Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
31 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

The Cambria Daily II Leader" gives later news than any paper published in this dis- trict. I

Advertising

The London Office of the ( "Cambria Daily Leader" is at 151, Fleet Street (first floor) where adver- tisements can be received: up to 7 o'clock each: evening for insertion in the next day's issue. Tel. 2276 Central.

RETREATING FROM RIGA

RETREATING FROM RIGA GERMANS CHECKED RUSSIAN WARSHIPS CO-OPERATE WITH LAND FORCES MANY VILLAGES REOCCUPIED Paris, Friday—The Echo de Paris says further fighting took place yesterday in the Gulf of Riga, the Russian forces being supported by the guns of their warships in the Gulf. The" enemy was forced to abandon his new position. The Hnséan offensive was continued yester- day to the south and êoutlwest of Riga. XIie Germans were compelled to retreat in the direction of Mitau, and in some places they were scattered. Driving a Wedge. Headquarters. Russian Northern Armies, November 10th.—The winter has get in with varying degrees of intensity for General Ruszky's armies. The northern .sector is firmly in the grip of ice and snow, while at Dvinsk and Riga frost alternates with thraw. From his windows the Commander-in-Chief beholds a typical Russian scene, with tho white-clad battle- ments and cupolas of the ancient city. The premature advent of winter has not affected Russian plans, inasmuch as (he rivers and the ground are unfrozen in the Dvina Valley. The cutting of the Riga-I>vinsk railway has riot interfered with the work of supply, which is all being effected from the rear. We have pressed back the German flank south of Riga, where the enemy had arrayed some new but very inferior troops, and we are driving a wedge int he centre of superior formations which had been threatening our line west of Itvinsk. Better things remain in store.—" The Times." German Retreat from Riga. Geneva, Thursday.—I learn from Inns- hruck that the Germans are retreating on the niga-Dvinsk front, where they have lost 73 miles of ground since November ¡h. About 20 villages have been reoccupied by the Russians, who continue advancing] in this sector. Cossacks are constantly harassing the German rearguard.—" i 'l- I

fOUNDCRED tM OJGMT TjjND

fOUNDCRED tM OJGMT &Tjj\ND Swansea Laden French Schooner Lost. News has reached Swansea of tb* wreck in a storm of the French schooner Alfred'"1 Jaure. with all hands, which left Swansea about six weeks ago with coal for Lisbon. It was while Hearing "Rochefort, and in sight of éhi" harbour, she struck the rocks which an that coast, and foundered. Her naster was Captain M. Hervis, and she aad a crew of five, all Frenchmen. When outward bound from Swansea on one! occasion the Alfred Jaure picked up a crew of a vessel which had been in a zia)ali boat for 12 days, who were landed in M>e nearest port. The Swansea agent for the lost schooner "Tas Mr. W. G .M. Jeffreys.

TRANSPORTTORPEDOEDI

TRANSPORTTORPEDOED I ■■ ■ Damaged British Vessel II Reaches Port. I Press Bureau, Thursday, 11 p.m.—The War Office announces that on Septomber 2nd the transport Southland, from Alex- andria. was torpedoed in tlif Ægean Sea, hat reached Mudros under her own steam at 10 p.m. the same day. As a precau- tionary measure, the troops were tranks- ferred to other transports. Th ere were some casualties, already t re- ]>orted, amounting to nine killed, two slightly injured, and 22 missing, believed drowned. rThe Southland is a twin-screw steamer of 11,8,99 tons, She is owned by the Inter- national Naval Company (Limited), and I was built in 1900 by Messrs. J. Brown and Co., Glasgow.

E SCOOTED

-«E(?) SCOOTED Amusing incident at Naval Recruiting Depot. An amusing incident is jd to have occurred at the Swansea Navai Division Recruiting Headquarters last Ono morning, what was apparently a sni.rt, well-built young fellow pres(\tocj himself to the recruiting officer, express, ing his desire to enlist. In the cuurse ot the conversation which ensued, the officer; perceived that the would-be recruit p-is^-sed a pronounced effeminate I-o- ice* The ofifcer, somewhat perplexed, ques- honed the individual at some length,! eventually imparting the information that a medical inspection would be necessarv 1 before the enrolment could be effected. I *his statement was ;i elded tf) by the fact 1 that, process could be proceeded with nur>iodiately. as the medical officer was already on the premises. The recruiting efficer roqueted the recruit and jT he would summon the doctor. But' instead of complying with the request the woui^-be recruit hesitated: and sud denly furn«d pale. Then, before, (he officer rou.d leave _»ho room, the recruit hurriedly preced ed him and was well out of sight before he could reach th9 office front EIle Tan 08. .r "llrh.

Uflt dunrlVOR LANDED I

Uflt dunrlVOR LANDED I I.lord's report that the steamer Rhine- land has been sunk. One survivor was anaed. 11 bss Association War Special, j

IGOAL CONCILIATION

GOAL CONCILIATION EFFORTS TO MAINTAIN PEACE IN SOUTH WALES ¡ SUB-BOARD'S MEETING (By Our Mining Correspondent.) I A meeting of the Sub-Committee of the South Wales and Monmouthshire Coal Trade Joint Conciliation Hoard was held on Friday at Cardiff. A number of matters specially referred to the sub-committee by the Joint Board were dealt with. There is just now need for a give-and- take" policy on many subjects, and a sincere endeavour is made on both sides to avert stoppages, and to keep up the; output, of coal throughout the SouthI Wales coalfield. A case in point, which might be inci- dentally mentioned, is the Ynyshir (Stan- dard Co;Eery) checkweigher case, which was referred at the last Joint Board meet- ing, to the two chairmen, two secretaries, and two solicitors of the employes' and workmen's sicks. I Cases of Friction. ) The particulars need not be entered into, I but the contention of the management of the colliery is that the checkweigher acted in a manner to which they had a right to object. They threatened pro- ceedings against him. Then the miners at the colliery sided with the checkweigher, and a resolution was passed at the Khondda Federation district meeting that if a summons is issued against the check- weigher they will all come out on strike. As the workmen of the district number on-er 30,000. the matter looked serious, whoever might be in the right, and who- ever may be in the wrong. Hence the, decision to try to effect a settlement- by the gentlemen referrd to and so avoid proceedings. I am told thai there are other cases of a similar kind under consideration—cases of friction arising on one side or the other frequently now—and the' officials and leaders are doing all they can to make the best possible use of the Conciliation Board, and its sub-committee in order to I maintain peace and promote concord. GREEK CHAMBER DISSOLVED I New Elections to Take Place 0 in December. Athens, Thursday (received Friday).— The Chamber wa? dissolved this eveiiiul-. I MJecHons for the new Parliament will be j held on December 19th (December 6th old  style).—Press Association War Sppcial. CARS IN COLLiSiQN ] -& i Serious Street Accident in Birmingham. I The Press Association Birmingham cor- respondent telegraphs:— A tramway accident took place in Bir- wingliau) early on Friday morning ;?s the ¡ r??i of which oue person w?s killed and of lvhic-& 'O.11,L- Por-son -.vvs killed Liid A car, which was loaded with workmen, i was one of the first to leave the depot, and at rhe j auction of Victoria-road and Lichfield-road, Aston, for some rea

A NAVAL ACTIONI

A NAVAL ACTION Violent Firing From Direction of Kiel. Copenhagen, Thursday.—Reports have reached here that a terrific cannonade was heard yesterday in Southern Laaland front the direction of the Fehmern Belt, south-west of Ttoedby Harbour. The tiring lasted for twenty minutes with such violence that doors and win- dows were forced open, and the houses vibrated as if an earthquake had oc- curred. Owing to the thick weather it was impossible to observe any details, but the general impression is that a British submarine fought a German squadron.— Renter. [The Fehmern Belt lies between the Danish islands of Paaland and Fehmern. Roedby is on the southern shore of Laa- lan d tb land. about fifty milrs from the mouth of the Kiel Canal.]

CLERGY AND ENLIMENT I

CLERGY AND. ENLIMENT Mr. Outhwaite's Pertinent Question in Parliamsrit. The No-Conscription Fellowship in I Manchester have been warned hy the military authorities, Mr. Tennant's view being that the eaid organisation is issuing seditious statements. Has :tny member of this society." asked Mr. Outhvaite in tho House of Commons on Thursday, done anything more seditious than the Archbishop 01 Canterbury, in Paying that his clergy should not enlist r" It was a question that struck home— nftEll' 1111, 20,000 priests are serving with the French Army, and the cheering of the JToucre showed that the immunity claimed for tho clergy nearer home ie very unpopular. Mr. Tennanfs answer I will he ?P remembered The ?tAtements that I have in mind," he said. were much more seditious.? This impUc&Hon caueed ?oud laUghter'1 which developed into r:_g,ed cheering.

A FIT OF MADNESS I

A FIT OF MADNESS." I At Aberavon on Thursday, Hy. Russell, sailor, was charged with being drunk and disorderly and with ;St,a181hng P.C. Vernon. The officer said defendant was;' very drunk, and when being locked up he acted like a madman, and hit and! kicked him. Defendant: Whatever I did was done in fit: of madness caused by annoyance by the bounce at the shipping oiffce. (Laugh- ter.) HI) A,iiq finf)i! 20s. for assault, and 10s. or viaing drunk and disorderly. 1.

REASONS FOR DELAY

REASONS FOR DELAY SIR E. GREY EXPLAINS SERBIAN TACTICS PROVING SUCCESSFUL I BUlCARS ASK FOR ARMISTICE j I Salonika, Wednesday (received Thurs- day night).—There is nothing to report to-day respecting the situa'c'.o 1 on the Allied front. Further British! reinforcements have been sent forward to strengthen the right wing of the Allied line. The rumours of an Albanian rising against the Serbians finds no credence in; veil-informed circles. According to information received from the Greek frontier station, fighting on a Jnrge scale has been proceeding since yesterday between the French and Bnl- garians between Gradsko and Kuprulu (V des). The Bulgarians asked for sus- pension of hostilities for five hours for VH purpose of burying their dead and collecting their wounded, hut only two hours were granted tiiein.-Prt-Fa Associa- tion. General Monro to Command British. The following French official commu- nique has been received by wireless:— Paris, Thursday Afternoon. Tlit, British and French headquarters staffs communicate the following official infor- mation regarding the situation of the Allied trool)-,i. The British troops, now reinforced by a new division, are fairly occupying the region to the north of Doiran, spreading out fanwise in the direction of Strum- nitza, where encounters between Briti-h j and Bulgarian patrol parties are sig- nailed. The Bulgarian attacks against Krivolak are so many clear proofs of the disquiet which the forward progress of the French troops on the other side of the Cerna is causing them, this all the more so as the French now occupy the region of Merzin, Camendol, and Derbrista, effectively pro- tecting the roads lrading to Babtina. Supply trains circulate very freely at Glievgeli and Gradso. The arrival of General Monro from the front in Flanders is shortly expected, and he will then assume the supreme com- mand of the British troops. Allies Hold Raihvay from Salonika. The Kiilotdng statement has been re- ceived from an authoritative Serbian source by the Press Association:- With regard to the military situation in Southern Serbia, the Bulgarians have been repulsed upon a line from east cf Giiilan, in the direction of the railway, and aleo from liatshanik to the south- east. After taking TTskub the Bulgarians advanced to the north-west towards Kat- shanik, hut were driven back. In this region the position of the Serbian Army is favourable. Allies liaVO TP- have re- captured Yeles proves to he correct this will be of the utmost importance. In this event the Bulgarians will quickly be driven from the TJskub-Kumanovo litlo, and this region will be cleared of enemy. The railway from Salonika to near Veles is in the hands of the Allies, and is being daily used by them. All the region bet wen the southern Morava and the western Morava is held by the Serbian Army. The claims put forward by the Germans regarding the capture of prisoners lefijr chiefly to the- civilian population. Every- where the Serbian Armj is intact and in the best fighting: spirit. Its effective force is in no way diminished and it is deter- mined to continue at all costs. The seat of Government is now at Bashka THE APPROVED SERBIAN PLAN. Fighting Retreat into Albania. I :Mr. Ernest Smith, the Milan rres- Mi-. Erneet Smith, the Milan corrm pondent of the Star," cablesSignor Luciano Mngrini, the special oorrespon- dent of the Secolo with the Serbian Army, says that he is informed that the plan of the Serbian General Staff is to niake a slow lighting retreat before the Austro-Gormans in the direction of Scutari and Dura mo, and that this plan has the approval of the allies. The Government left Nich on October 26. Six automobile drew up before the Government Palace, and the Ministers, accompanied by their seereta ries, took their eeats. The Premier occupied the second car. King Peter visited Nish just before the town was abandoned. In spite of his illness and griet, he spent a few hours >it the front. As he drove through the streets he smiled at the troops, but it was a forced snrile. The King was obviously affected by the sight of his flee- ing people. RUMANIAN HESiTATION I A correspondent of the Tims" at Bucharest expresses the opinion that if Russia could send to the Serbian cam- paign a force of 200,000 men, while French and British troops land 0'1 the Aegean! coast, the hesitation ivhich prevails in certain quarters in Rumania would be dis- solved, and both Rumania and Greece might throw in their lot with the Allies. J WHY BRITISH AID WAS DELAYED. Speaking late on Thursday night in the House of Commons. Sir Edward Grev ex- plained that what Great Britain has been able to do to aid Serbia has been limits not by her will but by her power. He stated once more that no time was lost in making preparations after it. became evi- dent that Greece was not going to fnlfil her treaty obligations. One reason, he said, why French troops reach ed Serbia before British was that, a French division being ready, first, we provided the trans- port, for some of the French troops, thus delaying our own men. (Continued on the bottom of next ooiumn)

REASONS FOR DELAY

Russians on the Danube. Geneva, Thursday.—According to a mes- sage from Bucharest, the Russians have ascended the Pan 11 be and landed a small; force of troops and artillery near Silistria, Bulgaria. [Silistria is the first point at which the; Danube touches Bulgarian territory. It is nearly 300 milee from the mouth of the Danube, and a.bout 200 miles from Sofia.]

THE ATTACK ON CORlr I

THE ATTACK ON CORlr I ¡ RAIN AfiD FOO IMPEDE ITALIAN INFANTRY TENACIOUS TROOPS' DASH Rome, Thursday. — To-day's OffiCiall¡ communique says: In the Upper Campelle Valley (Torrent of I aso, Val Sugana) the ene-my attacked our position on the San Giovanni Pass. Although supported by the fire of numerous guas, which had been hoisted to the cupola summit and Mount Alon, the attack was repulsed. In the Cordevale Valley we continued our vigorous pressure against the moun- tainous ridge between Mount Sief and Mount Lettass. Minor operations were also began with the object of clearing out. detachments of the enemy remaining behind the Col di Lana. On the Middle Isonzo, in the Plava sector, our inUntry yesterday began a resolute advance beyond the Zagora dis- trict and captured 2H0 prisoners, includ- ing three officers. On hills northwest of Gorizia we also made a little progress and captured eighteen prisoners. On the Carso fog and pelting rain all day long paralysed the action of the, artillery, and 4s the numerous ravines were converted into rushing torrents our infantry progress was impeded. Never- theless, the dash and tenacity of our troops succeeded in the capture by assault of some strong trenches south-west of San Martino (Corso). Thirty prisoners were taken in this As-ociation War Special. ■"■» J

RAIDS ON ESSEN j

RAIDS ON ESSEN ■■ • Mr. Baifour on Possibilities of the Future. Speaking in the House of Commons on Thursday on our aerial position, Mr. Balfour said: In regard to the quqestion of an aerial offensive, he thought Mr. Joynson-Hicks had underestimated the diniculties of such an offensive with the ae.oplane, which had not at preset got a range which would make it possible, from these shores to do nything import- ant against our enemies. The time might come when an aeroplane starting from I Norfolk might become a menace and A terror on the banks of the Rhine, but that time was not yet. Mr. Joynson- I Hicks appeared to think that the recent raids were by Zeppelins housed m Belgium. That he believed was not the fact. They came from North Germany, and from a distance y here at present effective attack on our part was not easy. Raids 011 Esen. He was not sure that it would ever be possible for one country to have such a flight of aeroplanes as to be able to at- tack such a place as Essen. It might be possible, and he lived in hopes that it would be. But it was impossible to de- fend Essen. He would suggest it could not he very easy to de- fend London. He thought the dutv of the Admiralty was to develop to the ut-, most; the number and power of the aero-1 planes and th-e number and skill of thfir pilots, and to develop to the utmost the gun protection of London, whether at the coast or in London itself, or on board f'hip. These problems were novel, com- plex, and not easy of solution, but they were constantly before the Admiralty, and he hoped the ccuntrv might rest assured that whatever could be done by the Admiralty would be done.

MORE BELGIANS EXECUTED

MORE BELGIANS EXECUTED Amsterdam. Friday. The Echo Beige announces that. Jules Legay, of Cuesmes; Joseph Delsaux, of Cuesmes, and Charles Simonet. ot Mons, have been sentenced to death and already executed, while another JRgay, of Cuesmes, has been sentenced to 12 penal servi- tude. The aceu sed were found guilty hy a German court-martial of communicat- ing to the enemy news of the movements of troops to and from the front.—Press Association.

DARDANELLES SKIRMISHES I

DARDANELLES SKIRMISHES Amsterdam, Thursday (received Fri- day).—A communique published in Con- stantinople says:—There were artillery combats at three sectors on the, Darda- i nelles front and patrol skirmishes near Anafasta and near Avi Burnu. Our ar- j tillery silenced the enemy artillery. At the mouth of the Korka-disc, near t:11 Bahr, an cnetny mine exploding on the left wing killed a portion of the English troops. Our artillery drove off two monitors which had opened fire against the coast of Saros.

MADE FRIENDS IN COURTI

MADE FRIENDS IN COURT At the Aberavon Borough Police Court on Thursday, Ben Newman, traveller, y, Crown-érN't, Port Talbot, summoned B(,? Williams, ta?or, High-street, Aberavon, for aseault.—Mr. Lewis M. Thomas ùc- for assau l t.-Mr. LewLS ?,I. 'f Itoinas de. Complainant deposed that a dispute arose between him and defendant through a trousers of alleged wrong pattern and inferior quality sent to witness. He went to defendant's shop to find out if a mis- take had arisen. Defendant denied that any mistake had occurred, and used abusive and filthy language, and said, Get out, you Jew," and lifted hie hand and smacked him in the face. By Mr. Thomas: When defendant used bad language he (witness) also l the eame language. (Laughter.) The Mayor: Cannot this matter be amicably set!led? After retiring with the Mayor, the case was amicably settled, and complatrrant, defendant, and witnesses left the court all smiling.

lORD DERBYSI HINTS r

lORD DERBY'S I HINTS r FINAL WARNING TO SINGLE MEN COMPULSORY" MEANS TO CET I NECESSARY RECRUITS MARRIAGE AFTER REGISTRATION I Press Bureau, Thursday, 8 p.m.—Lord Derby is authorised by the Prime Minister to express his surprise that his statement in the House of Commons on November 2nd .should be considered in any way ambiguous. The Prime Minister on that occa?iou pledged not cnly himself, hut his Gov?.'n-? ment, when he stated that if young men; did not. under the stress of national duty, come forward voluntarily, other nd cejupulsory means would lie taken before the married men were called upon to fulfil their engagement to serve: lord Derby is further authorised to state definitely that if young men: medically fit and not indispensable to any! business of national ilnl)ort-iince. or toi any business conducted for the gencrall good of the community, do not come forward voluntarily before November! 30th, the Government will after that date! take the necessary stens to redeem the pledge made on November 2nd- It jnu-st be clearly understood that -ial marriage contracted after registration! da? (AUu5t 15th) will entitle any mau! to be relegated to the married groups. Whether a man is indispensable or not to his business will be decided not by the: man or his employer, but by compe- tent authorities and tribunals which aie being set up to consider such cases. The instructions which will be iss 1 to the local tribunals will make adequate provision for dealing with special or ex- ceptional cases. I

THE INCEHIOUS TOMMYI

THE INCEHIOUS TOMMY I I Surmounting Language Diffi- culties in France. In his book, "With Our Army inj Flanders," Mr. G. Yalentine Williams 1 says that the language difficulty is now pretty well surmounted. At first "wee" and "liong" were the whole content of the British "Tommy's French, But wry soon, as wo know, he learned doolay for milk, doopong" for bread, doolo and doovang for water and wine. Jam, having no precise equivalent, proved a stumbling block till someone thought of the Army's own slang term, H poz," since when jam has been rendered fr doopoz" for the sake of -LITI "Wipers" and Plug-street are familiar as phe- netic adaptations, but some of the follow- ing place-names are new: Armentieres Arm-in-tears. Havcrskprqup Haversack. Etaples Eatables. Wytschaete White heet, Halteba^t ITell-and-Blast. the amusing thing, says the author, "is that the whole Army has adopted this nomenclaturp. You will hear Staff officers who know French well speaking of Arm- in-tear" and White Sheet.

I PRISONERS H GERMANYI

I PRISONERS !H GERMANY No Serious Complaints by the British. Further reports of American visits to prison camps in Germany wore issued by the Press Bureau on Thursday. At Cre- feld it is reported that there are Ifio British ooiefi-s. including General Bruce and Colonel Bolton. The men's food is stated to be very good. In Wahn there are in all some 40,000 men, including' SOU Englishmen. All were well clothed, and the general health seemed good. A game of football was in progress at the time of the visit. The orchestra, c:on.! posed of thirteen captured British bands-1 men, rendered a selection from Gounod'si Faust. fhere is another orchestra, nno have made themselves stringed instru-i ments. A brg" ball has been arranged, for theatrical performances. At Duelnen there arc some ion British N.C.O.'s and men. Two prisoners had escaped from hero. One man. Private R. Matthews (981) | Welsh Regiment, has lost his left eye, and' complains of paints in the head, but is able to be about. He has been exeust-v from all work. and his case is being con-i fiidered for exchange, though he is not entitled to repatriation under the exist- ing agreement. In Wesel there are 200 British N.C.O.'s and men, largely captured in the late days of September. They said their treat- ment had been entirely satisfactory.

I 133 HOUSES AT CLYDACHI i

133 HOUSES AT CLYDACH At the Pontardulais Council meeting on Thursday plans were submitted and ap- proved for the erection of 113 new houses, to be built at Clydacli for the Mond Nickel Companr.

ANOTHER SWANSEA AMBULANCEI

ANOTHER SWANSEA AMBULANCE The Mayor of Swansea announced at Thursday's Council meeting that Coun- cillor George Hemming and Mr. Chtil'les I Gustavus had undertaken to contribute a motor ambulance in the name of Swansea. I

RECRUITING IN SWANSEA I I

RECRUITING IN SWANSEA I Sergeant. Evans, who has been in charge of the recruiting office in Union- street, and who was sent to Cardiff to meet the rush there, has returned to Swansea for the present. We undpr?tand that Hie S"ana 1'e-1 pon continue to ? satisfactory, hut it  is flt in many qurtNs that to meet thel rush' which it is confidently exacted will take plac? duriu? next wp?k more accommodation should be prov ided. 'The suggestion has been made that recrmbng otfiees, with ?)!1 arrange- m?nts for examination and ;<

THEWARI I

THEWARI .———— I Resume of To-day's Messages. I "Leader" Office 4.50 P.m. Sir Edward Grey told the House of Commons that British aid to Serbia was delayed because our transports were utilised to convey Trench troops to Salonika. The position in Serbia is more hopeful, although news is lacking. A rout of the Germans before Riga is un- officially reported from Paris. The Prime Minister warmly rpplied to an amazing attack on Lord Kitchener in the House of Commons last night. He pointed out that Lord Kitchener never tendered his resignation, and his mission was the result of important news which reached the Cabinet on November 3rd. I The Greek Chamber has been dissolved and the elections fixed for December 19th. The Press Bureau has issued an authorised statement by Lord Derby that ii single young men do not come forward voiun- tarilv before November 30th, steps will be taken for a compulsory measure. The British transport Southland, which 1, wats torpedoed in the ^-Egean Sea, did not sink, but reached port under her own steam. Nine people were killed, two injured, aud 22 missing, believed drowned. Despite the fog and rain which is im- peding, progress, the Italian advance on Gorz is being continued, and a series of Austrian trenches have been seized.

THE SWANSEA BAIT ALlONI

THE SWANSEA BAIT ALlON. No Likelihood of Further I Leave. .The Lord Mayor of Cardiff-on Thurs- day reeeived a letter from Lieut.-CoIonei Prank Gaskell with regard to the Cardiff City Battalion that he believes he can get sanction for a 24 hours' leave of ab- ..•:onue, i>os«ibly or Saturday week, for the Battalion to pay a visit to Cardiff. They will be in the City but for a few hours at iiiist. Lieut.-Colonel Gaskell, with a few friends, are very kindly paying the cost of I special trains for the purjwse. In an interview with Ald. Corker, it was learned that it is not expected that the Swansea Battalion will be able to ) visit Swansea. We can add, upon authority, th;it as far as the commanding officers of the i battalion are concerned, a visit to Swan- j sea is not contemplated. I

HIS WORD HIS BONDI

HIS WORD HIS BOND Mayor's Tribute to Swansea;, Theatre Manager. The application of Mr. Ton Byrne, the popular manager of the Swansea Grand Theatre, to the Swansea Council for per- mission to hold a serits of Sunday eon- certs at his theatre in aid of various local charities found favour with the council- lors. and evoked a deserving tribute from the Mayor (Alderman Merrelis), who said that as Mayor of the town lie was in entire accord with the proposal to permit the concerts. lie had known Mr. Byrne for some years, and if he said that thp concerts would he of a high-claj-s charac- ter they could take it that his word was as good as his bond. (Hear, li-ear.) Con- certs of the Queen's HaH type would be a boon to the town. The resolution Mas carried unanimously.

j BAPTIST COLLEGE STUDENTS

BAPTIST COLLEGE STUDENTS Advised to Eniist in the Army. At a meeting of the House Committee of the South Wales Baptist College. Car- diff, on Thursday, the following resolu- tion m-ar, passed on the motion ot Mr. T. I J. Hughes, seconded by Mr. Ei-ait Oii-tn, JY. That. the mfnibpi-s of 1 he House Com- mittee of the South Wales Baptist Col- lege desire to- direct the immediate serious and prayerful attention cf the students to the solemn appeal of the King to the manhood of the nation to en- list in the R.A.M.C. or some other unit of his Majesty's Forces, and pledges the College authorities that any student who responds to the appeal shall not be pre- judiced in his college career if and when he be discharged from service and de- sires to re-enter the college." It may be mentioned that the sons of Principal Edward-s and of several mem- bers of the committee, including Bev. Charles Davies, Itev. John Owen, Mr. T. J. Hughes, Mr. Evan Owen. and Mr. J. E. Turner are already serving in rhe forces, and there is every probability that a number of the students of the College will shortly enlist in the K.A.M.C.

SOLDIERS DEATH ON THE RAILWAYI

SOLDIER'S DEATH ON THE RAILWAY The body of Private Harry Dugruore, of the Warwickshire Regiment, was picked up badly mangled on the railway near Portsmouth on Thursday night. D ased, who was about 5'J years of age and belonged to Birmingham, is presumed to have been accidentally knocked down by a train while proceeding on duty to guard thp line.

No title

Owing to the demands of the military authorities for skilled telegraphists, it is probable that a number of the less im- portant telegraph offices in the London district will shortly be closed. It has not so far proved practicable to ii-;e women labour to any large extent for this branch Ol v uv 1..

Advertising

I BRITISH BATTLE. WITH BULGARS. Zurich, Friday.—A tele- gram from Sofia, which, had evidently been despatched to the Hungarian newspapers and then transmitted to Zurich, states that the Bul- garians delivered an attack en mae on the British position in Dorian on Wednesday. The engagement assumed the pro- portions of a battlt-N.-El- change Special. FRT.NCH OFFICIAL. Paris, Friday.—-Tho folloMing wua officially issned this ah)!,ll00D ;n » bombardment this aiternoon has fcecta at! iyû on both side. in the section of Loos and in that 01 the Caloane Fcstse. In the region of Bus-en Artois, out artillery silenced the enemy's betteii^s, which were firing upon our organisation. On the rest of the iroot the straggle with mines coniinues with s.utc«". Argonnc. on Hill 2bo, wo exploded twa* oi the (Jorman works which were busfrlv engaged to the north of Flirey. Another of our mine explosions bi