Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
32 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

plllll ■■■■■■■ I——— TKY SOUTH WALES NEW SEASON MARMALADE. South Wales Jam and Marmalade Co-, CARDIFF.

SLOW BUT SURE 0

SLOW, BUT SURE 0 ——— AUSTRIANS' STUBBORN RESISTANCE 'ITALIANS MAKING STEADY PROGRESS ON ALL FRONTS. ALPINE DETACHMENTS SUCCEED The. Italian armies on all fronts are steadily advancing, despite the stubborn resistance offered by the Austrians, who are supported by powerful artillery. The Italian progress, it slow, is favourable end sure. To-day's official communique is as follows Romf. Thursday night.—The following communique is issued by the Head- quarters Staff. Along the w-hole frontier preparatory fighting continues, which is still develop- ing to our advantage. Particular mention should be made of the favourable, though slow. continuation of the offensive action which our troops, after having occupied recently the Monte Nero Ridge, on the left of the lsonzo, near Tolmino, are developing upon the rUBleJ rcwkc. on the left bank and at the bottom of the valley, fighting with dash and stubbornness against the Austrians, who are strongly entrenched and sup- ported by powerful artillery. In Carnia the Austrians are stubbornly hut vainly engaging our Alpine detach- ments near the Monte Croie Pass, being >alway9 repulsed. Pola Oil Reservoirs Burning. I Rome, Thursday.—The oil fuel reservoir at Pola. which was set on fire during Sunday's bombardment by Italian war- ships, is still burning. Yesterday huge clouds of smoke were visible from the -sea off Venice. Shelling of Monfalcone. I Rome, Thursday.—The following official Statement is issued:- Our vessels on their return to-day from their scouting cruise report that 24 hours after the bombardment of Monfalcone, carrie.l out on May 31 by our destroyers, clouds of smoke and tongues or fire could f till be seen from l'orto Buso to be rising from Monfalcone.—Renter. Smallest Republic's War. I Amsterdam, Thursday—A Wolff. Bureau telegram from Lugano states that the Republic of San Marino, in Italy, has declared its approbation of the Italian Government's attitude towards Austria and that the territory of the Republic La? ben dedared fn be in a state of war. —Exchange. The MepubHo of Pan Marino, the maUt i existence, is on a mountain a few miles behind Rimini, on the Adriatic. It possessee a wirelss station. l Its army, when mobilised, consists of 1,200 men.

MR KEIR ARDS HEALTH I

MR. KEIR ARDS HEALTH. I Mr. KMr Hardie, M.P., was yesterday I Fhowing but little signs of improvement I in health. He ? still in a nursing home near London, and his condition varies very considerably from day to day. I I

THE JEWISH liMESI

"THE JEWISH liMES." I We understand that the prohibition of the Jewish Times" by the authorities has been withdrawn, and that no pro- ceedings aro being taken. Publication will be resumed to-day.

LATE EARL OF JERSEYI

LATE EARL OF JERSEY. I The funeral of th., Earl of Jersey took place at Middleton. Stoney at noon to- day. Memorial services were held at the same hour at St. Gorge's Church, Han- over-square; at Heeton Parish Church, Middlesex; and in South Wale-s at Bag- Ian Parish Church, at Swansea, at 3ritonferry, arid at. Llaneamlet.

CREEK VESSEL MINED I

CREEK VESSEL MINED. I Athens, Friday.A- (!reek cargo boat, proceeding to Trieste, struck a mine near Salvore, three hours' distance from Trieste. All the crew are reported to have perished except two, who aj-e serioualy i4 'ju.red. Details are

GERMAN TRANSPORT TORPEDOED I

GERMAN TRANSPORT TORPEDOED. I The Secretary of the Admiralty made the following announcement yesterday: The Viee-Admiral at the Dardanelles reports that one of \he British sub- marines at. present operating in the Sea of Marmora torpedoed &-large German transport in Panrma 'Bay yeaterday morTling. • P-andernia Bay, or Perama Bay, as it is called on Rome maps, is an inlet about four miles wide and ten miles long on the northern coast of Asiatic Turkey. From the entrance to the Dardanelles at Cape Helios is nearly ninety miles distant. Fifty miles separates the bay t'rom Constantinople.

WELSH REGIMENTS LOSSES I

WELSH REGIMENTS' LOSSES. I Thursday's casualty lists contain the nanift of 118 oiffcers and 1,740 inen of the Expeditionary Force, reported as under:- I Officers. mf)n. I Killed 28 314 Died of wounds 2 52 Fatal gas cases 7 Wounded i 70 937 Non-fatal gas cases 7 147 Missing 11 383 In the ="ow Ijealand contingent in the Dardanelles 737 casualties are reported. Among the rank and file of the South Waleo Borderers, Welsh Regiment, and tho Monmouthshire Regiment, the num- ber of killed ("including died and died of wounds) H; 116, wounded 321, and missing 29, made up as follows Killed wounded Missing le-t South Wales B. 56 161 — 2nd Welsh 54 14$.„ 29 2nd Monmouths 6 5 — 3rd Monmouthe — 9 — fotak .HWWJIU 323 29

POOR CROWN PRINCE

POOR CROWN PRINCE FRENCH AVIATORS CALL UPON THE HOPE OF GERMANY. IMAGINATIVE EFFORTS Germany will be shocked. The head- quarters of the Imperial Crown Prince have been visited by a squadron of French aircraft, and bombs and darts dropped thereon. The locality of this daring exploit is not indicated, but the fact that the French Headquarters were fully acquainted with the position of the Crown Prince, and were able to effec- tively reach it will not commend iteelf to that notorious young man. The official record is contained in the following communique issued in Paris last night at 11 o'clock.— Fresh progress has been made by our troops in the Labyrinth. Twenty-nine French aviators between 4 and 5 o'clock this morning bombarded the headquarters of the Imperial Crown Prince. They dropped 178 bombs, many of which struck their objective, and also several thousand darts. All the aircraft returned safely. Allied Aviators' Activity. I During the la&t few days Allied Mro-.I planes have been shoving marked activity on the Yser, daily making a searching inspection of the enemy's posi- tions in the neighbourhood. It now appears that the greatest dam- age done to St. Pierre Ctation at Ghent by our airmen the other-day was not to the station itself, but to the more im- portant series of tunnels by which the line runs through the station. The air- men were so accurate that their bombs burst their way through the tunnels and smashed the track. WHAT GERMANY THINKS. Imaginary Account of Zeppelin Raid on London. Rotterdam, Thursday.—The « hrt of London, with its most gigantic harbours in the world, has been hit by our fire," gleefully declares the Kolnusche Zei- tung," referring to the Zeppelin raid on London. In the absence of particulars of the damage done the paper draws on its imagination, and continues: "The bom- bardment of Ramsgate and Brentwood loses some .of its interest in face of the bombardment of theqk>cke, to .which it was the prelude. The docks-the real heart of London—have been hit. The extent of the damage done by our bombs we do not yet know, but the announce- ment that the fires could not be traced to the attack from the air is but a little joke of the English Censor. It only proves how fearful they are in England of the truth. This is shown still more clearly from the fact that the publica- tion of details about the attack is strictly forbidden. From their silence we can only suppose that the damage was much wors* than appears, and we can be proud. H Bombs have been extensively strewn over England, and we can conclude from the report of the German Headquarters that the damage has been extensive too. We shall probably be told that Ramsgate is a quiet place for convalescent Lon- doners, and that it is against interna- tional law that peaceful people bathing should be frightened by bombs. Pro- bably the same will be 6aid of Brent- wood, which must look pretty now with its spring Bowers. How can the enemy demand the sparing of its unfortified places when our open towns have been sought out by their bombs for months past? The damage will be mostly material-and we hope it will be very valuable material— hips as well as cargoes, that have been destroyed. It is to be supposed that fire breaking out in the night would easily spread, and that the famous docks and wares piled in them will suffer too."

EARTHQUAKE IN GERMANY

EARTHQUAKE IN GERMANY. The wireless news officially circulated from Berlin yesterday and received by the Wireless Press, contains the follow- ing:- In various parts of South Germany earthquake shocks have lieen felt.

LABOUR LEADERS SON I I

LABOUR LEADER'S SON. Private Willie Orbell. a younger son of the late Mr. Harry Orbell, of London, for many years National Organiser of the Dockers' Union, has been seriously wounded in action, the right arm having been taken off, and the left hand shat- tered. He is in hospital and making fair progress. Private Willie Orbell is well- known at Swansea.

ZEPPELINS CRUISE OVER SEAI

ZEPPELINS CRUISE OVER SEA. I Copenhgen, Thursday.—Several Zep- pelins and aeroplanes have been cruising over the North Sea off the island of Sylt, west of the Schleswig coast. A large Zeppelin was observed this morning by the military outposts of Copenhagen. It came from the north and had evidently been reconnoitring -it. the entrance of the Baltic. After two hours it disappeared in a southerly direc- tion.-Exchange.

IKBUPPS SECRET WAR MACHINES I

KBUPPS' SECRET WAR MACHINES. I Rotterdam, Thursday.—A German cor- respondent of the "Tyd" writes: On Krupps' grounds at Essen a new building has just been completed and put into use. It seems destined for the secret preparation of something extra- ordinary. A big gang of workmen speci- ally chosen from old and trusted em- ployees in other departments has arrived, and the yfork is being directed by offiters of artillery engineering. Enormous war machi. it is said, are being prepared, the invention having been placed lvefore the Kaiser and the General Staff only a few months ago. Borne people say the new invention is a tremendous tube for discharging at a I great distance enormous masses of burn-

IPRZEMYSLS FATEI

PRZEMYSL'S FATE. I Why Russians Withdrew I From Fortress. I I I Important Victory on Lower I San. I' ll I io Enemy's Line Pierced and 4,000 Prisoners Taken. Przemysl was evacuated by the Russians on June 3rd. It was captured from the I Austrians on March 22nd, after a prolonged siege, when 126,000 prisoners and 708 big guns were taken. Our Eastern Allies, however, after withdraw- ing the garrison, have surrendered the fortress—now practically worthless owing to its partially demolished condition, in accordance with plans made some time ago—the success of which is to be seen on the Lower San, where the German line has been pierced, a fortified position taken, and about 4,000 prisoners captured. The Germans have progressed near the town of Stryji, but have suffered great losses, including 1,000 prisoners. Petrograd, Thur&day.-An official com- munique, issued to-night, says: On June 1st the battle in Galicia con- tinued with undiminished desperation on the whole front between the Vistula and the Nadvorna region. On the left bank of the Lower San our I troops, after a powerful advance, finally on the 2nd pierced the enemy's line aDd! captured an important position, which ) the enemy had fortified in the region of Roudnik, where we took about 4.000 prisoners, guns, and numerous machine giins. Our offensive on the whole front as far as the mouth of the Wisloka continues to develop euccessf ully. Withdrawal from Przemysl. I As Przemysl, ■ in view of the state of its artillery and of its works, which were destroyed by the Austrians before their capitulation, was recognised as incapable of defending itself, its maintenance, in our hands only served our purpose until such time as our possession of the posi- tions surrounding the town on the north- west facilitated cur operations on the I San. When the enemy captured Jaroslav and Radymno and began to spread along the right bank of that river, the mainten- anco of the said positions forced our troops to fight on an unequal and very diffic-ult ftont, increasing it by ? versts (22 miles), and subjecting the troops 00 cupyitlg these positions to the concen- trated nre of the enemy's numerous heavy guns. we had f,6r Fame time Consequently, we had for some time j been proceeding with a gradual removal from this point of various material which we had taken from the Austrians. This having been completed, we removed, on June 2nd. the last batteries, and tho fol-j lowing night, in conformity with orders: received, evacuated on the north and west fronts of the positions surrounding Przemysl, and fonned on the east a more concentrated force. Attacks which the enemy delivered between Przemysl and- the Dneister on June 1st were rl"pul. Great German Losses. I In the region beyond the Dneister, the enemy, who had concentrated in the vicinity of the town of Stryij very large; forces, succeeded in making progress on; the Tismcnitza—Strayij front, -qustaining, however, very great losses, and leaving us, j in the course of our counter-attacks, with 1,000 prisoners. On tho Switza—Lomnitza front on June; 1st, we pressed the enemy, and on the Bystritza we repulsed with success their attacks. I West of Roudnik we almost eomplplely annihilated the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Tyrol II Regiments. t On the Bzura, on June 1st. the enemy sent out a large cloud of gas, which at first reached the river, but owing to a! change of wind was blown hack and! spread in the enemy's trenches. A large number of Germans had then to leave their trenches and run in a crouching position alongside the front, where our exact fire decimated them. On other sectors of the general front there is no change. Libau Cut Off. I Petrograd, Tlxursday--It ia stated on good authority that Russian troops I operating south of Libau have cut off I Libau from Memel and deprived the Ger- mans of their land base. At the same tinle it is reported that the Russians I have captured Folanghen and the small town of Rutzau, situated south of Libau, while another Russian detachment is ap- proaching Libau from South Libau, an outlet only. on the sea. More Repulses for the Turks. Petrograd. Thursday.—The following communique is issued by the Russian General 8taS' in the Caucasus, under date June let:— In the direction of the coast there has been the usual lighting in the direction j ol Oity, successful reconnaissances from Monte Crote having been made by our scouts: our troops inflicted the local de- feat on a'Turkish column in the vicinity of the village of Kosrik, in the direction of Van. I In the region of the Oeake-Chilkhichan 1 Pass, our troops, pursuing the Turks I from ManniRila, reached the villages of Rakon and /akha, whence, alter a suc- cessful engagement, they repulsed the Turks to the south and west. PRECARIOUS POSITION. Extraordinary Intensity of German I Attack. The final attack on the fortress ap-j pears to have been delivered with extras' ordinary .tmensity. Cp till Wednesday; the enemy had only wrested from the Russians three of the ring of forts, these being on the north. On Wednesday night they made another fierce asfcault, having for some days had the support of heavy guns up to 16in. calibre. The fortiiica-1 tions on the north side were etormed and: a Vienna official report status that the; attacking forces took possession of the! fortress at 3.30 yesterday morning. There is no information as to the nnlll- ber of troops left in the fortress, though, according to a German war correspon- dent, ever since the line of communica- tions had been within ransre of the guns of the Hanking forces the Russians had been removing men. The precarious position of the fortress had, indeed, bedn evident for ever a week past. It formed a salient projecting sharply from the Russian line. and connected only with the' main bulk of the Grand Duke's Armies by a narrow zone on the east about 10 miles wide, the whole of which was well within range of the enemy's fire. Advance on Lemberg. The enemy's advance towards Lemberg, I which is reported from Berlin, is a con- 1 sequence of the storming of Stry. This hostile force is proceeding from the south, I at a point 60 miles east of Przemysl. It, is stated to have reached the Dniester; line, near Mikolnjow, or about 25 miles eouth of IiCmberg. Przemysl t?cms d

TOO BIC FOR HATE STUNT I

TOO BIC FOR HATE STUNT. An American travelling on the South- Eastern Railway noticed that the labels in German warning passengers not to lean out of the windows were still displayed. They are proof how confident you English are," he remarked to h fellow- passenger. They are proof that old England is too big for the hate stunt. They are advertisements of your civilisa- tion."

IHERR DERNBEIGS SAFE COIIDUCTi

HERR DERNBEIGS SAFE COIIDUCT. New York. Thursday.—Tho safe con- duct which, the Allied Governments have! granted Herr Dernburg is said to bel quite informal, these Governments hav- ing unofficially notified the American i authorities that Herr Dernburg would not be molested on the voyage should he decide to return home. It was announced last evening that he would leave on Jnn? 12, but he declines to confirm this an-I nounoemejifc.

ISEVEN MEN LOST EVERY MINUTEI

I. SEVEN MEN LOST EVERY MINUTE. I The military correspondent of the Times makes some interesting obser- vations on German resources in man power. He says:— "'If the German population is larger than ours in the United Kingdom we must not forget that the German casual- ties have probably been ten times more numerous than ours have been, and that the strain of fighting on two fronts has been immense. We should endeavour to visualise what it will cost the enemy to fight on three fronts. This strain, this tremendous strain, must tell in the long nin. No nation can go on losing seven men a minuto day and night as the Ger- mane do. without in the end becoming exhausted. Every month of war costs the Germans 300.000 casualties. The supply of men is not exhausted, but to a large extent the flower of the Ger- man youth has withered at a moment when ours is about to bloom, and no one can regard this curious development without, speculating and building hope- fully upon the reeult."

MINISTER OF MUNITIONS

MINISTER OF MUNITIONS NEW DEPARTMENT TO BE CREATED BY PARLIAMENT. MR. LLOYD GEORGE'S COLLEAGUES A Parliamentary correspon d ent writes: A Parliam{>ntary oorrospondent writes: I understand that the personnel of the newly-created department to organise and accelerate the production of munitions of war will be as under:— President Mr. Iloyd George. Controller-General Sir Percy Girouard. Assistant-Controllers Mr. G. M. Booth General Mr. E. Geddes, Rail wa" Expff i. Permanent Secretary ?h'i*? ?.?? .<  ?h. ¡ Assistant Secretary.. Mr W H Beveridge. Parliamentary Sfcc. DjK C. Addison. It will be seen from tlie foregoing names that the new department for the provision I of munitions will be very strongly and 1 efficiently manned. A New Department. In the House of Commons yesterday, the Home Secretary asked leave to introduce a Bill to create a Minister of Munitions. This new department would he concerned with the supply of munitions for the pur- poses of the present war and the organisa- tion of industry throughout thd country. For that purpose the latter function did not at present appertain to any Govern- ment department, but certain functions, such, for example, as inspection, would be transferred from existing departments to the new Ministry. The new Minister of Munitions would be empowered to exer- cise the powers conferred by the Defence of the Realm Act upon the Admiralty and the Army Council, and the Bill contained a provision to remove the disqualifica- tion which would otherwise attach to the head of the new department sitting in the House of Commons. In reply to Mr. Allen, the Home Secre- tary added that the Minister of Muni- tions would have power to take over fac- tories for the manufacture of munitions and carry them on. The Home Secretary further stated that the maximum salary of tho new Minister of Munitions was fixed at £ 5,000. Leave to introduce was given, and the Bill was read a first time. [A report of Mr. Lloyd George's speech at Manchester yesterday will be found on Page 5.]

THE OTHER FULLER I

THE OTHER FULLER I King Bestows V.C. Upon Grenadier Guardsman. The King this morning conferred the V.C. upon Corporal Wilfred Fuller, of the Grenadier Guards, and Private \V. Buck- ingham, of the Leicestershire Regiment. Fuller won his award for conspicuous bravery at Neuve Chapelle on March 12th. Seeing a party of the eneidy endeavour- ing to escape along a communicating trench he ran towards them and killed the leading man with a bomb. The re- mainder, numbering nearly 50, finding no' means of evading his bombs, surrendered to Itiin. Corporal Fuller was alone ati tho time. Private Buckingham won 'his V.C. for conspicuous acts of bravery and devotion to duty in rescuing and rendering aid to the wounded whilst exposed to heavy fire, especially at Neuve Chapelle on the 10th and 12th of March.

BULGARIAN GARRISON REVIEWED

BULGARIAN GARRISON REVIEWED. Athens, Thursday.—General Thodoroff has reviewed the Bulgarian garrison at Dedeagatch. The Turks continue their military measures at Adrianople, indi- cating that they fear a Bulgarian attack.

WEST INDIAN BATTALIONI

WEST INDIAN BATTALION. Kingat-on (Jamaica), Thursday.—Jam- aica is enlisting a contingent of 500 men, which number it is proposed to maintain at the front. It is announced to-day that the colonies of Trinidad, Barbados, and British Guiana are following Jam- aica'6 lead. It is hoped to form a West Indian battalion of 1,500 men.

LONDONS HOMELESS STATUESI

LONDON'S HOMELESS STATUES. I A resting place has at length been found for the homeless statues of English Sovereigns which once adorned West- minster Hall. They stand about lift. 9in. high and are seven in number, namely, Charles I., Charles II., James I., Mary II., William 111., George IV., and William IV. The statues will be erected iu the spacious entrance hall of the Old bailey.

RESPIRATORS FOR SOLDIERS I

RESPIRATORS FOR SOLDIERS. I The Secretary of the War Office an- nounces that an improved type of respirator has been adopted as the official pattern on the recommendation of a special export, committee. Ample supplies of this respirator are now available at the front, and it is un- desirable as well as unnecessary for the public to supply their soldier friends with other patterns.

SOLDIERS LETTERS HOME I

SOLDIERS', LETTERS HOME. I The Rev. Oliver Russell, home from the front, relates a story of a letter he was asked to write for a wounded man. Dear Wife,—I hope this will find you as it leaves me; I have a lump of shrap- nel in my leg," it began. To another patient it was suggested to begin his letter My dear Wife." Yes, put that doon." said he: "she'd enjoy that. I never ca'd her that name before."

WHISKY PRICES NOT ALTERED I

WHISKY PRICES NOT ALTERED. At a meeting in London yesterday, at which twenty branches of the branded Scotch whisky trade were represented, it was unanimously decided not to alter the brands or prices of whisky to" Hie trade and to the public. The London retailers, who met on Tuesday under the auspices of the Licensed Victuallers' Central Protection Society of London, had decided to advise I license-hoiders in Greater London to in- crease tJie price of draught spirits by one penny a. Quartern.

TH E WAR

TH E WAR Resume of To-day's I Messages. "Leader" Officc, 5 p.m. Rome officially reports to-day the favour- able, though s low, continuation of the offensive on the left ba.nk and in the valley of the Isonzo, near Tolmino, fol- lowing up the occupation of Monte Nero I Ridge. The Austrians, who are sup- ported by powerful artillery, have also been repulsed near the Monte Croic, JVsS, Carina, Petrograd reports that the Russians with- drew from Przemysl on June 3rd. in accordance with pre-arranged plans. The fortress has since been occupied by the Austro-Gerntan forces. On the Lower San the Russians have pierc.ed the German lines and captured an important fortified position in the region of Roudnik, taking 4,000 prisoners, in addition to field guns and machine guns. The offensive developed successfully on this front. In the Caucasus the Turks have been driven south and west, and several vil- lages have been ocupi by the Russians. t Mr Lloyd George paid a visit to Liver- pool to-day and conferred with the em- ployers on munition supplies, and in- spected the Dockers' Battalion. The Swedish steamer Lapland, sunk by an explosion 55 miles from Peterhead, was. in the opinion of the captain, torpedoed. The headquarters of the Imperial Crown ) Prince of (ermany have been visited by a French aerial squadron, which I dropped 178 bombs and several thou- sands of darts.

SWEDISH SHIP SUNK I

SWEDISH SHIP SUNK I Captain Asserts Vessel Was Torpedoed. The Swedish steamer lapi.and, of 3 -W tons register, was sunk shortly after I eleAen last, night, 55 miles off Peterhead, and the crew of ? men and four women i were h'md?d at Peterhead at ?ight o'dock I thi? morning. TIH vf'81 wan preceding from Xorvik to .Middl?shro wit? iron ore. Captain John Peterson states that he was awakened when in his bunk by the force of an explosion, the vessel having been struck on the starboard side near No. 4 hatch. Tlie iron ore was sent fly- ing all over the ship, which began to 4 11 10 sink by the stern. The crew took to two boats, one of which was smashed, and had to be towed by the other. A blue light was burned, and shortly after mid- night the boats were picked up by a patrol boat from Petershead. One. woman was slightly injured in the foot. The remainder were uninjured. The captain added that no enemy ship or submarine was soen, but he believed the vessel was torpedoed.

I RAZORS FOR THE TROOPS 1

RAZORS FOR THE TROOPS -1 I FIRST BATCH OF FIFTY DESPATCHED I Have you got a razor that you can do without r' In response to the appeal for razors for the troops, a goodly number has reached the Leader" Office. We have now been a.ble to make up the first parcel of fifty to send to the Cutlers' Hall, S heffield, where they will be re-set and otherwise overhauled and then sent on to the troops at the front through the War Ottice. Those received up to mid-, day to-day are:— Mr. John Pavlor, J.P., Ty-Newydd, I Mumbles 4 Anonymous 8 A friend .I. 5 Mr. Daniel Thomas, Coronation- terrace, Cwmbwrla 2 Mr. Selby 1 Mr. W. C. Williams' 2 For the Troops 3 Mr. Meech, Mumbles 1 A.P.IF 1 Mr. C. C. Vivian. London City and Midland Bank, Swansea 2 Mr. Bell, Mumbles t) 11". I)inhaiii 2 Mr W. Fvans, Waterloo-st., Swansea ) From T.D." 3 Anonymous, "Pontardaw(! 2 -Air. 1'. Powell, Clairwood, Neath 2 "A Friend," Swansea 5 To date 50 Itns first consignment is being sent to I the Master Cutler by this evening's des- I patches. I j

GREEK KING CONVALESCENT I

GREEK KING CONVALESCENT. I Athens, Thursday.—The King has gone tA) the Villa Reygabete for .the period of his convalescence.

PRICE OF MEAT IN VIENNAf

PRICE OF MEAT IN VIENNA. f Zurich, Friday.—Tlie retail prices of meat in Monday's cattle market in Vienna were increased by twoll<'e a pound. Tho import of live stock from Hungary and Transylvania is the lowest on record, and, in the circumstances, is occasioning much I uneasiness. The price of beer in Vienna was increased on June 1st by d. a pint.

THE RECRUITING BOOMI

THE RECRUITING BOOM. I There has been a. rush to the Colours in (ilaanorgan this week. One hundred ?in d f and, fiftv lllNl were recruited in tihe on te- stations on Wednesday alone^ and there is every indication that this week's figures will prove the best for many h".

Advertising

IN THE "LABYRINTH." PARIS, Friday. The following official communique was issued this afternoon r—To the cast of the eugur refinery of BoucLcz, our troops, progressing towards Souchez village, carried an isolated inn whicli the enemy hg4 organised, took alpout 50 prisoners, and captured throe machine guns. Thy also made iresh progrcea in the" lAôrynlh." On tin rest of the front there tare boon artil- lary Uu«Ie. flour Cortitfig Down. Liverpool and District MiHors* Asso- ciation today rodwod our a further 1!. per eack- The minimum pricu of the bakere' trade if tow 4Ts. per eack- Lawpe&'s fioar PrlCC6 "t few am-ca wore 53, 6d. This week they kave gone tiovu to ".A, Sd, Fo actio* bas beet reoeiTOd of any further reduction at pBt. 1 I ( •; v ,'J