Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 6 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
29 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

I- The Cambria Daily Leader gives later news than any paper published in this lis- trict.

Advertising

I The London Office of the "Cambria Daily Leader" is at 151, Fleet Streetj (first floor), where adver- tisements can )e received I up to 7 o'clock each evening for insertion in the next dav's issue. Tel. 2276 Central.

GREAT BRITISH 1 ADVANCE

GREAT BRITISH 1 ADVANCE. OUR NEW ATTACK. t NEW ATTAk-4 r. Second Line Broken on Four Mile Front. ———— TWO VILLAGES TAKEN. The following telegraphic dispatch received from General Head- quarters in France, was issued by the Press Bureau this morning at 11.10 a.m .— General Headquarters, 10.4 a.m. This morning at dawn, I attacked the enemy second system of defence. Our troops have broken into the hostile positions on a front of tour miles, and have occupied several strongly defended localities. 1 Heavy fighting continues. I TWO VILLAGES TAKEN. I The Press Association special correspond nt with the Army in the Field says:— Latest reports state that we have captured the villages of Lon- gueval and Bazantin-le-Grand, and have cleared the enemy out of Trones Wood. The weather is cloudy and cool, and favourable to our operations. From the Press Association's special correspondent:-War Cor- respondent's Headquarters, 9.30 a .m.Followmg upon a heavy bombardment of the German sc ond line system, the British in- fantry launched an attack to-day at dawn, and the second German line broken through over a front of five thousand yards.

1 TODAYS FREXCH FF1CIAL

[1 [| TO-DAY'S FREXCH 'FF1CIAL. | I Artillery Activity in th Sector of Gouviile. I The following Frenc h official com- munique was issued through the Press Bureau this aHer:aOOIl:- To the north of the Aisne, in the re- gion to the south of Ville-au-Bois, and on the platea.ux of Vauclaine, two attempted attack's by the Ger- mans were immediately stopped by our machine gun fire. On the right bank of the Meuse the artillery duels continue very ac- tive in the sector of Gouville. Some patrol engagements took place, in the Chenois Wood. There is no important event, to re- port on the rest of the front. I BRITISH OFFICIAL. General Headquarters, France, Thllrs- day, 10.10 p.m.—The artillery on both sides has been active throughout the cia. As a result of sharp infantry fighting we have not only maintained our piessuie j on the enemy, but have appreciably ad- l vanced our line at various points (JIl the I hattle front. In one sector of the front we captured some German howitzers, with a quantity of munitions, which will be used against the enemy at a suitable opportunity. I FRENCH OFFICIAL. Paris, Thursday, 10.42 p.m.—T?night?s J official communique says: — Apart ii-om a rather lively bombard- ment of the Souville sector on the right I bank of the Meusp? there is no important I event to report on the front. I CONFIDENCE IN VERDUN. Assailants May Soon be Wanted Else- where. I Paris, Friday. Reviewing yesterday's fighting, an expert French commentator; says: :Ilfte,r their heavy attacks yesterday against Fort Souville, the Germans, wliOi had been very sorely tried, attempted no. infantry action. To-day (13th July) before Verdun, how- ever, a lively bombardment was kept up' against Chenois and La Laufel Woods dur-j ing the night, and in the region of Suu- viile throughout the day. Fresh attacks may therefore be expected as>u.in i. the latter position and Fort Travannes, which flanks it to the east, but precedents ,r,, not lacki ng to show the time required to -il)- ture our first line of defence, behind waich the enemy would have other defensive CYS-, tems to carry before he could l'e VI) Ver. dun. N Events will occur in the meantime de- manding the presence elsewhere of all the troops at his disposal. On the Somme to-day was desultory fighting. On the British front our Allies everywhere repulsed the enemy counter- attacks, holding all their positions and extending them at some points. Their tenacity has obliged the Germans finally to make up their minds to admit the loss of Contalmaison. On the French side no important inci- I dent occurred, but the calm which is re-j ported does not mark a pause in the off en-l On tb" .ontvar-ir f"ho soldiers wore [engaged to-day in making fresli prepara- tions for their next efforts. HEAVY GERMAN LOSSES. Paris, Friday.—The Echo de Paris") states that according to information re-1 ceived from a British officer, the Germans, lost 12,00(1 men in their four deslwrate counter-attacks upon Contalmaison, shuw- ing hy their reckless sacrifices the import- ance they attached to the recapture of the 'position, which is further shown by their dilatoriness in admitting they had lost it.

TRAWLERS BLOWN UP I

TRAWLERS BLOWN UP. Submarine Attacks on English Fishing Craft. Two steam trawlers, the Florence and Dalhousie. belonging to Scarborough, were sunk off Whitby earlv on Thursday j morning by a German submarine. The rrews were taken aboard the suhmarine and the trawlers sunk by means of bombs placed on board. The crews were after- wards transferred to email Ixiats, in which they reached Whitby. Two Stnithes fishing cobbles, the Mary Ann and Success, have also been sunk. The crews ar? safe. AMERICAN STEAMER MINED. A Lloyd's Bordeaux message dated i Thursday, says:—The American steamer' Gold Shell, from New York with petro-1 leum. arrived at Verdon with a largo hole forward under the wnt.or-line, having j struck a floating mine.

SATURDAYS ECLIPSE I

SATUR-DAYS -EC-LIPSE. I An eclipse of the moon will take place next Saturday morning, the shadow of the earth first touching: the moon at 4.19. The eclipse will be visible in F,ni-land for about three-quarters of an hour. The maxi- mum phase, in which four-fifths of the lunar surface will be darkened, will occur at 5.46 a.m., and the shadow will pass off at 7.12 a.m. The eclipse will be best seen from America.

CASE FOR INQUIRY I

CASE FOR INQUIRY. I Mr. Alan Burg-oyne inquired in the House of Commons on Thursday whether a driver at the Royal Aircraft Factory who offered to ajjpear as a witness at the Air Inquiry was arrested immediately on his return to Famborough from London. Mr. Forster said he would make inquiry. He believed that a pledge of indemnifica- tion againsif victimisation was tjiven by Sir David Henderson, and the pledge, he was sure, would be kept.

BODY IN RUBBISH HEAPI

BODY IN RUBBISH HEAP. I The body of Elizabeth Parkin, an eleven- vear-old girl, who disappeared from her home in Sheffield on April 23, 1915, has been found, says the Sheffield Tele- graph." in a disused factory in a thickly populated part of the city. The discovery was made by some boys, one of whom kicked a ball through one of the windows of the building.- While searching for the ball he saw a human leg sticking out from a heap of rubbish. He gave the alarm, and the body was removed, and was recognised as that of Ehzabeth Parkin. I Apparently the child had been mur- dered. A pi"o of rope had been drn?n in a tight slip knot round her throat, a n(? ?iere were tja??es of blood at the baee nf rk;> ?n?. (

500 DAMAGESr

£ 500 DAMAGES r LINER CAPTAIN AS A Ci!-SESPS«DEST In the Divorce Court on Friday Mr. David Stewart Fraser, in the employ ot, the Elder Dempster Shipping Co., was granted a decree nisi against his wife,, i Mrs. Kathleen Beatrice Fraser, on the ( ground of her adultery with Mr. George Wm. Hoyie. from whom damages were claimed. The suit was undefended. and damages were agreed at £ 500. Counsel said co-respondent, was a master mariner, and a friend of petitioner. The hitter lived with his wife at Sekondi and at Accra, a,-i,4 I'tei- a holiday in England towards the.d of last year he lett his wife here. "l.lH February lie received a letter frogs his wife and one from co- i .*ipoml< uf*»" Passages in his wife's letter .ran:— j 1 hope this letter will not pain you too much. Tilings between us have been very strained for the last few years. The truth is I am Jiving with Captain Hoyle as his wife. We havo both fought against it. but the love we iiad for each other was too strong, and life would not be worth living apart. Hope you will divorce me. so that we can get married." The co-respondent wrote, "I loved her dearly, although we have both fought against it. 1 have resigned my job and shall take her to a new country and make her happy. It is all your fault. You had one of the sweetest of women in this! world, and had you recognised it, she might have been yours. Had there been any chance of Kitty being happy, I would have been content to remain outside, but as each year went by the relations tween you were more straitened. She would have been living a slave's existence. but now, thank God, she is a happy and honoured woman." Petitioner said the letters were the first; intimation of the relations between his wife and the co-respondent. A decree nisi and damages as 6tated were granted.

WELSH UNIVERSITV I

WELSH UNIVERSITV. The Unifying of Collegiate Work. The question of the college and univer- sity education in Wales was discussed at a conference in London 011 Thursdav. The proceedings were strictly private. No offi- cial report was issued at the close, hut it is understood that the scheme the Royal Commission had in view for unifying col- legiate work in Wales, and for building tip an improved system of education and effec- tive control by one central body was out- lined minutely by Lord Haldane, who fully appreciated that there should he special and peculiar treatment for Wales. Sir Herbert Roberts submitted the views of the Welsh members that there should be one university for Wales, and that other places besides Cardiff, Aberystwyth, and Bangor—Swansea for instanec-should have power to establish a college if it came up to the standard; that the level of intermediate education in Wales should be raised in order to give better prepara- tion for the colleges, and that there should be set up a Council representative oi the university and colleges to deal with the Treasury as to grants, and allocate them to and control colleges with a view- to guard against overlapping of effort and work.

CLASSROOM SCENE I

CLASSROOM SCENE. I Britoftferry Woman Assaults Schoolmistress. Charged with assaulting a Britonferry schoolmistress named Ellen Phillips. Ada Harriet Whit lock, wife of a local mason, appeared before the Neath magistrates on Friday, and alleged that the first blow was struck by complainant. i Mr. Edward Powell prosecuted, and Miss Phillips, who still bore evidence of the alleged blow on the bridge of the nose, said Mrs. Whitlock came to her school at Jerusalem Vestry on the 3rd of July. and aroused her of beating her daughter Lilian. Before she had the chance to explain, defendant: struck her in the face wi tll her clene heo. fist, discolouring her eye. This took place before the whole class. Witness ordered the woman ofi' the premises, and in the struggle which ensued defendant struck her another blow on the arm. Defendant: Can't you teach my little girl without beating her?—I simply shook her -for talking. i You may be a woman, but I am a mother, and r'H not allow you to beat my child. Not long ago she had concussion of the brain. Gladys White, a school girl, corrobo- rated her teacher's story, and Mrs. Whit- lock, excitedly called her a little liar for making such a statement. Defendant was fined 20s. or 13 days.

BULGARIAN SENSATION I

BULGARIAN SENSATION. Bucharest, Thursday.—'M. Lianchieff, leader of the Democratic party in BuJ-! garia, and formerly Minister of F-inane<>, has been arrested by order of the Bul- i garian Govrrnmpnt. pub l i,?, l i(- d two a I The ex-Minister has published two ar- tides criticising the Budget, and on the? eve of it he day on which the Budget was I to be discussed he was arrested. The Budget was voted without discussion. The Deputies of the Democratic party have now, however, given notice of an in- terpellation on their leader's arrest.— Reuter.

ENEMYS LATEST CRIMEI

ENEMY'S LATEST CRIME. Stockholm, Thursday (received Friday).! —The directors of the Russian Red Cross Society have addressed to the Red Crrss. in various countries, and to the Inter- national Comm:rtt,

WELLS HEALING WATERS I

WELL'S HEALING WATERS., Yet another pilgrim to the famous well of St. Winefride's at Holywell bears testi- mony to its healing powers. His name is John M'Mullen, and he lives at 49, Station- road. Shettleston, Glasgow. M'Mullen told a Press representative that eight years ago he received an injury to his spine while working as a colliery, which had madp it impossible for him to continue at work. He affirmed that after bathing in the well several times he had hftor. 'xmlutely our*» d.

MERTHYR TRAGEDY I

MERTHYR TRAGEDY I WOMAN ALLEGED TO HAVE BEEN KICKED TO DEAIH A sad story of a domestic tragedy was told at Merthyr on Friday, when Daniel Sullivan, a powerfully built man of 35 years of age, was committed for trial at the Assizes, to be held at Swansea next week, on a charge of having wilfully murdered his wife, Catherine Sullivan, a, small, slight woman of about his own age, by kicking her to death on Saturday last. According to the doctor's evidence, de-: ceased sustained terrible injuries, includ-j ing five broken ribs and a severe lacpra- tion. The little step-daughter stated that prisoner told her a corpse would leai-e the house that night. Prisoner, who was drunk, pulled her mother out of bed and proceeded to kick her. A sister of the deceased said prisoner had o nseveral occasions stated that lie would swing for her. In reply to the charge, prisoner said he wouid not have, done it if lie had not been in drink. Prisoner, who pleaded not guilty, re- served his defence, and was committed, for trial.

GORSEINON HERO

GORSEINON HERO. — Memorable Welcome and Presentation Meeting. Gorseinon rose to the occasion on Thurs- day evening, when arrangements ior hon- ouring the home-coming of Lieut. William Honey, R.G.A., the holder of a Military Cross, were successfully carried through by the local committee. The strains of national and martial music by the Excel- sior and Temperance Bands were the sig- nal for a gathering of the inhabitants at! the Institute, where it public meeting of recognition and presentation was made. Lieut. Honey, accompanied by his wife and younger sister, was driven by motor- car, preceded by both bands playing appro- priate music, to the Institute, where the party was received by Councillor Albert Harding, M.E. (chairman), who was sup- ported by Dr. Tra?)'d Mitchel! and Mrs. j MitcheH. Mr. Thos. Jones, Rev. W. Wal- -Ititchpl], .\Tr. I'lios. T?,ev. W. Wil- ezer), Mr. D. W. Doxies, and Mr. Griffith Willis (Indian Mutiny veteran). The Ch airman apologised for the absence of Major Lewis, V. D., and read letters of regret from Sir J. T. D. Llewelyn, Bart., Penllergaer, and Mr. J. Gough. THE PATRIOTISM OF THE VILLAGE. Major Dr. Mitchell. V.D., outlined the efforts which had been made on behalf of recognition for local heroes at Gorseinon,' and said that previous to conscription the village supplied 1,300 purelv voluntary men. Out of that number the list of 'died on the roll of honour numbered 38, and that was imperfect. It was recogn ispd that some time or i,'hpr honours would fall to the share of at least a few of these men. CertainlY a 11 were honoured, but the -particular honours bestowed by the War Office were such that demanded par- ticular recognition, and that recognition: so far had been provided and given, first! to Sergt.-Major Jap-vts, D.C.M., and now, second, to Lieut. Honey. They were await- ing the homo-comin<; of their first D.C.M., in the person of ply. Thomas. HOW THE DECORATION WAS WON. Lieut. Honey, continued the doctor, was evidently a. soldier of sterling qualities, for the War Office had commissioned him from the ranks, and had further decor- ated him with the Military Cross for dis- tinguished conduct at the Battle of Loos.! Holding at that time the position of for- ward observation officer to the artillery, Lieut. Honey had for three successive battle days kept the firing line of artil, lerv and their effects in such effective communication that he was marked out for distinction, with the result that 'they 'I were ass?mh]cd Put nighl to shar^ that distinction with him and to mark it with a sword of honour and a case of Treasury notes. Other speakers were Mr. Thos. Jones. Rev. W. Walters (Talmai), end the Rev. D. H. Thomas (Ebpnezer). During an interval in what may well be regarded as one of the nnest miscellan- eous musical programmes gone through at the Institute. Mrs. (Dr.) Mitchell pre- sented the Lieutenant with the sword of honour, which bore the following inscrip- tion: Presented to Lieut Wm. Honey, R.G.A., hv the inhabitants of Gorseinon as a mark of esteem on the occasion of his attaining the "Military Cross on active ser- vice, 13th July, 1916." She also handed him a case of Treasury notes, at the same time wishing him and Mrs. Honey long life and happiness. THE RECIPIENT'S REPLY. Lieut. Honey, responding, said his heart was deeply touched with the earnestness and goodwill of the presentation, and he sincerely thanked them all. When one thought of comrades lying on the blood- stained fields o," France and elsewhere, it was no time for speechmaking, but rather for doing—aye, and the lads were doing it that day; the lads were winning. (Cheers.) In a few Welsh words he re- minded them that he was still in heart, the Will Honey who had worked amongst them in his younger days as a tinworks lad, and even a collier doorbov in the Duke Colliery. STIRRING AND TOUCHING SCENE. A touching scene was witnessed when Mr. Griffith Willis. Indian Mutiny veteran, was introduced to the lieutenant on the platform. There they stood, an old man with all the bearing of a soldier, re- calling the terrible scenes of the Indian Mutiny, and the young soldier whose fine fignre expressed some of the vigour of our army as it is to-day. They clasped hands —and there wes no need for words'—they understood ee h other, though the old veteran was trembling with emotion. Those who contributed to the programme were: Mrs. Lewis, Messrs. J. Richards, W. Jenkins, D. W. Davies, D. R. Evans, W. Davies, D. Winch, and Rhys Walters; accompanists. Prof. Bowen, Mis Williams, and Mr. A. Jones for the male voice party. Votes of thanks to the artistes were pro- posed by Mr. David Davies, Plasycoed, and seconded by Mr. A. Williams; and to the chairman by Mr. Ben Davies, seconded by Mr. W. R. Evans.

ANCIENT SPURS

ANCIENT SPURS. A mlle-etion of historical spurs, formed by Mr. James James, was bought by Mr. Whawall at Christie's on Thursday for 530 guineas. There were 1a3 specimens,! ranging from Roman times to the 18th century. ITptil recently they were ex- hibited at Aylesbury Museum.

RUSSIAS FIGHT I

RUSSIA'S FIGHT I 2,000 MORE PRISONERS I IN GALICIA ASTONISHING USE OF CGSSAGK CAVALRY Petrograd, Thursday (received Friday).—An official communique issued this evening says:— Caucasus Front.—After hand-to hand fighting, the Turks were driven by us from heights east --if Baiburt. They are retreating. The offensive of our troops west of Mamakhatun continues success-! fully. After a desperate fight we occupied a series oi heights there. South-east of Mamakhatun the Turks attempted to take the offen- sive, but were repulsed. 'Driving the enmy back, our troops occupied the villages oi Djebakey and Almaly. Paris, Friday.—A telegram from Tiflis to the Journal says that operations in I the Caucasus are daily growing in import- ance. De-spite their desperate efforts the Turks have only trifling successes to record which are purchased by heavy loss. All Russian attacks between Baiburf and Ackkala have beeh victorious, and the Russian artillery inflicts terrible loss upon the Turkish armies, both on the army, operating on the Black Sea littoral and f ro l' the enemy forces on the Persian front. A great battle is now raging near the' great redoubt of Kcrnanshah. The Turks have a great number, ably led by Shefket Pasha, but the Russian guns work havoc ,amongst them, and the Russian cavalry 'completes the work of the artillery by hurling itself upon the enemy already de- cimated by our shell fire. Petrograd, Tliui-s(!a- The following official communique was issued in Petro- grad this afternoon:— On the Dvina, above and below Frederickstadt, we made some successful reconnaissances. On the Stokhod there was an artillery duel. Some enemy aeroplane squadrons flew behind our lines, dropping bombs and firing with machine guns. In Galioia, in the region west of the Lower Strypa, there were stubborn con- flicts at different points. The enemy de- livered some vigorous counter-attacks. We captured over 2,000 men. one gun, and some machine guns. In the Black Sea on the 11th our tor- pedo boats captured in the western part of the sea the Turkish steamer Itschihad, laden with petroleum and barley, and brought her into one of our ports. Other torpedo boats on the 12th destroyed at the mouth of the River Melenn. wott of the town of Ergheli. a loaded sLeumer and two tugs. On the Caucasus front. west of Erzerum. an offensive by our troops was successful. At some points the Turks vainly attempted to make counter-attacks.— Reuter. IMPORTANCE OF DELATYN. Paris, Thursday.—A Petrograd di&- patch, dated July 12, to the Petit Parisien." &ays:- The struggle for the railways is mor" lively on the Russian than on the French front. for two reasons: The small number of railway lines which renders their possession the more valuable. The small number and bad state of the roads. The capture of Delatyn by Letchiteky is one of th'e most useful and important inci- dents of the war, and is bound to have immediate consequences of the most fruit- ful kind on the development of operations in Southern Galicia.—Exchange. New York. Thursday.—The correspon- dent in Berlin of the Associated Press sends the following dispatch The Austro-German retirement from the' Czartorysk salient, just south of the Pinsk swamps, is completed, and the opposing armies have come to grips all along the line of the Stokhod River, where von Lin-I singen has elected to stand and cover the approach to Kovel. For some time correspondents in Berlin have been hearing of the astonishing use of Russian cavalry on the front south of the swamps, and getting repeated tales of repeated talc?6 of charges of masses of horsemen against en- trenched and unbroken infantry under -iigges t t i lf, height conditions appearing to suggest the height of madness. The explanation now re- ceived shows that there was a certain amount of method in this madness, and that the Russians have devised new tactics. The plan is not to use cavalry to press home an assault, but to advance a line of mounted skirmishers rapidly across the danger zone before the actual charge is started. The role of the cavalry is played when the infantry line reaches a point some 3,000 yards from the Austro-Gernian trenches. A swarm of cavalry in a widely extended line was then flung forward through the intervals of the infantry line. Horsemen dart forward at headlong speed for another 1,500 yards, fling them- selves to the ground, and open a rapid fire against the enemy. Cossack horses are trained to participate in this manceuvre and lie down at command, forming a liv- ing breastwork for the riders. Under cover of a heavy fire from the d ismolJ n ted horsemen, the infantry lines are pushed forward acrossr the intervening c. ntry.i Men and horses, maddened by excitemeru. often refuse to halt at the destined posi- j tion, and tear on against t-renoaes and entanglements in -an unpremeditated | charge. Cossacks are also being !ar«;e!y use in attempts to force slightly guarded river! crossings, though Russian oion^ers hhxle devised a new scheme of '.rising for in-1 fantrv where more resistance is antici- j pated. Long slender rafts are m.xirc-d along the banks of narrow with which this swampy country is inter- sected, and are concealed by ov<»ruanging bushes. At the proper .noment the I p- stream end of each raft is rL>sOfl, hl d the current swings it across river, foim- ing a series of narrow bridges for 8\4,) m- ing pa rties .-Reuter Special.

IDEATH FROM TETANUS I

DEATH FROM TETANUS. I Ma.ry Sullivan, a soldier's wife, who was said to have boxed a couple of rounds" with James Neill. whom she accused of being a Sinn Feiner during the rebellion in Enniscorthy. was acquitted at Wexford Assizes on Thursday on a charge of the manslaughter of Neill. Evidence was given that thp man and woman fell, and when Neill up there were scratches on hi^ face. "Neill diM from tetanus.

TODAYS WAR RESUME

TO-DAY.S WAR RESUME "Leader" Office 4.50 p.m The British have launched a new attack, and have broken into the enemy's second line on a four mile front. Latest reports say that the British have captured the villages of Longueval and Bayartin-le-Grand. Information given by a British officer, l and published in the Echo de I)aris shows that the Germans lost 12,000 men in their desperate counter-attacks on Contalmaison. The advance of the Allies is creating great uneasiness among the Austro-Ger- man population, according to repo tL, from Bucharest. Efforts are being mado to sound the Rumanian Government as to its intentions, but they are meeting with no success. The Turks are retreating before the Rus- sians. Cossack cavalry has been suc- cessfully used.

TODAYS HEWS iN BRIEF

TO-DAY'S HEWS iN BRIEF An otter was seen to kilj a ferret on the bank of the Usk, Brecon. Electricity in Hornsey, N.is to be 25 per cent, dearer than before the war. Dealings in wool rubbings pulled before September 1 are not to be prohibited. The first Army Order to bear Mr. Lloyd George's signature was published on Thursday. Martial law has been declared in all the districts in Spain affected by the railway strike. A woman drove one of the mourning coaches and her husband drove the hearse at a funeral at Biggleswale, Bedfordshire. Mr. and Mrs. George Cordrey, who have lived in one house at Stokenchurch, Bucks, for 55 years, have celebrated their diamond wedding. Amsterdam, Wednesday.—According to a Berlin official telegram, during June sixty-one enemy merchantmen of a total of 101,000 ions were sunk by German and Austrian submarines and nlines.-Reuter. It was stated in the City of London Court on Thursday that owing to the war a millionaire, well known in City circles, is unable to meet his obligations. The millionaire's name was not disclosed. Athens, Friday.—The Royal chateau at Tatoi and adjoining barracks have been destroyed by a forest fire. Several lives are reported lost. The King and Queen and their family have taken refuge at Prince Nicholas' residence at Kaphissin. -Ruter,

BRIGANDS TOWERS

( ? BRIGAND'S TOWERS. I British on Euphrates Punish Bandits. War Office. Thursday.—Euphrates Line. —On July 10 a detachment of our troops blew up the towers of a brigand who had been implicated in the theft of heliums (country boats). At 2 a.m. on the 11th marauders in boats attacked our boat con- voy crossing the Hammar Lake. The escort drove off the assailants, who suf- fered some casualties. Tigris Line.—At Sanna-i-Yat the enemy's machine-guns were active during the night cf the 9th-10th, and on the evening of the 11th the enemy's artillery and aircraft were both engaged in an effectual bom- bardment of our trenches. No material damage was done.. On the 12th the tem- perature was 117 degrees.

BUMP CAUSES DEATH

BUMP CAUSES DEATH. Peculiar Story at Inquest on Local Labourer. The Swansea Borough Coroner held an inquest at Swansea on Friday upon the body of Bernard Fagan (59), of No. 3, Crymlin-street. Port Tennant, Swansea! a labourer on the Midland Railway, Swan- sea, who met with an accident at the sheds on Tuesday. He died on Wednes- day. Mr. Andrew (of Messrs. Andrew and Thompson) represented the relatives, and Mr. Hilditch (Inspector of Factories) was also present. Mrs. James, deceased's landlady, said deceased came home from work on Tues- day, and at about 9.30 n.m. was seized with a fit of coughing. In reply to a question by witness, he said, "Something has come over me.. I had a blow in the works to-day." Ultimatelv. witness, to- gether with her husband, helped de- ceased to bed. Dr. Fellows was sent for but was unable to come. Deceased died the following morning. Alfred Harrop, wagon repairer in the employ of.the Midland Railway Company. 6aid that he was working with deceased most of the time up until about six o'clock. At three o'clock in the after- noon deceased went away, and on return- ing. said to witness, Can you see any- thing on my forehead? I was looking1 through the mess room window and I bumped my head." Dr. Fellowes said tbat, from the parti-! culars given by the messenger he thonght it was merely a slight stomach trouble, as no accident was mentioned. Subsequently a post-mortem examination was held by the doctor. There was a bruise right on the centre of the crown, niercing through i the scalp, skull covering of the brain, and on the brain itself. At the base of the brain he found a clot of about the size of a walnut, which was the a(-tiial cause of death. The doctor advanced the theory that when deceased approached the window he stumbled aud hit his head I against, the bottom of the window. The nature of the injuries were consistent with this theory. The jury returned a verdict of death in accordance with the medical evidence. and expressed sympathy with deceased's, relativf>s.

FOOLISH VALOUR I

FOOLISH VALOUR. M Barres, one of the most charming j writers of France, lecturing to the Royal Academy on Thursday night, described the scene at the Military School of St. Cvr on July 31, 1914, when the annual promotion of young officers took place according to traditional ceremony. The men. he said, swore to go into action and receive their baptism of fire in full dress with white gloves and plumed kepis. They kept their word—and many of thprn fell immediately in consequence of their con- spicuous dress. Foolish valour though it may have been. it was yet in accord with the traditional spirit of France, and sym- bolised fhe elan with which the whole nation -ose to defend its own existence and with it thp cnise of justice.

Advertising

UPLANDS TRAGEDY, At the inquest, this aiternooa on tha body 01 Mrs. Mary M. Davies, wlioca body was recovered from the reservoir at Cwmdonkiu Park, the husband stated that his wife had been ill two iiiontht-, and wai very depressed. He had been called up to join, the Army un the 21th of this month, and he thought she worried a hout it. There wore four clildr.n, and she had eaid tli-a could not struggle along without him. SWANSEA SESSIONS. Thomas Morriasey was found not guilty of assaulting hia wife with a brick.—'Thomus Crowley, Robert Sulli- van, Timothy E. McCarthy, and Patrick O'Connor were proved flot guilty of rob- bing Joliii Herbert in a Swansea publk- house. GATWICK MEETING. Betting (3.0r: 6 to 4 Heiford. o-oO-WEiST WOLFALISi: 2. LLAX- THOXT o.Nine ran. Benin?: 7 to TWwt, 4.0-ANNE HTDE 50IALL COUMY CRrCKET 3.—Fjre ran.

NEW FRENCH WAR LOAN

NEW FRENCH WAR LOAN. I  New York, Thursday (received Friday). —It is officially announced that a French loan of a hundred million dollars has been successfully negotiated here. The state- ment issued by Messrs. J. P. Morgan and Messrs. Brown Shipley and Co., 8aytS an American eorporation will be formed, to bek known as the American ForeigE Securities Gx. which will issue about 95,OUII.000 dollars for a period of three years at 5 per cent.-Reuter.

PLAYING SOLDIERS

| PLAYING SOLDIERS! Seven Resolven school boys were sam- moned at Neath on Friday for throwing stones on the highway.—P.C. Jones said the lads were in gangs playing soldiers. They had toy swords, and were throwing stones into Tonvrhew-road.-W. H Billon, who was said to be the leader of the soldiers" was fined 20s., and the other boys 2s. 6d.

LAND FOR RETURNED SOLDIERS

LAND FOR RETURNED SOLDIERS. Brisbane, Thursday.—Queensland is formulating a scheme providing for the employment of rcturned soldiers. There are nearly five miilion acres capable oi producing farms for over 20,000 returned Ipldiiers. The Government aim at giving the men permanent and comfortablf homes.—Reuter.

SWANSEA VALLEY SCOUTS

SWANSEA VALLEY SCOUTS. The annwal inspection of the Yal^ Scouts takes place on Saturday at t111 Headquarters of the 2nd Swansea Valley Troop at Ynispenllwch, Clydach, b: Major-General H. H. Lep. J.P., D.L., a' 5.30. The inspection will be precede by an attack on the headquarters by al the troops in the upper Dart of the Valley which will be defended by the Llansam let and Clydach troops. The attacken will start from Pontardawe under Colone Gough. of Yniseed- n, at 3 o'clock. Th< District Commissioner, H. N. Miers, Esq. will be in charge at, Ynispenllwch. At 5 o'clock, tea will be given to al the Scouts before the formal inspection The following Saturday. July 22nd, th' Clydach Troop will hold their annua sports, at which Lance-corporal Wood wil give an exhibition of his marvellous feat of jumping over a motor van, carriag' and pair, etc., and Hall. Beddoes an. Morgan will do a 100 yards' sprint for i'10 stake. In spite of many diffirulti-s owing to the number of scoutmasters an' older lads having joined the Navy am Army, the troops are in a fairly flourish [ ing condition.