Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 6 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
35 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

1 The Cambria Daily L d 1 Lea d er gives later news than any paper published in this dis- trict.

Advertising

The London Office of the "Cambria Daily Leader" y is at 151, Fleet Street (first floor), where adver- tisements can be received up to 7 o'clock each evening for insertion in the next day's issue. Tel. 2276 Central.

WAVE UPON WAVE

WAVE UPON WAVE. MANY ATTACKS FAIL AT VERDUN GERMANS FORGED TO ALTER THtik pLAN Paris, Friday.—The Echo de Paris" oSa..V$ We learn from reliable sources that it va.s our energetic offensive on May 23rd against the fort of Douaumont tha;t brought about the violent reaction on 'the fcide of the enemy, and compelled him to attack on the whole front with his reserve divisions vuich lie had only mean t to use later on. In other words, the enemy has had to titer his plans in order to counter our LJ o tl v t1- The general perspective of the battle is as follows: Yesterday, after, an extremely violent bombardment of our trenches, at about 4-30 in the afternoon, two waves of attack- ing forces, to tiie strength of two regi- ments. advanced and (lec Imated and effectively checked by the curtain fire of f-ur machine-guns from the slopes north of Thiauraont. At 4.40 aii-other assaulting oolumn, pre- ceded by pionters, was entirely swept away by our curtain fire halt-way between Douaumont and Bras. north-west of Hill 310. A BRIEF VISIT. At 5.20 a German brigade debouched from the north of the wood of Haudro- ni-ont in three fractions. The attack was received by us with a furious fusillade, and the assaulting columns were cut up. Nevertheless one German battalion managed to gain a footing near the quar- ries north of the fork in the roads from Bras to Louvemont and Bras to Douau- mont, but we ejected the enemy from the Positions he had succeeded in taking by counter-attacks in the south-west. To sum up, on the whole terrain torn up by ehells situated on the right bank of the river the situation remains un- changed. To the west of the Me use we await a renewed offensive on the part. of the enemy, "'no is ceaselessly bombarding our posi- tions between Avocourt, the south of Hill O., and south of Cumieres, but the very fact that he has pushed further an flx- ••"emely violent effort of the day before 'jhow-s that he has been forced to reor- ganise his badly cut up units. In conclusion, on summing up the situation it seems to be fairly encouraging ">n account of the effectiveness of our heavy artillery, which, operating from the Rois Heese and from BOIS Bourrus, keeps the enemy at a distance in spite of every- iing. BATTERING-RAM TACTICS. Pa.ris, Friday.—Tihe terrific struggle of the iktst two days on each bank of the Meuse has been succeeded before Verdun KTa. series of German offensive actions on UlI'I eastern sector alone, with the evident object of reducing to nought our progress of May 25th on the Douaumont Plateau, t-o-day's gemi-offici-,il review. This time the enemy returned to the Elated battering-ram tactics. They attacked first our positions at the quarries Haudromont, north of which they suc- nfteded only in occupying a trench. Then, towards the end of the day, they launched series of violent assaults between Haudromont Wood and Tbiaucourt. Farm Without any other result than to enter the advanced elements of our line. These are. it can be seen, absolutely hi vial results, which promise nothing and eonii)romipe nowise our recent gains in this direction. In the Douaumnot region the artillery tfuel continues very fiercely on both sides without interruption, and is a prelude to Spending infantry actions. Attempts will be renewed, perhaps soon, and perhaps eVeIJ simultaneously, on the left bank. Where Hill 304, which has itself been sub- letted to a continuous and progressive Lombard merit, seems to be the objective particularly in view. Finally, the enemy, taught a lesson by Yesterday's murderous defeat, made no briber attempt to debouch from Cumieres, but our grenade-throwers, in actions, regained ground in the little woods on the eastern border of the ullage, thus forestalling any enemy en- sloping movement by the narrow defile ^"hich separates our forces from the wparates ouz foi-c?es from the LAST NIGHTS FRENCH OFFICIAL.1 IJaris, Thursday, 11 p.m.—To-night's f c-ial communique says:— the left bank of the M^u«e the -etiyity of the enemy artillery increased tAiring the day against our positions at Hill 304. On the right bank, after a violent bom- ardment, the Germans made a series of ^ffensive actions at 5 o'clock between ■"audromont Wood and Thiaumont Farm. All thoc.e atta.cks were repulsed with heavy loss except at one point, where "-nemy parties carried a trench element. Tn the Douaumont. region artillery actions continued violently on both sides. firing by one of our long range guns QaUReQ a conflagration in a German war stores depot at Haudioourt. north-east of St, ilihiel On the rest of the front there was inter- mittent cannonading. During an air fight one of our pilots brought down a Fokker. which fell in the 5 He my lines north of Vaux In the region of Etain one of our squadrons engaged a party of German a're^aft. Two enemy machines, seriously damaged, were forced to descend. GERMAN OFFICIAL (Thursday). Wt of the Meuse three enemy attacks Against the village.of Cumieres, which they have lost, failed. Bast of the river, following up their successes of the day before yesterday, our regimenfcs pushed forward and captured ^nemy trenches south-west and south of Port Douaumont. The quarry south of the Farm of Haudromont is again in our hands. In Caillette Wood the enemy all day long made unsuccessful attacks against our position. Besides very heavy "ap-guiiiarv losses, the French lost, over 850 Prisoners and fourteen machine guns. Two enemy biplanes were shot down in allr fights—one near St. Souplet, and the frther near Herbebois.—Press Association.

OFF FLANDERS COAST I

OFF FLANDERS COAST. I Th German official on Thursday stated trerrftan aeroplanes attacked a number torpedo-boats and scout vessels I Off tbe ooaat of Flanders.

15041 000 VOLUNTEERS I

15,041 000 VOLUNTEERS. I I KINO'S MESSACE TO THE NATION I PRESS BUREAU, Thursday, 9.50 p.m. The following message from his Majesty the King to his people is passed to the Press for publication: Buckingham Palace, May 25th, 1916. To enable our country to organise more effectively its military resources in the present great struggle for the cause of civilisation I have, acting on the advice of my Ministers, deemed it necessary to enrol every able-bodied man between the ages of 18 and 41. I desire to take this opportunity of expressing to my people my recognition and appreciation of the splendid patriot- ism and self-sacrifice which they have displayed in raising by voluntary enlist- ment since the commencement of the war no fewer than 5,041,000 men, an effort far surpassing that of any other nation in similar circumstances recorded in history, and one which will be a lasting source of pride to future generations. < am confident that the magnificent spirit which has hitherto sustained my peopw through the trials of this terrible war will inspire them to endure the addi- tional sacrifice now imposed upon them, and that it will, with God's held, lead us and our Allies to a victory which shall achieve the liberation of Europe.— (Signed) GEORGE R.I.

I KUT PRIVATIONS I

I KUT PRIVATIONS. I Exchanged Prisoners on I Their Ordeal. Bombay, Thursday.—To-day I was granted an interview with some exchanged prisoners from Kut. All bear traces of great hardship and starvation. A private in the 2nd Dorsets said that April's rations were ioz. of bread and 12oz. of flesh per man per day. The men ate weeds as vegetables, and the customary drink was tea or ginger- beer made from bits of ginger boiled in water. All the men paid glowing tributes to General Townshend. A very small proportion of the British prisoners, as compared with native troops, were included in the number of those ex- changed. The total number of Britons so changed does not appear to have been more than eighty. Their fate was decided by a Turkish Army doctor who visited the hospital, and after a cursory examination pronounced Yes or No."—Exchange Telegraph.

OUR AIR SERVICES I

OUR AIR SERVICES. I Lord Montagu Gives I S Evidence,, i The fourth sitting of ?he li;.al Com- mittee appointed to inquire ]-?to th? alic- rations against the air orvioe v as held on Friday at Westminster Hall, L^rd^n. Lord Montagu of Beaulieu, the hist wit- ness, was told that the committee desired to got at any charges or criticisms that W-C)IIld direct their attention to special matters which they thought ought to be inquired into. Lord Montagu said he h;d rever brouglij; any personal charges f.j-ains' the Royal Flying Corps. He had uttackid the system, not persons. I Lord Montagu remarked that the general purport of his early speeches on the subject showed the helplessness of trying to-get the Government to do any- thing in these matters unless one could get public support.

PIGEON RACING I

PIGEON RACING. I A month after the war started pigeon racing was prohibited, and it is estimated that since- then a million and a half hom- ing pigeons have been idle. The National Homing Union has now been officially in- formed that pigeon training will be per- mitted. under cprbain conditions, from points twenty miles inland and with the convoys limited to 400 birds. A special eoiiirliit i ee. of the union will meet on Satur- day to arrange details.

ECONOMIC CONFERENCE I

ECONOMIC CONFERENCE. I As the result of an exchange of views I between the Allied Governments, it has bæn decided to adhere to the date of iiine- 5 fixed for the meeting of the Econo- mic Conference in Paris. The chief Italian delegate will be Signor Daneo, the Minister of Finance, since the other members of the Italian Cabinet who had hoped to attend the Conference are likelv to be detained in Rome by their Pa rliamentary en >"»epmp!its.

THE COLONELS LETTERI

THE COLONEL'S LETTER. I Lieutenant-Colonel John Bland Jameson, R.A.M.C., charged at the Central Criminal CAmrt on Thursday with unlawfully incit- ing Dr. Frank Collins to administer drugs to an unknown woman, was found not guilty and was disch arged. Mr. Muir, prosecuting, said the defendant wrote to the doctor stating that a woman, an old friend of his family, who was engaged to an officer, desired a consultation, and that before committing suicide she had thrown herself on my mercy. She is poor and a governess. I ask if you could help her." The defendant said the girl in queyrtion believed that 'he man was either dead or a prisoner. He (the defendant) had not the slightest intention of asking the doctor to do anything illegal.

LAST OF THE GRACES I

LAST OF THE GRACES. I The death is announced of Dr. Alfred Grace, the last survivor of the five brothers, of whom W. G., E. M., and Fred attained such exceptiona l distinction in the cricket field. Alfred was the second son and was born at Downend, near Bristol, on May 17, 1840. He never appeared at Lord's, but accord- ing to N Scores and Biographies he was a pretty good cricketer, his usual pewt in the field being longstop. As a player at no tinic, did he rank with his brothers, but in local cricket he scored several innings of over a hundred, and when only 1.5 years old be formed. on? of 22 of West Gloucestershire who met the All England Eleven at Bri-stol. Although he did not excel as a cricketer, Alfred stood out as one of the finest horsemen in England, and for many years followed the Duke of Beau- fort's hounds three or four days a week. For many years Dr. Alfred Grace prac- tised as a surgeon ^t Chipping Sodbury, ,G loiaBWtershi re.

WORRYING THE TURK I

WORRYING THE TURK. I R. F. C. Do Good Work in Egypt. London, Thursday.—The Secretary of the War Office makes the following an- nouncement :— Since the enemy's air attack c;i Fort Said yesterday and to-day he has allowed little rest by the Royal Flying Corps. This morning advanced posts -it Rolli Salem, El Hamma, Bir Bayud, Bir Sal. mana, and Bir El Mazar were heavily bombed by four of our machines. Fo- tv bombs were dropped and had considerable effect. The buildings and plant at El Hamme were seriously damaged, while the water tanks a.t Rodh Salem were smashed by direct bombs. This will upset the whole plan of the enemy as since the destruction of the drilling plant at Jifjaffa by one of our patrols he has set great store on the water works at Pohd Salem. Diinn^ the return journey the pipes leading to the petrol tank of one of our machines was perforated by a bullet. The airman was forced to descend in a wadi beyond our lines, but managed to repair leak and return safely. According to the reports now received it is evident that the column, consisting of troops who suffered heavily from the bomb attack on El Arish by the Royal Flying Corps on May 18, were Germans. This perhaps explains their hasty retali- ation by dropping bombs on Port Said civilians. Further details of the naval bombard- ment of El Arish on May 18 have been received. Two monitors and sloop took part in the attack, their accurate fire be- ing directed by seaplanes with great eifect. Altogether 34 shells were fired by the heavy guns of the monitors, two of which were observed to hit the hangar on the aerodrome, while most of the remainder hurst in the camp among the tents, caus- ing the enemy to scatter in all directions. Many took to cover amongst the palm groves near to the shore, but meanwhile, under covering tire of the monitors the sloop stood in close to the shore and thoroughly searched these groves with, salvoes of medium-size shell.

SKEWENS DCM

SKEWEN'S D.C.M. Promoted to Rank of Sergt.-i Major. The welcome news has just been re- ceived at Skewen, that Corporal Albert S. Widlake, of the 6th Welsh Regiment, who some time ago was awarded the D.C.M. for gallantry on the field, has now been promoted to the rank of Ser- geant-Major, as a result of his excep- tional efficiency as a soldier. This is another source of great gratification to his wide circle of friends.

BURIED FOR EVER I

BURIED FOR EVER. No Differences Now Between Britain and Russia. Moscow, Thursday.—Receiving the free- dom of the city to-day, Sir George Buchanan, the British Ambassador, said the jealousies, suspicions, and mutual differences 8pd misunderstandings which formerly scpara.t?d Russia and Great Britain were buried for cv?r. The new ara op?ned full of promise for the futnre. The two Governments were in full agreement on all questions on which formerly their interests clashed. With their faithful ami valiant ally (France) they would march to ?nal victory. Tliat.1 achieved, nothing would he able to shake I the alliance.

BLIGHTED HOPES I

BLIGHTED HOPES. I Germany Disappointed at Text of Sir Ed. Grey's Speech. I Amsterdam, Friday.—Advices received from the Hague states that Sir Edward Grev's speech relative to peace has pro- duced a startling effect upon the Berlin Bourse, where prices fell heavily when the text of the speech was made known in the evening papers. In political circles an attempt is being made to explain away the speech as "mere bluff." although the leading politicians, editors, and captains of industry express the view that Sir Edward Grey's speech represents the opinion of the whole of the people of England. Germany is disap- pointed at the solidarity which, according to Sir Edward Grey, exists between Eng- land and France.

VETERAN FIELDMARSHAL I

VETERAN FIELD-MARSHAL. I A wireless message from Berlin says: Field-Marshal von ibuck, who is 70 years old, has received numerous congratula- tions, amongst other a. message from the Emperor. Von Kluck, whose health is completely restored, though one bullet is still tmextracted, has offered, himself again to the Emperor for service.

LIMITATION OF PRICESI

LIMITATION OF PRICES. I Meetings of the coalowners' associations were held again in London on Thursday to consider the proposals to be laid before the President of the Board of Trade re the limitation of prices of coa l for export to France. The Board of Trade suggest that prices should be limited to 20 per cent. below those ruling on March 8th. In the evening Mr. Runciman again met the coalowners, who put their suggestions before him. The proceedings were private, but it is understood that an arrangement was come to, and that a scheme will now be completed to meet the position.

MOVED THE SCOTCH I

MOVED THE" SCOTCH." I Mr. W. W. Brodie conducted an inquest at Llanelly concerning the death of Dd. J. Jones (15L 47, We&tbury-st.reet, who was killed while following his employ- ment. It appeared from the evidence that a crane was being worked in connec- tion with excavations at the South Wales Steelworks extension on a slight incline, and that it was scotched by the foreman, who claimed that he was the only person that had a right to do the ecotching. The deceased was seen remov- ing the scotch, with the result that the crane moved down the incline. Deceased got in front of the crane and was run over, his left arm being severed while he aleo sustained internal injuries. Ac- cording to the driver of the crane he gave no instructions to the boy to remove the sootch.-A verdict of U Accidental Death I was returned. I

I THE REBELLION I

THE REBELLION I WARIll iGS THAT REACHED. THE AUTHORITIES. The Royal Commission on the Irish rebellion re-assembled on Friday in Dublin. Major Price, ex-inspector of the Royal Irish Constabulary, who acted as inter- mediary between the police and the j Under-Secretary, said the Arms Act worker perfectly during the period of its operation, but from August, 1914,, to November, 1915, the importation of arms was permitted. After the expiry of the Peace Preservation Act arms were sold all over the country. Arms were im- ported and sold in various places-some in grocers' shops. Major-General Friend, next called, said he came over to Ireland in 1913. and was thflll connected with the administration, ] and combined his duties with the com- mand of the troops for a period until Sir J',hn Maxwell came over. During i 1913-11 he watched the progress of various bodies of volunteers in Ireland, and after the outbreak of the" ar those movements took a new departure. Existing volunteer organisations north and south came for- ward and helped the military authorities energetically. Large numbers of them joined the ranks of the army. THE BIRTH OF SINN FEIN. In 1914 a new organisation came to his notice. It opposed recruiting for the army. Mem hers were pledged to take an obligation not to enlist. This was the Sinn Fein. It fluctuated in character i and numbers, but arms of various kinds were obtained in various ways. Action was taken, but he had always to consult Dublin Castle before he took definite steps. The most serious drawback was found to be in the right of appeal from the court-martial to trial by jury. In Dublin, Cork and parts of Galway the position caused anxiety There were various reports and warnings, and from the Admiral at Queenstown there was a warning given of the possibility of the at- tempted landing of arms from Germany, America, or by a rising of disaffected persons, as well as volunteers. These alarms had been going on for eighteen months. On February 9th last he at- tended a meeting with the Chief Secre- tary and Under-Secretary at Dublin Castle, and in consequence of that meet- ing he wrote the Comjna ndor-in-CItief of the Home Forces and Adjutant-General, and a correspondence ensued. MORE OPEN PROCEEDINGS. He told headquarters of a conversation be had with Mr. jiirrell and Sir Matthew Nathan, in which he had spoken of the | importance he attached to the more open I proceedings of ih0 Sinn Fein organisa- tion. Under the Defence of the Realm Act he thought he could not do much more than he had already done, and he considered great-r powers ought to have been given him to take stronger action. Lord French saw Mr. Birrell personally in London, and he got a letter dated 14th February, saying Lord French had seen Mr. Birrell and discu?ed the position with him. The C'h?i?'ma.r: Was anythinK done at' the time in consequence of th:; corre- spondence ? I Witness. Not as between the War Office and the Home Office authorities and my- self. hut we rearranged the troops here. THE MILITARY AUTHORITY. I He was in direct communication with ill.. War Office. Several warnings were received to an attempted landing and simultaneous rising in March and April. The Chairman: Were the troops suffi- cient to meet a }K>ssible rising? Witness: I had to strike a balance be- tween the requirements in England and whether I should call for assistance. Up to April 1 took the responsibility of say- ing 1 had a sufficient force to meet all emergency. The Chairman: To whom are you directlv responsible J- Witness: To the War Office up to the end of 1915; now to. Lord French. I have usually informed Lord Lieutenant of anything of special importance from time to time. Has he any control over the military forces in Ireland ?—None. If His Excel- lency asked for more troops to be brought into Dublin, I should not be obliged to comply with that suggestion, but I should telegraph K) the Wlir Office to say he had asked, me. Were you present at the interview be- tween Lord French, Lord Wimborne, and Mr. Birrell on 23rd March?—Yes.

HIRED TO COMMIT MURDER j I

HIRED TO COMMIT MURDER, j New York, May 25.—A German woman j has confessed to the county authorities that she was hired to blow up a Cunarder leaving New York en Saturday. Sh0 ,as carrying an infernal machine on board wrapped up in baby's clothing, and re- turned to the pier on the pretence of ex- amining her baggage. Detectives are now searching for the conspirators.—Exchange.

THE WIFE TO BLAME I

THE WIFE TO BLAME. In the Divorce Court on Friday Mr. Justice Bargrave Deane found that Mr. Wm. Thomas Stevens had proved his case against his wife and granted him a decree nisi with costs, the wife being pronounced guilty of adultery with the two co- respondents, Alfred Shone and Percy Frederick Beaumont Thornton, the latter now in the Army, who gave evidence denying the charges against him, and with a man unknown. Respondent had denied all the charges of the respondent.

OFFICERS BRAVE ACT J

OFFICER'S BRAVE ACT. J The Albert Medal of the second class has just been awarded to Second-Lieut. William Marychurch Morgan, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. During grenade instruc- tion in a trench a man let fall a grenade, which sank in the mud, so that only the smoke from the burning fus", could be seen. Lieut. Morgan, who was outside the danger zone, at once sprang forward and groped in the mud for the grenade. The difficulty of finding it added greatly to the danger. He picked up the grenade and threw it over the parapet just in time, thereby saving several men from death or serious injury. Second-Lieut. Morgan is the son of the Rev. William Morgan, formerly Congrega- tional minister at Saundersfoot and Saris. The rev. gentlemarn has now retired from the ministry, and resides at Burton. Second-Lieut. Morgan has been twice wounded, ajid has two brothers in the Army.

FOOD SUPPLIES

[ FOOD SUPPLIES. German States "Sucked Dry" I by Prussia. Amsterdam. Friday.—According to Ger- man newspapers, the President of the German Food Supply Board, Herr Von Batocki, made a short speech before the cMfif Budget Committee of the Reich- it8g.. tIe warned the House not to expect any sudden change or improvement of the conditions. Of special importance was thr- close co-operation of the new board with the authorities of the Federal States. tli-, az-my, and the civil administration. Great difficulties," he added, are nrising out of the relations of the Federal States. From Wurtemberg al- I ready menacing letters have reached me, protesting against the sucking dry of Wurtemberg by Prussia. Without the ready co-operation of the authorities of the Federal states. their organisations, and entire population, say work cannot j 1m successful." THE ADVENT OF PEACE. Cohlmenting on Sir Edward Grey's re- ply to the pacifists in the House of Commons, the "Cologne Gazette*" writes:— We agree with Sir Edward Grey that it is useless to indulge in re- eliminations. We cannot understand Sir Edward Grey, and he will not under- dand ns. Therefore, the military events I mud speak. If Sir Edward Grey speaks of first-class lies and says the German people are being fed with lies by this Government, we reply that we do not feel as if we are being ted with lie. but that we greatly pitv the English and the French peoples, because the promises which their leading men made them havo not been fulfilled once during the war. The hoar of retaliation will yet come. The Koelnische Volkszeitung says p-?aeo can only be built upon a general acknowledgment of the military facts of war. Sir Edward Grey declares he is not prepared to do this, which proves that the time for- peace negotiations has not come yet.

THEY RAN AWAY

THEY RAN AWAY. Germans Decline to Face Portuguese Landing Party. Capetown, Friday.—An official telegram from Lorenzo Marques states that a naval force from a Portuguese cruiser landed on May 21st at Point Rovumo, and attacked the German positions on the left bank. The Germans retired without fighting.

TURKS ISOLATED

TURKS ISOLATED. Russians Likely to Strike a I Smashing Blow. Paris, Friday.—In a dispatch from Piolis to H Le Journal," its special corre- spondent says:— Russian troops continue to progress vic- toriously. Caueaks-us and in Meso- potamia. A. smashing result may soon be looked for in Mesopotamia. Their simultaneous action in Russian and British areas is daily becoming more act-in. A Tllrkish force of over 100.000 men is isolated and unable to receive any tangible reinforcements.

NEUTRAL SHIPS

NEUTRAL SHIPS. Ravages of German Submarines. Athens, Thursday.—The Press con- tinues to express indignation at the tor- pedoing of Greek steamers by Austro- German submarines, and suggests that the Greek Government should claim the same rights for its flag as the American Government. Fifteen Greek steamers, totalling about 40,000 tons, have been destroyed by German submarines. Lloyds report that the Spanish steamer Aurrera has been sunk. Lloyds report that the Italian steamer Ercole has been sunk by a submarine in the Mediterranean.

COAL TRADE DEADLOCK

COAL TRADE DEADLOCK Mr. Runciman Convenes Joint I Board Meeting. The South Wales Miners' Federation Executive again met Mr. Runciman, Pre- sident: of the Board of Trade, on Friday morning to consider the dcadiock which has arisen in the South Wales coalfield j over the wages question. The men com- plain that Lord Muir Mackenzie, the in- dependent chairman; who on Thursday night resigned his position, had rendered it impossible to adjudicate upon the appli- cation, he having given an opinion in a letter to the joint secretaries of the Con- ciliation Board before having the matter discussed under his chairmanship. On Friday morning, the new situation which has arisen owing to the resignation of Lord Muir Mackenzie was discussed, and Mr. Runciman undertook to convene a joint meeting of the Conciliation Board at Cardiff on Monday next to consider the situation. To this course the depu ta tion agreed and decided to hold a meeting of their executive at Cardiff at 10.30 to- morrow (Saturday) morning.

STEAMER ABLAZE I

STEAMER ABLAZE. A Lloyd's telegram from Hong Kong, dated May 26th. states that the British steamer Wisley, New Ycrk and Port Natal for Vladivostock, has been beached, and is on fire, in Vrangro Bay, Capo Varella, Cochin, China. With prompt help the ship and a considerable cargo can be saved. The tug David Gillies, with the necessary gear, has been des- patched, and a surveyor accompanies her.

ENEMY DISLODGED I ENEMY DISLODGED

ENEMY DISLODGED. ENEMY DISLODGED. Petrograd, Tliursday.-To-dayls official communique says:— j Western Front.—In the region west of the 161and of Dalem the Germans after violent bombardment, took the offensive, and driving back our advance guard cap- tured one of our advanced trenches. We delivered a counter-attack and dislodged the enemy, who withdrew to his trenches. Our losses were insignificant. We repulsed by our fire an enemy at- tempt to advance towards Karpifovka (ten versts to the north of Olyka railway i station) and cut our barbed wire entangle- ments. On the rest of the front the situation remains unchanged. Caucasus Front.—In the direction of Mosul we repulsed an enemy offensive ,against Reranduz;

TODAYS WAR RESUME II

| TO-DAYS WAR RESUME I I "Leader" Office 4.50 p.m. I The King, in a message to the nation, states that 5,041,000 men have joined the Colours as volunteers. < The German battering-ram tactics have availed them little against Verdun. The fighting still continues on the most in- ten scale. The Compulsion Bill is now law, and I comes into force on June 24. Dissensions among the Federal States of Germany are reported, mainly on the question of food supplies, Wurtemberg accusing Prussia of sucking the other States dry.

TGMVS NrlWs IN BRIEfl

TG-MVS Nrl-Ws IN BRIEfl The Earl of Halsburv wa.s stated to be much better last evening. Berne, Thursday.—To-day's official rate for sight Exchange on Germany per 100 I marks was 95 francs. It is 123 francs normally. Mr.. E. W. Milner Jones, .barrister, of Cardiff, has been appointed a Commis- sioner for Wales by the Military Service (Civil Liabilities) Committee to investi- gate cases of hardship. He represents Glamorgan County. Rome, May 25.—By a decree of to-day's date, following on a Cabinet Council, Lieutenant-General Roberto Brusati has been placed on the retired list. Lieuten- ant-General Brusati was the junior com- mander of the Second Italian Army. Mr. Oswald Stoll has fixed upon Cin- derella as the book of a new pantomime that he will put on next season at his new place—the London Opera House. He has engaged a fine lot of artistes already, and bids fair to rival the splendours of Drury Lane. Sydney, Thursday.—According to a Kal- gorlie telegram, the progress of the refer- endum of the goalfields electorates on the question of the earlier closing of hotels shows 3,820 votes in favour of closing them at six o'clock, and 6,60d in favour of clos- ing at eleven o'clock. -Air. Heydon, President of the Court of Arbitration in Sydney, has refused the application of the Pastry Cooks' Union for fresh registration on the ground that the strikers defied the court. The original j registration of the Union was cancelled because the members struck on being re- fused Easter holidays. Simla, Thursday.—The Viceroy has wired General Sir Douglas Haig acknow- ledging General Joffre's telegram, and say- ing India is proud her sons should fight in the same cause and on the same field with the gallant armies of Prance, whose prowess at Verdun has won the admira- tion of the whole world.

I MINING ACTIVITY AT LOOS I

MINING ACTIVITY AT LOOS. I -7 The following official statement was issued at British Headquarters on Thurs- ilay;- Last nigut and to-day there has been considerable mining activity in the Loos salient, in which we have had the advan- tage. The artllery on both sides have been active at many points of the line, princi- pally near Gommeccurt, at Arras, and the Vimy Ridge, opposite Hulluch and Wytschacte, and Fricourt, and Bauraines. Our fire was particularly effective.

I MR LLOYD GEORGES PLANS

MR. LLOYD GEORGE'S PLANS. Mr. Lloyd Georgo will probably visit Ireland during the next few days, but. no definite arrangement has been made, Meanwhile he will continue ponvprsat'i?n? with the leaders. No joint conference ha5 yet taken place, but there is a likelihood of one being arranged. It will, however, be quite informal.

MARRIED TO A MAORI I

MARRIED TO A MAORI. I A romantic wedding was celebrated at Walton-on-Thames on Thursday, when an English girl, Miss Winifred Alderton, was married to a Maori soldier who had fought in Gallipoli, and who did not reach thi> country tiil eight weeks a TO. The bridegroom. Private refer Poi-Poi, a man of splendid physique, belongs to the 16th New Zealand Regiment. He came to Walton as a patient in the Felix Hospital, where he has been nursed back to health. lie anticipates returning to New Zealand I on home service.

Advertising

FRENCH RE-TAKE TRENCH. The following French comrouniquA was issued in Paris on Friday after* noon:— In Argouae vo exploded a mine witii inject* ar La Fille Morto. On the left liuitls of the Meucourf. Wood and the Dead Man. Tn latter region a German attach, which ■wta« preparing to debouch, proved abortive after our curtain firt- .immedi- ately tho attack started. On the right bunk a, counter-attack restored to na the port ion of the trench occupied yesterday bv the enemy between tb llauuromjiit Wood and Thiamont. To "i e: fu-rm ve pregr $ Wit Loud Qrenadcs in tne couri»o of tliQ night and took wmc prisoners. Tha night was relatively calm on the reel of the front. GATWICK MEETING. BettiEg: S to 1 skyscraper. S.S't-Amphitryon. 1. Parley and Ken- drh d- ad heat.—17 rac- 5 to I Amphitryon. 4