Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 10 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
35 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

i I The Cambria Daily Leader" gives later news than any paper published in this dis- trict. • ——.—

Advertising

The London Office of the "Cambria Daily Leader" is at 151, Fleet Street (first floor), where adver- tisements can be received I up to 7 o'clock each evening for insertion in d T the next day's issue. Tel. 2276 Central.

ACCIDENT TO THE h KING

ACCIDENT TO THE h KING. Thrown From His Horse. REASSURING BULLETIN TO-DAY. Press Bureau, Oct. 28. While the King was inspect- ing his Army in the field this morning, His Majesty's horse, excited by the cheers of the troops, reared up and fell. The King was severely bruised, and will be confined -to bed for the present. Latest Bulletin. Oct. 29.—The King has had a fair night, with some sleep. His temperature is 99.2, and pulse 75. His Majesty's general con- edition has improved, and no complictions have arisen. On Page Three we print a long story de- scribing His Majesty's visit to the Allied troops. To-day the King's horse, Friar Marcus, won the Queensbury Handicap at New- market.

TWELVE MONTHS ACO

TWELVE MONTHS ACO ] TVelv* months ago on Thursday the 6th Wolst Wt Swansea for fv second Territorial batfofcygfe^* land ;,p'1 that country.

A LASTING INSPIRATION I

A LASTING INSPIRATION A tribute to the memory of Lord Ninian Crichton-Stuart was paid by Colonel J. (raskell, V.D., at the quarterly meeting of the Glamorgan Territorial Association at Cardiff on Thursday. Colonel Gaskell said that the manner of his death was roch as everyone would hope for, long for, pray for. Lord Ninian's inspiration would remain. Colonel Gaskell moved a vote of con- dolence with Lady Ninian, which was ,carried in silence.

KAISER AT MEMORIAL SERVICE

KAISER AT MEMORIAL SERVICE Amsterdam, Frid;av.-According to a telegram to Norddeutsche Allgemefoe Zeitung' from Donai, the Kaieer was present on October 22nd at the unveiling of a monument at St. Quentin in memory of German and French soldiers who had -led of wounds in the army hos- pitals. The Kaiser was accompanied by the 'Duke of Brumwick, and was received at the entrance to the cemetery by Prince •Eitel Friednch.

A HUMANE PROJECTILE I

A HUMANE PROJECTILE I The father of a soldier in the Artillery received, a ew weeks ago, a communica- tion from hIS son's commasrffcLng officer stating that a shell had burst near the man, and that, as no trace could be found of hinl subsequently, it must be presumed that he was blown to pieces. The family had been in black for six wks, when .the father received a post- o-ird from h,3 son saying that he was alive and well, and a prisoner in Ger- many! The assumption is that the man was blown from the British trenches into those of the Germans, without a scratch! I

KIEL TRAMWAY CABLES CUT

KIEL TRAMWAY CABLES CUT Copenhagen, Thursday.-In order fo obt aiu coPP? the municipality of Kiell' has orderedhat the cable tramwav lines J in the less busy parts of the town shall be done a?'?y ?h. The brcalung up of js the !iHM 1 n three streets in the town has I been hp??' '? wbich 3,300 yards of cable six tons will be obtained for war < purposes. Further work of a similar nature is contemplated JIl other parts the -itv. It is expected that similar retrenchment fcxperiments will shortly be introduced in a number of large German cities.-Reuter. ]

A FEABlERSMANI

A FEABlERûSMAN I The "London Gazette announces that the King has been pleased to award the Victoria Cross to No. 6738 Lance-Sergt. 11 Oliver Brooks, 3rd Battalion Coldstream Guards, for most conspicuous bravery near Loos on October 8, 1915. A strong party of the enemy having captured 200 yards of our trenches,. Lance-Sergt. Brooks, on his own initiative, led a partv I' nf bombers in the most determined] manner, and succeeded in regaining pos- ( gession of the loet gronnd. The signal ( bravery displayed by this non-commis- eioned officer, in the midst of a hail of bombs from the Germans, was of the very first order, and the complete success at- tained in a very dangerous undertaking was entirely due t.) his absolute fearless- nesfi. presence of mind, and promptitude. Lnnce-Sergt. Brooks is a. son of "11". Joseph Brooks, ff Mid?omer Norton,  Somerset, a?d is 27 years of age. <

INURSE CAVELL

NURSE CAVELL I NATIONAL -MEMORIAL I SERVICE IMPRESSIVE SCENES AT ST. PAUL'S CATHEDRAL QUEEN ALEXANDRA PRESENT The memorial service to the late Miss Edith Cavell, held on Friday in St. Paul's Cathedral, London, was a remarkable de- monstration and tribute to one whose fate has aroused the deepest emotions of the resentment and horror among civilised peoples. A heavy pall of fog hung over the city and the suburbs in the early hours, but notwithstanding these adverse conditions crowds began to arrive before eight o'clock, and within a couple of hours long queues had gathered on the steps at the western doors. Besides the general public awaiting ad- j I mission "here were members of the ser- vices, nurses in uniform, and represenia- fives of the Women's Volunteer Jieserv\3» Khaki and naval dress was prominent, but the great majority of persons of both sexes were in deep mourning. The doors were thrown open at ten o'clock, and the free seats of the great building speedily filled. In its long history, the great national Cathedral has been the scene of many great functions, both of thanksgiving and of mourning for departed servants of the State, but on Friday morning it was im- possible to gaze on the faces of the vast congregation without realising that they were gathered together to give expression lo an intimate and personal sorrow. A Wonderful Gathering. Filling the nave from the dome to the western entrances, and closely massed in the north and south transept, the waiting congregation sat or kn(-,It-for hundreds occupied themselves -in private devotion. They were representative of every social grado of his Majesty's subjects, and of many professions and callings. There were large deputations from hos- pitals and institutions, and the nursing profession, to which the martyred woman belonged, was in strong force. There were to be seen here and there small groups of wounded men of our own Imperial Services, and other mourners wearing the uniform of the Allied troops. The official rlres gave touches of colour, but the prevailing tone, »*i"t:ecially of the general public, was black. The members of the Cathedral staff were for some time occupied in conducting ticket-holders to the seats, stretelung right and left near the entrance to the sanctuary. Here in an open reserved space below the ohoir was stationed [ the Band of the 1st Life Guards. The in- j strumentalists, who had discarded their scarlet full dress for service uniform, ap- propriately opened their programme with Schubert's Grande Marche Heroique," to the very effective arrangempnt of Mr. George Miller. This was followed by the minor tones of the Killed in Action lament from Somervill's Symphony in T). After these opening selections came j Vprdi's H Joan of Arc" overture, and a particularly impressive rendering of Mas.<;(>neU's Angelus." Miss Cavell's Sister. Mrs. Cavell, the venerable mother of Nurse Cavell, was. owing to her condition of health, unable to he present, but a seat had been reserved for her, and it was left unoccupied. She was rppresented by a. daughter, Mrs. Wainwright. Their Majesties the King and Queen were represented hy Mr. E. W. Walling- ton. Earl Howe attended on behalf of Queen Alexandra. The Premier was accompanied by Mrs. A lcl-Li i th. Lord Robert Cecil and Sir Horace Eumbold were from the Foreign Office, and also seated under the dome were the Secretary of State for the Home Office, the President of the Local Govern- ment Board, the Postmaster-General, and the President of the Board of Education. ?ir A. Keogh attended as representing the fWrefarv of tnte for War. The chfln-I cenor of the Exchequer and the Financial Secretary to the Treasury were unavoid- ably absent, but Mrs. McKenna and Mrs. Montagu occupied the seats allotted to these members of the Ministry, Lord Mayor's Procession. Ten minutes before the hour, as the last strains of Massenet's Angehis died the Lord Mayor's procession ap- moached. The great assemblage stood gvllile tho official representatives of the lit.. slowly traversed the nave from the western front. The party wore their scar let robes of office, and the mace was iiorne in front of Alderman Sir Vessey Strong, who was present as deputy chief magistrate owing to the absence of the Lord Mayor through indisposition. Mr. and Mrs. Asquith came in from the! south side of the choir as the band v,)ened, with a roll of drums. Clwoin's Marche Funeral," the triumphant notes )f which reverberates! tlu'oogh the nave uid aisles. This composition, whic). is Yfiquently heard at. St. Paul's, was a avouritc of the late Queen Victoria, who ■hose it or her own funeral obsequies, rhf; Life Guards' Band on tlw present sorrowful occasion gav1" it thrilling e-x- UMaion while tha entin' congregation itood. Queen Alexandra Present. Queen Alexandra was not only repre- sented, but at the last momnct Iler Majesty decided to be present in person, md was conducted to a seat specially re- served within the choir. It wa-s not vnown. to the general body of the congre- gation that Queen Alexandra was in their TIidsL "Cp to the hour of the opening of :h. service the scene in the thoroughfares xdjacent to the historic fane was a re- markable one. There were many hun- lTeds who found it impossible to gain ac- cess to the building.

BRUSSELS TO HONOUR MISS CAVELLI

BRUSSELS' TO HONOUR MISS CAVELL I Amsterd am, Thursday.—At a secret meeting of the Brij,e!F, _Ilnicipal eil, i! w;<.? dfcid?] to give the name Cavell to one of the principal ?;fre?l in Brussel s on th- first day circumstances l pertflSk—Exchange.

ALLIED TROOPS IN I SERBIAi

ALLIED TROOPS IN I SERBIA. I  British Supporting the' French. I FALL OF PIROT DENIED. i I The enemies of Serbia are closing in upon) her from thegjporth and cast. The Bul-I garian-3 new hold a line from Zaitchar, through Kniashevatz, to a height north, of Pirot. The threat to Nish from this advance js plain. Kniashevatz is less than 20 direct miles from Nish. There is, how- ever, no through railway communica- tion between them, as the line has never been completed. From the north the Austro-Germans are advancing on a wide front, which runs, at present, slightly south-east from Valievo and then swings in a broad curve north-east almost to the Danube at Kladovo. Here it joins hands with the right wing of the Bulgarian-. Through the gap that still exists between the lines of the allied enemies, roughly from Zait- char to Kraguievatz, the Serbian re- treat is being carried into the interior. Another serious factor in the Serbian situation ib the invasion of the north- western frontier. Here the Monte- negrins are fighting the battle of Ser- bia. They now admit that the enemy has forced the passage of the Drina east of Vishograd. The enemy's objec- tive here is plainly the railhead at Ushitza, about 20 miles from the point where he has crossed the Drina. In the south the Bulgarian attack down the valley of the Valdar seems at least to have been arrested. The Serbians are said to have retaken Uskub, and there are reports of a French advance from Krivolak which threatens the Bulgarian's hold on Ishtip. NEWS OF THE ALLIED FORCES. Paris, Friday.—M. Rutin writes in tue Echo de Paris": We can deny on the most trustworthy authority, that the town of I'irot has been taken by assault by ;). J^filgarians, as is announced in telegrams of German origin. Pirot is still in the hands of the Serbians, and the Government is still at Nish, which will be warmly defended. The French troops which were landed, of whom we have good news, and who are entrenched in the region of Krivolak- Sfrumnitza, are a bout to receive on their right and left the support of the British contingents landed at SaJonika. BULGARIANS ANNIHILATED. I Paris, 1 riday.—A telegram from Athens I to lie Journal" states that between Radrovo and Strumnitza a Bulgarian division operating in the valley of the lower Timok, having advanced in order to cut. off the wing of the Serbian Army in retreat, found themselves surrounded, and were completely annihilated.—Ex- change. RUMANIA'S PREPARA- TIONS. Paris, Friday.—The Salonika corre- spondent of the Petit Parisien n is able to confirm, as the result of enquiries in a well-informed source, the statement that Rumania has mobilised 550*000 men, of vrhom 200,000 have been centred ca the Bulgarian frontier, and the remaiadM' on  the B?ngariau frontier, where fortifica- tions appear impregnable.—Exchange. Rumania Ready. Paris. Thursday.—A telegrom from Constance to the Intransigeant states that the Rumanian Government affirms officially that, contrary to the statements of M. Filipescu, the army is ready, and I the moment, has come when it will prove I it. Germany's Claims, I Amsterdam. Thursday.—The commu- nique published in Berlin to-day states:— The armies of General von Koevess and General von Gallwitz have captured since October :3:1rd 2,033 prisoners and several machine guns. Tho army of General Bojadeff has cap- tured Zaitchar, north of Ashevatz. The Timok river was crossed on a large front. Kniashevatz is in Bulgarian hands and several guns have been captured. The height of Drenova Glava, 25 kilo- metres north-west of Pirot, has been occu- pied. Kniashevatz is 22 miles south of Zait- char and 25 miles. north-east of Nish. Both towns are on the Timok river. Pirot, 38 miles south-east of Nish. is on the River Nisava. and Drenova Glava height is about 25 miles from Nish. Bulgarians Claim Pirot. Amsterdam, Thursday (received Fri- day).— A telegram from Sofia, via Berlin, states that after long and sanguinary fighting the Bulgarians have captured the fortress of Pirot. Communication between the Bulgarian and Austro-Ger- man Armies has been established. [Pirot is on the Nischava, 30 miles east- f;outh-cat of Nish. It has a population of abont 11,000.] ALLIES' PROPERTY IN BULGARIA. I Amsterdam, Thursday. — A telegram from Sofia states that in consequence of the bombardment of Dedeagatch, which, for some reason, unexplained, is held by the Bulgarians to be contrary to inter- national law, the Bulgarian Government intends to attach all British and French property in Bulgaria as a security for the losses sustained by Bulgarian subjects through the bombardment. The Bul- garians allege that a considerable amount of private property was destroyed. STRUMNITZA'S FALL EXPECTED. Athens, Thursday.—According to advices I from a Serbian source, the French forces operating in the region of Strumnitza have occupied th" heights of Valandovo. Kab- rava. and Tatariisolre, all of which dom- inatf Strumnitaa, which is not exoecte^ to resjist much, longer. 1 MISCHIEVOUS GERMAN REPORT MISCHIEVOUS CERMAN Rt''PORTII Efforts to Create Trouble With Greece. Paris, Thursday.—The Tlemps states that the Greek Minister visited the Quai d'Orsay this morning in order to draw the attention of the French Gov- ernment to the mischievous reports eir- culatel by the Austro-Hungarian. man, and Bulgarian Press, with a view to di-sturbing the harmony of the rela- tions between the Entente Powers and Greece. M. Zaimis, he said, had instructed him to give a formal denial to these reports. The Greek Minister was also anthorised to declare that the persistent, and mis- chievous rumours, according to which the Allied contingents were not safe ,.t Salonika sinco Greece, under German and Bulgarian presstire, might at a given moment be induced to expel them, were entirely false.—-lieu ter. A German Tale. A-msterflaiii, T,'rida.i,Ac-ording to a telegram to tho "Vossische Zeitung" from Salonika, the commander of the ])ort has informed the Commander-in- Chief of the troops of the Entente that he expects that all foreign troops will he removed from Salonika by November titii. g-1—' ■■

FIGHTING WITH BOMBS i I

FIGHTING WITH BOMBS i Gunners Very Busy in Champagne Sector. Piess Bureau, Friday afternoon.—The; following: French official communicationi has been received:— Wireless communique, October 29th. On the western front during vesterdav: evening particularly violent bomb and torpedo ligh ting ¡ !)ok)¡-

OUR OFFICER PRISONERS i

OUR OFFICER PRISONERS Only Complaint-Shorts for Football Barred. The Press Bureau on Fridav issued a report prpsrnkd to Sir Edward Grey by the American Ambassador in London iiii the visit of h. Lithgow Osborne to officer prisoners at Bischofsfrerda, Saxony. Mr. Osborne found evidences that life had become more tolerable there. The tennis court has been put in first-class condition Football is now being played, and a committee has .been formed now that has some superintendence of food and which after Januarv will have the whole matter in its hands. There were complaints against the pro- hibition of shorts for football and the re- j duction of opportunity for baths to once a day. The commandant promised to allow shorts to be worn and that there should bo another bath on football davs.

TAXICAB FATALITY I

TAXI-CAB FATALITY Victim of Swansea Accident Identified. Identified. The body of the unkrown woman who was killed as the result of a motor acci- dent in Approach-road, Manselton, on Wednesday night, has been identified as that of Mrs. Mary Ann Edwards, a widow, aged 62 years, residing at Mynydd ewydd Cottage, Mynydd Newydd-road, Fforest- fach. The body was identified by Win. Edwards, of Pentre Estyll. Swansea, step- sckii of deceased. The inquest will he hel I this afternoon. 0-

BIG RECRUITING RALLY OR SWANSEA j

BIG RECRUITING RALLY OR SWANSEA j A recruiting parade on a most ambi- tious scale is being arran< xl to take place in fjwansea next Saturday week. It is likely to be the most im-osing military spectacle Swansea has yet YE. t

A PATiiiOT IN TROUBLEI

A PATiiiOT IN TROUBLE I At the Pembroke Dock Police. Court on Thursday Albert Madge, a private in the 3rd King's Liverpool Pegiment, was charged with being drunk in charge of 1 horse in Water-street on the previous evening. Defendant pleaded guilty. Supt. Thomas pleaded for leniency for the defendant, who, ho sbtnd. had come from Boston, U.S.A., to enlist in the British Army. Ho suggt sted that the Bench show their appreciation of de- fendant's spirit of patriotism by dismis- sing the case on payment of costs.—The j case was therefore dismissed. -I:

ENEMYS SLACKENING EFFORTS 1

ENEMY'S SLACKENING EFFORTS Petrograd, Thursday.—C olonel Clergefc. h the Russky Invalid," learns that on October ]8th and 19th a large transfer began from Von Linsinger V Army in a southern direction through Transylvania, I in order to form a per » £ sj ftf Banat against a possible threat nom the diree-i tion of the Rumanian .fr?tie!' against! the rear of Mapk?n.?n?s foic?s in Serbia Th? onensiv? displayed by certain unils of Von Lin?Dgen's Armv has probably been undertaken to OOVN Ht?o wit?- drawals and to Loh) th? prc-enf HnpJ Those* who took pari in the 

r NEARLY HALFAMILLION I I

r NEARLY HALF-A-MILLION » PREMIER'S LAiEST TOTAL OF BRITISH CASUAL TIES In a written reply to Mr. Molteno. who asked the Prime Minister what are the total casualties in the Western area of operations, between killed, wounded, and missing, up to October 9th, as well as the total casualties in all fields of operations, Mr. Asquith says:— WESTERN AREA. Killed. Officers 4,401 Other rank"6 63,059 Wounded. Officers 9.169 Other ranks 225,710 Missing. Officers 1,507 Other ranks. 61,135 Total casualties inWestern area 365,

CWMll YRBANG CASEI

CWMll YRÀBANG CASE I Important Correction. I In our issue of Monday, the 18th inst., we published a report of a case heard at Ammanford Police Court, in which Mr. Eees W. Thomas, of the Garage. Cwmllyn- fell, was summoned for furious driving. In a, summary of the cross-examination, it was stated, Xct only the driver was the worse for drink, but some of the occu- pants also." ??..? This statement is F-;h'

FATAL FIRE AT A SCHOOL I

FATAL FIRE AT A SCHOOL I Peabody (Massachussets), Thursday.—It I is feared that over 20 children have been burned to death, or fatally injured, in a fire which broke out in the parochial school just as the children had taken their places this mornin,R exit pr.

SWANSEA MAN ABOARD MS ARGYLLI

SWANSEA MAN ABOARD MS. ARGYLL I Amongst the crew on the H.M.S. Argyll which went aground off Scotland, is A.B. Arthur Davies, whose parents re- side at 11, Short-street, Mount Pleasant, Swansea.

FAMOUS EXPLORER ENLISTS I I

FAMOUS EXPLORER ENLISTS I Sydney, Th ursday.—Professor David, of Sydney University, who was a member of the Shackleton Antarctic Expedition, has enlisted, and is going to the front as geological expert to the mining engineers, with the rank of major.—Reuter.

CARDIFFS NEW MP I

CARDIFF'S NEW M.P. I Mr. James Herbert Cory, of Cory ton, has been unanimously adopted by the council of the Conservative and Unionist Association for the united boroughs of Cardiff, Cowbridge, and Llantrisant as their candidate for the vacancy in the Parliamentary representation caused by the death of Lord Ninian Crichtou- Stuart.

MACKENSENS NEW INCOME I

MACKENSEN'S NEW INCOME Amsterdam. Thursday.—The German papers state that the Kaiser has appointed Field-Marshal Mackensen a member of the chapter stewards of the cathedral of Mersebu/g. an honorary post with a yearly income of i'2,flft0. Mackensen, who has no personal fortune, already possesses all the military decorations within the Kaiser's gift.—Exchange.

W R APPLEGARTH ENLISTS I

W. R. APPLEGARTH ENLISTS W. R. Applegarth, the world's sprint champion, has enlisted in the 1st Surrey Rifles, and after a short leave will proceed to their camp at Tadwerth. The successful recruiter was Sergeant Ernest Barry, the world's champion sculler.

MERTHYR MINERS BALLOT I

MERTHYR MINERS' BALLOT I In view of th(' ballot rf'sults dEclared In view of the ballot resu l ts declare 4 in the Merthyr Parliamentary Boroughs on Wednesday and Thursday there ap- pears to be little room for doubt that Mr. James Winstone, president of the South Waleii Miners' Federation, has been chosen by the miners as their official nominee. The results so far declared show that the position of the two candi- dates is as follows:— J. Wiustone 7,661 I C. B. Stanton 0,334 ,r „. Majority 1.327 I.- A few additional results may yet be rMp?t d. !n]t they are not hkely 'to haDge I the poaitioa, 1

THEWAR

THEWAR Resume of To-day's Messages. u Leader" Office 4 50 p.m The news from Serbia is of the most con- tradictory nature, but the following facts emerge: Pirot has not been cap- tured by the Bulgarians; the French. are in position hefore Strumnitza, and the British are taking up positions on the ings. The Austro-Germans and Bul- garians are making violent efforts to effect the destruction of the Serbian Army. The Italians are energetically, pursuing their offensive against the Austrians, and in the Isonzo front have captured 5,064 prisoners and a number of guns I and bomb tlnowprs, w hich they "have used against the enemy. An impressive service to the memory of Nurse Cavell held at St. Paul's to-day was attended by Queen Alexandra and Mr. Asquith. Mr. Asquith announces that the total British casualties in all fields are 493,294. I A new French Cabinet has been formed, with M. Briand a^ Premier. ?_

A GERM PLOT I

A GERM PLOT? I Presumed Incendiary Fires on American Piers. I Seattle, I riday.—A lire, snppo.-ed to be I due to incenaiarism. destroyed the Blue ] funnel Line Pier. The estimated loss is half a million dollars. Baltimore. Friday.—Piers ?t and 35. nelon?in? to the Bahimore and Ohio Bail- road. have been burned, with their c&n- 'ent?, mostly de"ined for London. ¡

J TO FURNISH FULL ACCOUNTS I

TO FURNISH FULL ACCOUNTS A Mansetton Contractor's Affairs. j a. rs.. I At Swansea Bankrapt?-v G'c?. ? Fr- day. H'llT: Kogers, ) ?j ",d 'k 1 rádnl', ,M: att('ndf'd fo his ad-I journed pub!ic examination before the Kegistrar r. Frank P. Charles).—Mr. 

L96030000 DAMAGEI

.L96,030,000 DAMAGE I I Amsterdam, Friday.—The Telegraaf f learns from the frontier that the damage by the bombardment, of Lille is estimated at 1,800.000.000 francs (about £ 9S,0<)0.000). War taxes at Lille, Roubaix and Tour- coing already amount to several million of francs. Meat can no longer be tlh- tained in those towns.

SIR CHARLES MONROS TASKI

SIR CHARLES MONRO'S TASK I As for Gallipoli, caris Colonel Repington in the Times," we certainly have troops there and a part of them might conceiv- ably have been used elsewhere. Sir Charles Monro has gone out to report, and apparently upon him will rest the onus, and possibly the odium, of a de- cision.

GERMAN GARRISON DEPLETED I

GERMAN GARRISON DEPLETED I Amsterdam, Tliurcday.-Acoording to the "TeJpgraaf" considerable forces are being sent to the front from garrisons in the Rhine provinces. Several small gar- risons of 1,000 men have been reduced by 700, who left last Wednesday for tha, front.

BRITISH RECRUITING IN PARISI

BRITISH RECRUITING IN PARIS I Paris, Thursday.—The King's appeal to all Englishmen of military age to JOin the Colours has deeply afl'ected the British colony in Paris. On the initiative of the British chaplain, an enthusiastic recrnit- ing meeting was held in Paris to-day. T%o leading members^of the colony nrgwi young men to eDtiObviond the older met to place no obstacle in their way. The meeting was very representative, a-nd I employers approval of the sugges- tion that a part of their salaries be paid .to omployes who en high.

Advertising

[ CSMSRALJOFFREIN LONDON. A Press Association mes- h' .c sage, received this afternoon, says:— v; 1 T d I.' General J oft re paid a' visi„ t', 'o the War Oiffce to-day. He J f n" i, afterward s left that, Depaft- iiie u and drove away with ..t1 '1 C' (7,11 .L o. H j" H .L L c rcl Kitchener. The FrencN ..L'- -1 L'J.üe.Lh::r. 4 Commander-iii-Chief had a magnificent reception from D 1 'd the crowds outsi de. THE KING'S DOCTORS. The Frees Bureau message recording 'he accident to the King was signedvby, icllowizs •nedir.a! rsenArtS'u* Bctxlor, xjtrtraai Eerringhan, Cnthbert "Wallace. AM í M PRO B A B L E S T E F Ars-itfrdais, Friday.—Tha report cix* •nlaterl 18: the German press that tiki Il&rboc" Command at Salonika de- a r- the withdrawal of British and troops br November 6th it »y the" Lcikalanzeizer," whiril nothing is known of such a. step, is considered very improbable NEATH COAX. THEFTS. ? Elizabeth Jones, Skewen, and Maftha nn Jones, Seven Sister?, were, 3* Neath. •:»a Friday, each fined 20s. for stealing coal, value 2d. Kate Williams, gum. Tiio.ned for *1 similar offence, at first accused the constable of tilling her saick with coalj but later pleaded guilty and sked for leniency, as she was a soldier's v lie. The Bench said she deserved to u, rent to prison for making stich p false õtateroent an d fined her Z(;s. < i I I I I < 1. I