Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 6 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
37 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

The London Office of the Cam- bria Daily Leader" is at 151, Fleet Street (first floor), where advertisements can be received up to 7 o'clock each evening for insertion in the next day's issue. Tel., 2276 Central.

Advertising

5.30. EDM

GERMANY WA NTS PEACE 1 1

GERMANY WA, NTS PEACE 1 1 I REMARKABLE REPORT "WILLING TO LISTEN" IF ALLIES ARE REASONABLE." DESIRE TO END STRUGGLE An Exchange message from Berlin states that considerable importance is at- tached in political circles in Germany to the semi-official statement published en Thursday evening to the effect that Germany is willing to listen to peace proposals if they are reasonable. It is hoped throughout the German Em- pire that the Ailies will respond to this call simply by expressing a desire to end the struggle as early as possible. It is expected tbfat the Imperial Chancel- lor will make another statement on peace in the name of the Kaiser in the forthcoming ses-,ion of the Reichstag. Peace in October. Amsterdam. Thursday.—The German armies have published the following order of the day throughout Flanders;- Our work is practically tinished in the East now, and we are about to begin in the Wefct. Peace is certain in October. The Telegraaf hears from the fron- tier that numerous cases of desertion hare occurred amongst the German armies owing to the impending resump- tion of a general attack along the Ypres- Xia-Baeeee line.—Exchange.

COMMISSION CF INQUIRYI

COMMISSION CF INQUIRY Russian Authorities to Inves- tigate Army Supplies Abuses. Petrograd, Thursday.—The Russian Minister of Teheran, M. Korostovetz, has been recalled from his post and appointed. a member of the Council of Ministry for Foreign Affairs- An announcement of great importance wa-s made on Wednesday. An Imperial Commission has been appointed to inquire into abuses in the matter of army sup- plies, to which reference has so fre- quently been made of late in the Duma and at various public gatherings. General Petroff. a member of the Coun- cil of Empire, will preside, and other members will be the Vice-President of the Council of Empire, the Vice-Presidpnt of the Duma., a f-en a tor, and a representative of the War Office. The work of cleansing local administra- tion has Irtigun by the dismissal of M. Kurloff, Governor-General of the Baltic I provinces, against whom complaints have been particularly titrong, and M. Nabo- koff. Governor of Couriand. The dismissal of oth-er Governors notorious for high-handed action is re- ported as impending. The importance of these measures at the present moment is that they will remove impediments to the development of the munitions move- ment.

A MYSTERIOUS FIREI

A MYSTERIOUS FIRE I Amsterdam, Thursday.—The Cologne Gazette states that a fire broke out in the powder works at Reinsdorf, near Wittenberg, from an unknown cause, j Stveral persons were killed.

NEW GOVERNOR OF WARSAWI

NEW GOVERNOR OF WARSAW I Amsterdam, Friday.—The "Vossiche learns that Commanding-General Frei- herr von Scheffer Bovadel, has been ap- pointed Governor of Warsaw. The general specially distinguished himself in the great attack in December last.

ESCAPED IN A BASKETI

ESCAPED IN A BASKET I Milan, Thursday.—With the last pnrty of refugees coming frornAustria there ar- rived here yesterday a young Venetian subject to military service, who had escaped from the concentration oanrp at Katzenau and travelled 15 hours eon- j cealed in a clothes basket. He had suf fereel greatly on the journey, but was still eble to present himself for duty. J'

BOOKS FOR THE TROOPS I

BOOKS FOR THE TROOPS. I ————— There was a slump on Thursday in the I contribution of books for the troops in response to the "Leader" appeal. Two volumes only were received. It is devoutly to be hoped that the public will not weary Df well-doing in the matter of providing our heroes with literature. To-day's p acknowledgment:— Already acknowledged 4,342 Hiss Powell, Marlborough-road Periodicals and 2 Total. 4,344

DEATH FOR DRUNKENNESS IN TURKEY I

DEATH FOR DRUNKENNESS IN TURKEY. I New York, Thursday.—Mr. H. Wood, the special correspondent of the United Press. has sent the following dispatch from Constantinople: By a special Irade of the Sultan public drunkenness has just been made a crime subject to trial and condemnation by oourt-martial with all the severity with which thi-s military trihunal usually acts in Turkey. This new order of things will be effective throughout the continu- ance of the war. With the very existence of the Ottoman Empire threatened by the campaign now being waged at the Dardanelles not only the Turkish Government but also the Sheik ul Islam has announced that the Turkish public must comfort itself in full conformity with the seriousness of ti-ft situation. One of the recent orders of the Sheik ul Islam prohibits the use as wrapping paper by shopkeepers and others of newspapers or other printed sheets on which the name of Allah may by chance be printed.—Exehan^a*

PATROL CRUISER LOST i O

PATROL CRUISER LOST O I BRITISH AUXILIARY CRUISER TORPEDOED AND SUNK. 141 LIVES SAVED I PRESS BUREAU, Thursday, 9.30 p.m. The Secretary of the Admiralty lllake-s tho following annoillioemout:- H.M.S. auxiliary cruiser India (Com- i inander W. G. A. Kennedy, R.N.), whilst engaged on patrol duty in the North Sea ou August 8th, was torpedoed by a Ger- mar..submarine, and sunk. Twenty-two officers and 119 men have been saved. Prior to the war the India was a P. and O. hner. Of 7,940 tons, she was built at Greenock in 1896. and was fitted with a wireless installation and the electric light. Funeral of Victims. Chnstiania, Friday.—The funeral of twelve more English sailors from the India took place yesterday afternoon with fr)l military honcurs- Ther were many m-rf?atbs O) tb? coffins, including an off,-r-1 inK from the Norwegian Navy and the British Legation. A company of Nor- wegian soldiers paid the last honours by the graveside. THE LYNX AND THE RAMSEY. Over One Hundred British Sailors Missing. The Admiralty issued on Thursday night a list of 63 petty officers and men miesmg from the sunken destroyer1 Lynx and another of 46 missing from the sunken patrol vessel Ramsey. Half the latter number comprise the specially entered mercantile crew. The great majority of the ratings belong to the Portsmouth Division. I

TRAIN CHASED BY AEROPLANE I

TRAIN CHASED BY AEROPLANE Petrograjd, Thursday—A passenger train | has arrived at Kiev from Siedlice (Poland)* having been struck near tau t place by bombs froai a German aeroplane which pursued the train. The aircraft flew overlie fid for some time before dropping the bombs. One second-class and one third-class car- riages were partially wrecked, and several passengers were serioutily wounded.— Reuter.

I MAILS THROWN OVERBOARD I

I MAILS THROWN OVERBOARD I Copenhagen, Thursday.— According to a tele-gram from Bergen, the Norwegian* mail steamer, Iris, was stopped at 7.30 yesterday morning by a German sub- marine an hour's steam from the coast. The submarine fired two shots across her bows, and a German officer and some men then boarded her. One of the passengers states that some bags of parcel post for Russia were thrown overboard, but the letter post and parcel post for Scandinavia were not touched. The .^u'mnnrjne disappeared in a south- easterly d i ter.

CUT OFF BY THE TIDE I

CUT OFF BY THE TIDE I Two young ladies, visitors to Clee- tlwrpes (Miss Elsie and iliss Catherine ifealey), had an exciting experience on Thursday. They were on the beach and did not notice the rise of the tide until they were cut oil from the shQre. Efforts were made to reach them with a sand-cart, but this proving unsuccess- ful, fi young mam named John NnttaJl, swam to their ai-d and assisted thJU, through water up to their necks, to a point where it was shallow. Two soldiers wading breast high into the sea were able to complete the rescue.

FIVE LIANDILO BROTHERS Itl KHAKI I

FIVE LIANDILO BROTHERS Itl KHAKI I ill r. V. II. Lee, butcher, Wandilo. and ) Mrs. Lee, have cause to take pride in their family's record of service to the King. Five sons are serving with the Colours, one of whom. Sergeant Thomas 11. Lee, journeyed all the way from Van- couver, British Columbia, to enlist. He is now attached as Sergeajnt-Instruetor to I the South Wales Borderers. Corporal Fred Lee is a. dispatch rider at the front, Sergeant Charles Lee is with the South I Wales Borderers. Private Arthur Lee is o*, the Dardanelles, and Private Bertie Lee is with the 4Ui Welsh. All of them are well. I

UNDER WATER FOR EIGHT MUTES I

UNDER WATER FOR EIGHT MUTES. I A Kingston bargo) nameci Alley has had a wonderful escape from drowning .-it Shepperton Lock. A lock keeper plunged in fully dressed to his rescue, hut w.-vs caught arouud the neck by the drowning man and forced ki?nse]f fr. Alley sank, and efforts to find the hody by bing failed. Persons hurried to fhe- scene, and on bubbles being seen on fhf, water Alley was hauled out by a pole. He had rnY'l1 lying in 12 feet, of water for eight minutes, and was to all appearance dead. After an hour's artinnal rpspintion he sufficiently iccoveied to be taken to the hospital. Such a recovery, bearing in mind the time of immersion, is believed to be unprecedented.

7777 I DISHONEST DEALERS INGENUITYI

7 7 = 7.-=7 = DISHONEST DEALER'S INGENUITY I Paris, Thursday.—A dishonest but amusing trick by a French cattle dealer in the sale of his stock to the Govern- ment has been discovered. The dealer had a contract to provide the Army with a certain number of cattle each week. They were paid for by weight. A wide-awake Government inspector noticed that every week, just before thtf cattle were brought into tho yard to be weighed, tho side street in which they were waiting was flooded with water by an overflowing conduit. The cattle im- mediately began to drink, and when they reached the scales they weighed a good many pounds heavier. Discreet inquiries led to the discovery of the fact that an arrangement existed be- tween thp cattle dealer and the owner of the conduit that there should always be an, overflow at the right time. The trick- has Vd to considerable profits for both accomplices*

TURKS MAY SECEDE

TURKS MAY SECEDE -0 AUSTRALIAN ESTIMATE ANOTHER HOSTILE WARSHIP IN THE DARDANELLES TORPEDOED. SUBMARtMS COOD WORK Athens.—Operations on an extensive j scale have been resumed on the Gallipoli Peninsula, and the latest news is, on the whole, very favourable. The battle has been general in the region around Krithia (6 miles from the S.W. point uf the peninsula). The Allies, having been strongly rein- forced, attacked the Turkish positions. and in brilliant fashion won two lines of trenches which (according to French offi- cers) possess considerable strategic im- portance. In the region of Achi Baba (2 miles from Krithia) the artillery duels have been intense. At. Art Bnrnu (on the west coast of the peninsula, 10 n)ile, N. of the entrance to the straits) a British battalion was forced to retire for some 300 yards before a par- ticularly violent attack, but the position is none the worse for that occurrence. Dtiring this attack three enemy aero- planes flew over our lines directing the Turkish fire. A Vulnerable Point. Rome. Thursday.—From Salonika comes the news that the recent progress of the Allies in Gallipoli js equal in im- port.ance to Hny success they previously attained. The Allies have discovered on the western coast of the peninsula an ab- solutely vulnerable point in the Turkish defences. which will enable them to make a further rapid advance. PRESS BUREAU, Thursday, 8.30 p.m. The Secretary of the Admiralty mates the following announcement:— The Vice-Admiral in the Dardanelles reports that one of the British sub- marines operating in these waters sank a Turkish battleship ou the morning of August 8th at the entrance to the Sea of Marmora. A Turkish gunboat, the Berk- i-Satvet, and an empty transport have also been torpedoed in the Dardanelles by one of the -British submarines. In connection with the above, in a. Turkish official communique, dated Aug. 8th, it was reported that the Turkish i battleship Majrredin Barbarosse had been torpedoed .by an enemy submarine. The IJairredin Barbarosse is an ex-Ger- man battleship, purchased by Turkey in 1910. The Berk-i-Satvet, like the torpedoed battleship, was built in Germany, Launched in 1906 at Kiel the Berk-.USat- vet wa a torpedo-gun boat displacing 770 ton? with a speed of 22 knot. and carry- ing two f-incli quickfirers, three torpedo tubes, and smaller armament. There is only one other of this class, the Peilk-i- Schevket,and she. may be among the many smaller warships sunk-but not identified. One of the Berk-i-Satvet class of gun- boats was sunk by E14 on May 3rd. BEFORE END OF OCTOBER. Predicted Fall of Constantinople. I A wounded Australian soldier, with whom a Press representative had an inter- view yesterday, prophesied that the fall of Constantinople before the end of October was as certain as it is that night follows day. The Turks," he said, j have been whacked FO completely during recent attacks that I shall not be in the least astonished if they throw up the! sponge at any moment. From time to time we have picked up messages which show that the Turks have lost heart, and their secession from the Central Powers is only a matter of a very short time. Do you want a good bet? Take any odds you can gé. about the fall of Constanti- nople before the end of October."

LABOUR BATTALIONS

LABOUR BATTALIONS Recruiting for Novel Bat- talion at Swansea. Instructions have been received for the immediate recruiting of a limited number of battalions of labourers for the Royal Engineers for service abroad. The typ-3 of men eligible are those accustomed to pick and shovel work, and their duties will be of a non-combatant nature, such as excavations, road-making and field fortifications. rfhe age limits are 40 to 17 years, and there are no height, chest and eye-si^ht standards. The rates of pay are from 3, per day upwards, with rations, uniforms, etc., and separation allowances. Recruiting started at Swansea on Monday, at the Labour Exchange. Mr. l. A. Johns is the responsible, local officer, and all enquiries should be made at the Labour Exchange.

RAZORS FOR THE TROOPS

RAZORS FOR THE TROOPS. Four more razors for 

TO RENnER TORPEDOES HARMLESS

-=- TO RENnER TORPEDOES HARMLESS Paris. Thursday.—An Italian named Guarini has invented an apparatus which is reputed to he capable of instan- taneously nullifying the effect of tor- pedoes discharged hy submarines by caus- ing them to burst before they reach their objective. The invention has already h'ê'f'n submitted to the examination of the Italian naval authorities, The mechanism is susceptible of application, to any kind of ship, and can he wQrked equally well whether the vesse l be stationary or movmg. 7h>. inventor assures the authorities that even if the enemy dis- covers its presence he will be powerless to neutralise its agRet.-Exchang%

NO MORE BOGUS BADGES

NO MORE BOGUS BADGES I MR. LLOYD GEORGE DETERMINED TO STOP AN ABUSE. I HEAVY FINE FOR WEARERS Mr. Lloyd George has determined to stop the scandal of the bogus war service badge. Rules have been issued by him under Section 8 of the Munitions of War Act, one of which- reads :— No person t:.Iiall, excfp" with the ex- press authority of the Minister, make, eell, issue, or wear any badg-c similar in form or appearance to any badge sup- plied or authorised hy the Minister, or any colourable imitation thereof, or any badge or other distinctive mark calculated or intended to suggest that the wearer thereof is engap-w-A on muni- tions work or other work for war pur- poses. Under the Ad any person who acts in contravention of the rules is liable for each offence to a fine not exceeding £ 50.

DROWNED MANS IDENTITY I

DROWNED MAN'S IDENTITY I The man whose body was found in the !)orth Dock, Swansea, on Thursday, has been identified by Mr. George Gunning, as Maurice Murphy, aged 46.. whose home is at 8, Manchester-court, Wavcrley-st., ■ Hull. T'he inquest will be held ou Saturday.

LOUGHOR COLLIERS ACCIDENTI

LOUGHOR COLLIER'S ACCIDENT I Thomas Edwards (28). a collier employed at the Cae Duke Colliery, and,residing at Brooklyn-terrace, Loughor, was admitted to the Swansea. Hospital on Thursday suffering from a fractured skull sustained at the colliery. At Loughor, Edwards was attended to by Dr. Thompson, and then sent, into Swansea Hospital, where he was detained.

IT AlIAtfSESCPEFROf117RiESTE I

IT AlIAtfSESCÅPE-FROf117ÎRiESTE I Milan. August 12.An Italian who was sent from Trieste, to an Austrian concern tration camp made an almost miraculous escape in a large wicker clothes basket, in which he remained 40 hours in a train. During that time he had only a little bread aud cheese to eat and some water to drink. He arrived in Italy in an exhausted condition. As soon as he had recovered, the refugee asked to he allowed to join the Italian army in order to tight against Austria .-Reuter-

PLEA FOR CHEAP FARES

PLEA FOR CHEAP FARES The suspension of excursion and other cheap railway fares and the consequent hardship on the travelling public is the subject of a letter which the London and Suburban Railway Passengers' Associa- tion has addressed to Mr. liunciman. It is pointed out that there is no inten- tion of attempting to hamper the Govern- ment, but it is felt that it is quite possible that the railways could be utilised for the purpose of running cheap fares trains without prejudice to military require- ments. I -——————————— )

VIOLENT LONDON TBUNDERSTQRMj

VIOLENT LONDON TBUNDERSTQRM j The violent thunder-storm which broke over London yesterday afternoon was re- sponsible for some rather alarming mis- haps in the City. About 3 o'clock, when the storm was at its height, the iron (Yel.iug of the main sewer manhole a t the junction of Far- ringdon-street with Ludgate-eivcus was forced into the air and fell with a crash in the roadway. The water from the burst main rose above the adjacent obelisk and subjected pedestrians to an involun- tary shower-bath.

WELSH PEERS SOS SILLEDI

WELSH PEER'S SOS SILLED I The distressing news reached Glanusk I Park, Crickhowell, on Thursday .that i Lieutenant the Hon. Gerald Sergison Bailey, of the 2nd Battalion Grenadier Guards, second son of Lord Glauusk, had been killed in action by a bomb. He was 32 years of age. Lord Glanusk is at present on active service, being in command of the Breck- nock Battalion of the South Wales Bor- derers. Other members of the fanlily at present serving with the forces are the deceased's two brothers, Lieut, the Hon. Wilfred Bailey, Adjutant to the 2nd Battalion Grenadier Guards, and another, yvho is in the Navy, and his three uncles— Lient. the lion..). Lancelot Bailey, on active service with the ffrsf line of the Brecknock Territorial Battalion; Major the Hon. William Bailey, seco ud in com- niand of the first line Welsh Horse Regi- ment and Captain the Hon. Arthur Bailey, at present in British East Africa I' Lady Glanusk herself has been taking a prominent part in various movements in London connected with the war.

WOULDBE CAIRO ASSASSIN

WOULD-BE CAIRO ASSASSIN Cairo, August 2nd.—The native, Mah- mond Hilmi. who rented the house from which the bomb was recently thrown at the Sultan, is still at large, but the policc have under arrest, at Alexandria a young schoolmaster, w ho. investigations go to show. was undoubtedly concerned in the attempt on the Sultan's ]i•' He is a native of Abou Maia, near Mehalla, and teaches in a school in Alexandria. One of his pupils happens to live in a house in Ras-el-Tin-street, near that from which the bomb was thrown, and he has told the police that the day before the outrage he saw his master in the empty house. The barber who aded- as the inter- mediary for the letting of the house to Mahmoud Hilmi says that the prisoner came to him and inquired as to the whereabouts of the "house in tluosfion. A cigarette-end found in the empty house, m the mine room in that in which a further horilb was disqffvered, is similar I to the brand smoked by the prisoner. The evidence, agai nst the ii-in it will be quit.e sufficient to eend him for trial. As the result of rkxmmenis seied by the police, several mtm have been detained, and will require examination and sur- veillance on a?eoan?. of UKaj' exalted td

THE LAST PENALTY I PAID

THE LAST PENALTY I PAID SMITH EXECUTED THREE MURDERED BRIDES AVENGED BY I, THE LAW. "I FINAL LETTER TO f\'iIS PEGL;n 1 FINAL LETTER TO TTISP PEGI & 1 George Joseph Smith, who was convicted I at Old Bailey in connection with the brides in the bath case, and sentenced to death, and whose appeal against his conviction was dismissed, was executed in Maidstone Gaol at eight o'clock on Friday morning. The condemned isian spent a restless night, and was quite resigned to his fate. At an early hour he was visited by the chaplin. Rev. J. Stott, and at 7.50 Ellis, the executioner, entered the cell occupied by the culprit for the purpose of the pinion- ing process, which was quickly accom- plished. Just on the stroke of 8 o'clock Smith, with a warder on either side cf him, walked with rather faltering steps to the ecuAcrd. which was t-ituatcd about 30 yards away, and almost opposite the prison gates. Ellis did his work very expeditiously, and death was apparently instantaneous. There were present at tho execution the Under Sheriff, Mr. F. R. How left; De- puty Governor, Mr. F. T. Wintle; the prison surgeon, Dr. C. Hoar; the chap- lain, and half-a-dozen warders. Very Dejected. For the first time for many years no permits were issued to the Press. It is stated that during the ten days he had been incarcerated in Maidstone Prison, Smith gave those in attendance upon him very little trouble. He was throughout the/ whole time very dejected. Soon after his arrival in the county town he made known the fact that he was a Wesley an, and as a result the local minister of his denomination visited him more than once, while the chaplain saw him several times daily. Judging from his demeanour Smith was grateful for the ministrations of both tlieee gentlemen. A crowd consisting principally of work- ing people gathered at the entrance to prison, but there was no public demon- stration beyond the almost universal re- mark, The wretch deserved his fate." The police refused to allow any photo- graph to be taken of the ccents cu'sid the prison on the ground that it was in a prescribed area under the Defence of the Realm Act. The Inquest. j The inquest on the body of Smith was held in th-j jail by Mr. T. Buss, the county coroner, the prison being in his jurisdiction. Inspector Xeil, of the Y Division Metropolitan Police, deposed to being pre- sent when the culprit was sentenced to death at. the Central Criminal Court for the murder of Miss Mundy. The Coroner: lie was 43 years of age, I think ? The Inspector: Yes. Mr. Wintle, governor in charfe of Maidstone Prison, said he received a war- rant for the execution of Smith, and also his record, and a communication from the Home Secretary. Prisoner was received into the prison on the -ith inst., and was duly executed fiat morning at 8 o'clock. The Coroner: You were present at the execution ? Witness: I was. Tho Coroner: And it was carried out according to law ? Witness: Yes-, and in. a very biiinarp and expeditious manner. Dr. C. Hoar, the prison rurgeon, who also atteuded the execution, stated that death was due to a dislocation of tite vortebrpp, and was absolutely instan- taneous. The jury returned a verdict that deceased was duly executed according to II law. HIS LAST LETTER. Protected His Innocence to Miss Pegler. I Smith died protesting his innocence. His last letter, written to Miss Pegler, "the woman to whom he always re- turned," is similar to-many such final documents writteii from the condemned cell. It is in these terms:— To His "Dear Love." I Maidstone Prison, August 9. 1915. Dear Love,—Your pure heart and con- science free from stain hclw me to be- lieve that whilst memory holds a seat with.in your sacred brow you will remem- ber me. You are the la,zt person in the world to whom I s'^all write, inasmuch as this is my last letter. I could write volumes of pathos prompted by the cruel position wherein I am now placed, but I have too much ret-pect aad love for your feelings to do 60. I have not asked for a reprieve, nor made a petition, and do not intend doing so. Thus, since we have failed to obtain justice from the earthly judges, I prefer death rather than imprisonment. So an incMjent man jaroes to his untimely end a victim of cruei fate, God alone is my judge, and the King of Kings. It was He who gave me life-who ordained our coming together. My property I give to you. Don't he alone on the last day when I shall have left this weary ark. behind where perjury, malice, spite, vin- dictivenoss, prej udice, and all othe* earthly ills will have done its best and can harm me no more. ) "Solemn Meditation." My time is occupied in solemn and deep meditation. 1 am preparing my soul for fIÜn to receive. I return to the teach- ing which I received from my mother. 1 have gone to God. with, all my sins, with trtlt" repentance, and asked His forgiveness and mercy on my soul. I truly believe and feel that my faithful and sincere prayers havo been answered. I shall have an extraordinary peace, per- fect peace. May an old age. serene and bright, and as lovely as a Lapland night, lead fl" to thy grave. Now, my true lore, good-bye until we meet again. Yours with immortal love, George. P.S.T must eay that the chaplain here ¡ is the best man I ever met. »

TH E WAR

TH E WAR Resume ef To-day's Messages. "Leader" Offire, 5.0 p.m. Mr. Lloyd George has intimated that the "wearing of colourable immitatiollS of war service badges will b3 punishable I by a fine of X50. British tjsbmarin" in the Dardanelles have sunk a. Turkish gunboat and an empty transport. The Germans are concentrating energies upon the fortress Kovno, which, is an important obstacle on t\@r!r march towards Petrograd. They are l suffering heavy losses. A Russian Imperial Commission has been appointed to inquire into the abwes in Army supplies. The work of cleansing local administration has begun. -Mcoordiivg to a.n Exchange message from Berlin, a semi-official statement ha* been issued to the eflect that Germany is willing to listen to peace proposals if they are reasonable. H.M. auxiliary cruiser India has been sunk by a German sv-bmarine. One hundred and forty-one members of the crow were saved. Bulgaria, it is declared, re/juires a guaran- j tee that hpr claims to Serbian Macedonia will satisfied t>olore .she will enter I the war.

THREE LIVES LOST I I

THREE LIVES LOST. I The steamer Summerfield has been sunk. The mate, his wife, and the chief engineer were drowned, but sailors hadiy injured were taken to the hospital for treatment. Sel-en of the crew were landed. The names of the drowned are Thomas Summerfield, the mate, and his wife, and I Griffiths, the chief engineer. I

MAHONEYS LAST CIVILIAN DIM j

MAHONEY'S LAST CIVILIAN DIM j At Swansea Police Court on Friday, an iTigenius excuse was given by -kticbaeil Jehu Mahoney, a labourer, who was fcund drunk on the previous day by P.S. Skiuner. Mahoney, a finely built fellow, ex- I plained at some length, that having de- cided to join the Army lie had a drop before going to see the recruiting ser- geant. The case was adjourned for a week.

NOT YET RECAPTURED I

NOT YET RECAPTURED. I Two German officers of high standing escaped during Wednesday, night from the Old Cas: internment camp, West Meat-h, and have not yet been re-cap- tured. The men answered, or srot some others to answer for them. at the rolUsaJI. A short time afterwards -hey were asissed, and, although an exhaustive lim been made by the police and military, they have not yet been apprehended. It is believed that they have gone to the sea coast in the hope of catching a vessel. n -4

EXPORT OF COAt ORDERI

EXPORT OF COAt ORDER. I The Order in Council prohibiting the exportation of coal and coke, except by licence, to all destinations abroad other I than British possessions tiici protectoratee came into operation to-day. The new order, of course, will have a considerable effect on the trade, of Swansea port, but local merchants are taking it in a pat- triotic spirit, and it is hoped that in due course, by the expedition of the issue of licences, the inconvenience caused will be reduced to a minimum.

BRITISH FRONT IMPREGNABLE I

BRITISH FRONT IMPREGNABLE I A Roscommon gentleman serving as an officer of an Indian cavalry brigade of some 2,500 horses, which was the first to reach France from India, says that for two months they acted as infantry in the trenches. It was almost certain that another winter would be spent in the trendies. The British front as at present situated is absolutely ii-ql-)roguable. I r. one day alone at Soucliez it is computed that the Fron-h fired 300,000 shells, but the Germans wee quite well able to keep pace with fliem. Tlie officer also avers that the pre- valence of spies on the western front is t?traordmary. They utilise underground tclpphon?? to a !a''? extcDt. and th,y have numerous methods of M?tMjHT?. A plough with a ?-hit? or ?-my T?orre has often located the position of a battery of artillery to an enemy aeroplane. Another I favourite dodge has been to drive a fhvk of sheep close to the position of a battery.

BLAMED THE HOUSEKEEPERI

BLAMED THE HOUSEKEEPER I Charged with allowing his five children to become chargeable to the Swansea Union, a man named Jas. Alfred Clarke told tIn Swansea magistrates on Friday that -the sole reason for his present posi- tion, which he keenly felt, was the per- fidy of a wom-aii he ha4 r-w aped as lio use keeper. I thought she would be a friend to mp." he said. <0 but instead she has been a <>nr=e. to me." Warrant Officer Hoskins said the chil- dren ha-d been in the Workhous? since June 28th last, and the cost of main- tenance per week was ~i?1 12s. DeferKlaut had been unfortunate in llihonæper, and ho (Mr. Hoskins: thought that that was the cruise for his failure to keep a home, (fla.ike had been a ganger,, having authority over 50 or 60 rnn. find Ihis pm- ployers gave him an excellent character. He was a FO(,-ady and reliable workman The case, was rtdpynmod for a week to P-nohlp defmid-ant to set up a new heme aRa;in. I

Advertising

Several Ships Sunk. Lloyd's report the Norwegian steamer Aura haa been, sunk. The steamer Jacoxia, of Dundee, has been sunk. The soaeter and nine of the crew were landed. Th,e English smack Hum fries, f rolu Crimshy, bus been sunk. After drifting about for tiv-e hourt, the crcw were picked up. By-Product of War." Suicide who Apologised in Death. Remarkable letters were read at iu. quest at Westminster to-day on Sv.:o'id- Lieutenant Randolph Rae Smith, 13th Battalion Slienrood foresters, who com- mitted Suicide in Tavistock Hotel. A brother from Barrow-in-Furness sail A-,g,eased -expremea wieh 18 months ago that he were dead. Deceased had aN accident in infancy, and had been eccentric. l'urthcr evidence stowed .4 6hot was beard, and deceased was lound in armchair, with, revolve: at iiia ice- In apologising to the management for damage and for committing 6uicide in the hotel, he added, A man must have somewhere to die," and said v. hat he had done was. a by-product of the far. Burnt fragment of paper read. though I am damned to the nether- meet Nell,, clear one, yonr prayers ara more than you can tell."—(Proceeding). <