Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
6 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

W. J. BEER Lance-Corporal, Royal Engineers "As a sufferer from Neuralgia and Nerve Strain, who has been highly benefited by Phosferine, I feel I must let you know in order to express my gratitude. I have been engaged on exchange operating and maintenance for 15 months, and in a busy Garrison the job is not an easy one; the strain on one's nerves is very great at times. After being used to open-air work, I soon began to develop neuralgia and was subject to sick headaches. I was advised to take several different medicines, but being no believer in medicincs in general, I did not pay much heed to the advice. In March last, however, happening to read of a man on active service who had found Phosferine beneficial, I decided to give it a trial. After the first bottle I could feel a great change in my health, so I kept on with it, with the result that I would not be without it now. I am feeling as fit as a fiadle, and always keep a. supply of Phosterine Tablets by me." This keen and efficient Lance-Corporal says he can get more and more out of his day since Phosferine saved him from the menacing nerve collapse provoked by his 15 months of continuous duties—Phosferine roused the inactive nerve organisms to produce the extra vital force to outlast the most exhausting activities, and thus made certain no further exhaustion of the system could occur. When you require the Best Toole Medicine, see you get Ao"h' o "4m 'mm PHOSFERINEI A PROVEN REMEDY FOR Nervous Debility Influenza Indigestion Sleeplessness Exhaustion Neuralgia Maternity Weakness I Premature Decay Mental Exhaasticn I Loss of Appetite Lassitude Neuritis Faintness Brajn-Fag Ansemia Backache Rheumatism Headache Hysteria Sciatica Phosferine has a world-wide repute for curing disorders of the nervous system mere completely and speedily, and at less ccst than any other preparation SPECIAL SERVICE NOTE Phos:erim is made in Liquid and S

No title

Henrv KnigM. a hutchpr, was fined C15 at C?'ldford on Monday for having inhis?s'-te.?sioudisea-?dmpat.wlncit, he said, was in) ended for dogs' food. Poisoning in sui>|w-ed to he the cause of the presence of thousands of dead iisli which were notified floating in the River Trent at a point, just above Burton.

WELSHMEN ON GALLIPOLI

WELSHMEN ON GALLIPOLI MORRISTON SECT-MAJOR'S RECORD OF I FIGHTING DAYS GUNNER'S EXPERIENCES (Passed by Censor.) I The following extracts are taken from a long letter written by a well-known Morriston Sergt.-Major %-holi:— In the Field (on the Gallipoli Rocks would Ik? more correct).—Well my dear friend, as a family, how are you all? It is now 4.30 p.m., Sunday. I can hear the faint sound of Jiymns from the gully be- low—prosumably' a prayer meeting going on. All the orchestra is very quiet. The sua is hidden in dense black rain clouds, lowering over Anafarta Plain, turning the afternoon into night. It is evidently going to he a stormy night. I suppose you fetill continue your con- stitutional walks. Often when crouching in my shelter (we generally leave the s out), my thoughts wander hack to those walks we used to enjoy. Do you recollect oil one occasion my telling you that the roving spirit in me was not yet exhausted, and that I longed for another trip abroad? Well. I am having my wish gratified, and "What can man want more?" I always had a kind of presenti- ment that I should also experience active service. The Shell Shelter. I am in my shelter writing this. The shelter conistii of two large stones stand- ing on ends and one on top. the hack well blocked with small stones. There is j nst room enough for mo and a few flies which dispute possession daily with me. My shelter is fairly safe cover against rifle or shrapnel bullets, but an high ex- plosive would expediate my exit off the peninsula. The effect of these shells vary a great deal. If one collides with a shrapnel or rifle bullet—well, there you ar £ Being in the danger-zone of a high expl-o-iv* Where arc you? This battery has been very fortunate as regards casualties. The first one was a bombardier. We had hardly got the guns in position, and the bombardier had been sent as an orderly to another bat- tery about half-a-mile away. On his way h? was hit b.s Point. A little further away, Achi Baba was also getting it. Smola Bay was readied in the early hours. There we disembarked off the boat. We then. marched to the reserve trenches and rat holes. Then we had a couple of hours' rest before breakfast. After breakfast, we were paraded, and warned to keep under cover, because the Turks had a largo gun trained on the ground. At last, we were experiencing the curious sensation of being fired at. We selected a position for our guns, and began to dig dug-outs and prepare gun pits, Work could only be done in the dark. We were given onr area, an observation station was selected, and wc informed the Turks by a well directed firq that Jiattprv, Brigade, had declared war on them. From the observation station, we had a good view of the Turkish trenches, our own, and also Anzac Ridge. Elite of Five Nations. Tip to the present, we have not had any great attention from the Turks. Possibly, Hnver Bey has been informed that this battery comprises the elite of five nations. The major is an English' man, the second-lieutenant an American, one of the section-commanders is a Scots- man. the other section commander is an Australian, and the sergeant-major a Welshman. No wonder the poor Turk is getting downhearted. a few words about our supplies. W ater has been very scarce. What we did have was something like the Beaufort Pill water. At present the supply and the quality is much better. Foodstuffs are plentiful, but not much variation. Jam and bacon for breakfast, jam and slew for dinner, jam and jam for tea. Jam i frecwast, jam i gfno. D- M- ma jam eto i We also get tobacco and cigarettes Issued. Bread is issued about three days a week, so we are able to save our biscuits. We intend to use them for tiling the roof of our next dug-out. Flour is issued occasionally. That enables us to make flap-jacks." Here is the recipe for flap-jacks: Grease (any kind), flour, and water. If you haven't any baking powder, use Eno's Fruit Salt, Fry the paste until you can smell it hurning: Serve hot. You need not watch it cooking. You'll be able to I smell it when it does. The Angry Welshman. I While we were at Mndor, I got acquainted with a little chap from North Wales. JTe had been wounded in the arm. Although he was fit again the doctor would Dot return him to duty because he looked rather a weakling. So ho was, but he was very annoyed at having to stay there. I tried to persuade him to stay where he was, and that he did not look fit to carry a riile, much less than use. one. Oh," he said. "Well, I have taken my place in three bayonet c h arges, anyhow." To encourage him to talk, I gave him some tea and a cigarette. I asked him: How did you feel during the first one?" The first wae the best," he said. <0 We had been in the trenches about two days, and 1 had not seen a Turk. About 4 p.m. the company officer cania with the order that we were to make a charge about 5.30 p.m. Well, J thought to myself, I shall be the last out, anyhow. About. 5 p.m., the artillery started firing. A little while I later we got the order to fire and h?Ix bayonets. By this time all nervousness had left me. and the noise of battle made me feel as big and strong as. Goliath. Tt was as much as the officers could do to keep the men in. the trenches until the proper time. It was worse than waiting r^r the last train. Then we got the wel- come order, and. indeed. I think I was the first over the parapet, and then on, shouting like boys let out from school, through the barbed wire on to the parapet of the first trenches. Then I saw my first Turk-a big, burly fellow, with whiskers. I jumped right on top of him, pulled the trigger, so I shot and stabbed him at the same time. I caught hold of my rifle again. but could not get it out of his grip. There were plenty of rifles lying about. One I picked up, and off I went again to the next trench. Here I found that our men were in possession. We were told to remain there. Darkness was now coming on, and the firing dying down. Those that had rations shared with the others, and w made things secure for the night. I would much rather be in the trenches than in the convalescent camp, where there is no one but myself and the tent pole."

Advertising

Coughs of the Elderly relieved by A[ IL I L. son ANGIERVfflUlSION Of ell Chemists, 2;fi As a healing, invigorating tonic to those of advanced years, Angier's Emulsion is invaluable. It is un- equalled for bronchitis, and for chronic catarrhal affections generally, whether of lungs, stomach, or intestines, It improves appetite, digestion and nutri- tion. There is no better tonic for the aged and feeble, and none that has such soothing, comforting effects. I( is pleasant to take either undiluted ct in soda-water, milk, wine, whiskey, et- ENDORSED BY THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. A Nurse writes:—"In my experience I have found Angier's Emulsion particularly beneficial for elderly patients suffering from chronic winter coughs and bronchitis. I know of several who have been greatly re- lieved by taking it regularly. It is good, too, for those who are inclined to be constipated. I am pleased to recommend it whenever opportunity arises." (Nurse) E. Make- peace, 36. Dudley Gardens, West Ealing, W. FREE TRIAL Send name and address, 4d. postage, and mention this pa.pee. BOTTLE. ANGIER CHEMICAL CO.. Ltd.. 86. Clerftanwell Rd.. London

No title

Li?rtenant 'Franc-(,, iho Lih(,.rill member for the Mor?y division of Lan- cashire, has intimate that h? ?'iH not' accept his parliamentary salary during j the continuance of the war. ( A Committee has been set up by the Government to inquire into the question, of timber supplies. The Duke of Grafton, who has been ill for some weeks, is still very weak and unable to leave his bed. Diphtheria cases in the Metorpolitaii Asylums Board's hospitals on Monday reached the unusually high total of 1,543. George Mather, an ex-^oldier, who has been discharged from the Army after beirig wounded in France, was at Runcorn on Monday sent to gaol for three months for having interfered with a sentry. Printed and Published for the Swansea Press. Limited, hv ARTHUR PARNTCLI, HIGHAM, at Leader Buildings, Swanapa.

Advertising

 R E. JONES jL?-o ?!L?o