Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 6 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
33 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

I The" Cambria Daily Leader" gives later I I news than any paper I published in this dis- trict.

Advertising

The London Office of the I Cambria Daily Leader" is at 151, Fleet Street (first floor), where adver- ¡ tisements can be received up to 7 o'clock each evening for insertion in the next day's issue. Tel. 2276 Central.

VERDUN BATTLE I

VERDUN BATTLE I NEW STRUGGLE FOR THE I FORTRESS HUGE fAILURErn CHAMP  HME FA!Lm !M CMMPAME TO-DAY'S FRENCH OFFICIAL. The following French OOllUllUIllllll n<><> issued on Friday afternoon:— In Belgium a destructive fire from our batteries overthrew the enemy's organisa- tion in the region of tho Dunes. In Champagne yesterday, at the close of fcfee evening, following upon, the bom- bardment of our positions situated jye- tween Maisons-de-Champagne and Aut- mont-Fetu, the (jerm

No title

Mr. Harold V. Williams, B.A. (Oxon.), ron of Mr. W. Williams, The Cliff, Mum- j hies, was ordained in Holy Orders on Sun- day last by the Bishop of Llandafi' (for the Bishop of St.

OALLAMT WELSHMEN I

OALLAMT WELSHMEN I FUSILIERS BniLLIAiil COMTEK-ATTACK I SENuS OtRiViAfiS BAiK I ENEMY CUaG SILENCED I Thursday night's official report from British Headquarters in France says:- Early this morning the enemy 

US AND MEXICO

U.S. AND MEXICO. The Fighting on the Fronts. El Paso, Friday.-A few additional de-) tails have T0adled the hordeI'  tails have reac hed the bor d er regarding the iiicidezit. Ac(-ordiii, to a wireless message from General Pershing, stragglers report that the Americans suf- fered an unprovoked attack. They num- bered 65, and the Mexicans 200. Captain and Lieut. Adair, commanding the negro cavalry, were killed. The Mexican General Trevino threatens attack unless Pershing's forces retire to the ))order.-Reiitor. AMERICA PROMPT. Washington, Fi-i(lay.-The War De- partment has ordered the fii 'it five thousand men of the militia mobilised in thtl Central and Western States to be rushed immediately to the border regard- less of the branch of service to which they belong.

UNITED FRANCE I

UNITED FRANCE. I Virtual Confidence Vote for I Government. Paris, Thursday (received Ilridav).-A i .ution accepted by the Government, to-night, "declares that the Chamber was resolved to give, in close co-operation with the Government, a more and more vigorous impulse to national defence, and to see that industrial and military pre- paratione were conducted with an activity and foresight corresponding to the heroism of the soldiers of the Republic. I It recognised.that the Secret Session had permitted it to be effectively informed, and decided to exert direct and effective control with the co-operation of the Gov- ernment of atl war services, and confident that the Government would employ all its energy towards strengthening the conduct of the war. The resolution was eventu- ally adopted by 44-1 to 80.-Reuter.

SWANSEA VTC

SWANSEA V.T.C..| Forthcoming Address on New Regulations. We are informed hy Major Perkins that he has received a telegram from London stating that Mr. James Little, Registrar of the Council of Volunteer Training Corps, is coming to Swansea on Monday next to address a meeting of the battalion and their friends at the Albert Hall the .same evening, when he will explain the new regulations.

SAILOR S BIG DROP

SAILOR S BIG DROP. Jno. Johnson, A.B., of the s.s. Mane Eh-ie. now in the King's Dock, was ad- mitted to the Swansea Hospital on Fri- day wit'i injuries to the left foot. It ap- years that Johnson was going down the bunker hatch of the vessel to feed a dog belonging to the ship when he fell and dropped a. distance of 21 feet into the hold. He sustained injuries to the head which necessitated his detention at the hospital.

THE SERMON ON THE MOUNT

THE SERMON ON THE MOUNT. The alleged action of the Penarth police in seizing, so the question runs, the Sermon on the Mount (by the Bishop of Oxford), is to be brought up by Mr. W. Rnch, who wants to know whether any person in possession of thia work is liable to have h jot; premises searched and the book seized.

JKITCHENERS LAST SPEECH

JKITCHENER'S LAST SPEECH. i Mr. Llewelyn Williams is asking the Prime Minister whetboi lie can see his way, without detriment to the public service, to publish the speech delivered by the late Lord Kitchener to M.P.'s and, if not, whether he will publish such parts of it a £ 'i tend to justify Lord Kiieh- ener's administration of the War Office without betraying national secrets to the Treasury.

ILLANELLY GIRLS TRIP

LLANELLY GIRL'S TRIP. Linda Elaine Jenkins (20), of Loughor, dressmaker, was charged at Plymouth on Thursday with travelling on the Great j Western Railway from Paddington to Plymouth without paying her fare. She i pkaded not guilty. A detective said the girl told him her father kept a public house at Llanelly, and she went to Lon- don on Whit Monday. On the Wednes- ,dav had nothing to eat; but met a isÙor, who asked her to accompany him to Plymouth. He took tickets for Ply- mouth, but left her on arrival. She did I not wish to see him again. Witness had satisfied himself ehe knew Llanelly well, and she wished to get hack home. The railway company did not wish to press for conviction, and had brought the girl to: the police station in order that she might j not be <»ent adrift. She had no money on her. At the suggestion of the police, the girl was handed over to the Salvation 1 Army until Friday in order that her ?th?r might W communic&ted with. I

AIR REPRISALS I Q I

AIR REPRISALS I Q WON DERFU l FEATS BY PPF??H _AIBMEN: F?L??? Ha??nJ?. THREE GERMAN TOWNS BiMASDED Bi ALLY'S A FLiCHTjjf 215 MilES A French communique, issued on Thurs- day night, records a wonderful series of  F ranch reprisal raids and aerial successes. The report says:— By way of reprisals for the successive bombardments by the Germans during the last few days on the open towns 01 Bar les Due and Luneville, our squadrons cai- ried out several operations on enemy terri- I tory. » On the night of the 21st-22nd 18 shells were dropped on the town of Treves, where a large fire broke out. To-day a party of nine aircraft dropped ■10 bombs on Karlsruhe, 172 miles irom Xancy. Another squadron of ten aircraft bom- barded Mullieim l the right bank of the llhine. iitty bumos were dropped on the military establishments of this town. The efficacy of these bombardments was duly observed. Pursued by a squadron of Fokkers, on returning from jiulheim, our machines engaged in a combat, in which a Fokker was brought down. One of our machines had to alight on account of breakdown. During the day our pursuing aircraft ilso displayed activity. Sub-Lieut. Muges- sei brought down his eighth machine, which fell at La. -7iforville, near our wire entanglements. South of Lihons, a German machine, hit simultaneously by machine-gun fire by Sergt. Charmet and Sub-Lieut. Guymemer, crashed to the ground. Sergt. Charmet has brought down to date four machines, and Sub-Lieut. Guymemer nine. Finally, in the region of Einville, south of Luneville, an enemy machine was brought down by our artillery fire. The German craft, which fell yesterday morning north-east of St. Mihiel. and near Deucourt, were accounted for by Sub- Lieut. Chabut, who has brought down six enemy machines up to date. [The Karlsruhe flight of 172 kilometres and back (341 kilometres) is equal to 215 miles—a truly remarkable feat.]

NINEVITES I

NINEVITES." I White People E^ilSed by Negroes. Johannesburg, Thursday (received Fri-j day).—A brutal triple murder has come to light here. It was perpetrated by a gang of natives known as Ninevities," w hose op?ruti

BRITISH COLUMBIA MINERS1

BRITISH COLUMBIA MINERS. 1- A Home Office Inquiry. A meeting of the Executive Committee of the Miners' Federation of Great Britain was held in London on Thursday afternoon. Among those present were Mesrs. George Barker, Vernon Hartshorn and James Winstone. A letter was read from the Home Secre- tary, calling the attention of the Federa- tion to the fact that a considerable num- her of miners who were recently brought to this country from British Columbia to work in British mines under an agree- ment, bound themselves to pay back their passage money in instalments to the mine- owners for whom they were working. The Home Office the Federation to give them assid.anee in tracing a number of the men who had left the collieries to which they had been allocated on their coming to this country, and were now working in other clistricts, and conse- quently could not be prevailed upon to give up their pasasge money.

PILLOW PROBLEMS

PILLOW PROBLEMS. Is there more than one way of arrang- ing a pillow ? At the National F^onomy Inhibition which opens on Monday at Prince's Skating Rink three prizes of the total value of ten guinoas will be offered for the best examples of pillows arranged: (a) For the ordinary bed; (b) For the spl- dier's bed; and (c) For the baby's cot. The aim is to find a restful pillow to keep the head cool in summer and warm in winter, and not easily liable to dis- arrangement. Pillows with attachments | or d iagrams should be sent to the organis- j ing secretary. Public Trustee Office.

ICOLONEL CUTHBERTSONI

COLONEL CUTHBERTSON. I Colonel Cuthbertson,' of the Headquar- ters Staff at Chester, has been appointed hy General Campbell, in command of the Western Division, to succeed Brigadier- General Owen Thomas as in chief com- mand at Kimmel Park. The new com- mander took up his duties at Kinmel Park on Wednesday. Colonel Cuthbertson's ad- vancement has been rapid. Like General Campbell, he is a Scotsman. He served as lieutenant in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, and held that rank in the regiment when he retired. He was ap- pointed to the command of one of the Mon- mouth shire Territorial regiments at the; outbreak of hostilities, and served for a short period in France.

I NEWSPAPER POST

—— NEWSPAPER POST. The Secretary of the War Office an- nounces that the public are informed that the following regulations will on and after July 1 apply to printed matter dispatched to (a) all European countries and their colonies and dependencies in Africa and America except France, Russia, and Italy, and British, French, and Italian territory; (b) neutral countries of America; (c) Brit- ish and Allies' subjects interned in enemy countries: (1) Newspapers, magazines, books (other than trade circulars) will not be sent forward unless posted direct from the office of publishers or newsagents who have obtained permission from the War Office for this purpose. Persons desiring to send printed matter should, therefore, give their orders for execution to publish- ers or newspapers who have obtained such permission.

THE MEGGA RISING

THE MEGGA RISING TURKISH SILENCE' Oil THE GREAT ARABIAN RcVQLT BRITISH WARSHIP ARRIVES All that tho Turks appear to have made known in Constantinople regarding the capture by the Arabs of Mecca and Jeddah is in their official report of Thursday, which says that a British war- ship has arrived off the Iledjaz coast in Shaikh Memije Bay, which is near Jeddah. A contributory cauee to the Arab revolt is, says Reuter, the fact that following on a *visit of Envor Pasha to the Hedjaz, very drastic anti-Arab lueasures were taken, many Moslem Arabs having been hanged, shot, or imprisoned. Two Mahommedan Deputies — members for Damascus and Homs—,rexecuted. In addition to the Aral) disruption in j the Mecca district news has been received that the Shia Moslems of Kerbela and Nejef, in the Bagdad district of Meso- potamia, goaded by Turkish executions, also rose against the Ottoman garrisons and that the Turks shelled the sacred shrines of Kerbela. To Slria Maliommedaus, both of Persia and of India, Kerbela and Nejef are sacred. The shrines there contain enor- mous treasures, the offerings of pilgrims and devotees during past centuries. Ker- bela is about 93 miles south-west of Bagdad, and in the district there are close on half a ■ million Shia Mahommedans, 400,000 of whom are Persian-speaking.

OUR SOLDIER PRINCE

OUR SOLDIER PRINCE. His Royal Highness 22 To-day Captain the Prince of Wales was among the soldiers mentioned by Sir Douglas Haig for rr gallant and distinguished con- duct in the field." This is the second time that the Prince has been specially commended for his ser- vices at the front, and its significance may be seen shortly in further promotion. Considering his position, it cannot be said that the Prince's military advancement is being unduly hurried. When he left the Navy to join the Grenadiers for active service he had quali- fied for the rank of lieutenant. The steps in his soldiering career now stand as follows Second-Lieutenant, Grenadier Guards August 8. 191 i; Departure for the front, and ap- pomled A.D.C. to Sir John F'renefc November Hi, i!ll-1; Lieutenant, November 18, 1DM; Arrived in Egypt as staff captain on the staff of tlii, (,<,nei-;)l Commanding-in- Chief. Meditteranean Expeditionary, Force. Marc h, JiMli The Prince's previous" mention" was in Sir John French's dispatch of April 19!5, which his Royal Highness carried to London. Sir John then praised his good work a. a Liaison Officer during the battle 01 Neuve Chapeile, his quickness in acquir- ing military knowledge, his deep interest in the men's welfare, his sympathetic visits to the hospitals, and his thorough performance of any work entrusted lo him. Sir John added that the .Prince had done duty I' the trenches. YJany letters from officers and men have testified to his bravery under fire. One private wrote' We had a visit from the Prince of Wales right in the firing line. He goes about, everywhere, fearfng nothing, and the troops admire his courage immensely."

GAGGED AND BOUND I

GAGGED AND BOUND. Neath Schoolboy's Strange Story. A mysterious affair has just come to light in regard to a young lad named Joseph Harris, 15 years old, a pupil of the Neath County School, and son of Mr. Charles Harris, who resides at a lonely house called 'I'he Bath," on the side of the rail way line on which coal is con- veyed from Bryncoch Pit to Skewen. On Thursday morning the lad went to fetch water lor breakfast from a spring in th adacent woods. As he did not re- turn, search was made for him. His sister found him gagged and bound to a tree. A piece of paper was found in his pocket with the words that the lad should he made to work. He had won a scholarship in Neath County School three years ago. The boy says his as

IN 100 TON LOTS

IN 100 TON LOTS. For the first time in its history a lady was admitted to the hall of the Baltic Ex- change on Thursday. This privilege was grant-ad to Lady Arthur Markham in order that she might sell by auction 600 tons of coal left over from the Caledonian Market Fair. The coal was put up in 100 ton lots and in most instances realised 70s. a ton. Lady Markham also disposed of 25 colliers' lamps, which she said had become obsolete during the pa.st fortnight. These fetched from t5 to £10 each.

YOUNG JOSEPHS LOSES I

YOUNG JOSEPHS LOSES. The principal contest at the Liverpool Stadium on Thursday night was the 15 rounds bout between Sid Smith, of Ber- mondsey, the ex-fly-weight champion, and Young Josephs, of Pontypridd. who is one of Jimmy Wilde's "rrin, partners. Josephs started in a style that was any- thing but impressive, for he swung his punches without regard for direction, science being at a discount. Smith settled down to a steady style which, if not pretty, was effective, and ultimately gained him the victory on points.

A STRANGE CATCHI

A STRANGE CATCH. Private Charles Coleman, of the South Wales Borderers, who is billeted a f Holy- head, whilst fishing near the Admiralty Pier, hooked a gold watch which bore an inscription to the effect that it had been presented to Samuel O. Connor by thi- staff of Messrs. Byrne and Co.. Limerick, on the occasion of his departure from that town in 1910.. Connor's body was found floating in the Holyhead Harbour in May of last year. and at the inquest a verdict o "Found drowned was returned. The dead man's relatives have been communi- cated with.

r I DALM nuhnh1

r   DALM? nuhnh? BULGARS GROSS THE MESTA ALLIES AIR SQUADRONS BOMB EHEMr i-'uol i iiiiiS Salonika, June 20th (received 23rd).-1 Fighting between patrols in the country j round Kuprand O"sin has become more intense, and considerable movements of the enemy have been noticed 'in that region. Enemy aeroplanes have liombarded our lines on the Vardar, though causing no; damage. The usual artillery duel is re- ported. Bulgarians have crossed the Mesta.' The enemy artillery has increased it* radius of action towards Porois. A FrancQ-Britibh aeroplane squadron has bombed military establishments at I Gurrfuld Jina, while 'Fr Association War Special. GREEK SURRENDER THE TERMS THAT THE ALLIES DEMANDED. An official telegram from Athens re ceived in London on Thursday afternoon state.s Reuter, announces that the Greek Government has agreed to the proposals of the Entente Powers, including:— (1) Dissolution ot the Chamber; (2) Reconstruction of the gendarmerie; and (3) Holding of fresh electors. THE NEW CABINET. Athens, Wednesday.—M. Zaimis has accepted the task of forming a new Cabinet. He immediately paid visits to the Entente Legations, where he gave and received satisfactory assurances that the new Government will be an entirely busi- ness one. Its members will take the oath to-morrow. M. Zaimis will be Minister of Foreign Affairs. The news that he had agreed to form a Cabinet quickly spread in the city, and caused a feeling of im- mense satisfaction. It is expected that there will be an immediate improvement in the situation.—Reuter. DIPLOMACY'S TRIUMPH. Salonika, Wednesday (received Friday. —A sigh of relief went up to-day from all classes of the population upon receipt of the news that theSkouloudis Ministry had resigned. and that M. Zaimis was to form a new Cabinet. The new feeling is not confined to Salonika, but it bound to be felt throughout the kingdom. M. Zaimis is an experienced and trusted politician of high character in whom the Entent Powers can place implicit confi- dence. The event is undoubtedly a diplo- matic success for the Entente. Ministers: in Athen6, and cannot fail to have an im- portant effect on neighbouring States; indeed, it may safely be said that nothing: more important has occurred in this part of the world since the war began to en- hance and consolidate the prestige of the Entente, while undermining the diplo- matic position of the Central Powers.— Reuter.

LIGHT RAILWAYI

LIGHT RAILWAY. Ynysforgan and Morriston Service. At their meeting on Thursday, the Gla- morgan County Council were recommended by the Parliamentary Committee to sane- tion the continuance of a ten minutes' service on the Morriston and Ynysforganj Light Railway for the present. They had, however, appointed the chairman of the! Council and Councillor John Glasbrook to interview the tramway authorities at Swansea in order to see whether some re- vised arrangement could not be arrived at whereby the present loss to the county of running the service might be either dim- inished or avoided. The Council concurred.

BLACK SEA HORRORI

BLACK SEA HORROR. Passenger Ship Blown Up by a Mine. HUNDREDS OF LIVES 1M-I PERILLED. Petrograd, Thursday (received Friday). —The following details are given semi- officially of the loes of the steamer Mercury, reported to-day in a commu- nique issued by the General Staff: The Mercury was on her way from Odessa to Kherson, having on board about 800 passengers, including students and pupils of various schools returning to the country for their summer holidays. When 13 miles from Odessa, and within two leagues of the coast, the steamer struck a mine and had her bows com- pletely s-tove in. She sank in five minutes. Two large Ixiats had been immediately launched, but capsized. The survivors kept themselves afloat by means of various floating articles. Thirteen boats which were sent to the scene of the disaster were unable to approach the vessel owing to the very heavy sea. but picked up a Inrge number of persons. Many of the passengers who were able to swim managed to reach shore. It was due to this that the majority of the pas- sengers were saved. It is reported that the captain of the Russian steamer Potemkine, who saw the explosion and sinking of the Mercury, did not go near the vessel in distress, fearing a submarine. So far 28 bodies have been washed ashore.—Press Asso- ciation War Special.

A GREAT WELSHMAN

A GREAT WELSHMAN. Tribute to Mr. Hughes at a London I Gathering. At the Cymrodorion gathering in Lon- don on Wednesday, Mr. David Jones, an enthusiastic Welshman, of Melbourne, who comes to this country every year. spoke of the attachment of the Prime Minister of Australia to Wales and VVlsh instilutions. Every year, on the 1st of March, fifteen or sixteen hundred Welsh- men made a steamboat excursion in the 1 bay, and Mr. Hughes never failed to come II along with them. Mr. Hughes was a great AVelsliuian, of whom Australia was juetly I proud.

TODAYS WAR RESUME

TO-DAY'S WAR RESUME "Leader" Office 4.50 p m A German advance following a mine ex- plosion in the Givenchy region was fol- lowed by a gallant onslaught by the Royal Welsh F usiliers. High praise is given in the official report to the Welsh- men. who drove the enemy out of the captured positions. Fierge fighting is recorded on the front boiore Verdun. Furious onslaughts have brought the enemy little or no gain, and the French have recovered the ground lost between Fumin and Chenoia woods. There has been a wonderful seri." -,f F rench reprisal raids and aerial suc- cesses. Three German towns have beea bombarded by our Ally's squadron* in j the course of a flight of 21 mi1. Extremely heavy fighting is reportec. along the thousand miles of Russian front, from the Riga sector light down to the Southern Bukovina, 30 utiles below Czernowitz. The Turks are observing silence with re- gard to the great Arabian revolt. They admit, however, that a British worship has arrived off the Hedzay coast in Shaikh Memiji Bay,' which is near Jeddah.

TODAYS l l TODAYS NEWS IN BRIEF

TO-DAY'S l ?l TO-DAY'S NEWS IN BRIEF The War Council met on-Thursday. Acton Council has sold the grass grown on one of its playing fields 'for £27. Unexploded grenade6 have been picked up by children. on the shore at Ramsgate. £ 134,127 was left by Mr. J. W. Previte, chairman of Blackheath Art School. Captain Eccles, Governor of Borstal, has died, aged 54. Nearly 2,000 women have joined the Railway Clerks' Association. Two days' sale of Chinese porcelain at Christies realised £ 27,372. Baron von Bis.sing has not been released, 60 the Home Secretary states. Haymaking was in full swing in Clis- sold Park, Isorth London, on Thursday. On Friday afternoon Queen Alexandra opened a Y.M.C.A. hut at Aldwych. Queen Alexandra presented the prizes at the Gordon Boys' Home at Cobham. Thursday was the fifth anniversary of the Coronation of the King and Queen. It is not the intention of tho Govern- ment to re-open Kensington Palace to the public. The King was crowned five years ago on Thursday. Enemy goods are on exhibition at Bir- mingham. An Anzac button dav in Melbourne rea- lised £ 10,000. Alexandra Rose Day this year is ex- pected to have created a reocrd. A man who hought a taxi-cab a year ago for £90 told the Lambeth Tribunal he was now earning £ 8 a week. Commander Sir Edward Nieholl is giving a new reredos in memory of Lord Kitchener to Cardiff parish church. Fifty special police were the guard of honour at the marriage of Second-Lieut. Scott, their ex-leader at Walton. A second offer of 15 guineas has been made for the MSS. of Dr. Bridge's poen* on Lord Kitchener. Private Lemon, of the Middlesex Eegi- ment. was found shot in a train from Broad-street to Richmond. Commander Sir E. Nicholl is giving a new reredos to Cardiff Parish Church in memory of Lord Kitchener. A miner last his life and three others were affected by fire-damp at Lord Dudley's Baggeridge Colliery, Dudley. I am not nearly so clever as you think," said Judge Graham to counsel on Thursday. Bristol Corporation has decided to col- lect waste paper in order to relieve the rates. On Friday, July 14, Liverpool dockers' wages will be advanced Is. per day end Is. per night. Lieut.-Colonels L. W. Y. Campbell and A. M. S. Elsmie are gazetted temporary brigadier-generals. It was staged on Thursday that the Mayoress was among many women to be seen daily in Coventry driving vans. Out of 810 women conductors engaged by the London General Omnibus Company only twenty-five have failed. To support the export trade an ivory pianoforte-key maker was exempted at the Essex Appeal' Court on Thursday. Milking machines have been very un- satisfactory, said Mr. Fordham at West London Police Court on Thursday. Mrs. Elizabeth Curtis, of Minster, Isle of Thanet, has reached her 103rd birthday. She has lost relatives in four wars. M. N. Misu, the Rumanian Minister, who has been ill in bed for the last fort- night, is making satisfactory progress. War pension claims in Australia to the end of April numbered 10.701, iiivoln-ing £ 199.071) per annum. A great memorial feast takes place to- .day in Berlin in remembrance of General' von Moltke. who was buried on Thursday. Kent cherries are expected at Covent Garden next week, but a lot of them are falling because hands cannot be found to pick them. A window and alabaster tablet in memory of LOitit Cavell are to be placed in Swardiston Church, where her father was vicar. General Sir George Higginson, who is ninety to-day. inspected the cadet corps at the Gordon Boys" Memorial Home, Chob- ham. Gun-firing at Woolwich on Thursday night, commencing at 10.30, was officially notified in advance for the information ot the public. Dutch East India boats now sail by way of the North Scottish Archipelago, Gib- raltar and Suez as well as round the Cape. In the opinion of the Executive of the Miners' Federation there ought to be no increase in the selling price of household coal. The King of Siam has sent £ 1,000 to the Widows and Orphans' Fund of the Rur- ham Light Infantry, of which he is hon. colonel. The Government are considering how to strengthen the law governing the sale of cocaine, the Home Secretary announced on Thursday. Canadian wounded soldiers have elected in Ramegate Cemetery a stone in the shape of a maple leaf jn memory of chil- dren killed in an ah' raid. I

Advertising

A DESTROYER'S FATE. Bodies of 10 British tailors belonging to the destroy or Eden, recently eunk by collision in the Channel, have been re- covered and taken into Havre. ITALIAN COMMUNIQUE. To-day t Italian communique &ay*»~ 1 n the Vallarsa our troops have occu- pied a new position beyond the Rùmir i, east of Mes^arza Peak, and on Lora pur. W.LKT of Mount Pasubio riflea, ammunition and bombs were captured. Along the Poeera-A-stico front artillerr actions on both id; attacks by th", enemy in the regions of Campaglia and unt Spin were repulsed. On thog [Il,iteaii we maintained pressure. In Cainia and on Itonzo intense artii- lerv actions; explosions and ifress cautefl by our batterie?. LORD HALDANE IMPRESSED. Returning from a tour of the works. Lord Haldane told Leader reporter he was wonderfully impressed with the industrial enterprise of Swansea. A NEATH C.O." At Neath Tribunal to-day. Albert Jno Lewig, a local Socialist, appealed from Cardiff llr i Cardiff Prison, asking for a review of his case on conscientious grour.dg /rnd valuation 01 hie certificate. Jo- bis letter appellant pointed out that he bad been sen tended to 112 imprison- ment for refusing to sign attestation papere, and refusing to submit, to a. medical examination.—Application re- fused, ROYAL COMMISSION AT SWANSEA. A report and picture of the visit to Swansea of the Royal Commis- sion on Welsh University Education appears on Page Five.

CURATES SEND OFF

CURATES SEND OFF. Interesting Gathering at Manselton. On Thursday evening, a concert meeting was held at the Manselton Schools, Swan- sea, to present to the Rev. W. T. and Mrs. Brien tokens of esteem on the occasion of their departure from the district. The Rev. W. T. Brien has held the curacy at St. Michael's Church, Manselton, for nearly six years, and is leaving for a vic- ariate at Gloucester. Dr. J. Davies made the presentation to Mr. Brien consisting of a pocket wallet containing treasury notes. The presenta- tion of a silver fruit dish to Mrs. Brien was made by Mrs. Bailey, one of the oldest members of St. Michael's Church. Miss Long (on behalf of the Sunday School class) presented the curate's wife with a' prayer book. Eulogistie reference was made to both the rev. gentleman and his wife, who suitably returned thanks. Items were contributed to an excellent programme by Misses Edith Beale, Maggie Cox and Maud Loosemore, and Messrs. E L. Morgan and Jno. Morris, A.C.V. St Michael's Church Choir boys also ren- dered glees. Mr. Ivor Davi es acted as ac- companist. The proceedings concluded with the singing of Auld Lang Syne."

SWANSEA LAD KILLED

SWANSEA LAD KILLED. Mr. Wm. Webb, 35. S te p ney-street, Swansea, a rollerman at the Cvvmfelin Steel and Tinplate Works, has received a letter from Sub-Lieut. D. Allison, stat- ing that his son, Wm. Webb, A.B., had been killed in action. The letter savs:- H It is with very much regret that I have to inform you that your son, A.B. W. Webb, W. L. 1039, was killed in action. He was'a very fine soldier, and held in. high esteem by me and the men of hie platoon. It is some consolation to know' that he died whilst doing duty for King and country. The platoon join with me in expressing my deepest sympathy. A.B. Webb enlisted about 12 months ago. and prior to enlistment was employed a beliinder at the Cwmbwrla Works. He went through the Dardanelles without a scratch, and has only been out in France two weeks. He was about 18 years of age. and had been home on leave twieo-