Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 6 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
29 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

I The Cambria Daily Leader" gives later | news than any paper I I published in this dis- ¡ I trict.

Advertising

j — The London Office of the J "Cambria Daily Leader" ?is at 151, Fleet Stree ,1 (first floor), where adver- tisements can be received up to 7 o'clock eachi evening for insertion inf the next day's issue. Tel.i 2276 Central.

GROUND REWON i

GROUND RE-WON ■ i I FRENCH REGAIN CROW'S WOOD. Enemy's Sacrifice. "NOT BATTLEFIELD, BUTI SLAUGHTERHOUSE." I Pari4 Friday.—The military expert, Poiooei Bo« £ Get, declares in the Petit pa?MMC? that the almœt entire recap- of the Crow's W?od, wher(%.r= solidated o1}ISelv in the course of the night, has rejioved the pres6ure on our I lints of defence, and will probably enable us to retain Gooefe Hill, which supports Bur right wing in this Western sector. The" Figaro n states that wherever fhe Germans managed to make any head- way it is literally over heaps of corpses. Our own batteries are horrified at the spectacle. It is no longer a battlefield, I but a slaughter-house. Such tactics dis- honour war; it is no longer war.— Ex- change SpeciaL "Situation Unchanged." Paris, Friday.—The following review 3s I fanned :— In the Argonne the French artillery cannonaded the German convoy signalled an the rcxid from Frontmoatsattcone to Avanece. To the east and west of the Mease the situation has not changed. In the course of the night the Germane wfctempted no attack against the French position. The bombardment continued on both sides of tha French front generally; violentlygn the left bank and right WwVg of the Meuse and intermittently in the wipevm Tw Afeaoe the French batteriee de- stroyed the Germsai trenches on Hill 425, east of Thaw. German Misrepresentations, Im epite of the enemy's desperate efforts, the 19th day of the great battle oL Verdun (or the third day of its third phase) finds the balance in favour of the French. who, so far from being driven back, are able to ommt-er-attack and re- take previously-lost ground. The Germans have resumed their at- taefas Gn Verdun in the vital region W- fereen Etofaauraont and Vanx. only about five nLL-lgs northeast of the fortreee, They clain a considerable success, but their Story is flatly contradicted by the French psport- The opposing statements are: Frends. German, In epite of intense The village and jutitkry fire and armoured fort of riotfwit assaults the Vans, witlL nume- enemy was unable rows adjoining for- to bead our line, tified positions, and was oompletely were captured in a I repulsed. Some glorious night at- German elements tack. who penetrated Vemc village wera I drives out. On the west of the Meocse the French eml Wednesday secared a valuable success in driving beck the enemy to the edge of the I Corbeaax Wood. where he is still held. This is briefly dismissed by the Germans wM t? a--tiom that th?y are occupied a ei-xing ?he wood of the French troops oWl œemammg in it/' T?ey makej no rafe?M?ce to their fierce at??c?s on Pethdncc

GROUND REWON i

attacked. The troops who occupied it were perfectly calm in the face of the bom- ba rdroent. The same telegram further asserts— (1) Phs-i. German troops are occupied in clearing Crow's Wood of parties of French who are still thpre; and 1 (2) That the Geimans have taken by assault the village of Vaux. These assertions iire likewise false. The enemy occupy at the present moment onlv tbp p??tcrR cxtrfmitT of Crow Wood, fho greater part of whkh is held by us. All the <'?rm:m counter-attacks did not Wiccee d in driving us from it. Village of Vaux Held. I The village of Vans was attackoo last i light by German troops and was vigorously deluded. It remained in our hands. A number of German infantry who succeeded in getting into the village ,nt,re driven out at the point of the havonet. It is found moreover that: since the failure of the offencrive against Verdun the German dirvpatehes are multiplying their false allegations. Thus. when the French troops retired from Fresnes, German telegrams an- nounced on March 7th that were 300 French prisoners, then on March 8th that the number of prisoners amounted to over "O'l men. As a matter of fact, thr garrison of Fresnee did not number more than 700 men, and it was able to retire from the village without great difficulty. In an attack directed upon Forges. Rrgncville and Crow's Wood, the Germans declare that thev made prisoners 58 officers and 3,278 unwounded men. As a matter foot, the garrisons of Forges and liegn

CENTRAL CONTROL BOARD j

CENTRAL CONTROL BOARD j CONFERENCE TO BE HELD AT SWANSEA The Mayor of Swansea (Alderman T. Merrelk) received intimation on Friday that the Central Control (Liquor Traffic) I Board will hold a conference at the Guildhall, Swansea, on Monday, Marah 20th, for the purpose of considering the scheduling of a further area. The visit of the Control Board has been expected fcr some time. They were ex- pected at Swansea at the end of la-st year, but for some reason or other the visit was poetpomxl. The procedure of the Control Board is to take evidence as to tho actual position, and afterwards come to a decision.

SEVEN MILES FROM KUT I 1

SEVEN MILES FROM KUT I .1,, British Relief Farce Attacks II Turks. I I Press Bureau, Thumday.-The Secre- tary for War anriounces:- Mesopotamia.—General Lake reports that General Aylmer advanced on March 6. and, moving by the right bank of the Tigris, reached the lis Sinn position, about seven miles east of Kut-el-Amara. This position was attacked on March 8. bat General Aylmer was unable to dis- lodge the enemy. General Aylmer states that the enemy suffered very severely, and beyond strengthening his position has showtf no activity. Our casualties, however, were not heavy, and the majority of the cases were very slight.

I HEWS FROM SMUTS 1

HEWS FROM SMUTS Crossing Seized by British Troops. Presa Bvreaa, Thursday.—The Secre- tary for War makes the following an- nouncement:— East Africa.-The troops under the command of Lieut.-Genera. 1 Smuts have j advanced against the German forces in tha Kilima N'jaro area. On the 7th General Smuts seized the crossings of the Lumi River with insig- nificant losses. Several counter-attacks by the enemy were successfully repelled. [The Kilima N'jaro area is situated in the north-east coast of German East Africa, to the west of Voi (on the Mom- basa Railway), and about 170 miles from the coast. Its chief feature, which gives the district its name, is an extinct snow- clad volcano, 19,328 feet high, on the German side of the frontier. On the southern slopes of this mountain is Moslu, a German military centre. The chief European settlements and planta- tions are found in this corner of the oolo113 ]

ssireirs WIFE ADMMISHEDI

ssireirs WIFE ADM(MISHED. I At Abennron on Tlmiedar, Gwendoline Howells. a young married woman, of Water-street, summoned at the instance of the N.S.P.C.C. with neglecting her four children. Mr. L. M. Thomas prose- cuted and Mr. Dan Perkins defended. Mr. Thomas said the husband was in the Army in France, and defendant re- oaived 21 fis. a week separation allow- anoe, paying 55. 3d. per week rent. Inspector Best spoke of visiting the house with P-S. ftv.yiffiek{. They found defendant and another soldier's wife in bed, with tho baby between them. Both women were drunk and the child was 1 dirty. The bedroom was filthy. There was no food in the house. They found empty beer and whisky bottles. Defn-I dant had been warned several times. j Mr. Perkins said that the defendant was prepared to give up the drink and sign the piedge. She wns severely admonished, and the case adjourned for a month. .—————————————— I

PORTUGAL IN THE GONFLIOT

PORTUGAL IN THE GONFLIOT. STATE OF WAR DECLARED t CERMAilY TAKES ACTION CONSEQUENT ON II SHiPS' SEiZUiiE. THE PORTUGUESE ARMY Renter's Amsterdftm message, under Ihursdav's date, s.a.rs :-Acco.ding to the Berlin official declaration, which will bo deiivered to the Portuguese Government in LiabMi, conclTlù( as follows: The Im- penal Government finds itlf obliged to draw necessary con-elusions from the atti-I tude of the Portuguese Government, and ■considers itself from now in a state of I war with Portugal. PORTUGAL'S ARMY. I As Poe-tugal is now practically in the war," a few particulars of her strength and resources are of interest. Her mili- tary system is a duplex one of militia and conscription, but universal compul- sory service is a projected reform. The continuous training is one of 15 to 3ij! weejuo;. Her petwô establishment is only 32,000, but the estimated war strength (first and second iine forces onlv) is: 100,000. Her military budget, for 1913-11 was for £ 1,971,210. In the fourteenth and at teen th centuries she was the world's foremost maritime power; to-day, lw'A'-j lover she has sunk to lesser rank, com- ,nvererally thriving, politically restless, ifinancially unsound. Agriculture, though backward, is Ji-er chief iijdustry. German Exodus. I Lisbon, Thursday.—German families are continuing to leave Portugal. The newspapers state that the Minister of lMaxine has sigcod an order of the day oommending the Commandant of the Naval Division. Captain Leotto Rego, and the officers and men under his command £ or tn-e manner in which they carried out the order for the utilisation of German I ships in the Tagus.-R.euter. Spanish Cabinet Council, I Madrid, Thursday.—A Council was h?H 1 at the Patac? to-day. the principal suk>-i let of (ii?ussion being the Portuguese political cituation j n relation to Germany. The Marquis de ViMaI?Tar. the Spanish Minister in Bruas?!?, nM arrívl here. The nowspape? pnhljih a Note, which has a semi-official appearance, saying that it must not 00 thought that conditions in Spain will improve by a German deciara- tion of war against P?rtngal. which it is feared will shortly he made. Oil tbt I contrary, conditions win take a turn for the worse in Sjjain, which would be bound to feel the effect of the hostilities ■ Reuter.

KEATitS RED CROSS HOSPITAL

KEA-TitS RED CROSS HOSPITAL Countess of Plymouth Opens New Institution. At the opening of "The Laurels/' Neath's new auxiliary Red Cross Hos- pital on Thursday, Mrs. Moore-Gwyn pre- sided. The Countess of Plymouth performed the opening ceremony, and referred to the good work done by such institutions. The war was not yet over, and it was necessary to prepare for eventualities. She compli- mented those responsible for the excellent equipment. Major McClean paid a warm tribute to the British soldier, who, he said, was a thorough gentleman. The President, Mrs. Moore-Gwyn, moved a vote of thanks to the Countess for her presence, which Mr. J. Cook Rees, district commandant, seconded. Miss Sybil Roos presented the countess with a bouquet.

WHAT THE MINERS WANT I

WHAT THE MINERS WANT I Another Visit to Sir George Askwith. ) The South Wales minors' deputations interview with Sic George Askwith on Thursday lasted a very short time, the members then returning to Cardiff and district. Our London correspondent, how- over, learns that the deputation fully put their ca-e before the Chief Industrial Com- missioner, but finally no definite arrange- ment of the trouble was arrived at, and it wi-S to again meet Sir George Askwith next week. It is hoped that then Mr. Runciman (President of the Board of Trade) may find it convenient to rcceive the deputa- tion for tbe purpose of discussing the tbj* matters in dispute, arisimr out of the new agreement—the Sunday nig-ht shift, the bonus turn for orders, and advanced rates of wages for ski-Ile-i surface crafts, men. On all these questions the Executive of the South Wales miners failed to agree with the owners at the last meeting of the. Conciliation Board, when negotiations to a deadlock. Now the workmen's officials are asking the Government to intervene in order to have the points settled without a stoppage.

SOME CORPORATION BILLS

SOME CORPORATION BILLS. Among the bills which came bofore the Swansea Finance Committee on Thurs- day were the following: A. E. Roseer, claim for damage to garden vallc, Pantygwydr-road, £4; The Mayor, expenses to London Jan. 30 to Feb. 2. S7 9s. 6d.; Town Clerk, expense.s to London. Jan. 30 to Feb. 2, £ 8 Gs.; Western Trinidad Lake Asphalt Co., paving and maccadam contract, S37 lGs.; J. and F. Weaver, private street works, £ 226 196. Sharpe, Pritchard and Co.. agent's chargee. Light Railways Order, 1314. etc., £ So7 9s. 4d.; Ald. M. Tutton, expenses to Cardiff, Feb. 18 (college meet- ing), £ 1 3s. lDd.; Councillor David Wil- liams, expenses to Hereford, Feb. 18 and 19, re purchase of horses, C3 Ald. J. H. Lee, expenses to London, Jan. 31 and Local Government Board re Singleton Cemetery site, £ 5 6a. [

CONTROL OF ALCOHOL I

CONTROL OF ALCOHOL MR. LL8YD CEORCE'S. WHISKY PELLETS FOR GERMANS Mr. Lloyd George some interesting facts to a deputation from the Temper- ance Council of the Christian Chun"he. which waited on him at the Ministry of Munitions on Thursday, to urge more rigid enforcement of the orders of the ^nf ral Control Board in scheduled areas. The achicveillcuhs of the Central Control Board," he said, are very re- i markable. Drunkenness in this country, so far as the lipalicie, records go, is down 10 ne- cent., aNd I think it fair to a?uiQ? that the:'? } a substantial r<'ducuoa in drinking generally. Tnei-e has been a very sulistajitial reduction in the last! quarter in the consumption of beer," and he added that police reports showed that; there bad been an increase in public order and a diminution of crime. Much hail høen done in the provision of refreshment i for the workers, in order that the men; should not be forced in meal times to goi into public houses. The Greatest Distiller. In taking over the whole of the patent still distilleries in the kingdom during the last few weeks, Mr. Lloyd George said, he bad become the greatest distiller in the world. I am doing my best to provide whisky for the Germans," he continued, ami it the whisky pellets I am distilling for th«u do half as much harm to the Ger- mans as whisky has done to this cot-in- i try I shall fed v.-ry satisfied. Our difficulties have been largely with whisky. Beer can be kept much better I under control. I shall be greatly dieap-i pointed if this war ends !x?.fore the j/eople I of this country realise that the future destiny of this Empire depends on our settling this question once for all. H I tltink we are gradually gripping rt, and I shall be very surprised if before the end of the war, experiments vil! not have been carried out with the general sense of the community which will have placed the consumption of alcohol under euch control as it has never been before, at any rate in this country. | If we do, well then the war, horrible; as it is, will have paid lor itself. There are many changes which I hopo we 8'hall accomplish through this war, hut this will be the greatest and most beneficial' change of all, if we succeed in carrying it through."

i WREXHAM BOM DISASTER i

WREXHAM BOM DISASTER i Shocking injuries Caused by Soldier's Relic. On Thursday evening a shocking tragedy occurred at M-oss. near Wrexham, Private John Bagnall, "1 the 4th Royal "WVtish Fusiliers came home from the front and wes showing a bomb which slipped out of his hand and exploded, killing a child, and inflicting terrible in- juries on six people. Bagnall, who has been at the front for 16 months, lost one leg, and the other may j have to be amputated. A woman had both legs terribly injured, necessitating ampntation. SheTstill curvie, Another; woman "lost the whole of one foot and half of the other. The fourth, a girl, sustained compound fracture of the thigh and other wounds.

SWANSEA PORT TRADE

SWANSEA PORT TRADE Gratifying Increase Recorded During February. j During the mcnth of February last, im- ports of the Swansea Harbour, represent- ing « total tonnage of fí..9Jfi. marked an increase of 7,700 tons compared with the corresponding period of 1915. Of sulphur j ore, pyrites, salt and chemicals, 13,919 tons were brought into the port, whilrt j in the same month of last year they totalled 5,478 tons. In grain 11,213 tons -were;, imported, als > an increase of 7,211 tons compared with 1915. li-ozi, cteel. pig irou and castings represented an increase oi 937 tons. For the first two months of the year the total imports were 128,269 tons, an increase over the same period of last year of 11,321 tons. Exports generally represented a de- craa-sc. For tho month of February they totalled, 332,078 tens, whilst in 1915 the exports were 3S9.128 ton?. Coal and coke sent from the port totalled 231,586 tons, j against 297,250 tons for the same period of 1915: patent fuel stood at 53,039 tons, an increase of 2.2-S9 tons compared with February of 1915. In tin, ine, and black plates, 25,110 tons were exported, whilst in 1915 the transmission from the port in this department was 19.390 The total imports and exports for Feb- ruftry were 399.994. a decrease compared with the same month last year of 49,350 A comparative statement of revenue and expenditure shows that the revenue foi the month of January was £22,138 the corresponding month last year, and the eTi^eurliture £ 39,957, against S2P.965. The exce*?? of expenditure to 31 kc December, 1915, was £ 6,517. to which has to hI' added £ 4,607 for ths month of j January.

LLANDOVERY Bmm FATALITY I

LLANDOVERY Bmm FATALITY. Mr. R. Shipley Lewis held an inquiry at Llandovery on Thursday into the cir- cumstances attending the death of Ethel Dural, a matron's maid at the College, aged 16. Miss Eussell, matron, eaid that shortly after 8 a.m. on Feb. 28th, she heard screams in the passage, and saw deceased with her clothing in flames. She tried to pall her into her room but failed, as she was too strong. She event itaHy pushed her into the room. She took a table- cloth off th? table to wnw a)M?t her, and the vardon rushed in with a liath robe and dressing gown. Witness then tripped deceased and got her on the ground and succeeded in putting out. the ifre. A student who was in bed ia the sick- room said deceased brought him breakfast about. 8.30 a.m. Witness th"'l1 noticed that the back of deceased's apron was on fire. Witness jumped out of bed and and pulled her apron off. By this time the bed had started catching fire. Witness pulled off the blanket to wrap around her, but deceased, before he could stop her, rushed from the room. After hearing the evidence of Dr. Bankes Price that deceased died of heavt failure and blood poisoning, the jury returned a verdict accordingly, and 

TWO BRITISH WARSHIPS LOST

TWO BRITISH WAR- SHIPS LOST. rINED OFF EAST COAST. TOSPEDO BOAT AND DESTROYER SiNK WITH 45 OFFICERS AND SStN. FRENCH LINEl t ALSO SUNK. The Secretary of the Admiralty an- nounces that H.M. torpedo-boat destroyer Coquette (Lieut. Yere Seymour, R.X.Ii.. in command) and H.M. torpedo-boat No. 11 (Lieut. Jones, A. D. Legh, R.N.) have struck mines and sunk off the east coast. 3 The casualties are:— II-M.S. Coquette—1. officer. 21 men. H.M. Torpedo-boat No. 11—3 officers. 20 men. [Ihe Coquette was a twin-screw torpedo destroyer of 355 tons. Her indicated horse-power was 5,700 f.rI.]. FRENCH LINER LOST- The French liner Lausiane was eunk yesterday evening: the crew are reported to have been saved. Lloyd's repcrr the French four-masted, barque Ville De Havre, in ballast, has been sunk. Twenty-six of the crew have been saved, aDd two lost-

U n J BREACH OF PROMISE SUIT

U- n J BREACH OF PROMISE SUIT. Settlement Reached in a Local Action. In the Nisi Prius Court of the Glamor- gan Assizes on Friday, a settlement wa-s announced in the breach of promise case, ITall v. Read, judgment to be entered for ".ill and costs. The plaintiff. Miss Har- riett Hall, is a dressmaker carrying on business at New Tredegar, and the de- fendant Herbert Samuel Reed, a colliery mechanic, of Cwmgwrach, Neath Valley. Mr. St. John Francis W^liiams (in- structed by Mr. Harold Lloyd) appeared for plaintiff, and Mr. Artemus Jones (in- structed by Messrs. Kenshole and Proeser) represented defendant.

CERMAr MAiiOEVRES

CERMAr MAiiOEVRES Explanation of Enemy Fleet Movements. Rotterdam, Thursday.—Inquiries made to-day at Ymuiden prove that the German Fleet was in the North Sea on Monday morning from teven to t-wclve o'cloc. evidently engagod on manoeuvres on a great scale. The Fleet steamed in a south-weeterly direction at seven o'clock, and returned between ten and eleven, making a north- easterly course in three squadrons acd in different formation from that which was seen earlier. On returning each battle- ship and cruiser was convoyed by a torpedo-boat. A Zeppelin remained above the Fleet during the manoeuvres. On each of the great ships with three or four funnels it was noticed that the after funnel was enveloped in yellow canvas. One Dutch steam trawler was stopped, the Germans giving a certificate of exami- nation of the ship's papers. Many Mines in North Sea. Copenhagen, Thursday.—The Chris- tiania correspondent oi the Politiken reports that the Norwegian steamer Mimona., which left London on Feb. 24 laden v-ith coke for Fredrikstad, is miss- ing. another steamer belonging to the same company sailed at the same time and arrived at Fredrikstad on Feb. 28. She reported fine weather during the entire crossing, hut added that she passed an extraordinary number of min. It is therefore possible that the Mimona was mined. The captain cf another Fredrikstad steamer reports that eeveral other steamers which left England for Norway on Feb. 28 are all missing. Fears are entertained that they struck minft.- Reuter. Unwonted Activity. Rotterdam, Wednesday.—The German Navy is snowing unwonted activity. Large forces of marines have If-it Hamburg and Premen for Kiel. T learn on excellent antliority that the Germans have built many super-submarines, each of which requires a crew of forty-five, but the Admiralty is experiencing difficulty in getting trained men owing to the loss of numerous U-boat. Daily Mai1." Austrian Dreadnoughts' Dash, Pome. Thursday.—According to the a Tribuna two Austrian Dreadnoughts, of the most powerfully armed ond speediest type, will shortly ettempt to run the blockade of the Adriatic and make a dash to vhe JEgean Sea. with the object of entering the Dardanelles. It is for this that the Turks are removing the mines obstructing the entrance. The two Austrian battleships hope to emulate the feat of the Goe'ten and Bres- lau. Turkey is desperately in need of such aid, especially since the Russian Fleet has been increased by two t-uper- Dreadnoughfcs. They have ju-t been com- missioned, and are co-operating in the Russian advance düng the southern coast of the Black Sea.

I BELGIANRAILWAYS MED j

 BELGIAN RAILWAYS MED. Amsterdam, Friday.—The Telegraaf letims from the frontier that last Men- day and Tuesday six French airmen flew over the railways connecting Central Bel- gium with the front. They dmpped a number of bombs. causing serious damage^ and refurned safely.

NO FIGURES TO BE ISSUEDi

NO FIGURES TO BE ISSUED Sir Alfred Moud (Swansea) having asked the Prime Minister whether it was in- report 0:1 re- cruiting up to and inclusive of March J. and whether report would state the number of single men enlisted, the number of men exempted, and the estimated num- ber of men subject to the provision* of the Military Service Act, lpit,, Mr. Asqnith has replied in- a wriften answer: Ther* i, no r.r-eeent intention of i^suins such a report.

THEWAR

THEWAR flesuma of To-day's Messages. "Leader" Office 4.50 p.m. A state of war exists between Germany and .iitugal, and Ambassadors have received their passports. Whilo this afternoon's French review gives no rt. the position around Verdun, Colonel Rousset, in the Petit Piinsien. says the French have re- gained almost the whole of Crow's Wood. H.M. torpedo-boat destroyer Coquette and H.M. torpedo-boat No. 11 have struck mines off the Last Coast and sunk. An official statement gives the losses of British non-coiubatants duo to enemy acts as ioliowsi By bombardment, 127 tilled or died of injuries; in air raids, 403 non-combatants on British mer- Gliall" and fishing ships (approximately) j 2,750. j General Aylmer lias advanced to a poj- tion about se\on miles from Kut-el- Amara. j

HEGnO RESULI I A 1 171 E Lt C T i 11 oqE S U I T

 ?H.EGnO!) RESULI I A 1 ,17)1 -E Lt C, T i 11 oq',E S U I&. T Pemberton Billing Gains Over i i 11,CLO Majority. ?Tl]9 East Herts hy?l?.tioB.vhichv; as' fought purciy ca a question of our aÚ- cra't defences, resulted in the election llr t,,rton-Bi.i1411g, an independent i candidate, ?ho roprp&ou?d vhe air | party. His opponent was Captain Brodie I-li6 cppo)-?ent -as (-'aptain Bro,.ii. j Henderson (Coalition) and the rarauf v ? a5 caused by the i?t;rpm<'nt of Sir J. Pollcston. Th? iig?rM "??? the poll were declared on Friday morning as follows: Pemberton-Billing (Iud.) 4,17,90 Henderson (Coalition) s.jr-y 'A ct j 0 Majority 1,031 At the last contest jn December. 1910, the figures were;-U., 5,594; L. I maj., 1,368. AIL-

I hI j SWANSEAS TRADE DURSHG 1915 I

__h_ j SWANSEA'S TRADE DURSHG 1915: Interesting Figures From I Harbour Trust Report. "Swansea total trade during 1915 was as acr-c-a-,ng to the Swansea Har- bcur Trust annual report:— Russia, 12,758 tens; Sweden, Norway j and Denmark. 222.252 tons Germany. Hol- land and Belgium. 88,189 tons; Channel |Islands. 22.917 tons; France. 3,137,677 tons; iPoTtugal, 77.909 tons: Gibraltar, Malta, Madeira and Azores, H6 tons; Spain, 256.4O tons; Italy, 693.809 tons; Austria, j Greece and Rumania. etc., 47,265 tons; Algeria, Turkey. Tunis, Egypt, Morocco and North Africa, 197,354 tons; Cape of Good Hope and E. and W. Africa, 34,293 tons; Bengal. Bombay nud Persia, etc., 1.5,452 tons; Straits Settlements. China and' Japan, 90.6 tons; North AD?ri<-?, 153,188 tOD; Souih America, 1?,?.? tcn&; Aus- tralia? 4.155 tons; total ?orfign trade, 5,198.525 tons; total coastwise trade, 677,952 tons: grand total, 5,873.477 tons.

I SERIOUS RIOTS INCOLOGNE

I SERIOUS RIOTS INCOLOGNE. I Amsterdam, Thursday.—According to •the Telegraaf," rumours are again cur- rent that last. Ttlesday serious riots took place at Cologne, apparently caused by the heavy losses of Germany around Verdun. Travellers were not allowed to leave trains at the railway station. It is reported that guns have been posted in order to keep back the Jpob.

ISOLDIER OR POLITICIAN

I SOLDIER OR POLITICIAN? The Daily Telegraph Parliamentary correspondent understands that Colonel Churchill has been granted a few days fur- ther leave of a bsence by the War Office in order to determine whether he will re- turn to his regiment at the front or dis- l'ha,rg-e his duties in the Iiou.se of Com- j mons. On Thursday evening Colonel Churchill had not. yet arrived at a decision. Many of his political friends are urging him to stay. P is probable that he wll return to France.

1j DOCKS ADVISORY COMMITTEE I

j DOCKS ADVISORY COMMITTEE. I In conncciion with the Swansea Cham- j bcr of Commerce there is au advisory | committee dealing with the Military Ser- vice Bill, composed of tho following gentle- men :—Messrs. H. Goldberg (president), E. P. Jones (.vice-president), T. P. Cook, W. T. Farr, W. Turpin, and Mr. J. H. !-Marshall (secretary). Two meetings have already been held, and one was held on Friday afternoon, when several appeals from docks employers for exemption for members of their office stair were con- sidered. and recommendations made to the military authorities. The result of the appeals are not given as the deliberations of this committee are strictly private.

z I MINING ENGINEERS FAILORLI

z.?- = MINING ENGINEER'S FAILORL I The statutory first meeting of the credi- tors interested in the failure of Mr. Ernest Hall Hcdley, described as of 28, Pembridge-square. Noiting Hill Gate, and lately residing at Pontardawe, Glamorgan- shire, bok plac on Friday, before Mr Garton, the deputy official receiver, at the London Bankruptcy Court. The statement of affairs hied under the proceedings disclosed -to- liabilities of which = £ '7,512 are scheduled as unsecured, and no available assets. in the absence of a quorum rf the credi- tors, no resolutions were passed, and the matter was left in the hands of the official receiver, who .ill wind up the estate in j bankruptcy n- ter an order for nummary I administrati' 

Advertising

I AERIAL SUCCESSES. I "ii Gsrrnan Machines Brought Down. Paris, rr; 'ay.-To-day'c- communique contains the ff'irwing in addition to ths earlier published daily review — During the day of the 8th March, our cho-red par4licula- activity. A nrzabcr of combats were delivered by ur marbiD. mostly is. the tnemy .U. In the couree oi these aerial engagements 15 German machines were put to flight. Ten were eeec to drop vertically in their lines. Accord- iiig to definite information, two German ol -oplaiies, one being a lokker, were j also struck down in Champagne, ar