Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
36 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

EIKH mEb I P, ?M fn???55EB? H?)) L WA LES ??t WMw PL .R pi kv"ao I

Advertising

r 0 I" fit f th'* r fp 'f Î,' ) f :.p*0 1figt4jl w S* ^n 'WI'i'Ø .fiiø\Ç ?  V THE "Cambria Daily Leadar Has a Guaranteed Circulation I Larger than that of any other paper published In the district of

The Corner Column

) The Corner Column, ————- .lIP ———— A local blacksmith stopped a run- away horse by locking at u. Hyp- notism? I looked for the candle, but some- body had boned it," said a witness at Swansea Police Court. Vr- 'Phone call: "Who areyou. the plumber."—" Hurry up please, au- other burM." ifc ii The Market value of the Muni- cipal Reformers has dropped consider- ably lately. =& I I am going to the ball as the Spirit, of the age," said a depressing looking youth. A cat altael-ed a, policeman at Reading. The Suffragettes will have to look to their iaurels. The rejected of Swansea Is the accepted of the Welsh Rugby Union, which is sagacity parson-i-jied. tSwansea making history" is the Somttent of a great London d pily. Of coursie, are we not always "doing it." :)« Swansea teachers are seriously con- sidering the formation of a committee to assist docksmen in running their business. What everybody wants to know: "Was last Saturday's Swan song, the sweetest that will be sung in the Ragiish Cup It is an old Storey now that even Grates a-Greer-ably failed to check the conquering Ball, when it was so Cleveriey directed. > » The Chief Constable has performed a public service in putting a. stop to the reckless driving of taxi-cabs in the borough. 4f "Thi-s. stock must be cleared," says great ornamental lettering in a Swan- bea shop window. But there is no fiteek-ent.v an empty shop. » Scarlet ooats are being worn by quite a number of flappers this winter. Dear little fashionable Cock Robins" thpy are dubbed bv the knuts. :!t -

Advertising

-5 f ro in » P(5. .WAt e St.

PEACE AT LEEDS

PEACE AT LEEDS END OF THE STRIKE. CORPIRATISH TERMS ACCEPTED IY MEN WORK TO BE RESUMED. The Leeds municipal strike was finally settled to-day on the Corpora- tion ternus. which were accepted. Work w ill be resumed on Wednes- day. The settlement follows a meeting be- tween Mr. J. It. Clynes, M.P., aim the special committee ot the Leeds Corpor- ation yesterday. After the conference, which lasted iouu- hours, the special committee annouaced that bir. Clynes would report fuUy at a meeting ot the men to oe held to-day, and that they would be asked to a.ccept or reject the terms offered by toe committee. A mass meeting of the men was held this morning at the Albert Hall, aad the terms were accepted. The Twms. The terms of settlement are 9,6 fol- Ic,tv,s:-In -addition to the advances offered by the Corporation prior to the strike, tne cases of the men who had claimed for an advance must be im- mediately submitted through the men's society, ajid would be dealt with forth- with. The special comnilttee gave etery assurance that no man would be pre- judiced in his claim to resume work or be victimised or p-onalised because he took part in the dispute. All men would be reinstated as soon 36 possible after the settlement, and the workmen not reinstated in the first instance would be enabled to resume within seven days of the setlement while temporary men displaced ii;jid left unemployed were to be enabled to resume work as vacancies occurred. The meeting accepted the terms by a great majority, and it was further stated that it had been arranged that men should present themselves a.t re- spective depots this afternoon and begin work to-morrow morning. ————— "DUBLIN DOCKERS. Fifty Transport Union Memtam Return te Werk. The most important development in the Dublin strike situation to-day was the return to work of the dockers of the Burn5I.lÜw," jtho .beett~,«ui wnoe November. The members of the Transport Uiion, marched to the company's sheds on the quay accompanied by a delegate and commenced work. It is undersrood that the conditioc of resuming is that all goods will be handled. One hundred and twenty more free labourers arrived to-day. J

APPLICATION DISMISSED

APPLICATION DISMISSED MR. TRUEiiAAN'S RE-AP?EARANCE AT NEATH At the conclusion of the business of the Neath Police Court yesterday an apiltilica,tion for a., yammons was made by Clement R. Trueman, the well- known litigant. The court was cleared, and the magistrates, Mr. W. B. Trick and Mr. E. Phillips, dismissed the application.

PASSENGERS BUNKS ABLAZE

PASSENGERS BUNKS ABLAZE Ftltt IN ISARu STEAMER IN LIVERPOOL DOCK. During the night a fire was dis- covered on the steamer Drinia, lying -in the Noith Brocklebank Dock, Liver- pool. The outbreak occurred in the thiki- dass passenger aooommodation, and be-* fore it coukl be subdued, about fifty beds were destroyed. No damage was done to the vessel. mwmmm——1» •

ANTARCTIC HARDSHIPS

ANTARCTIC HARDSHIPS. SIR ERNEST SHACKLETONOSTLlNES HIS TIME TAILE. Sir Ernert Shackleton yesterday de- scribed some of the physical hardships of Antarctic travelling. On his lorthcoming expedition he proposes to observe a day of 19 hours instead of 24, the daily time-table be- ing I'ollows t-l'roparation, one holU xnurcl), tour liours; rest, one hour, march, iour hours; rest, one hour; sleep, e ght hours.

BROTHER CELTS

BROTHER CELTS, EX-PREMIER OF FRANCE UPON LLOYD GEORGE, The ex-P-ieinicr of France M. Briand, has been giving a Daily Chronicle" cutrei-porKient his impressions of Mr. Lloyd George. He thou gut that the future of Eng- land greatly depended on the success of his policv,. Iiia.ve, sympaJthy with him for a spe-cial reason," he raid, "be- cause, like myself, he is a. Celt, and we both have the qualities and also the (C- fects of that race!" (M: Briand was born in Brittany, the French WaJe&) What are the d.fects r" the corres- pondent inquired. M. Briand smiled and replied: Too much impulsiveness, too much ardour in* the fight, and a tendency to be carried away by otlr own ideas. On the other hand, these defeofe. are the ex- cesses of virtues of the Celtic race, for even the somewhat myotic or even dreamy character of the people springs from the desire to be led by a hagh ideal, and an ideal is necessary to tJie s&lWbion œa countr?*"

I SPREADING

I SPREADING. I AFRICAN UNREST PARALYSING TRADE. i BALLOT EAGERLY AWAITED I 1 At the time of writing there is little fresh news from South Africa, and what is to hajid is not good. Of course, at any moment may be ex- pected the result of the ballot which it was arranged should be taken through- out the Unions on the suggestion of the Executive of the Federation of Trades that a general labour strike should take place. There are indications that the strike has already spread considerably, and the railway service in the Transvaal was paralysed yesterday. Needless to say, the unrest has had a most serious effect on trade. Even the Cape men are be- I coming affected now. I Arrest ef Leaders. As briefly reported last night, another leader was arrested yesterday while ad- dressing strikers in Cape Town. An application was made to the Supreme Court at Pretoria, asking that cause should be shown why three leaders ar- rested on Saturday should have been placed in gaol. The Court granted a rule returnable on Thursday. The Niwtal coalowners ha.ve given the miners till this rooming to return to work on their own (the owners) terms after which the offer will ba, withdrawn. As the ternus are not j-eg».rded as suffi- cient. the rainers have wijScted them. I Juirsfontiifl Rt#irar. A telegram despatched yesterday from Jagersfrmtein states that large batches of natives of various tribes, anxious to return to their homes as the result of the outbreak on Friday, have beam discharged in contingents of 100 and 200, and are being escorted by armed whites to the border. A further force of burghers has ar- rivoo,for vigilance and protection duty. At the inquest on the Basuto named Daniel Moleft, whose death as the re- sult, it was alleged, of a kick by a white man led to Friday's disturbance, a native witness deposed that he saw the' deceased hit and kicked, and medical evidence was given that death was due to a kick or fall. A miner named Stoekenstroom, charged with murdering Moleft, has been remanded until Thursday.

I LINER CRIMEj

I LINER CRIME. DOCTOR ASSASSINATED BY AN EMIGRANT. EMICRANT. A wireless message at Gibraltar re- ceived from the North-(xan Lloyd steamer Berlin, outward bound from Genoa to New York, states tbtlit an Italian naval doctor in charge of emi- grants has been assassinated by one of them.

I KAISER CUTS FIREWOOD

I KAISER CUTS FIREWOOD. I THE MAlLEI FIST DOES SOME USEFUL WORK. The ii Berliner Tageblott" learns that the Emperor William, with the approval of his physicians, has been trying a manual labour cure in the garden of the New Palace at Potsdam. His Majesty has worked with a gar- dener every morning sawing wood and chopping it with an axe into suitable sizes for burning in stoves. A good quantity has been cut up each morning (says Reuter) which the Emperor has piled hImself ,the gardener getting the p? d in payment for his help. w

I WHY WOMEN EAT MORE

I WHY WOMEN EAT MORE FEWER AND THINNER CLOTHES INCREASING APPETITES Will ladies be pleased to learn that Dr. A. E. Taylor, professor of chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania, says that the present thin dresses worn by women, and fashion's demand for few undergarments, is causing an increase in the cost of living of 10 per cent. ? New styles compel women to wear fewer and thinner clathes," states the professor, and this demands a greater number of heat units to keep their bodies at a normal temperature. Hence, women must eat more, and I estimate the increaeat 10 per cent."

I SERMON IN A PLAY

I SERMON IN A PLAY II SUNDAY EVENINC PERFORMANCE IN A CHURCH HALL. The Chrisitanas mystery play is being revived in Wales. At Swansea, the congregation at Christ Church has for some years past given "Bethlehem" scenes, but these were presented on week nights. There has now been an interesting devejopment. At the Church Institute, Bridgend, aHer the hours of service on Sunday- evening, the girls of St. Mary's, Nor- ton, gave a performance of the Mystery "'The Way of Love." The Rector of Coi'ty requested the gathering to look upoin it as a sermon and to refrain altogether from ap- plause. A'fter the performance of the play the gathering sang the Doxologv.

I A QUID PRO QUO

I A QUID PRO QUO. I Dr. Macnamara. in an address at Herne Hill Congregational Church last night, said that when a pupil teacher he was considered good at English." A friend of mine used to work my mathematics," he added, and I used to write letters to his sweetheart."

I HANEJ OVER TO ESCIAT I

HANÐEJ OVER TO ESCIAT. I At the Swa-nsea Police Court to-day in the case oiMichae1 Evans (20), the deserter whose arrest caused a rtot at Greenhill, and who was remanded yes- terday until an escort should arrive. Supt. Roberts stated that the escort had arrived to take charge of defen- dant. Defendant was therefore handed over to the eftoort. f f

AIR TESTS NOT IFULLY MADE

AIR TESTS NOT I FULLY MADE. I PIT, PERILS. IMPORTANT STATEMENTS AT SENCHENYD3 TO-DAY. 1 x "A FOOL'S PARADISE." il. The Coroner for East Glamorgan (Mr. D. Rees) to-day resumed his inquiry into the Senghenydd Colliery disaster. When the court re-assembledj Dr. Wil- liam Nicholas Atkinson, Divisional In- spector of Mines for South Wales, was called by the Cordnor and sworn. Dr. ^Atkinson read a statement, a great portion of fciuch was taken up with details of hfe visit to that mine immediately after the explosion, and with particulars ail to what he observed on inspection. He noticed that the indications of farce's were in instances inward, in others outwards towards the shaft, and there were soviet parts of the mine in which there were indications oi force in both directions. If the origin of the fire was in the Mafeking incline, he said the question was how it was caused. There were large falls in that locality. Gas might have come away 'with one of these lalls; if so the only means of ignition would be a spark, either from an electric signal wire or from rocks brought down by the fall. I Theory of Sparks. Sparks from a wgnal wire might be the cause. This theory was not advanced as a positive conclusion, because the esperi- montf. so far did not provo that the cur- rent in lee was capable of producing a spark which would cause ignition. l'here were factors (as pointed out by the expert witnesses), which would re- duce the intensity of the spark. Mr. Nicholas (for the Miners' Fed- eration) If this explosion resulted. from the sparking of a signalling wire, would it be desirable that there should be some additional legislation with a viewr t.) preventing any sort of sparking upon main returns and in places where there is likely to be inflammable gas? Witness: That seems to be a reason- able conclusion, I think. Mr. Nicholas I want your new with regard tQ Ht? other ?ecry of a naked light at the lamp station. Whether a naked light is permissible at all is a ma-tter for argument elsewhere, but having regard to the theory which is noiv being advanced awl supported by gentlemen, of cotes^lerable ehlinenee in the mining world, 1, take it you would agree that for the futurê, at all events naked lights should not be allowed in lamp stations? Witness: In fiery mines, yes. Air Tests. Mr. Nicholas pointed to the regula- tions as to taking air tests, and asked Dr. Atkinson if they had been fully carried out. The reply was "No." Certain tests had, however, been made for the purpose of classifying the mine. Mr. Brace, M.P:: In admitting that you did not take air-tests at this mine. are you not admitting that the Home Offioo Staff if; in a chaotic condition F Witness: No. Mr. Brace: In July, 1912, the Act of Parliament cSSine into operation, but it was carried in 1911. Should I be correct in stating that the particular sections were carried on the advice of the Home Office? Witness: I think you know that better than I do. (Laughter). Mr. Brace: I suggest that these sec- I tions on taking samples were inserted on the adrice of the Home Office? Witness: I suppose they were intro- duced by the Home Office. h A Criticism Replied Te. Air. Brace: And if they have never been carried out are not the Home Office and its staff of mines inspectors open to strong condemnation ? Witness: They are being carried out. Mr. Brace: if minatory clauses are pit into an Act of Parliament, ought they not to be carried out? Witness: They will be carried out in the course of time. Mr. Brace: If the delav continues and involves danger to the lives and limbs of men, ought not the Home Office to be condemned? Witness: It is not for me to condemn the Home Office. Questions were put on the system of inspection adopted, and Dr. Atkinson said some mines were examined many times a year. Mr. Brace If I am correct in suggest- ing that a mine is not examined com- pletely and wholly in one year, is that a system that the workmen ought to trust to for their safety ? Witness: 1 don't think that is for me to say. Mr. Brace: We are trying here to discover a problem of the loss of 430 lives, 'and I am trying to put it to you that there is something radically wrong in your system of inspection ? • Witness: Yes; but I take it it is a question for the Government and for Parliament, rather than for me 10 answer such questions. Water Supply. Having his attention next called to the recommendations of the jury on the occasion of the last explosion, with respect to the system of watering Ly cab:s" Dr. Atkinson said that 90 per oent. of all the water from pipes and tanks was of no value from the point of view of safety. [ Mr. Brace: Then we arc in a fool's paradise ? Witness: So far as any one believes watering would prevent explosions. Mi*. Brace: Ought it not to he a legtf obligation upon the management to clear dust from the roof and sides ? Witness: I do not think it is practi- cable to such an extent as to render explosions impossible. The risk must be accepted if the pits are to be worked until further steps are taken. Accord- ing to the latest research something may be done to render thé dust non- inflammable and so render it incapable of producing an explosion. Mr. Brace: In your judgment, is the present inspection sufficient to thoroughly inspect the mines of the United Kingdom? | (Centtnuftd 8n Page 5).

IAN ERUPTION

I AN ERUPTION. FLAMES AND LAVA THREATEN JAPANESE TOWN. 0 I' VILLAGES WIPED OUT. t Reuter telegrams describe a terrible state of affairs in Japan. Already famine has caused great suffering to nine millions of the population, and now earthquakes and a volcanic eruption are reported. A message received to-day from Kago- shima. a. large town situated on a bay of the same name, at the south end of Kiu-Siu Island, states that there have been sixty or seventy earthquakes daily since Saturday, culminating yesterday in a terrific eruption of the Sakura Shima volcano. The village of Sakura Sbima has been destroyed, and it is feared that other villages have also been wiped out. Already numerous casualties are re- ported. A message from Moji states that two naval squadrons have gone to Sakura Shima. Flames and lava have reached Kago- shima, and the town's situation is seri- ous. There is a population of about 55.000. and the manufactures are porce- lain, pottery arms and cotton goods. The town was bombarded in 1863 by a British fleet.

I THE CANTEEN CASE I 0

I THE CANTEEN CASE. .0- WELL-KNOWN COUNSEL RE rAINED BY ONE uEFtNOANT. In readi nes.s for the hearing of the suminoihses aga.inst the 16 officers and civi-ilaiis in connection with the Army canteens Bow-street police court will be re-arranged. The counsel and solicitors engaged in the case are so numerous that the large dock standing immediately behind the solicitors' table will be removed from the court. It is expected that the case will be token on Saturday next and the follow- ing Saturday, and then on two days in each week afterwards, such days to be I fixed for the convenience of counsel. Sir E. Carson, K.C., Mr. C. F. GIll, K.C., Mr. Bodkin, and Mr. Frampton will conduct the defence on behalf of one of the defendiants.

IIHOSPITAL BALLS LICpSE

IIH-OSPITAL BALLS LICpSE.! ML Wo J. TRr' W'S APPLICATION TO THE MAGISTRATES. I At Police Court io-ftzy, Mr. Laurence Richards, on behalf of Mr. W. J. Trew, of the Plough Inn, ap-I plied for a license for the sale of intoxi- cating liquors at the Albert Hall on the occasion of the Hospital balls from 9, o'clock, to-night until, 4,30 to-morrow morning, and from 9 until 1 o'clock to- morrow night. I The Magistrates stated that they would have to tret the Hospital people as other people, so that they could only grant a, license up to 2 o'clock to-morrow morning. The ap- plication for to-morrow night was tgranted. I Decision Reconsidered. I Mr. Laurence Richards at a later stage applied to the Bench to reconsid- I or their decision with regard to the license of the Albert Hall. He stated that last year the license had been granted until three o'cloc k The Bench thereupon decided to grant the extension until three o'clock- tor to-night.

I TIME TO STOP

I TIME TO STOP I) MANCHESTER DEBATE ON NAVAL EXPENDITURE Last night there was an interesting debate on naval expenditure at the Manchester Reform Club. Mr. P. A. Molteno, M.P., declared that Great Britain was forcing the pace whilst she was in a position to start upon a reduction. If she had the cour- age to take such a lead sh e would earn the gratitude of all Europe. "We can stop," he declared. We have gone far enough. Let us urge the Government to go no further and then take some positive step to create I some opportunity to get this subject discussed by all Europe." Mr. Gordon Harvey, M.P., supported the demand. I Newcastle.. I The Newcastle Liberal Association I I last night passed a resolution viewing with alarm the growth of expenditure on I armaments. a

I WAVEB A RED LIGHT

I WAVEB A RED LIGHT ————. ————. ADVENTUROUS BOYS' FOOLISH PRANK ON RAILWAY LIKE. I At the Swansea Juvenile Police Court I to-day Cyril Thomas (10), William Tompkins (13), Ralf Jones (14) and Wil- ham Aubrey (10), were summoned for trespassing on the Great Western Rail-, way so exposing themselves to danger and risk on November 26th. Mr.: Rupert. Lewis prosecuted. lAichard Charles Hurst engine driver, said that on 20th December at 7.27 p.m. be left Cockett with his engine and a van for Landore. The Loop West signal was against him, and about 50 I yards farther on were some red lights flashing. Witness pulled up smartly and got off the engine to see what was the matter and he saw four boys on the line. They ran away when lie ap- proached them. P.C. 62 Groves who made .inquiries said that he saw Ralph Jones who ad- I mitted the offence. He produced a lamp which he said he had iised. Cyril Thomas admitted the defence also, but I when he served the summonses the mother denied the offence. William Thomas admited the offence also, but! His light was a caudle in a. jam jar. Aubrey also admitted the offence. Detective Morris proved that the notices were up. Defendants were each fined lOa. jl I

OMNIBUS CLUE

OMNIBUS CLUE, THE CONDUCTOR'S STORY. I I POLICE SEARCHINC FOR MAN Of FOREIGN APPEARANCE I WAS HE THE MURDERER 7 The police, who are seeking the murderer of the little boy, Willie Starchfield, are investigating state- ment." made last night, by the driver and conductor of a motor omnibus. These were to the effect that on Thursday afternoon, about 3.30, they saw Willie fctarchfield accompanied by a foreign looking man with long deli- cate hands, get on their omnibus from Iventish Town railway tit at ion to Tutneil Park tube station, where they dis- mounted. It was raining at the time, and it is alleged that the man almost brutally dragged the boy to the top of the 'bus. Both driver and conductor visited' the mortuary yesterday, and identified; the dead Ixxly iiz, that of the boy who! rode with them. t Coroner and Police. It is understood that to give the! police more time for inquiries, the Shoreditch Coroner has not yet deii-i nitely fixed a date for the opening of the inquest on tho boy Willie Starch- I field, the victim of the North London train murder.

ICHILDRENS P8ET I

I CHILDREN'S P8ET I DEATH OF WRITER If BEAUTIFUL I HYMNS I Mrs. Miriam Midlane, widow of Mr. Albert Midlane of Newport, Isle of Wight, the children's poet and author of that world-wide popular hymn, "There' a friend foi- little children," diNl this iiioi-rilli, of pneumonia. She was eighty-eight, and will be buried by her late husband's side, in Carisbrooke Cemetery.

EMBANKMENT SLIPI

EMBANKMENT SLIP. I I RAILWAY TRAFFIC HELD UP OUTSIBEij II LONION. L t >9 a* W. —. V Delay and inconvenience was caused I to-day to the Great Eastern HailwaY t service t? London by a big em baMK- ment ?lip on the. South&nd huc, near Billeri_c„salinp .on the- Southend line, near Tons of earth fell on to the perm?n?nt WV- necessitating the traffic being run on a single line. mm #

I NOTHING TO SAYI

I NOTHING TO SAY. I II MOTORIST EEMANOED ON CHARGE OF I MANSLAjCHTER. At Bangor Police Court to-day, Thoe". J Elli-s was charged with the man- j slaughter of Alfred Cyril Jones, the son of the Vicar of Llandegai, on New Year's Day, hy nmning him down witJi a motor car. Accused sidd he had nothing to say, and was remanded till Thursday on bail of ;C40, himself 1ll £ 20 and another I surety for £ 20.

DEARER CIGARS

DEARER CIGARS. I JERSEY STATES PROPOSE ADDITIONAL: TOBACCO. TAX. I At the Sessions of Jersey State. to- day, the Finance Committee in order to meet the deficit on the Budget, rec-oiii- mended an additional tax of 2d. per pound on leaf tobacco with stem; three- pence per pound on manufactured tobacco and cigars, and also a tax of two pence per pound on tea. If adopted the taxes will be retro- í spective from to-day. I

A RUSH TO WORK I

A RUSH TO WORK. | I HOW TO FIHB EMPLOYES WITHOUT! TROUBLE. I The announcement that in auto- j mobile manufacturing concern in j Detroit proposed to distribute £ 2,000,000 of its surplus profits in in- creased wages to crnployes, so that no one, even floor-sweepers, should re- ceive less than 20s. a day .Resulted (says llouter) in the city being thronged with crowds seeking positions with the j firm. i Several disorderly scenes occurred at the works amounting almost to a riot. i, n 4AImo?sT ? t4o a riot. A crowd estimated at 10,000 en- 1 deavoured to rush the works, knockjn down policemen and breaking windows with bricks and other missiles.

ORANCE WOMENS PETITION

ORANCE WOMEN'S PETITION. HOME SECRETARY'S ASSURANCE GRATiFY D £ PUTAT>0N. The Home Secretary to-day received a deputation from the London Costers' Union as to the action of the police in regard to Drury-lane orange women. The Home Secretary said there was no inteution of altering the practice of former years. He pointed, however, to the congestion of streets in the vicinit-vi of Drury-lane Theatre, and urged the necessity of limiting the number of orange sellers in the district. The reply 'vsts received by the women with cries of "God bless you," and a "Happy New Year," 1 —»

No title

It is z-uinoured tha-t Raisuli has been; murdered by his own adherents, but i there is no confirmation of the state- j ment. j

Advertising

I POLGCE ALLEGATION. A meeting of tne special sub-com- mit tee appointed by tiie Swansea Vi fitch C-omnuttee to inquire into viiai has become kno^n as the 0irlllbe3., Police Scandal," was heid To-dav at the Guildhall. The matter arose out of a statement alleged to have been read;* by a mem- ber of the for(,t, ii "til reference to another officer with a member of rile committee. v The meeting was private, and no statement was issued to the Press, but it is understooo tlw matter has I been amicably disposed of. I <. S Swansea Mercantile Cj., Ltd. 18, PARK STREET, SWANSEA, MAKE ADVANCES DAILY from '1. 10 1.1,9U, 4 No Cb-arge- XJnlees Business Done. Bill Discounted. Strictly Private aud Confi deutial. For further particulars, applr H. B. JONES, Managing Director.

ASTOR AND SINCLAIR

ASTOR AND SINCLAIR RICH AMERICAN'S REPLY TO THI NOVELIST Mr. V iucent Astor. the richest young man in America, hats been invited bj Mr. Upton Sinclair, author of "The Jungle and other remarkable novels, to employ his £ 20,000,000 fortune in furthering the cause of Socialism. Mr. Astor assures Mr. Sinclair that he is not in-sensible to the terrible social and industrial evils from which the country is suffering, but declai-es t it not one of the labour leadens whom—he has consulted "regards Socialism as a il r d ;is a cure for the evils we all recognise an-d deplore. He adds that it is incomprehensible that anyone informed of the social pro- gress made in recent years can credit the pessimistic and sensational state- ments contained in Mr. Sinclair's appeal.

PASHAS PLOT

PASHA'S PLOT. ESSAS'S SUPPORTERS DEFEATED BI GENDARMERIE. Y alona, Monda y. —The Gendarmerie to-day defeated the supporters of Esmd Pasha near El Hassan.—Renter. It will lie remembered that Jad Pasha, the former War Minister of Turkey, attempted to seize the Albanian throne, but the plot was dis- covered and frustrated. The Court-Martial. I Yalona, Monday.—The trial began here to-day, before a court-martial, under the pre-s,idency of the Gend. armerie Commander, Colonel Weer, of the Albanian agitator, Bekir Aga, and six Turkish oiffcers and five band leaders, who arrived here last-Monday on board the Austrian Lloyd steamer Meran, accompanied by two hundred men, and were arrested. A number off civilians who were arrested on the charge of complicity are also to be tried by court-martial.

FELL A THOUSAND FEET

FELL A THOUSAND FEET. Lieut. Mery, a Chilian military :1Vi. tor, was flying over Santiago de Chile, says Reuter, at a height of about a thousand feet, when his machine turned over and crashed to the ground. Lieut. Mery was killed on the spot.

NECKFICTURES

NECK-FICTURES. Fashionable women in St. Petersburg are painting tiny figures on their facei and necks, says M. Sergius Diaghileff, the Russian impresario. Elepnan trees, and geometrical designs are the commonest patterns.

ARTCICIAL DISESTiON

ARTCICIAL DISESTiON. The "Daily Mail" Paris correspond deut reports that Professor Daniei Berthoiet claims to have reproduced artificially the processes of digestion bj the action of ultra-violent rays from s mercury vapour lamp on food substancw contained in a quarts vessel. The processes were produced withouf the aid of ferments, which play so great a Dart, in the natural orocesses,