Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 6 o 6
Full Screen
15 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

 &tuL?&?'6at??????-??? —?'????_??????B?????? ?/ For the j; duration I J of the War, use. 1 & f  |PHEASANT MARC RI you will never go baçk ?" «— to the other kinds after. ?—1 See the t-Ib. Packages with red, white, M and blue riband and Pheasant seal. m •■■ PER LB. 1 PER LB. Ask your Grocer. P m. I- -,1

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED THEFLAMBARDS MYSTERYI

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. -THE- FLAMBARDS MYSTERY. I BY SIR WM. MAGNAY, Bart. Author of The Heiress of the Season," The Red Chancellor," The Master Spirit," etc. CHAPTER XVIII. I A Suspicious Restitution. If I were you, David, I should feel in- clined to abandon the Jurbv portrait." It was the morning after the wedding l and I had been reflecting seriously o J all that had occurred to give me food iui- suspicion. Gelston stared at me rather blankly. Give up the commission, man? Why?" "Wdl," I answered, "I have my doubts, very grave doubts, as to the re- sl-ectability of our friends at Morningford Place." Well, I never supposed they were very classy, he replied. All the same, that is no reason why the lady should not have her portrait painted if they can af- ford to pay for it." Certainly not," I agreed. But there is a vast difference between not being classy and being criminal." Gelston jumped up. What on earth d) you mean?" Don't get excited, my dear David. I mean simply this. I have been thinking over the last fortnight's happenings, so fa:' as we have been permitted to know the<)t, and have come to the conclusion that if Rolt cared to tell us everything that is in his mind we might possibly be- come aware that Morningford Place is headquarters of a precious set of scoun drelg and —— "And ?" "We might not have to look farther for the murderer of Mr. Rixon. Gelston whistled. "This is plain speak- ing with a vengeance," he replied. But are you not letting your imagination run away with you? I dare sav Jurby and his fiiend6 may be crooked enough in their business dealings; men of that type and position must be unscrupulous in order to make money so quickly. But how or why he should be connected with the Flam- bards affair I don't see." Nor do I," was my rejoinder. All the same, I fancy Mr. Bolt understands it." Gelston laughed uncomfortably. "I can't quite see a murderer in tha blatant old money grubber," he said. And I should have agreed with you two days ago," I replied. But I am pretty certain he had something to do with the rather abortive robbery last evening-" I know you think so. He took off In- spector John's- attention while a fellow slipped behind the curtains and un- fastened the windows. But from what you have told me of the robbery, of the substitution of worthless jewellery for thQ real things, and of Rolf6 place of obser- vation, 6urely it was intended by them to encourage the thieves. Johns had to pre- tend to look another way while absorbed in a discussion with someone handy who happened to be Jujby." I saw my friend did not want to be convinced. Very well," I returned, I won't argue with nothing but suspicions to go n. But it is more than likely you will afld them justified before many days are past. And in the meantime go on with your work, if you care for the risk; but don't forget I have warned you." a I don't see much risk even if the man is' all you suggest," Gelston said, rising and getting his things together. He won't consider a poor painter worth knocking on the head and robbing. And to the poor painter a nearly finished sixty guinea commission is not to be so easily thrown up. In fact, after what you have hinted at I shall find some ex- citement in what has hitherto been rather dull work." There was nothing more to be said, and I let him go without attempting further argument. All the same I was now convinced that something was gravely wrong about the occupailts of Morningford Place. The idea that the man I had seen go into the library and disappear-probably the lead- ing spirit of tJle actual thieves—was the same person I had met as Errington had now become settled in my mind. It fitted in with Jurby's conduct and was plausible enough. And then there had, it was to be remembered, lately been another robbery, that at Glenthorpe Hall, some eight miles away. Rolt was rather a puzzle to me • The mixed attitude of reticence and frankness which he showed towards me was more than I could understand. Nor could I ac- count for his method of procedure, so far as it wag allowed to appear. Why did he hold his hand? Why had the thieves of the previous evening been allowed to es- cape, when it would surely have been the easiest thing in the world to capture them? It was all rather fase-inatingly incomprehensible, and during he day's work my mind kept reverting to the mystery. On my return at dusk I found WhPaoe Rixon waiting to see me. I took him up to my room. Can you give me any idea as to what Mr. Rolt is doing?" he asked as we lighted cigarettes. I replied that I had seen him the day before. Here p." he demanded. No; out at Great Rossington." My visitor looked interested and slightly surprised. Great Rossington ? That's miles away, isn't it? What was he doing there?" There was a swell wedding there," I answered. Lord Halidown married Miss Ashbury, of Roton Court." Oh, yes," Rixon said. I saw that in the paper to-day. What was Rolt doing there ? H Presumably looking after the very valuable presents," I said guardedly. Rixon looked surprised. What! a swell like Roit guarding wedding presents," he exclaimed. "That looks queer, doesn't it? There must have been something behind it, eh?" I could not help rather admiring the shrewd remark from one who did not give me the idea of possessing such acuteness. This is no fool, after all, was my thought, but I simply answered with a shrug, Possibly." He stared at me curiously, as though suspecting I knew more than I would tell, but he did not press for an explanation. H 1'11 tell you why I want particularly to see Mr. Rolt, and without delay," he said. I have a great .piece of news for him." Indeed ? Yes. What 4o you think ? The bank- notes paid by Mr. Finching to my poor uncle just before he met his death were not stolen after all." (To be Continued.)

REPENTANCE AND HOPE I

"REPENTANCE AND HOPE." I Preparations for the forthcoming Mission of Repentance and Hope" in the Church of England is at present, in Swansea, confined to the very necessary, and indeed vital processes of individual self-examination and corporate prayer. Meetings have been held by the Church Men's Society at St. Jude's. The only public service yet arranged is that in St. Mary's on Monday, Sept. 4th, for which the C.E.M.S. Federation is responsible. The Bishop of Swansea hopes to preach on that occasion.

No title

It is a free country, and no one is bound to answer a letter."—Clerkenwell County Court Judge. Because his parents had adread of his being taken prisoner, Private W.. T. Bur- nett, of the West Surreys, promised them solemnly on his last leave that that should never happen. His death on the field has just been reported. I

Advertising

0" /00 REDUCED PRICES AT ALL GROCERS vu ) 13ff? ELECT

TRADE AFTPR THE WAR I

TRADE AFTP-R THE WAR. I Changed Conditions & Needs I of the Future. i < Views of Premier, Mr. Bonar Law and Sir A. Mond. The more we ponder over the fruits of the Paris Conference and the determina- tion to consolidate the interests of the ( British Empire by means of directing and. encouraging trade after the war," the more do we see of the evident unity of purpose among those who are leading the way to the fruition of a national purpose which shall, to some extent, repay this country and its colonies, and also our Allies, for the enormous sacrifices which have been, and are being, made in oon- nection with the war. MR. BONAR LAW AND THE CHANGED CONDITIONS. In his speech, in the House of Commons, on the Paris Conference, Mr. Bonar Law said: U I do not deny for a moment that under our Free Trade system this country has developed an amount of wealth and accumulated resources which are not equalled by any other country in the world at this moment. In my belief the effect of the tariff is greatly exaggerated on both sides. It is really a question of organisation more than the method by which you are to carry out that organisa- tion. But all our old arguments about what is called Imperial Preference and all that kind of thing must be looked at from a new point of view, as a result not so much of the war as of what we feel the consequences of the war might be." Then, referring particularly to the remarks of Mr. Lief Jones and Mr. Snowden, Mr. Bonar Law proceeded: May I point out that, to Liberal members of the Govern- ment, one curious result of lion. members' criticism is this: the three resolutions which have been condemned or criticised were, every one of them, drafted—I do not know whether that is praising or condemn- ing them—before he had consulted with me, by the President of the Board of • Trade. He looked upon this as the nat-ural thing to do in view of the changed oon- ditions during the war." PREMIER ON FUTURE GUARANTEES. 1 Now, having glanced at the statements thus made from the Unionist side of the Coalition Government, let us take Mr. Asquith: "Tlae resolutions contemplate only necessary measures in self-defence against economic aggression threatening, the Allies' most vital interests, and in carrying them into -effect I need hardlv ( say that every endeavour will be made to ] ensure that neutrals do not suffer. In 1 fact, our interests and the interests of ] neutrals in this matter are the same. The determination of the Allies to defend them- < selves against aggression from elsewhere is ] or ought to be a sure guarantee that we shall pursue no aggressive policy towards other people. I am told that there is some apprehension, not in neutral countries, but J in our own country, that i? carrying out j these resolutions we may involve some { departure from our traditional policy of ] Free Trade. There are "ry few older and there is no more ardent Free Trader in the 1 House than myself. I believe we are left ] practically free in this country to pursue j the policy which is bast adapted and most < suited to our own economic and industrial ] needs No one who has any imagination ( can possibly be blind to the fact that this ( war with all the enormous upheaval of < political, social and industrial conditions ( which it involves, must in many ways, and ( ought to if we are a rational and practical people, suggest to us new problems or ] oossibly modification in the s-olutionof the old ones. I am not surrendering amy con- victions I have ever held. I am asking the House of Commons and the people of ] these Islands to take part with the Allies (with whom we are fighting side by side in a struggle which we all believe to be essen- j tial to the preservation of the freedom of the world) in securing for the future not onlv protection against the possibility of < military domination, but also true, vell- o-rounded and lasting independence." i MR. ASQUITH IN AGREEMENT WITH SIR ALFRED MOND. There is in the Prime Minister's speech, j as given in Hansard," marked agreement f with the views published by Sir Alfred Mond, who was unavoidably absent from i the debate on August 2nd. Writing to j the r' Manchester Guardian several days I E previously, Sir Alfred Mond said:— a The only sound policy is to assume i that, whatever the result of the war may ( be, the German Government and nation e will endeavour to seize every opportunity i to resume the present struggle as well in 1 diplomacy and commerce as on the field of < battle. The only saie course for the 1 Empire to adopt is to expand all its re- sources, the control of which has proved of inestimable value in the present crisis, ] to safeguard its essential industries by all ] necessary means, to develop in man power, money power, and material power the enormous field which the British Empire J offers as an economic unit. At this ( moment, when the Allies in their united offensive on all fronts are freely giving tie best of than- blood in the common cause, the idea that when the struggle is over and victory is won no effort is to be made to bind together in peace the forces united in war seems as humanly unsym- pathetic as it is politically unwise. That I the carrying out of these ideas may involve alterations in the fiscal system to which we have become accustomed and under which we have prospered is in itself no conclusive reason for rejecting them. There is a great difference between adopt- ing a system of selfish Protectionism, bol- stering up private interests and unhealthy industries and raising prices to the con- sumer for the benefit of private indi- viduals, and working out an economic scheme for the protection and future de- velopment of the British people and of our Allies. It will be a profound error on the part of Free-traders and contrary to I the interest of their own cause if they I assert that their principles are so inelastic >, and unadaptable that they annot meet the new conditions created by such a huge world-catastrophe as the present. Adam Smith, the father of our modern trade ] economics, already recognised that de- fence is greater than opulence.' While endorsing this sound doctrine we may add that blood is thicker than money." THE CHARACTER OF THE CHANGES. I In Reynolds' newspaper of the pre- vious week, Sir Alfred Mond wrote an article it which he anticipated much of what was said in the House of CommoI18 debate by the Prime Minister and Mr. Bonar Law, as the following extract shows* "The struggle has revealed to us our roal friends, and we know how to appre- ciate their friendship. The heroic sacrifices of all the Allies ie forming a bond of blood brothership between them. When tlJeo L dearly-bought victory is woji we are 6uxely1 < not going to say to each other: Thank you, dot it's all over, and we are no longer gooing to assist each other or work together!" It is inconceiva ble to me that this should be the feeling of those who are fighting together so gallantly to- lay, or who are following the efforts of the illied Armies with such keen anxiety and appreciation. We want to do everything possible by economic ties to retain our Allies in war as friends in peace. "These principles should be firmly fixed in the national mind. The methods of arrying them into effect will require care- ful consideration. No sane man wants to impose any avoidable sacrifice upon this! country, or unnecessarily to disturb our trade. Above all, no fresh burdens must be placed upon the shoulders of the poor. Care must be taken to avert the evils of Protectionism under which private in- terests benefit at the expense of the com- munity. If any form of tariff be adopted the benefit to private manufacturers must be compensated for by State control guar- anteeing adequate remuneration to labour and a sufficient supply of the protected articles for the home market at reasonable prices. We should further aim at Free Trade between all the States of the Em- pire, utilising each part of it for the best advantage of the whole, and at the con- clusion of such liberal treaties of com- merce with our Allies as would be to the ni-utual advantage of all the States con- cerned.

THE MILITARY CROSS I

THE MILITARY CROSS. Many Welshmen Win New Distinction. The "London Gazette" on Thursday contained a long list of N.C.O.,s and men upon whom the King has been pleased to confer the Military Medal for bravery in the field. The Welsh Regiment, the Welsh Guards, the South W?leg Borderers, and the Royal Welsh Fusiiers, also the Royall Field Artillery, the Poyal Flying Corps, and the R.A.M.C.. are represented in the list. The following men in local regi- ments or having other associations with Wales are named, and are privates, un- less otherwise stated:— F. Bond (9W8), R.W.F. Sergt. J. C. Byrne (4535), R.W.F. W. H. Buttle (10361), Welsh Regt. Corpl. M. Byrne (8R516), R.E. Corpl. D. H. Davies (9147), R.W.F. r. H. Davi% (17263), R.W.F. Sergt W. Dawson (6/17229), S.W.B. T. J. Dodd (9231), B.W,.F. F. Dunkley (10888), R.W.F. C. Edwards (16706), R.W.F. 5ergt. J. EHaway (6/14526), S.W.B. ^cting-sergi. F. Garner (20324), R.W.F. 3. Griffiths (16440), Welsh Regt. Oance-Corpl. G. Gwynne (16991), R.W.F. W. Hall (35383), R.W.F. Lance-corpl. J. Harris (492), Wielsb Guards. CorpI. D. H. Hughes (21246), R.W.F. Lce.-Corpl. J. Hughes (11590), R.W.F. Sergt. A. J. O. Jlumphrey6 (29), Welsh Guards. Horpl. D. James (613), Welsh Guards. NT. -Tames (17618), R.W.F. k. TonV. (11275). R.W.F. 3. Jones (4820), R.W.F. (T.F.). ;ergt. J. T. Jones (6/17059), S.W.B. L. A. Jones (6851). R.W.F. (T.F.). r. C. Jones (21235), R.W,.F. 7 W. 0. Jones (20731), R.W.F. Lance-Corpl. G. R. Knight (36481), R.W.F. L Lewis (29271), Welsh Regt. Tr. S. Morgan (8320), R.W.F. EI. Noble (27986), R.W.F. j'orpl. P. O'Brien (17337), Welsh Regt. :.orpl. J. S. Phillips (1833), R.G.A. CarpI. A. Price (25727), R.F.A. CorpI. G. H. Re (17491), R.W.F. 3. Roberts (8365), R.W.F. (T.F.). 1. Soar (23681), R.W.F. Lce-Corpl. S. Soar (21151), R.W,.F.). A. G. Thomas (798), Welsh Guards. W. Thomas 31172), R.W.F. Sergt W. Thomas (6/14491), S.W.B. Bandsman M. Walsh (8043), R.W.F. A. A. West (758), Welsh Guards. ergt. W. Milii+bread (10677), R.W.F. Lce-Corpl. J. Wilcocx (19151), R.W.F. J. Yates (6/17236), S.W.B.

3ALLANT RESCUE AT BURRYPORT

3ALLANT RESCUE AT BURRYPORT. | On Wednesday evening a man and boy larrowly escaped drowning at Burryport Phe boy was bathing near the Burryport Pier. The tide was going out, and he was larried off bis feet. A man from Llanelly lumped in to assist him, and he also was swept off his feet, being unable to swim. Several men joined hands and tried to ..each the man and boy who were drown- .ng before their eyes. Tom Evans, a ihearer at the Ashburnham Tinworks, who was sitting on the pier, hearing shout- ng ran to the spot, jumped in fully iressed, and caught the man as he was ;inking for the last time. The boy was ilso saved. The man was unconscious, jut artificial respiration was resorted to md he was soon all right. Had it not seen for the action of Mr. Evans both would have been drowned. Mr. Evans is i powerful swimmer. He is a deacon at Bethany Welsh Methodist Church, Burry- port.

No title

Natives of the province of Rewa, Fiji, nave contributed Y,1,500 for the purchase )f an aeroplane. Jack Mayman, a Turk, was at Aldershot sentenced to a month's imprisonment and recommended for internment for entering i prohibited area. Substantial decrease in the record of crime of all sorts was commented upon by Mr. Justice Pim at the opening of the commission for the City of Dublin on Thursday. There is only one case to go before the county grand jury.

Advertising

THE HEALTHY AND FASHIONABLE DRINK. BARLEY WATER made with FAWCETT'S British Unbleached Barley. Per 12 or. Sealed Packet. 4d. Sold only in Packets.

DOCK WORKERS I I

DOCK WORKERS. Swansea Harbour Trust's Depleted Staff. Decrease of 50 per Cent. The South-West Wales Munitions Court sat at the Labour Exchange, Swan- sea, on Thursday. Mr. J. Vaughan Ed- wards presided. A painter under the Swansea Harbour Trust applied for a leaving certificate on the grounds that the money he earned was not sufficient for a married man. Ap- plicant also suggested that it was not bene- ficial to his health. The Chairman coun- selled applicant to amend his appeal. The case was accordingly adjourned in order that applicant could appeal on the grounds that the employment was injuri- ous to hi& health. He was to appear before Dr. Jabez Thomas (Munitions Court advisor) at Port Talbot. DEATH OF DOCK WORKERS. An employe of the Swansea Harbour Trust appealed for a leaving certificate on the ground that he could render better service to the country at a local works to which he intended to go. Mr. A. 0. Schenk (Swansea Harbour Trust) said that they had lost 30 per cent. of their men. It was vastly more impor- tant that the harbour of Swansea should be kept open than that a man should leave with the sole intention of bettering himself. He told applicant that he was a steady, sober and industrious man, and an excellent employe. The Harbour Trust being a controlled establishment, the man could not be allowed to leave. Further, there were extensive repairs to be done and the man was wanted. The Chairman: Can you give us any idea 3f:: to the extent of the depletion of your staff? Mr. Schenk: With regard to this class of man, whereas a labouring gang con- sisted of 12 men in 1914, there are now only six, a decrease of 50 per cent. The certificate was refused. The court said they were sorry under the circum- stances, but it was the man's -sacrifice. LEFT WITHOUT NOTICE. Two workmen at a local controlled estab- lishmen were charged with absenting themselves without TeaVe; "They gave no notice and went to work elsewhere.. Mr. J. Vaughan Edwards sa.id the men did not terminate with the prosecutors, and therefore broke their contract. They were fined 30s. each. WARNING TO EMPLOYERS. I The Chairman advised prosecutors' re- presentatives to take proceedings against the emplojVrs who employed men after they had left. In fact," said the Chair- man, they are more to blame than the men themselves." He said the represen- tatives of the controlled establishments should regard it as a duty to punish the uncontrolled factories who gave employ- ment to delinquents.

CARMARTHEN JPs DEATH

CARMARTHEN J.P.'s DEATH. There passed away on Thursday a well- known Carmarthenshire gentleman in the person of Alderman David Lewis Jones, J.P., of Derlwyn, Llanpumpsaint, at the age of 77 years. The deceased, who had been in failing health for a considerable time, was a farmer, and had taken an active part in the public life of the county. He wa san aJderman of the County Council for many years, 3jjd as a justice of the peace for the. county he sat regularly on the bench at the Car- marthen County Petty Sessions. He was also a member of tie County Licensing Compensation Committee. Up to a few years ago he was a member of the Car- marthen Rural District Council and of the Board of Guardians, of which body he vas chairman for a long period. He was a staunch Liberal and Nonconformist. He leaves a widow and five grcwn-up daugh- ters, two of whom are married. His brother was the late Professor Tom Jones, a brilliant physician, who was head of the Welsh Hospital in the Soxuth African War.

LLANDOVERY FOOTPATHS I

LLANDOVERY FOOTPATHS. Public Rights at Stake. At the monthly meeting of the Llan- dover Town Council. held on Wednesdaj, under the presidency of the Mayor, Coun- cillor W. Pryse-Rice, a letter was read from the agent to the Town Estate, in-. forming the Council that the owner of such property was now agreeable to ajlow the public to walk alongside the riier bank from the chain bridge end towaris Dolauhirion Bridge, but would like the Council to persuade the public to keep t.s near as possible to the river so as rot to trespass unnecessarily on the adjoining lands. Mr. Esniond said he did not think any member would regard the letter satis- factory, as the tone of it suggested that the owner was conferring a grant or a favour to the Council by allowing the public to use the footpath. rtic LVnn< il did not ask-for such favours, and should assert their rights over such paths, whicn had been uninterruptedly traversed by the inhabitants of Llandovery for over 21 year*. The previous owner of the estate had never attempted to stop the public walking on such footpaths, and he con- sidered the better plan would be for the Mayor and Corporation to walk the several footpaths on the Town Estate at an early date, just to show that they claimed a right to walk thereon. Mr. C. P. Lewis concurred with the suggestion, and expressed surprise that the new owner, after securing the pro- perty only six months ago, should have made any effort to stop the public making use of the footpaths, which they had un- questionably the right to use. Mr. Esmond said that at the close of the conference between the sub-committee of the Council and the agent, held in May last, the agent of the estate had assured him that he would recommend Mr. mill- man to grant the public the right to walk on the path alongside the river referred to in his letter, and also along the Pon- taur road, provided the Council waived the right to the path near the house. Mr. D. T. M. Jones pointed out that litigation with regard to public paths was expensive, and urged the Council not to be too hasty in their decision. Ultimately, after a long debate, it was resolved to instruct the Town Clerk to write to the agent, asking him to adhere to the arrangement arrived at at the in- ference, and that a special meeting of the Council be convened immediately a reply was received.

No title

Net profits resulting from the sale of official photographs from the front are given to military charities. flu Chancellor Of the Exchequer has told Mr. Hume Williams that no proposal for the formation of a corporation with Government support to encourage and de- velop trade with Russia was at present before him. He would be prepared to consider such a suggestion if suitable ar- rangements were proposed, but the Treasury was bound to act in the first instance on the recommendation of the trade. A young shop assistant named Morris was sent for trial charged with shooting his girl wife at Mansfield. A young shop assistant named Morris was sent for trial charged with shooting his girl wife at Mansfield. While undergoing at Aldershot a sen- tence of 12 months for desertion, Wm. Edmunds hanged himself in his cell. Fifteen more public-houses have been taken over by the Liquor Control Board in Carlisle, making a total of 37 acquired. Three girls detained in Dublin since Sunday in connection with the Roosa cele- bration have been released by order of the military. Several exempted and badged men hav- ing been charged at Glasgow with drunk- enness, the magistrates are calling the attention of the, authoritiee to the matter. Rose Perkins, of Chatham, wife of a soldier serving in France, was sentenced to four months' imprisonment for neglect- in, her children. The magistrate said the case was both contemptible and horrible-1

Advertising

I G" ) fir?, :;):) r-: l-A -721(, 'C' \1l; r' 1 naii f :1.'II' If @ vsixm. rUiU!j1 ¡¡,¡, Ii lí.. ,¡..¡¡.,¡ II ¡rh.;¡ 1')'111 'Hi.. \iI iW -ft. MONDAY, AUGUST 14th, j AND DURING THE VEEK. Î • MATINEE SATURDAY AT 2.30, MURRAY KING and CHARLES CLARK introduce, by arrangement with Miss Doris keane, an Elaborate Production of the EARLY VICTORIAN DREAM PLAY- j "ROjVWJCE. t>J "¡. f1 II II ::====:!It:== ::=:=======:=-= :=:=::=- ==, 1 By EDWARD SHELDON. R,O 'd'igf! ??EWB?W?a Rev ?4 NGEM RO MANGE., RDANGE3 R  A i; %flaW' ■ ??L/? yM F? ? -Mo?r?/?r, ;i f 0 13, H eathfield St., Swansea. ■ I If it' s a Baby Carriage? 19" WE HAVE IT! LITTLE COTS FOR LITTLE DOTS. Latest Resigns in Push Carts, Mail Carts & Baby Carria g es. Terms arran g e d to suit We have a large selection of Folding Carriages, 'Sturgess' and 'Ijippa' Cars in great variety. REMEMBER! We guarantee complete satisfaction. ASK FOR CATALOGUE. Note the Address- OL M opm AM WAML &ip% JONES & MORGAN Complete House Furnishers (Opposite Empire), I 238, Oxford Street, SWANSEA. STUDEBAKER 15 CWT. DELIVERY VAN PRTCE f-270 COftPLETV. I STUOEBAKER, LTD., 117-123, Great Portland Street, London, W li-int-ed and Published for the Swansea Press, Limited, by ARTHUR PARNELIi HIGHATtf. at Leader Buildings, Swawe&