Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
28 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

—————— The Cambria Daily Leader gives later news than any paper published in this dis- trict. L_ _?__?.?.?  J

Advertising

I The London Office of the "Cambria Daily Leader" is at 151, Fleet Street j (first floor), where adver- tisements can be received up to 7 o'clock each evening for insertion in L d the next day's issue. Tel. 2276 Central. j t ———— 1

GREEK TROOPS IMOVING

 GREEK TROOPS MOVING. Bulgaria Declares 3ulgaria Declares War. SERBIA ACCUSED OF PRE- CIPITA TING HOSTlUYibS. Aliios' Generals Arrived. Bulgaria has declared war on Serbia and has informed Greece that Serbia fired the first shot. Bulgaria's purpose is unquestionably to influence Greece Dot to go to Serbia's aid under the treaty of alliance, which is a defensive one. Italian aid in the Balkans now ap- pears certain. The French Premier an- nounced yesterday that he had reason to believe that Italy would not remain apart from her Allies in the action they were taking to assist Serbia. Fn- official messages from Rome definitely support this view. Brigadier-General A. B. Hamilton. C.B., has arrived at Nish, and the French Commander-in-Chief in the Orient, General Sarrail. has arrived at Salonika, where the continued landing of Allied troops ie being facilitated by Greece. Portions of the Expeditionary Force are stated to have already reached Macedonia. Official reports from Nish state that the enemy's advance is being made only by inche; and very slight suc- cesses are claimed by Germany. The Serbians admit the evacuation of Semendria. where the battlefield is covered with the enemy's deact." Greek troops are said to be moving in tens of thousands" towards the Bul- carian and Serhinn frontiers. P,,)me, Friday.The Corriere de la Berra learns from Bucharest. that Generals Mackense.n, Gallwitz and Eiehorn arrived at Belgrade on October Wlh. and took over the command of (ho army of 350.000 men inarching against Serbia. Tbp Germans attacked Belgrade with fcix divisions, and they are now awaiting the arrival of four more army corps. The Bulgarians have captured near Tom- l'ahnke seven Russian barges and three tugs Union with corn for Serbia. According: to the Kiimaninn newspaper, Dimineala." 20,000 Bulgarians, com- manded hv General Foschef, are ready to invade Macedonia to attack the France- British forces how on their way to Serbia from Salonika. The Bulgarian forces concentrated on the Serbian front is estimated to number 130,000. One half of tbe remainder of the Bulgarian army is on the Rumanian front, find the other half on the Greek frontier. •-Exchange. REASONS FOR WAR. Bulgaria's Amasing Excuse. Athens, Thursday. — The Bulgarian legation has been advised from Sofia that a Serbian column attacked the Bul- garians near K ustendi 1 and Trn. The casualties were, 70 killed and 500 wounded. Bulgaria declared war at S a.m. to-day. The Bulgarian Minister to-day officially informed M. Zaimis, the Greek Prime ■Alinister, of the fiiet.-Reitter. [Kustendil is near the frontier south- west of Sofia.] Sofia. Wednesday.—An official statement iOSlHxl here says: It is learned that the Government will protest to the Legations of neutral States against the violation of Bulgarian territory by Serbian troops."— 3?eut«r. Appeal to Bulgarian Troops. According to a telegram from Sofia, re- ceived here, via Berlin, General Jekow. Commander-in-Chief of the Bulgarian forces, has issued an army order an- nouncing his nomination as Commander- in-Chief and extolling the splendid vic- tories of the Bulgarian troops in Balkan wars, which wpre followed by such tragic disappointments. General Jekow expresses his firm con- fidence in the bravery and the spirit of Eacrifice of the troops entrusted to his command, who, he said. will make good the wrong done to the Bulgarian nation, and will he loyal to their historical task to the end. Lacking Munitions. Paris, Friday.—The Salonika corre- spondent of the "Echo de Paris" states that, according to information from a Reliable source, the Bulgarians are lack- ing munitions. In the event of unfore- seen circumstances preventing a junction of the Bulgarian Army with the Austro- Qerman troops. Bulgaria would soon ho Educed to a position similar to that in ^'hich Turkey finds herself at present The military supply depots hav not Efficient rifles to arm-more than 250,000 r4Qn, while several battalions are in Lilian dress, and resemble battalions of rrulars. Munitions are restricted, and scarcely 250 shells per gun. This .•nation, which is not a new one, is due 0 the appropriation of funds in time, of P^ace by agents appointed to purchase j^nitions. \ii the Balkanic wars Bul- jwia "as onb- ahlf to SUpplv two-thirds her available troops with ritles, and it ;;a5 stated "t the time that it was due to f'° dispatch of 100.MO Prussian rifles 1,iat sh "'a successful in equipping the "?p of her army.—Exchange. QRiEK TROOPS MOVING 1 me, Thnr;¡da)"Signor Magriui tc,le- ^,al)lls to from Salnnika tens of thousands of Greek soldiers ^■7 arrive and move towards the Bul- barian and Serbian frontiers.

IRUSSIANS AT ODESSA

IRUSSIANS AT ODESSA.! Geneva, Thursday.—The Rumanian, journal "UnivGnsul" ptat? that large numbers of Russian troops Withdrawn from Bp?aarabia have been concentrated at Odessa. I Losing 3,000 a Day. Geneva. Thursday.—A message from Bukbarest to the, Tribune de Geneve" states that south of Belgrade the German losses average 3,000 daily. Around Semendria the Serbians have forced hack the Germans to the Danube. The Serbians near Shaoatz destroyed a German brigade and took 1.000 prisoners. On the Serbo-Bulgarian frontier the I' ¡ SniJÎans re?n?d cv?rv attack, capturing south-east of Nish 2.000 Bulgarians. I PUT TO FLIGHT. Paris, Friday.—" La Petite Journal" states that. according to information re- ceived from Bukharest, the Russian Fleet has put four German submarines to flight from the port of Varna. I OFFICIAL REPORTS. I Amsterdam, Thursday.—To-day's Ger- man official report says:- Balkan Theatre of War.—South of Belgrade., our troops are further advanc- ing. We have captured the fortifications on the western, northern, eastern, and south-I eastern fronts of the strongly consolidated position of Pojarevatz. LPojarevatz, situated east of the Morava Riyer, b 8 miles south of the Danube and 65 miles, as the crow flies. from the nearest point of the Bulgarian frontier. Assuming that the success took place on Wed nesday, the German advance is at the rate of a mile a. day, for they crossed the Danube on Wed- nesday week.] I The Austrian communique issued on Thursday stated In the Serbian theatre of war our troops yesterday advanced from the regiftn of Belgrade to the south-pafit lint, of tho for tress and entrenched positions on the Erino Borders, Cunak Stawara line. The enemy, who, according to the statements of prisoners, had been ordered to the last man, fled to the Avala mountain Region and the legion to the east. His losses were extraordinarily h^avy. Our big artillery played as ever in such opera- tions a very great part, in the success. The attacks of our Allies on the lower Morava are also progressing favourably. They have captured from the enemy the fortifications on the western, northern and ci'stern front of Pozorevac.

I KAISER IN OILS I

KAISER- IN OILS I Emperor's Gift to General Von Kluck. Amsterdam Friday.—Acceding to the Vossisclie Zeihmg" on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of military ser- vice by General Yon Kluck, the Kaiser sent him the following telegram:—"With pride and satisfaction you can look hack on fifty years' service. In your I I yüuLh you took part in glorious wars, ami I j'l long years Of peace you devoted your-J eel: with indefatigable freshness to the de- N-elopme n, of the army, and last year you saw the fruits of your, activity in the heroic dt?ds of the troops entrusted to you. Above ni?. yon. at the head of an army, crowned life-Ions work with fine enroe&ses nutH iiononrable wonnds torf you from work. For aH the service you have rendered me and mv army T express to you mv heartiest congratulations, my fullest, acknowledgments, and my royal thanks. As an outward sign of my esteem I confer on you my picture in oils."

I I MORE GERMAN BRIBES

I I MORE GERMAN BRIBES Rome. Thursday.—I am informed that Germany is making two more diplomatic moves against us. one in Spain, where she is tempting the Conservative Cabinet, with the offer of Gibraltar and Morocco, and one in Sweden, where her bait, is Finland. Germany s eouhhon being that the two countries enter into th? European war at a moment convenient to her?If. and that Spain gives her that part of Morocco which she had marked as German at the hme of the Agndir affair.—" Morning Post."

I BAVARIANS PAY THEPENALTY

I BAVARIANS PAY THEPENALTY Paris. Thursday.—The fact that Prinr p Rupprecht of Bavaria had throe regiments of his finest, troops entirely wiped out in tho recent counter-attack shows that the Germans were prepared to make huge sacrifices to recover their lost g-round. M. Marcel Hutin. in tha E«ho de Paris," quotes an officer as saying that the fire of the French 75's and machine guns wa3 so precise that the French felt therusalves in absolute security, and actually climbed on the top of the parapets I to fire. The infantry embraced the :artillerymen, so elated were they with j their success

I TWENTY GERMAN SHIPS SUNK

I TWENTY GERMAN SHIPS SUNK Copenhagen, Thursday.—The submarine war in the Baltic is causing no anxiety in Danish .shipping circles, as hithertoNao Scandinavian vessel has been sunk, the British submarines being apparently fit"- termined to respect neutral vessels. Danish traffic to Bornholm and the Danish steam- ferry traffic from Gedser to Warnemunde is still maintained, hut, owing to the danger of mines, the ships are only run- ning by day. Presumably about 20 Gor- man vessels have been sunk in the Baltic since October (I. The. exact number is not known, as no reports arrive concerning crews landed at German ports. Forty Ger- man steamers had recently been engaged I in transporting ore from Lulea, Sweden, and 18 are known to be in the open sea.

IENGLISH COAL CONCILIATION BOARD

I ENGLISH COAL CONCILIATION BOARD I A meeting of j he English Coal Conciliation Board was held on Friday at the Westminster Palace Hotel, London, to consider an application j by the Miners" representatives for an in- crease of five per cent, in wages. p A preliminary meeting of the Miners' Federation of Great Britain took place in connection with the same subject, and it is expected that a statement will be issued at the cloi-e of meeting of the Con- ciliation Board. The meeting lasted three-quarters of an hour, and at the dose, it was officially stated that application was made i,' v, Mr. Walsh, on behalf of the miners, for an adtancf of 5 per (?(?nt. in w?iges, After some di?cossion, the meeting was ad- journed by agreement until October 28th for the employers to consider the case! ?,T)Ilt %*ward Ly the workmen.

MEN ADVISED NOI TO STOP I

MEN ADVISED NOI TO STOP I ANTHRACITE CRISIS DEPUTATION'S VISIT TO FEDERATION I COUNCil TO-MORROW S MEETING (By Our Mining Correspondent). r CARDIFF Friday. A special meeting of the Council of the South IValps i%tin,-r Federation was held on Friday at the Central Offices. St. Andrew's-erescent, Cardiff. The chair was occupied by Mr. James Winston, the acting president, and among those pre- sent weTe Messrs. T. Richards, M.P. (general secretary), J. Williams, M.P., .1. D. Morgan, and John .iauies (agents for the All tl-raeite District), and W. Jenkins, Port Talbot. Anthracite Deputation. Practically the whole of the morning was taken up with a consideration of the position in- the Anthracite area. A depu- tation, consisting of Messrs. John Harris (Ammanford), Griffith Williams (Bryn- aninian), and Morgan Morgan (Rock ('nUip)-y, Giyn Neath), waited upon the counril in order to explain the position takrn n p by the Anthracite workmen upon the question of the manner in which the coalcwuers are dealing with the standards. It was stated that instead of paying upon the standard of 50 per cent, upon the old 1879 standard, the owners had varied it hy paying to to 46 per cent, in. some cases, while in others the full amount. was paid. There t.-a.s a good deal of dissatisfaction in the district, and threats were made in several collieries that tools would be put down and work stopped if the owners did not pay in ac- cordance with the agreement. Unwise to Stop. Tn the course of the discussion sym- pathy was expressed with the workmen, ■Suit ultimately it was decided that Mfc-ssrs. Winston and Tom Lucas should attend tho special meeting of the Anthracite men to-morrow (Saturday) at Swansea, and express the view of the council that it would be unwise to stop work pending the inquiry by Mr Justice Sankey, which it was hoped, would be gone on with iiu- mediately.

IJAPANESE CORONATION

JAPANESE CORONATION Preparations for Crowning the Emperor. Preparations are being made for the coronation of the Emperor of Japan, which fakes place at Kyoto on November 10. Owing to the war and to the absence of adequate accommodation at Kyoto the Japanese Government is not inviting special representatives of foreign Govern- "i?npnts. b?t the members of the Diplomatic Bod yat Tokyo will lw present as Envoys Extraordinary. The State ceremonials will extend over a week, and will include a banquet of 2,700 covers in the old Talace of Kyoto.

I A WARNING

I A WARNING  'Ware the Crying Boy! A well-built lad of about 14 years has this week been seeking the sympathy of residents of Walter-road and neighbour- hood. He pitches a heart-rending tale— with variants. His father was the victim of a eevere accident. There are six starving children. His father and mother are dead. He has been without food for over 24 hours. Could the- kind lady buy a piece of lace, to keep the home going? In Ffynone-terrace on Thursday evening 11,. stated that he bad been without food since the previous evening. He gave an address at the Mumbles. He, cried until li, dissolved the hearts of one family, j Then they heard other tales, and made j inquiries. All that need be said to-day is that in- vestigations at the Mumbles do not sup- port his I ale-nid that the lad has come undpr the observation of the Swansea police, who have already cautioned him as to lu. conduct.

I BRITISH VICECONSULS DEATH

I BRITISH VICE-CONSULS DEATH Copenhagen, Thursday.—Mr. C. H. Fundi. M.V.O., the British Vice-Consul at Copenhagen, wa-s found dead in his home at Hellerup, near here, this morn- ing. He had been very melancholy for a long time. owing to ill-health.—Exchange Telegraph Company.

I THE KAISERS PARDON

I THE KAISER'S PARDON Berne, Oct. 12th (delayed).—The Swiss Political Department has received a COll)- munication from Berlin stating tint L'milc Dorflinger. a Swiss subject, who ^as sentenced to death for espionage as Mulhausen, has been pardoned by the Emperor, after the intervention of the Swiss Federal Council.—Renter.

SWANSEA AND COAL PRICES

SWANSEA AND COAL PRICES We understand that Swansea Sub-Par- lianfentary Committee are endeavouring to arrange n. meeting with the coal mer- chants for nexif week, when the prices of coal available for domestic, use will be discussed. The Home Consumption Sales Committee also have the matter under consideration, and the two committees will no doubt be brought into touch with each other.

CANADAS NEW DRINK LAW I

CANADA'S NEW DRINK LAW Ottawa, Thursday.—Tho Premier of Ontario, Mr. Hearst, last evening an- nounced that commencinsr November 1st until tho end of the war all ban? in the J'rovin('nof()?tnnowiHr!o?at8p.m. ii?tpad?fHa.satpf'??nt;. Clubs and ?hup? will h<'?mafFf?t?d. Fourteen hundred hotels will Iia-?-P their selling hours curtailed by three houis.—R-eutw

WARSHIP TORPEDOED

WARSHIP TORPEDOED BRITISH SUBMARINE ATTACKS CERMAN SQUADRON CRUISER STEAMS AWAY I Copenhagen, Friday.-I t is reported from Falsterbo, Sweden, that a British sub- marine attacked a German cruiser and two German destroyers which were watching the southern entrance of the Oeresund this morning. The submarine torpedoed one destroyer, which immediately went down with a great explosion. I The cruiser and the other destroyer fled j southwards.—Exchange. A lleuter's Copenhagen message says:— The National Tidendo learns that in a great fight between a British sub- marine and a German cruiser and three torpedo boats off the Isle of Niven, the submarine torpedoed a torpedo boat, which sank. Other German warships fled WORK OF THE E 19. I Copenhagen, Tuesday.Survivors of the torpedoed German steamers con- tinue to arrive at Swedish ports. The captain of the steamer Moerthas states that he met Submarine E 19, whose captain said he had just torpedoed four German steamers. A telegram from Mocen states that a British submarine torpedoed a German torpedo boat, which sank immediately. Later, German cruisers patrolled the waters, but fou nd-iothing.-Exchange. NAVAL FIGHT OFF FINLAND. One Cruiser Reported to Have Been Sunk. Stockholm, Thursday.—A message to the Aftonbladet from the frontier states that a naval fight has taken place in the Gulf of Finland at I'orkala, not far from Helsingfors. One cruiser is reported to have been sunk and another heavily damaged. A Zeppelin raid is reported on the Fin- nish coast in the Gulf of Finland, causing a fire. t L.

AUSTRIAN SURPRISE FAILS j

AUSTRIAN SURPRISE FAILS Alert Italians Sweep the Foe Back. Rome. Thursday. A communique issued here to-day says:-On the Nirzli (Monte Nero) hostile forces yesterday evening attempted a sudden attack c i pn attack against our positions, but failed with ile.ax-Y losses. On the Carso on Tuesday afternoon the pnemy, after a violent art illery and rifle ihrf. accompanied hy the throwing of I numerous hand grenades late at night. attacked our.positions east of Monfalcone. Before the firm attitude of our troops and mown down bv our effective fire, the enemy's infantry t'Hl back in disorder on their line, leaving on the ground nume- rous bodies. We a lso took some prisoners.

ITHE BALKANS PROBLEM

THE BALKANS PROBLEM I Mr. Hilaire Beiloc on the Probabilities. Mr. Hilnire Bflloe. writing in the cur- rent issue of "• Land and Water," on "The New Balkan Factor," says the enemy's problem of controlling the rail- way to Constantinople is the problem of clearing and grasping the north-eastern earner of Serbia. An attack upon Serbia from the north, even if made with the full force calculated as necessary (not less than 500,000 men) would have a very i difficult task with winter approaching, ft has one line of easy advance, the lower | valley of the Morava, with its railways, for the first few days, after which -the road grows narrow, and after the first week's march becomes mountainous, while, on the rest of the front difficult mountain country with no roads begins st once. But the enemy is attacking with much less than the minimum number required for success. He lias not the half-million, but at the utmost a quarter, on the Belgrade-Orsova front, and is attacking w hen, his Reserves of men are very near exhaustion. But the Bul- garian Army can immediately mass forces upon the north Serbian frontier alone of over 150.000, and it would ap- pear unquestionable, that under a pres- sure of forces, whose total is not only double their own but converging from two rectangular fronts, the defence of the all-important line from Xish to Sofia and Constantinople must crumble. Being at the end of his reserves of men, the enemy is striking where he will have the most political effect. While, if the Allies can send and maintain an army sufficient to save Serbia, it would be amply worth while, though no decision was possible on this front. If the enemy got to Constantinople and equipped the Turkish forces lie would still not be I within a thousand miles of winning the war. Mr. Belloc cstimatea that the least number of men from the Allies that ivould turn the scale for Serbia would be 200,000. This figure would not com- mand a superiority, but it would prolong' the defence, and it would have effects exceedingly important at this crisis. It would give Bulgaria pause. The writer points out the problem of supplying such a force. rji

THE LORD MAYORS SHOWI

THE LORD MAYOR'S SHOW It was understood at the Guildhall on Thursday that the War Office had promised its support to the Lord Mayor and Sheriffs' Committee for the Lord Mayor's procession. An important featiire will be the presence of a number of men from the tranches, representing each of the City of London regiments.

No title

A Queenstown message says that, «n connection with the abandonment of the barque Saturnus in the Atlantic, it now transpires that the < row were rescued by the Wilson liner Colorado, bound to :,rull.

170 CASUALTIES I

170 CASUALTIES IN LAST LONDON AIR I RAID FIFTEEN SOLDIERS AND 41 CIVILIANS LOSE THEIR LIVES AIRSHIP IHA T HEELED OVER I The following appeared in our 6.30 p.m. edition on Thursday:— LONDON, Thursday Night. The War Oflica announces that hostile aircraft visited the Eastern Counties and a portion of the London area last night and dropped bombs. Anti- aircraft guns of the R.F.A., attached to the Central Force, were in action. An airship was seen to heel over on its side and drop to a low altitude. FiVe aero- planes of the Royal Flying Corps went up, but, owing to the atmospheric con- ditions, only one aeroplane succeeded in locating an airship. The aeroplane was, however, unable to overhaul the airship before it was lost in the fog. Some houses were damaged and several firee started, but no serious damage was caused to military material. All fires were soon got under by the brigades. The following casualties are reported: 1 MILITARY Killed, 14; [ Wounded, 13; in addition to the one announced last night. The Home Office announCe6 the follow- ing casualties other than military casual- ties reported above: C I V I LI AN S Killed: 27 men, 9 women, 5 children. Total, 4]. Injured: 64 men, 30 women, 7 children. Total, 101. Of these casualties, 32 killed and Of in- jured were in London area, and these figures include those announced last i night. ZEPPELON LOSSES. I Toll of the Vaunted I German Airships. Writing in the" Daily Telegraph," Mr. Archibald Hurd says:—As long ago as March of the present year Count Zeppelin admitted-in-a stafemerif published 4n—iW Const.inzer Nachrichten that during the first eight month s ot the war nine of his airships had been liist through various causes. The toll has since been increased. Some satisfaction is to be extracted from the following particulars of the losses which the enemy has sustained in airships of the rigid and other types: Zep- pel in Other Fate fonth. Air- Air- of 1914. ships, si-iips. flip Crew. August. 2 J 2 ki 11 12 prisoners Spptembpr. 1 3r2,t 81 Oct,)ber — — — November 1 1 ? December — 2 ? J 915. ,Taniiai-y 1 1 IB killed 7 prisoners Fel)rlmary O H 1 16 killed 27 interned March 2 -33 killed April 1 11 killed May 2 ] 40 prisoners June 2 ](+) 23 killed* July August 2 11 killed* 10 prisonere Sept 1-Sept 15 1 4 killed 126 killed Total. 17 M 138 prisoners 27 interned + Austrian airship. Estimate based on the regulation crew of a naval Zeppelin (!<>>, a. military Zep- pelin (12), and a Parseval (6). There is consolation in this record. which is based upon the official announce- ments made from time to time by the bel- ligerents. and on information obtained from neutral sources by the Scientific American/' whose intelligence resources are excellent. EFFECTS OF THE RAID. Commenting on the latest raid, the "Daily Chronicle" says: "The raid was notable in two respects. In the first place the attacking airships were decidedly numerous (the communique refers to them as a fleets In the second place the period of time. during which one or other of the invaders was bomb-dropping (and so court- ing detection and destruction), was; very considerable indeed. Moreover the night., in spite of a certain amount of fog over the Thames districts, was perhaps as clear as any autumn or winter night without a strong wind is likely to be. In these cir- cumstances the fact that all the Zeppelins escaped scot-free justifies a certain dis-I1 appointment." The Daily News cays: No part of the material damage inflicted, slight as in fact it was, was of a kind to diminish this country's capacity for carrying on the war," THE BERLIN REPORT. All the Airships Returned I Undamaged." Amsterdam, Friday.—A BerHn offic-ial1! telegram sa.' Our naval on the m?ht-oft October 13fh. attacked London's important establishments in the environs, nnd batteries af Ipswich. The City of London, which sustained several attacks, the London docks, the waterworks at Hamp- ton, near London, and Woolwich, were b'vishly bombarded with incendiary and explosive bombs. At all the places the gfeat efforts of the explosions and-big fires were observed. Tn spite of a vigorous counter-action which began when the airships reached the O-ea,t. all the airships returned un- da to aged. 'Signed'' Chief of the Admiralty Sftil

THEWAR

THEWAR Resume of To-day's Messages. "Leader" Office 4.50 p.m. Jyoss fts in Gallipoli announced by Mr. Tennant amount in killed, wounded, and missing to 96,899. Sir Johti French reports the use of gas r hy the British in Flanders in an attack in the capture of the J. trench of the Hohenzollern redoubt, and other important positions, j Bulgaria has declared war on Serbia. alleging that the latter began hostilities, j 1 o-day's news include rhe eoncentra- tion of Russian troops at Odessa, the! reported movements, of "tens of thono. ands of Greek soldiers towards ths Bulgarian and Serbian frontiers, and' the arrival of Brigadier A. B. Hamilton, C.B., and General Sarrail at Salonika. The raid on London and distric.t by a fleet of Zeppelins on- M-c-dnesday night! resulted in 41 people being killed and 101 injured. It is estimated from figxires obtained from authoiitative sources that! 27 Zeppelins and other dirigibles have been lost since the outbreak of war. A British submarine, it is reported from Sweden, attacked a German cruiser and two destroyers at the southern entrance! of the Oeresund, sinking one destroyer' and driving off the other warships. Attempted surpri-e light attacks by the Austrians against the Italians in Monte Nero completely failed. |

GALLIPOLI LOSSES I

GALLIPOLI LOSSES -0 96,899 CASUALTIES SUFFERED BY THE BRITISH. j t TURKISH CLAIMS I Mr. Tennant. in written answers to (jjueptions issued on -Fwfiav worning. i tai that the jy tjan Mnriitr- rancan Expeditionary Force up to Oct. 9tli, are: Killed or Died of Wounds. Officers 1. 1 So) Other ranh 17,77 Wounded, Officers 2. £ 32 Other ratik Missing. Officers 3S7 Other ranks. £ .7(V7 Total 9(;, Sf!:) Turkish Official. Amsterdam, !-nd..y.—An official rom- munique, issued ;ji Cioij-tantinople. says: Near Anatarta on Wednesdav our fire damaged an enemy aeroplane, which fell down east of Tuzlagocl and was finally ciestroyed by our artillery. N^ar Sedul Bahr our urtillory forced an enemy torpedo boat, which Fa? bombard- ing our left wing, to leave the Narrows. J LORD MILNER'S SUGGESTION, I Peers Discuss Dardanelles Campaign. In the House of Lords on Thursday the Marquis of Crewe, who made a statement on the Balkan situation similar to that of Sir Edward Grey in the Commons, de- precated discussion at the present junc- ture as being fraught with possible mis- chief. Lord Morley, however, commented gravely on the new campaign in Serbia, and suggested the danger of dissipating the national forces by intervention in the Near East. Lord Milner advanced on this. He put j forward the view that it would involve loss loss of prestige in withdrawing from the Dardanelles than would be the ease if the expedition should end in disaster. The Marquis of Lansdowne deprecated as unpatriotic this line of discussion :n face of a grave situation. Lord Mibier disclaimed the intention of suggesting that we should withdraw from the Pen- insula.

ITSAR GONE TO THE FRONT

I TSAR GONE TO THE FRONT I A Renter message states that after a short stay at Tsarskoe Selo the Emperor Ifft on Thursday for the front. The Tsarevitch accompanies his Majesty.

IFRENCH STEAMER TORPEDOED

I FRENCH STEAMER TORPEDOED The Messageries Maritimes steamer Yunnan has been torpedoed. The ship. however, did not sink. and the crow of 90 men were able to get off on the ship's boats and reach the neighbouring shore. There was no loss of life. The Yunnan is a steel twin-screw steamer of 6.474 tons, constructed in 1903.

PREMIER AND THE ANTIZEPPELIN SERVICE

PREMIER AND THE ANTI-ZEPPELIN SERVICE The Prime Minister, answering a ques- tion whether adequate steps have been taken for the protection against enemy aircraft of Westminster Abbey. St. Paul's Cathedral, the National (iallery, j the British Museum, and other great buildings, monuments and collections of national importance both in London and the provincos sa:v-- It would 1m1 manifestly impossible to take steps which would afford complete protection against enemy aircraft tn in- diyidual buildings "lWIt as those named, but the Office of Works has taken steps, in consultafion with the trustees of the Museums, to givo some measure of pro- tection. as also to some of the large pub- lie buildings. It is hoped, however, that the service, presided over by Sir Percy Scott, will deal effectively with any j further attempt at indisepmipat-e I struction of property.

Advertising

AIRCRAFT OVER HOLLAND. Zeppelin Trespassers Fired On Renter's Amsterdam mess-' age, dated yesterday, says: According to the Tele- graaf," a Zeppelin was ob- served this morning at Heer- len and another at Vaals, both going in the direction of Aix IF Hiapelle. Another Zeppelin came from south- west over Vlieland, nd two hours later another airship appeared from the south- east passing between the island of Vlieland and Ter- chelling. Both of t hese were fired on.- RUSSIA'S SUCCESSES A French ccmtnun^jue i-suc-d to-day by the Tress Bureau says: The llussian sueecsses continue to d'-vrl.ip iroiu Dvijisk down to 5,000 MURDERED BELGIANS. HaVre, Friday.—From official reports which have readied the Belgian Gov- ernment, it appear- that Prussian soldiers by the orders their duets, have at tllc- t ',I Belgium more than 5.000 civilians. ITALY'S BALKAN POLICY. Rome, Italia' states that Italy will not sodu any troops to the Balkans, but will cor- tinue to exercise pressure on Austria, „ which will be equally helpful to the cause of the Allies.—Exchange. Immorality at the Docks. Couu:iIlor W- J, Powlesiand's allega- tions that Swanfea Docks are becoming a hot bed of immorality were considered this afternoon at a conference of the Swansea Watch Committee with repre- sentatives of the Swansea Harbour Trust, at which the Chief Constable and the chief of the Harbour Polite were also present. Councillor Powlos- land's statement was considered, and it was didd that the Town Clerk and the Clerk of tli ? Harbour Truft. should prepare for presentation to the Joint Committee a report dealing with powers of supervision ûf dock property, aiter < ommunieating with the authorities in other porte. | j | i I i >