Advances, or any information desired, will be supplied, free of I charge, on application either personally or by letter to GEORGE pAYNE & SONS, 7, KING STREET, HEREFORD; or I 5, TOWN WALLS, SHREWSBURY. I Established 1870. I The Central Tribunal have decided to postpone dealing with the cases relating to men who are the sole support of widowed mothers until a future meeting. In the meantime a man whose case is before the Central Tribunal will not be called up for military service until a decision had been given upon the appeal. THE GREAT SKIN CURE. B UDDEN'S S.R. SKIN OINTMENT will cure Itching* after one application, destroys every! form of Eczema; heals old Wounds and Sores acts like a charm on Bad Legs; is infallible for, Piles; Prevents Cuts from Festering will cure Ringworm in a few days; removes the most obsti- nate Eruptions and Scurvy. Boxes 9d and 1/3. j -Agents jor Brecon, Mr Stanton and Mr Morris, High Street, Chemists; Builth Wells, W. Price & Co., T. A. Coltman; Llandovery, J. Nicholas, Chemist; Hay, J. L. D&viee and Son Talgarth, J. Parry, Chemist; Crickhowell, Mr Kirkland, Chem- I ist; Brynmawr, Mr A. M. Jones, Chemist; Knigh- i ton, Mr Perkins, Chemist; Pontardnlais, Mr Jones, Chemist. b987 r LOANS. ) tlO TO £100 LENT on not-e of hand j. to Tradesmen, Far- mers, Business-men, and others, worthy of credit, with or without sureties or securities. (Busineot completed immediately without any delay). Re- payments arranged to suit applicants convenience. XIOO TO zClOOO ADVANCED TO I enable person* to buy the houses they occupy or other property. Loans also made upon property already in possese- ion of applicants, existing mortgages. paid off and more money advanced if required. Interest from 41 to 5 per cent. per annum, on all mortgages. Apply, J. L. CUNNINGHAM, 19, Glebeland Street, br476 Tel. 70. Merthyr Tydfil. LONDON & PROVINCES DISCOUNT Co., Ltd. Immediate Cash Advances. £ 10 to &1,000 are privately completed at 24 hours' notice on your simple promMe to pay withoutprehmmar? i Stokes S Oroft BnSto1' °r %to na»er. W a??Sy Stokes Croft, Bnstol, or to 101, East Street Sere 1795p L 1795p 5% LOANS. Jf you have a private income or are entitled to money or property under a Will of Settlement -we N can, ai,r;ijige for you a Cash Advance at five per cent, por annum, and Principal can remain out- standing over a number of years. NOTE OF HAND LOANS (without any other Security) also advanced i-(,z- y iii<)t  very moderate rates extended over long or short periods. No c!iar?c unless business done. Apply M CHARLES STEVENS, Ltd. (Tm.. 467), J Hayes, Buildings, CARDIFF, OTK.—We shall be pleased to advise you i'l't'' t of a ;1 No expense of any description unks5