Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 6 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
36 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

The Icrttfon Office of the Cam- bria Daily Leader" is at 151, Fleef Street (first floor), whera Ii advertisements can be received up to 7 o'clock each evening for insertion in the next day's Issue. Tel., 2276 Central. j

Advertising

I The Cambria Daily I Leader gives later ) news than any paper i published in this dis- I trict. I

BADLY SHAKEN I ENEMY I

BADLY SHAKEN I ENEMY I GALICIAN FIGHTING I GERMANS CLAIM TO HAVE CAPTURED PINSK TERRITORY. r: RUSSIANS FALLING SACK Petrograd, Thursday.—Last night the Premier communicated to the Cabins .in Imperial Ukase proroguing the l/unia. The prorogation takes place to-day. The Premier conferred yesterday with the Inilitary and civil authorities of Petro- grad and Moscow, and at nine o'clock last night M. Rodzianxo, President of the Duma, called upon the l'remier. and was jntormed that the prorogation would last until the middle or November. Thpre is no disguising the fact that tine prorogation is most unpopular. The .Radical newspaper, Den." which has always been the Duma's severest critic, says: "The country was dissatisfied with the Duma. lint jt was her Duma, her mouthpiece, and the incarnation of her hopes and stvivngs."— Renter. After the suspensions of the Duma the Progressive Block held a meeting, at Aviii(-Ii the Cadel Deputy M. Ma kin koff. delivered a striking speech, emphasising the necessity tor the deputies not to sulk and not to dd. as they desired to ,10, the committees working tor the needs of the army. Other speakers lagged the deputies to keep absolutely calm, in order tllot to aggravate tlie situation.—-Reuter. More Men Mobilised. Petrograd. Thursday.—This morning a important Imperial Decree was pub- ^••shed calling out the second category of Entrained reserves. To-day's Russian Official. Petrograd, Thursday (received on Fri- c-.ciy)._The official communique issued to- night- says:— Jn the district south-west of Dvinsk wp Iepulsed on our wire entanglements re- I'llt,d German attacks between Dvinsk Ht ad and Lake ;nrnavay. Small detachments 01 German cavalry uea.- the railway net ween Molo- Utlriino and Polotzk, north-east. of Vilna. the enemy sueceedea in crossing to the let; bank of the A ilia. i ,)utli-east of (Jfany. Tlie Germans are attempting to leIO% the river Versovka, where it enters akf Tehorkay. Near the'village of Eismonty our troops ti, rov« the enemy back into the river, 111 the direction of Pinsk our troops are falilli, l back under the enemy's pressure. In the district of Nijnistochoz we ro- Pyiml an enemy attack against Ugri- l'tche. Badly Shaken Enemy. > he cn?my continues his counter-at- t ks in Derajno region, and en ft'fferent pa,t.s of our front in Galicia, badly shaken, tlw enemy is. seeking oy iHvse counter-attacks to consolidate 1116 L "-ition, but UK-SC attempts of the enemy. ,>n in the bept, circumstances, are only j'Jl lowed by small local successes, and our t1{)Ops continue to fulfil their tasks suc- cessfully. West of the village of Penoyki. in the b.rajn region, we took 410 prisoners and it;ur ma.bi i. glins. In the capture of a distillery and Cfmetery Ilea,- Lcrajno we look over hundred prisoners and four machine :1 116, and repulsed desperate enemy c'->u nter-at tacks. ear the frontier village of Nova Alexeretz, the town of Vichnevetz, and on t!lf' Strypa. west of the line Tarnopol-j ^tinboula, we are engaged in desperat-'j a<%tioas in many places against the enemy, V10 is clinging to the passeges of the] ai%,er Varna. Held Everything. i Lhp official commnnifj?jc 

HOtED OVER HUNDRED TIMESI

HOtED OVER HUNDRED TIMES. I Copenhagen. Wednesday.—The investi- Ration regarding the British submarine 1-13 proves that the hull was struck by «ver a hundred shots. A British crew is tx'-cupied in overhauling the vessel. A representative of "the Danish paper ( Politiken states that he -was informe:! tI.-ut the submarine be fore the wat" had twice passed Drogden and that the grounding on this occasion was du-e tv H misleading eonrpass. The submarine v stat»ned in the Mediterranean at th e outbT^pak of war, later perfm-ming Patrol servicv1 off Heligoland, where she Succeeded in sinking & GcinjUMt d^pti^er.

CREATION OF SALIENTSj

CREATION OF SALIENTSj MR. BELLOC ON CERMAN STRATECY IN THE EAST. THE RICA HALT Mr. Hilaire Bellnc's contribution to this week's number of Laud and Water is a minute examination of recent develop- ments in the Russian retreat—north of the Pripet marshes, and elserwhere. The immediate objective of the enemy, he says, is the north and south railway line from Riga through Vilna, Lida junction, and Itovno to Lemberg; the ulti- mate object cannot be decided, for the rumple reason that the enemy does not know it himself. The command of no I force proceeding so tentatively and amid such groping, cannot look far ahead. While by no means a single system, the continuous communication from Riga to Lemberg is strategically one thing. The value of its possession to the enemy is. of course, in tlie ability to move troops from one part o; the front to anther when he prposes to begin the invasion of Russia proper—is. in reality, necessary either to an advance or a defensive. Having (>ointed out that the munitions advantage is still with the Genfral Powers, but that the prolonged rearguard actions have de- pended upon a persona l superiority of the Russian over the Austro-German soldier. Mr. Belloc argues that the enemy can always at certain determined and re- stricted points and at certain intervals of time, compel a Russian retirement by the eoncentration. there of heavy artillery, and checking the Russian counter-offen- sive with a vast numerical superiority in •machine guns. The Most Anxious Moment. I The creation of salients by this means has been the method of the enemv since Ma,v 12th. with the object of surrounding Armies—and with that success. The Orodno salient provided the most anxious [moment of the ?t-f?t r?trpat since Przemysl. Th? army in th? ca?p wa? ?vcd. like ? many oth?r. through t!? immobility imposed npon the enemy by the very advantage in heavy artillery on which he absolutely depends. While the Grodno eiTort was in progress, south of the Marshes, Mackensen's force was try- ing to create another salient, compelling the retirement of the whole, but the Russians' counter stroke accounted for something lilie a division in enemy prisoners, nearly all the heavy guns of a ■German division, but only nineteen field pieces. The reasons for the Riga halt are un- known here.

IAN AUDACIOUS RAIDI

I AN AUDACIOUS RAID I AUSTRIAN USE PSUSSIC ACID BOMBS AGAINST ITALIANS. Rome. Thursday (received on Fridav).— The following communique is issued by the Headonarters Staff. Our mountain detachments on the 14th made scuno bold incursions against enemy ixwiitioiis on the Cresta Villa Corna (3,02t metres), at. the head of N'oee If, orrqnt and C-oucadi ^ix^t'cn?., in Val di Genmva. overcoming the grave difficulties presented by the nature of the country, including the glaciers, with skill and a Aur Alpine troops reached the enemy's entrenchments, attacked them. and partlv destroyed them, afterwards returning to tbjnr positions without being in any way disturbed. On the rest of the front there has been no event worthy of special mention. Chemical examination of the high ex- plosive bombs, whI e-li for some days the enemy have been throwing against our lines on Cargo, has. revealed the presence of large quantities of prussic acid. An aeroplane yesterday made a raid into the territory of Vieenra. throwing fiom a great height n h.omh upon Aiag-e I and eight bombs upon Vicenza. material damage was very slight. A nurv ber ûfpersolls were slightly injured. (Signed) Cadorna.

I BOOKS FOR THE TROOPS I

BOOKS FOR THE TROOPS. I The Cambria. Daily leader book list now stands at 5.500, which means that that number of volumes from our readers have rear-hen. or are on their way to, oar brave lads in khaki. T

WELSH PIT DISPUTES I

WELSH PIT DISPUTES. I The men t) Lady Lewis pit, Ynishir. who struck work on Thursday oving to a dispnto of hauliers regarding over- time, met the colliery agents on Th 1) l'ria, night, -,uith the result that work was innuerliatoly re-started. The strike, as regards one union at the Standard Collieries, Ynishir, continue, but the influences tending to terminate the stoppage are strengthening, and the strikers will probably be prevailed upon to resume work. The. question of the federation's attitude towards other organisations is being dealt with by the Executive.

HOW PECOUD DIED

HOW PECOUD DIED. Rotterdam. Thursday.—^The Berliner Citisen publishes a letter to his father from. Walter Kandulski, the Qernian air- man who fought the duel with Pegoud, which end-ed in the gallant Frenchman's death. Ka-ndulski writes: I hare han air bottle with Pegond. I can ass.ire you I Has obljged to lie well on guard. Scarcely bad I left the. Preniii 7.one of fire when a French machine ap- pioaclied. A fight took ee at a height of 7,800 feet. When we drew alongside my observer. Lieutenant Bility, began firing our machine gun. In tin*, meantime Pegoud approached to within lfiO feet. 1 turned mv machine with shoop curve to the left, thereby making imMe the escape of my opt." J

rRUMANIA MAY JOIN IN

r RUMANIA MAY JOIN IN. GERMAN RUMOURS EHVER PASHA'S REMARKABLE SPEECH TO ARMY. BULGARIA'S POSITION Amsterdam, Thursday.—Duke Johann AlbrecJ}t ,1' Me'" lenburg, the Kaiser's envoy to Bukharest, Sofia, and Constanti- nople. has now left Turkey for Berlin. While in Constantinople the duke saw the remains of the Turkish army parading under Enver Pasha. After parade Enver delivered a speech contain- illg the following striking phrases:— The presence here to-day of vour Highness we take as a definite promise of the early arrival of the great German armies, which we expect with hopeful joy." The Echo Beigecorrespondent at Rome has interviewed an Italian Consul who is just back from Turkey. The Consul states that the Turkish army is at the point of complete exhaustion in men. officers, munitions, and supplies. Tho officers keep the men going hy pro- mising them that a great army of Ger- mans anri Aut;tria 'I" commanded either by the Kaiser or the Crown Prince, is coming any da.r to relieve them. Rumania Rumours. Copenhagen, Thursday.—Tbe German newspapers have this morning and to- night twen allowed to publish sensational teiegrams intimating that Rumania's participation in the war may be ex- pected any i)-itnute.-Exeliange Entente Reply to Bulgaria. Athens, Wednesday (delayed).—The reply of the Entente to 13iilgikria was de- livered yesterdav,Ex(-)iir)ge. The New Frontier. Athens, Thursday.—It is reported from Constantinople that an Imperial Irade ratifying tlx* Turco-Bulgariun Agreement will be issued on September 26. The new frontier will. it is stated, be traced by German staft officers.—Renter.

THE BILLION DJLLAR LOAN

THE BILLION DJLLAR LOAN GERMAN SCHEMES GOING AWRY IN AMERICA. New York, Thursday.-fReports from all sections of the country are favourable as to the prospects for the floatation of tiie billion dollar loan." Ag-itation by the extreme pro-German section to pre- vent < icrman-American bankers from par- ticipating already seems doomed to failure, and the Anglo-trench Commission begins to see the accomplishment of its work in the United States. It is confirmed to-day that, quite a number of influential banking houses commonly regarded as German-American, hare signified their wish to participate, and wherever ther can prove the sincerity of their desire, free from factious aud ulterior motives, they will he allowed to do so. On the other hand, the real Ameri- can financial institutions are showing a keener support for the loan on account of the agitation, for nobody resents the attempt of German agitators to unsettle American condition? and usurp control of American affairs more than the financiers oi the country.

FRENCH LINER ASHORE

FRENCH LINER ASHORE Paris, Thursday.—The 'Petit JournalV correspondent at Marseilles states that the French liner Euphrates (? Euphrate) has gone ashore on the steep coasts of the island of Soeotra in the Indian Ocean. The passengers and crew were rescued by a Brit'sh vessel, which- brought them to Aden.—Renter. [The Euphrate is (or was) a MA««:I- geries Maritimes liner of nearly 7,000 tons. ]

THE WANDERING DANESI

THE WANDERING DANES. Two Danish seamen, John Jensen (23), ( and Henry Petersen (20), firemen, wore charged at Swansea Police Court, on Fri- day that, being aliens, they werf found in a prohibited area without the per- mission of tlie Aliens Officer. P.O. (19) Jones proved the case, and defendants were ordered to pay 20s. each and the interpreter's fee. Tlie magistrates present were Mr. H. A. Chapman (in the chair), Aid. Devonald. and Councillor Griffiths.

JUPITER AS A ZEPPELINI

JUPITER AS A ZEPPELIN I Jupiter, which is just now about 368 million miles awax, has recently been rising in the east or south-east shortiv after sunset and has frequently h"n mis- taken for t]w lig-h? carried by an enemy a?rop?an<' or Z<'p?tin. If has been a common thing in some parts of the coun- try to see people standing in groups watching the star. They have called others from their homes, while those who have been gifted with good imaginations have frequently been heard to declare that they could see the ligJht moving. I

WOMANS CRY FOR HELPI

WOMAN'S CRY FOR HELP I A woman's cry, H Help Help!" from a window of a fourth story flal- in South- grove-buildingx. Mile End-road, E., on. Thursday night caused consternation among the neighbours, who quickly con- gregated in the court 60ft. below. H If there is any woman down there with any woman in her she will save my I baby/' shouted the distressed woman. Mrs. Cartwright, the tenant of o. f.11. The people in five area rushed for a. blanket, thinking tha,t a fire had broken out in th? woman's flat. Mrs. Cartwright appeared at a tiny seullery window and threw her child, aged tiro yeans, into file blanket. A moment later, Mrs. Cartwright fell into the court, receiving such serious in- juries that she died in a few minutes. The child, very slightly injured, is at present, in the London Hospital The neighttonra arc, unable to account for Mrs. Cartwrigbt's erieg of alarm-

SUBMARINE LOST itfhn

SUBMARINE LOST itfhn TURKS CLAIM TO HAVE SONK E 7. j I i SEVENTH VESSEL CONE Press Bureau, Thursday, 5 p.m.—Thp Secretary of the Admiralty makes the following anDOUIlCellltlit: The enemy claims to have sunk sub- marine E 7 (Lieutenant-Commander Archi- bald D. Cochrane, R.i off the Dar- danelles, and to have taken three officers and 2.5 men of the crew prisoners. As no news has been m-eived from this submarine since the ,I'1. September, it. must bo presumed that this report isi correct. E 7 is the seventh British submarine to have been lost since the war began. and the third in the Dardanelles. The others in Ans- tra lian waters. H (800), in a bay on the German coast, D5 (.?n). mined in pursuit after East Coast raiders. ? 15 (800). ran ashore in the Dardanel1e, and sub,bi- the B,-4?tish. AE 2 (800). ?'u)? by a Turkish warship in the Dardanelles. 7". 13 (MOO1, run tshorp on Danish island and at.tacked b.v a German torpedo boat. Built three years ago, the E 7 displaced 800 tons, and was fitted with tour torpedo tubes, and two 3-inch guns. She carried nornufJly 25 officers and men, so that, all have probably been saved.

I NAVYS WHOOP OF JOY I

NAVY'S WHOOP OF JOY I- A JMIRAl BEA TTY TALKS OF "BARCINC ABOUT. Vice-Admiral Sir David Beatty, speak- ing after his wife had opened a naval in- stitute on Thursday, said More than a year ago we started this war in the Navy with a whoop of jov. We were at last to put to the proof thvi weapon upon which we had spent many weary years in perfecting, the weapon UJKUI which many thousands of distin- guished men had given their lives in making efficient, and we eongra tula ted ourselves upon the opportunity which was thrown into our hands to prove to the world that the British Navy was an abso- lutely incalculable factor. We startpd full of promise of what we were about to do, but the promise has fallen away. We thought, that we were- going out to foliov in tbe footsteps of the heroes of one hundred years ago, but wii^t has been the resu lt P We havp barg'nl about the North Sea —(laughter)—rajssinj mines and dodging submarines, and our patrol vessels have kept our harbours iritact." In the meantime 'hey had been able to read in the newspapers the glorious deeds done by our fellows all over the world. He thought ever; TIP va l officer would agree with him flat in such circum- stances the cheerfulness of the men had been utterly wonderful. (Cheers).

I REAR LIGHTS FOR CYCLES

REAR LIGHTS FOR CYCLES It is understood that ste]>s are" to be taken immediately to enforce the Home Offi-re regulation that cveles and other vehicles shall carry a red rear light.

I RUSSIAS GREAT BURDEN

I RUSSIA'S GREAT BURDEN Petrograd. Thursday.—The number of British casualties telegraphed here do i.ot represent one-tenth of those sustained by Russia in proportion to the popula- tion. Russia is bearing the burden of the war as expressed in actual loss of life in the ntio of 20 to compared with Great Britain.

METZ SERIOUSLY DAMAUDI

METZ SERIOUSLY DAMAUD. Berne. Thursday.—A neutral just re- turned from Alsace-Lorraine, says that the damage done at Metz by the French airmen last week was serious, although the extent cannot be ascertained. The Germans rport17 persons injured, of whom three have ince died. Owing io the frequency of aerial raids in Alsace lately, the inhabitants are making bomb- proof holes in the ground for protection.

WELSHMANS CRUEL DEATHI

WELSHMAN'S CRUEL DEATH I A shocking accident, occurred at Sum, near Pwllheli, on Thllrday, whicb proved fatal to a firni twrvittil. employed at Carreg Farm, named Evan Jones, aged 40, living at. Llwynddwyifordd. Whilst he was driving a cart with two horses the animals ran away at a great speed, and the cart went over the unfor- tunate driver, killing him on the spot. He leaves a widow and three children.

PREMIERS GUARD OF HONOURI

PREMIER'S GUARD OF HONOUR. I When the Prime Minister left Downing- etreet on Thursday afternoon on his way to the House of Commons he found a guard of honour posted outside the door of No. 10. consisting of about a dozen wounded soldiers in hospital blue. The men all came to the salute as the Prime Minister appeared, and. as the car moved off the members of the novel guard of honour removed their caps and cheered lustily. Mr. Asquith was quite unprepared for the demonstration, and was evidently greatly pleased.

HERO OF SIDI BRAHIMI

HERO OF SIDI BRAHIM I Paris, Thursday.—Bugler Rolland, the last survivor of the Rattle of Sidi Brahim, has just died at. the age of 94. Paris feted ihis old hero a few months before the war at a banquet. at which there were 1,000 guests, presided over bv the President of the Republic. Sent, to Africa, he took part in the Battle of Isly. On September 25th, 1843, he was taken by surprise with his com- pany near Sidi Brahim. A Mel Kader gave him the order to sound the retreat, but Rolland, in a moment of bravado, sounded the charge, routed the Arabs, and saved the sit tiatdon.-Exeizangs.

LOCAL TRAGEDIES

LOCAL TRAGEDIES DEACON KILLED BY I STEAM ROLLER UPLANDS LADY FOUND WITH THROAT CUT. A i^ruesome tragedy that occurred on Friday morning has cast quite a gloom over the Llansaml^t and Skewcn district. The victim, John Walters, was 51 years of age, a collier, living at Lonlas, Llan- enmift. It appears that at 8.311 this morning de- ceased, after watching the Glamorgan County Council 6team roller at work for some timp. suddenly went right in front of it as it came towards hira. Before any- thing could be done in the way of stopping it, the roller had passed over his head. crushing it to an unrecognisable pulp, death, of course, being in- stantaneous. Mr. Walters was held in high esteem in the district. ii.D..ti was a deacon of Ebenezer Chapel, in addition to which he had done much useful work in connection nitb local public movements. Latterly he had suffered a good deal from depres- sion. An icquest will. of course, be held- as. UPLANDS LADY'S FATE J I FOUND DEAD IN BED WITH THROAT CUT- A shocking discovery was made at the T plands. Swansea, on Friday morning, Miss Sarah Emily Hicks, of 25, Panty- gwydr-road, I)eiTIg found dead in her bed- room with her throat cut. Aged about 50, the deceased lady was a member of a very old and well known Swansea family. A niece lived with her, and there was a lso a gentleman boarder in the house. When tho tragic news became known in the district it caused quite a sensation. The facts havo been communicated to the coroner, and an inquest will be held. No cause to which, the lady's tragic I fate could be ascribed is known at the time of writing.

I SWANSEA MAGISTRATES MOTHER

I SWANSEA MAGISTRATE'S MOTHER. I We regret, to have to record the death of Mrs. Ann Thomas, of Glanynior, Joughor, the widow of Mr. Samuel Thomas, of the Broad Oak Colliery, and mother of Mr. Morgan J. Thomas, J.P., of Gwvdr Gardens, Swansea, and I- otigbclr. Mrf. Thomas, who had been ill for a considerable timp, died on Friday. Slio was an estimable lady, and was held in .the highest esteem by all at Loughor.

I EXARMY OFFICERS TRIAL

I EX-ARMY OFFICER'S TRIAL The trial of Richard Gorges (42), a retired army officer, charged with the murder of Alfred Youn. a detective, by shooting bim with a revolver at Hamp- stead on July Itth, was commenced on Fridav, before Mr. Justice I»w, at the Old Bailey. Prisoner pleaded not guilty. Mr. Cecil Whiteley, in. opening the case, dwelt, upon the circumstances of the alleged crime, which are flow well-known.

IFRENCH WAR EXPENDITURE

I FRENCH WAR EXPENDITURE Paris, Thursday.—The Chamber re- sumed its sitting to-day. Probably the most important business will continue ;.0 be done in the secrecy of the Standing Committees. M. Ribot in his Budget statement calculates the expenditure from the beginning of the war to the end of this year at about £ 1,200,000,000 sterling. The present monthly average is rather larger than that of ltijesia, and markedly less than that. of Germany and England.

EAST AFRICAN CAMPAIGN

EAST AFRICAN CAMPAIGN The following statement regarding the operations in East Africa was issued by the War Office on Thursday night:— Ou Tuesday last a strong enemy patrol was surprised eight miles south of Maktau by 60 British and 100 Indian in- fantry. After a sharp tight. the enemy fled, leav- ing one white and 31 natives dead on the field besides wounded. Our casualties were three dead ;,nd eight wounded. Many rifles, much ammu- nit.ion, and all kit were captured hy our I men.

BROAD SHEETS FOR THE TROOPS I

BROAD SHEETS FOR THE TROOPS I The second butch of the admirable I Times" broad sheets for enclosing in parcels, letters, etc., to soldiers, has just, j been issued, and it is sufficient to sav that the excellent standard set in the previous lot if maintained. It will be i'f- m?mbM-ed that at six for 1d. 1 he object is to ?iv" our men snatches of the best of EngUsh lit?T-at?r? that can he read in j spare- moments, and how varied and de-i lightfnl the snatches are can be judged by| the fact that, among others. Shakespeare, Sterne, Scott, Milton, Herrick, Win.1 Morris, Shelley, Ben Jonson, Goldsmith, .Addison, and Dickens are represented.

I EXTINPLATE MANACER IN TROUBLE I

EX-TINPLATE MANACER IN TROUBLE. I At Carmarthen on Friday, Arthur D. Leyshon, who stated he was a retired tinplate manager, was charged with being drunk and disorderly and with as- saulting the police. P.8. Jones said that on the previous night defendant created a disturbance in Guildhall-square, and when requested to go away, said, I don't care a fur you, or anyone else," Later witness had to eject him from the Half Moon Hoto], and outside defendant struck him with his umbrella. Defendant, who denied the charge, asked for the case tu be adjourned. 11 p had travelled all over the continent and Russia, and America, and this was the first time hp had ever been in trouble. The ease was adjourned until Monday, bail being allowed.

THEWAR

THEWAR Resume of To-day's Messages. I Leader" Office 4 50 p.m. I The German advance in Pinsk district continues, and the Russians arc falling back. In Galicia. however, the Russian* are maintaining their advantage. The Russian Duma has been prorogued, although this course has created dis- satisfaction. The second category of I untrained reserves have been called up. In Parliament Mr. J. H. Thomas pro- tected against compulsory national ser- j vice, and threatened social revolu- tion if it was attempted. According to to-day's Italian official news, the Austrians ate using shells contain- at4e u,? i-ii, L?lielis contain- ing Prussie acid, P  I The story of the total destruction of th? Hus?-ian ar?pnat at 

IPOLITICAL RUMOURS j

I POLITICAL RUMOURS j LOBBY TALK OF A COMING CRISIS • I .\h. P. !('h(llsollh(> L"!nh- I:ü:rres-I pondent of the "Daily News and Leader." [ asserts that among th?Ministpr? in th Cabinet, who favour national .Elpi-vier- and he alleges that these are Lord Cur- zoo, Lord Lansdowne, Mr. Lloyd George, Mr. Churchill, Mr. Bonar Law, Mr. Walter Long, Mr. Austen Chamberlain, Lord Selborne. Sir Edward CarROn-are some who, failing to get agreement on their policy, a failure which the corres- pondent. declares is to be assumed, since the majority are against them, intend to precipitate a Cabinet crisis by the re- signation of their offices. This they mean to do in order to force a General Election on the issue of eomr aloory r-I vice. The Times says in its political notes that Mr. Thomas's hint of the I possibility of a General Election, was the first open reference in the Chamber to a matter which has been the subject of much discussion and some speculation in the lobby since the Houw resumed. It is understood that the Cabinet has not yet decided upon an amendment of thA Parliament Act, postponing the appeal to the country which is fixed by statute for I January next at the latest." I

I RUSSIAN ARSENAL EXPLOSION I

I RUSSIAN ARSENAL EXPLOSION I I TOTAL DESTRUCTION OF MUNITION WORKS DENIED I We are in a position to give to the public (saysthe London "Star") the truth about, the explosion in the Russian powder works at Ochta, as to which so many exaggerated report? have recently been current. The climax bas been reached by an Am?nr an npw?paper which narrates that rt?ar?y all th. Russian arsen a^ and munition factories were set 1 on fire or dynamited to t'heir very founda- tions by the German-IIussians Vho had obtained entrance to Russian business and industrial life. The facts are that the explosion oc- curred at. one out: of several Rus-sian munition works, and in only one depart- ment. It. was a great disaster, but it is not true that Russia had put most of her eggs in a single basket." It is not true that the works at. Ochta were blo-wn up by a series of tremendous explosions which shook St. Petersburg as in an earthquake," killed thousands of trained workmen, and destroyed nearly all the munition plant. The explosion occurred towards the end I of April and the damage was made good in a month.

I CURATES WIFE A SPYI CURAIES FE A SPYI

CURATE'S WIFE A SPY  CURAIES 'FE A SPY I DARLINGTON WOMAN SENT TO I PRISON. Mrs. Luise S. C. Herbert, wife cf a curate of St. Luke's Church, Darlington, was at Darlington yesterday sent to prison for six months in the first class on charges of espionage under the Defence of the Realm Act. It was stated by Mr. La timer, who prosecuted, tbat the accused's husband, the Rpy. Edward Herbert, was formerly a missionary in India and was a British subject. His wife's parents were of German origin. Mrs. Herbert went to live in Darlington in January last at 11. A?acin-?trGpr, and employed a gi-rl named Dorothy Stephen- son as a day girl. On August 20 she asked the girl alxiut a factory, what sort of material was being mad,1, and whether she knew anyone employed there. The girl replied that she had a relative en- gaged there, and the accused then sug- gested that it would be easy for the girl to get information. She further asked whether certain articles were being made at certain works. The accused also tried to get informa- tion from Mrs. Stephenson, whose hus- band was employed at the works, and also tl)e location of a factory, and whether or not big guns were made in the town. I On August 30. when the accused was asked by a detective to go to see the police superintendent, she had the addresses of a number of Germans in her satchel. A I sketch of streets where soldiers were quar- tered was also found.

BUDGET SECRETSI

BUDGET SECRETS. I I At the Cabinet Council on Thunsdav Mi nisters put the finishing touches to t.11 e. Hudget to be introduced on Tuesday next. The Chancellor of the ENchequer'? secret is being well kept, hut the general im- pression is that the chief feature of the financial statement will he a substantial increase of the income-tax and of the duties on such articles as wines, tea, sugar and tobacco. Assuming that the extra revenue needed is. say. £ 100,000,000, direct and in- direct taxation will be called upon to contribute about equal proportions.

Advertising

ANOTHER SPY SHOT. A report cf the shooting of another spy will be found on Page fi" VIOLENT CANNONADE. Paris, Friday—The following coln. munique was issued this afternoon:— In Artoi6, between Angres and Southey, and on the south of Arras, our batteries, in reply to the enenn s firing, violently cannonaded his works and supplies. Between the Solum.' and the Aisne fusilading from trench to trench is re. ported, as well as a certain activity ca the part of the. German heavy artillery, to "hkh we. energetically replied. In the region of Sapigneul, and bo t-vccu the Aitnc and Ar;onne the artil- lery and bomb fighting continued during Tj; t of the night. There is netting to rep.v, iho rest of the front. Llartnndock' .i'e ITerbe;i .>Jorgan, Fiiairoae a >< r,e, LlPligaui >ck, Li re, left estate of fl:e gross value of 15*. Sd. Railway Workers' Wage Advance. The Committee on production have now issued their "n q, applica- tion of the Aliico Join* Trades Com- mittee for an advance in wages of is. on weekly rates and 10 per cent, on piece- work rates to the wen employed in the 1-Koruotive and repairing shops of the London and Sout h- W estern Railway Co. Tlie arbitration took place ten days ago. The arbitrator's award grants an increase of 3s. to weekly workers "ud 7: per cent, to piece-workers. The Harbour Guarantee. A meeting of Swansea Finance Com- mittee with the representatives of tie Coroporation on the Harbour Trust, was held on Friday for the purpose of appointing a committee to meet a com- mittee of the Harbour Trustees, to die- cuss the relations between the two bodies with references to the Corpora- tion guarantee. Mr. H. Maedonnell presided. Five members were appointed from the Finance Committee, viz.:— I Tin3 Chairman and A ice-Chairman Messrs. H. Macdonncll and W. W. Holmes), and Aldermen n. Miles and J. Devonald, and Mr. Percy Molyn- rux. The Corporation on the Harbour Trust were appointed cn bloc. Newmarket Meeting. Betting: 4 to 1 Waynficte, 5 to 4 Sharp Frost. 2.30—GTJM SHOE 1. NEWLAY ?. DIADU- ?.IENOS 3.-T-welve ran. Betting: 10 to 1 Gum shoe 100 to E Kewlay, 6 to 4 Diadumenos. 3.0—MELUSINE 1, EOS 2. LADY COLIN J. Eleven ran. Betting: 6 to 1 Melueine. 7 to 4 Eos, 5 to 1 Lady Colin. 3.30—KHEDIVE III 1, ANGUILLA 2. CARANOHO 3.-Five ran. Betting: 3 to 1 Knedivo 111. V?" J; V  ,i¡'  ? ? J- A