Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 6 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
41 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

I The Carn bria Daily Leader" gives later news than any paper published in this dis- trict.

Advertising

f —————————— mr————————. —————— —— The London Office of the "Cambria Daily Leader" is at 151, Fleet Street (first floor), where adver- tisements can be received up to 7 o'clock each evening for insertion in the next day's issue. Tel. 2276 Central.

TRENCHES FULL OF DEAD

TRENCHES FULL OF DEAD. OUR LATEST GAINS. FRENCH RE-TAKE PART OF FLEURY TO-DAY'S BRITISH OFFICIAL. Last ngiht the enemy's artillery generally showed increased ac- tivity. North-west of Bazantin-le-Petit, by means of a small local enterprisa, we further extended our gains in the enemy's lines. The German trenches in ti e area were fo iiii(I to be greatly da^ged and full of the enemy dead. A furt her hostile attack from Mar- tinpuich last night was repulsed as completely as his former attack yesterday. TO-DAY'S FRENCH OFFICIAL. "^sorth of the Somme several at- tempts at counter-attack by the enemy against our new positions south-east of Maurepas were broken by our fire. We took some prisoners. South of the Somme we took four machine guns in trenches taken by us south of Belloy. On the right Bank of the Meuse an attempt by our troops enabled us. after a violent combat, to drive the Germans out of a por- tion of the village of Fleury which they occupied. Some enemy parties are still oc- cupying a small heap of ruins situated on the eastern fringe. Between Thiaumont and Fleury our troops have also made appreciable progress. Fifty prisoners, including one oiffcer fell into our hands, as well as a machine gun. The night was comparatively calm everywhere else. BRITISH OFFICIAL. rhe following telegraphic dispatch, dated Thursday, 10 p.m., has been received from General Headquarters in France:—( On our right there has been considerable artillery activity to-day. Last night and early this morning the enemy delivered a series of determined counter-attacks on our trenches north-west of Pozieres on a broad front and with con- siderable forces. Six lines of his infantry advanced to the attack, but ran back suffering very heavy losses. Our guns and machine-guns did great execution. In no case did he suc- ceed in entering our lines. North-west of Bazentin we captured about 100 yards of trenches from the enemy. A counter-attack made by him from Martinpuiclx to-day was repulsed and some prisoners captured by us. A German aeroplane was brought down behind our lines near Pozieres. FRENCH OFFICIAL. Paris, Thursday Night.—On the Somme front our artillery was active and carried Dut numerous destructive bombardments against the enemy organisations. There was no infantry action. The number of unwounded prisoners taken by us to the north of the Somme yesterday exceeds 200. We captured five x ma chine-guns. There was the customary cannonade on the rest of the front. CRISIS IN ENEMY'S EFFECTIVES? Paris. Thursday (received Friday).—An expert French commentator, writing to- right says:—The day was calm on the whole of the Somme front, where our advance tha day before on both sides of the river was foUowed by no reaction. It is & signitican. fact, moreover, that the German replies in this sector are now becoming rare and slower than in the past. It must be regarded as a symptom of crisis in the enemy?s effectives for him to abstain thus from counter-offensives, con- trary to the traditions of German tactics and the principle of wer. In such condi- tion the enemy's task appears to be sin- gularly complicated by the general offen- sive of the Allies on all fronts, so oppor- tunely decided upon by the conference of Paris. Further, without wishing to exaggerate the consequences of the weakness of the German reply, we find in this fresh rea- sons for confidences and hopes, as also other reasons for having patience, §jnce j the tactics liithert-o followed with full suc- cess by the French command consist of developing by a series of secondary actions the progress of operations on a grand j scale which will come in their time. To-day our artillery resumed its destruc- tive fire on the fortified positions of the enemy north 

No title

The Emperor of Austria celebrates his 8fth birthday to-day. To-day is the forty-sixth anniversary of the Battle of Gravelotte. The Central Control Board (Liquor Traffic) have acquired thirteen more licensed houses in Carlisle, making a total of fifty taken over in this area. In the presence of:1 large assembly, the funeral of Mr. 1. T. Spnckman, late presi- dent of the Hearts *q1' Oak Society, took j place at Haraoiitead cemeteric.

I SERBIAN GROUND WONI

I SERBIAN GROUND WON I FRENCH INFANTRY ADVANCE IN I BALKANS Salonika, Wednesday.—French activity south of Lake Doirall was carried a step further yesterday. French infantry, whose advance was covered by heavy fire from the Allied guns, advanced, and seized some B uIgar defensive works close to the lakeside. This morning they established themselves on Tortoise Hill, near Doldjeli, which had been shelled for some time. These successes were achieved at small cost. the enemy offering only a feeble re- sistance. Doldjeli lies south-west of Doiran town and two miles within Serbian territory. A Bulgarian official report claims that the attacks on their positions south and west of Doiran Lake on August 14 and 15 were repulsed On August 15 the enemy a v; itL considerable force, but was compelled to retreat in great cii.sünler."

ITHE EMPTY CAGE I

I THE EMPTY CAGE. I I Neath Man's Suit Pawned to I Buy Ferret. At Neath County Sessions on Friday, Nellie Watkins, Aberdulais, summoned her husband, Griffith V.ttkins, Neath Abbey, for persistent cruelty. Mr. Edward Al)l)ey, for per,- i ste, Powell, who appeared for defendant, sug- gested that the parties should make it up, but the complainant refused, remarking, My life has been too bad with him to go back." Complainant alleged that on the 26th of July her husband threw a. brass candle- stick at her head. and threatened to kill her if she did not leave the house. She went, and stayed out. all night, with her baby suffering from measles. Questioned- by Mr. Powell, complainant denied that she went drinking. Mr. Powell: Did you pawn his suit of clothes?—-Yes, but he asked me to, so that, he could buy a ferret to go ferreting, (Laughter.) Have you pawned your wedding ring? —Yes, to buy food. Have you taken all the furniture from the house?—Yes, it was on the hir system. And the only thing you have left your husband is an empty bird-cage?—That's good enough for Him. (Laughter.) Mr. Towel 1 suggested that the case should be adjourned, and the Rench: agreed, defendant offering to pay 15s. a week maintenance.

IAUSTRALIAN WHEAT

I AUSTRALIAN WHEAT. Melbourne, Friday. — Mr. Hughes denies the report that he has chartered nearly one hundred vessels to carry wheat from Australia. He declared that he never made such a statement.

FAIRLY COPPED

"FAIRLY COPPED." William Owen. Lonlas, pleaded guilty aet Neath on Friday to trespassing on enclosed land at Talyworn, Llansamlet, in pursuit of game. P.C. Higginson said at daybreak on the 7th inst. he saw defend- ant carrying a gun, and later heard a shot fired on Talywern land. Defendant admitterl that he was fairly copped," and handed over the gun and live cartridges to the constable. He was fined 20s.

FISHERMENS WIVES

FISHERMEN'S WIVES. Amsterdam, Friday.—It is stated that on Wednesday evening a meeting of the wives of Dutch fishermen was held at Rchveningen, at which it was stated that there could be no question of the return of their husbands, because the shipowners refused to leave their vessels in England under other than their own men's care.

IGERMAN SHIP TORPEDOED

GERMAN SHIP TORPEDOED. Copenhagen, Thursday.—It is learned here that the German steamer Weser, of Hamburg, was torpedoed by a submarine two weeks ago, while on a voyage from Sweden to Germany. It is supposed that the crew was saved. -Exchange.

ITHE NEXT CREDIT VOTE

THE NEXT CREDIT VOTE. One of the first matters to engage attention when Parliament reassembles on October 10 will he the introduction of a new Vote of Credit. When the Prime Minister brought for- ward the last one on July 24 for €150,000,000, he intimated that this would carry us on until the middle of October. The amount already voted is £ 2,832,000;000. —Exchange.

EARTHQUAKE DAMAGE

EARTHQUAKE DAMAGE. Rome. Thursday.—Details of the earth- quake at Rimini shows that four persons were killed and thirty inj ured, and build- ings badly damaged. The- panic-stricken population are camping in the open air. The earthquake has caused damage in numerous towns in Central and North- Eastern Italy. The Under Secretaries for State. Signors Bonicelli and Devito, have left Rome to organise the rescue work in the stricken area.—Exchange.

PEERS HEIRS AND ARMY I

PEERS' HEIRS AND ARMY. Although many young men are receiving commissions in the Army by way of the ranks, the regular methods of entering the service through Sandhurst and Wool- wich retain their popularity. Among new subalterns from the Royal Military College are the Marquis of Blandford. the elder of the two sons of -the Duke- of Marl- borough, and the Earl of Altamont, tlie only son of the Marquis of Sligo.

ESSEN FOOD RIOTSI

ESSEN FOOD RIOTS. Geneva, Thursday.—More disorders of a serious character have occurred at Essen. Two thousand working men, exasperated at the increasing food price's, raided the municipal buildings and attempted to interview- the burgomaster. They were ejected by the police, street fighting fol- lowing.— Exc hange. Paris, Thursday.—The Munich H Neue-se Nachrichten of August 15 announces that there have been discovered recently in Berlin a whole series of fraudulent manoeuvres in order to obtain cereals from West-Prussia for the capital. Several per- sons cornered cereals, made false declara- tion to the authorities, and resold them in Berlin vrith a profit of between 300 and 400 per cent. The number or accused has alreidv reaehed 100. Among them t here are many railway chiefs, who assisted the transport of merchandise under a fa lse declara- tion. Lar^o landowners in Western Prus- aaa in.v)vro.h:.1U'.h.a.naa.

RUSSIANS HELD

RUSSIANS HELD DESPERATE STAND BY ITHE ENEMY. > The enemy in Galicia is holding very firmly on the wings-the two points, 60; miles apart, where a specially stubborn resistance has been noted during the last! few days. The Austrians speak of a most violent assault against the more northerly of these two points, where masses of Russian troops are said to have been thrown against the positions yesterday for 12 ?hours in vain. Here General Sakharoff is fighting at a point only two or three miles in advance of the ground he won before Bothmer's troops farther south re-I tired from their winter line. Opposite Hali< in the south, also the geographical positJ ,s are unchanged. RUSSIAN OFFICIAL. I Petrograd, Thursday night.—The situa- tion on the Western and Caucasian fronts I is unchanged. ENEMY CLAIMS. Berlin, Aug. 17.-German official report: Hindenburg's Front.—Heavy Russian attacks lasting into the night against the sector of Btttkow-Rarbuzow, west of i Zalozce [on the front of Bohm-ErmolliJ, were completely repulsed. Archduke Karl's Front.—Enemy assaults north of the Dniester at Tustobaby and Kouczaki lU and 9 miles east of lialiczj yesterday were again unsuccessful. We captured 154 prisoners. In the Carpathians we captured the j height of Stara Obema, north of Capull [Southern BukovinaJ.-Reuter. II Vienna, Aug. 17.-Austrian official re- port:— Hindenburg's Front.With the army of, |Genera' von Bohm-Ermolli fighting of the [greatest violence developed yesterday be- tween Prepelniki and Picniaki. For more i than 12 hours the enemy uninterruptedly I j threw his l"f'-ô aain6t our positions. Most of the assaults broke down before lour entanglements. Wherever the enemy' ic,lieceeded, however, in penetrating tem-i porai ily into our trenches, as happened near Manajow, he was driven out again by our reserves. This victorious repulse of the Russian assault is as much due to the excellent i work of the German and Austro-Hun- garian batteries as to the brave altitude of the infantry, especially the Humeri in Regiments 12 (Komaron) and 72 (Pos- zony). Our losses are slight, those of the enemy being exceedingly heavy.—Wireless Press.

I I TAX DODGERS UNEARTHED

I TAX DODGERS UNEARTHED. Most, of the tribunals have discovered numbers of prosperous people who have never paid income tax. At Lambeth, an appellant admitted that he earned X6 10s. or Y,7 a week and had never paid income tax. The tribunal decided thaf, as the country- wanted money, the tax collectors should be informed of cases of evasion.

IENEMY AIDS OUR CHARITIES

IENEMY AIDS OUR CHARITIES Dr. Macnamara stated in the House of Commons on Thursday that the total num- ber of people who passed through the turn- stiles to view the captured German sub- marine at the Temple Pier was 302,900, j and the total receipts £ 3,(>50 15s. 7d. Mr. Churchill asked if the Admiralty would consider whether the submarine could not be put to some military use. "I think that has been comÜderod,H re-J plied Dr. Macnamara. plied Dr. Maenamara.

ENEMYS JUTLAND LOSSESi

ENEMY'S JUTLAND LOSSES. Reports continue to reach the Govern- ment that the German losses in the Jut- !and b?ttip were far heavier than were re- ported, says the Daily Dispatch" Lon- don Letter writer. It is now certain that thoy lost the Kaiser and the Kronprinz,' two of the newest super-Dreadnoughts of the German Navy, which were built since the war began.

SUGAR CARDS IN EN G LA N D i

SUGAR CARDS IN EN G LA N D. i The Sheffield and Eceleshall Co-operative Society, which distributed sugar cards among its 25,000 members four months in order to ensure even distribution of its reduced supplies of sugar, will probably!' find it necessary to extend the system to flour. The general manager states that the members have several times expressed their dissatisfaction with the sugar-card system, but it is absolutely essential to have such a scheme in opeation. I

ITHE PRICE OF COAL

I_ THE PRICE OF COAL. ] Presiding on Thursday at the half-yearly meeting of the Commercial Gas Co., Mr. W. G. Bradshaw said that the Limitation of Coal Prices Act did something to modify the price of coal, no doubt, hut the Act was so difficult, of interpretation that he had not met two people who were agreed on its meaning. As a retflt coal- owners had been practically able to charge what they liked. TIE, had no complaint to make against the. firms whid) supplied the company, but he thought that the price of coal which was ruling generally in the trarle was much higher than the circumstances warranted, although perhaps it was not so high as it would have been, owing to the extraordinary demand for coal at home and abroad and the shortage of out- put. if the Act had not been passed.

TRAGEDY OF AN MPI

TRAGEDY OF AN M.P. I A distressing announcement regarding Dr. Charles tench, M.P., was made by the, Speaker on Thursday in the House of Commons. I regret to have to inform the House," he said, that in accordance with the pro- visions of the Lunacy (Vacating of Seats) Act I have issued my warrant to the Clerk of the Crown for the issuing of a writ for the election of a member for the West' Riding (Colne Valley) Division of York- shire in the room of Dr. Charles Leach. I whose seat has become vacant under tbdt Act." Dr. Leach. who had been Liberal mem- ber for Colne Valley since 1910, had been ill for a considerable time. He was one of the most remarkable figures in the House of Commons, and his career has been it rlnl(1 UN" Beginning life as a clog-maker, ho studied while others slept, entered the ministry, built up the Srcnday afternoon1 lecture movement, founded colleges and institutes, and promoted temperance and other reforms, conducted Cook's tourist. parties to Palestine, and jet found tunei to unita a dozen hooka. 1

ICARSO LINE HELD

CARSO LINE HELD. Italians Repulse Enemy Attacks. ITALIAN OFFICIAL. Rome, Thursday.—On the Lower Isonzo front artillery and trench mortars were active against the enemy's lines. We repulsed an attack on the Carso and took 100 prisoners, including four officers. In the Tolmino area our batteries shelled the railway station of St. Lucia, where movements of troops were reported. In the Upper Cordevole and on the Tonezza plateau there was great activity of hostile batteries, which were effectively replied to by ours. A squadron of our Voisin aeroplanes bombarded the railway station of Reinen- berg, on the line Gorizia-Trieste. Good results wen observed, and our machines returned safely. Last night hostile seaplanes dropped bombs on Venice and on the Grado lagoon. Some slight damage and no casualties are reported. _nu"-

PASSPORTSI

PASSPORTS. Regulations for Australian Commonwealth. The following statement is issued by the Foreign Offiee:- Passports for Australia.—It is hereby notified that after September 1st. 1916, no person over 15 years of age will he per- mitted to land in the Commonwealth of Australia, unless in possession of a valid pnswport issued or vise by a competent British authority. British subjects embarking for Australia from the United Kingdom must, carry valid passpords issued or vise by Passport Office. Downing-sfreet, London. Alien sub- jects so embarking must carry passports issued bv their own authorities and vise by Passport Office. Persons embarking from foreign coun- trip., f,,i- Australia must first have their passports vise by the British Consular officer in the country of embarkation.

EXPORTS TO SWEDEN

EXPORTS TO SWEDEN. Drastic New Regulations. At a meeting of the Privy Council at Buckingham Palace, on Friday, presided over by the King, his Majesty disposed of matters conneded with the war, the most important among which was a. proclama- tion prohibiting all exports to Sweden other than those permitted by licence is- sued by the Wat Trades Council. Licences will be subject also to a written guarantee issued by Handelskommision. and the i-mporter must also sign a declaration, which must be duly stamped and approved by the Swedish Government, as to the I destination of imported articles.

I PRIVY COUNCIL

PRIVY COUNCIL. The King held a. Privy Council in Buck- ingham Palace on "Friday morning. Lord Wimborne, who was present, was formally declared Lieutenant-Governor of Ireland on his re-appointment to the position.

I DOCKYARD INCREASES

DOCKYARD INCREASES. Additional temporary war increases have recently been granted in Pembroke and oth^r home dockyards and naval es- tablishments, viz., 3s. a week to adult males an dts. a week to apprentices and boys. The case of the clerical staffs is still under consideration.

I ILL SWIM FOR IT

I I'LL SWIM FOR IT." Two Glasgow coopers, named Thomas Brown and Thomas Balfour, were drowned under tragic circumstances in the Forth and Clyde Canal on Thursday night. The men had ,hH their work2, and were pro- ceeding along the embankment when Bal- four, with the remark, I'll swim for it," plunged into the water. He got into difficulties when half-way across. Brown went to t'ha rescue, but had only reached Balfour, when both men sank. The bodies were recovered on Friday morning.

HEAD OF SHIP CANAL

HEAD OF SHIP CANAL. Mr. Johr. Ken ivortjl Bythell, who retired a few months ago from the chairmanship of the. Manchester Ship Canal, died on Friday, at Manchester. In his early ('ars he !i■:ed in Bombay. Returning to England, he joined the directorate of the Ship Canal in 1887. In 1894 he retired from the firm of East Indian Shippers, in wich he was a partner, to deotev his energies to the development of the canal, and had the satisfaction of retaininthe. chairmanship unti1 the first dividend It Ordinary shares had been paid.

ISHIPYARD MENS DEMAND

SHIPYARD MEN'S DEMAND. A large deputation representing the whereof the shipyard workers of the shipyard workers of the country was re- eeived by the Committer on Production "I t Old Palace Yord on Friday morning, Sir George Askwit presiding, in respect of I)ejl,s ippiicailori for an advance of wages. The Boilermakers' Society are asking, for 6s. a week ctdvance for time workers, and 15 per cent, for piece work- ers. while the allied trades are seeking an all-round increase of i5 per cent. Tha proceedings were private.

KINGS WAR AWARDSI

KING'S WAR AWARDS. The King held an investiture at Buck- ingham Palace on Friday, when he be- stowed upon about tifty naval and military officers. Major-Genera I George orringe, who held a command in Mesopotamia and rendered conspicuous service, received the K..C.B., while Lieut.- Col. Charles Phipps, R.A., received the C.B., civil division. There were .three C.M.G.'s bestowed; nineteen D.S.O.'s, 2.1 Military Crosses, and a Royal Red Cross of first-class was awarded to Miss Violet Kiddle, ;i sister of Queen Alexandra's 1m- perial Military Service (reserved).

DEATH OF LORD REDESDALE

DEATH OF LORD REDESDALE The Press Association telegraphs: Lord Redesdale died on Thursday at his seat, Batsford Park, Moreton-in-Marsli, after an illness of ahout two months' duration. Algernon Bertram Freeman-Mitford, who wats in his 80th year, wa.s the first baron. He had lield diplomatic appoint- ment:, was a trustee of the Wallace Collec- tion and the National Gallery and of Shakespeare's Birthplace, and sat in j Parliament for South-West Warwick- shire as a Conservative from 1892 to 1895. The heir to the title is the deceased peer's eld-?t .son, the Hon. pavid Bertram Ogilvv Kreeman-M itford, who married a daughter of Mr. Gibson Dowles. j

I MILITARY TRIBUNAL

I MILITARY TRIBUNAL. Married Men and Single Shirkers. SWANSEA DISTRICT. There were over fifty cases for hearing before the Swansea District Tribunal at its sitting at the Union Offices on Friday, Mr. Morgan E. David presiding. A motor and cab proprietor, a married man, said he had only succeeded in dispos- ing of part of his business since he was granted exemption two months ago, and he was granted another month, this to be final. A licensed victualler of Pontardulais, who also owns a pit wood cutting at Llan- sawel, was granted three months. It was suggested that in the meantime he should endea.vour to get work in munition works, substituting a single man. A PERTINENT QUERY. One married applicant who tYae refused exemption exclaimed Why should I give up my business while bingle men are walking about? The Chairman: We know all about that, but we cannot alter it. Our sympathies are with the married men, but we cannot go against the law. Major Lewis had previously remarked in regard to another case: It is a pity we have to sen dmarried men away when there are plenty oi single men about." Tbe case of a motor driver was ad- journed for (I, mouth for the man to go before the Medical Board. Capt. Williams, the military representa- tive. requested employers to see that their assistants went before the Medical Board before appearing before the Tribunal. I STINGING WORDS. A Gowerton farmer appealed on behalf of an assistant aged 20. Applicant had five brothers, one working with him on the farm. and none of them were serving. No exemption was granted, the Chair- man remarking that applirrmt and his hrothers were a lot of shirkers. MEDICAL BOARD AND UNFIT MEN. A printing compositor who &aid he was suffering from varicose. veins had been passed for garrison duty at home. Mr. Matthew Griffith said a look at the. man convinced one he was not fit for mili- tary service, and he thought the Tribunal might, follow the example of other tri- bunals throughout the country and over- ride the decisions of the Medical Board when they had othe-r evidence that the men were not fit. The Clerk (Mr. Edward Harris) said he agreed with Mr. Griffith to the extent that he thought the boards were pacing men who were not fie. The Chairman: What is onr position? Suppose we went against the medical board, the military authorities would call him up nevertheless. Mr. Griffith: Our position is the same as other tribunals. Here is a man suffer- ing very badly, he says, from varicose veins, and yet they have passed him. I have known men suffering slightly from varicose veins who have been rejectee). Two months' exemption wa.s granted. A commercial traveller, aged ;)9, who snid he was suffering from hernia, had been passed for genera l service, class one. çnpt. Williams said he knew of a 6th Welsh man at the front who was wearing a truss. The case -was adjourned for Captain Williams to make enquiries. I FURNACEMEN EXEMPTED. Exemption was formally granted to 22 men, mostly furnacemen, employed at Baldwin's Works at Gowerton, upon the application of Mr. Atkins. The Clerk explained it was now neces- sary for badged men to get certificates of exemption. Mr. Atkins promised Capt. Williams he would release single men at the works if married men a.s good were substituted. I DONE HIS BIT." I A time-expired man, who formerly played half-back for Swansea Town, claimed exemption. He explained he had served five years with the Colours, includ- ing over a year at the front. He had two brothers on active service, one unofficialIv reported killed, and the other had been in France for ten months. He was a mar- ried man, and thought he had done his bit" for his oountry. Exemption for six months.

I A GERMAN VIRAGO

I A GERMAN VIRAGO. I Leader of an African Guerilla Force. News has reached this country of the appearance in the field of war in East Africa—in the Kilima Nyato region—of a. German virago w ho is said to be leading a body of native troops without the assist- ance of any other European. The wild dis- trict in which this truculent lady is. or was. operating contains the fabled Moun- tains of the Moon and from her strong- holds she is stated to have waged a savage guerilla wairfare again-st our forces. Among the fighting forces and residents in British East Africa this white Amazon is known as the Bibi Sacharini, a name which has been given her by the natives. The Askaris, the native soldiers fighting with the British forces, and also the natives who have been fighting for the Germans and taken prisoners, tell amaz- ing stories of the exploits of this white woman fighter. The native story is that she is the wife of a German commandant who was killed in the fight which took place at J,ona;dn on September 25. 1914. It was after this encounter that the natives began to bring in stories of the doings of the Bibi Sacha- rini. They said that she was so gri^f stricken over the death of her husband that she became mad and swore that ahe would not only wage war on the British, but would make it particularly hot for any British officer who was unfortunate enough to fall into her hands. It is fur- ther stated that the woman ha<: been seen through glasses by many British officers, always surrounded by her black troops. She rides astride, is a wonderful shot, and a great master of strategy.

AN IRON CROSS CRISIS I

AN IRON CROSS CRISIS. Rotterdam, Thursday.—A serious c*sis | has arisen in one of Germany's greatest industries, namely, the manufacture of Iron Crosses. This essential item in the equipment of the German soldier is com- posed ptortly of s ilver, which runs round the iron centre of the emblem, three grammes being required. The manufac- ture is in the hands of eighty silversmiths, who have intimated that their supplies of silver arc not equal to the demand. The Government has instructed them to apply to tlh' society which is responsible for the collection of gold and silver objects, in return for tlw voluntary surrender of which the owners are given iron riuoli- catss.

TODAYS WAR RESUME

TO-DAYS WAR RESUME "Leader" Office 4.50 p.m. Six lines of enemy" infantry advanced against our trenches north-west of Poziere.s, but the only result was heavy losses for them. The recent new gain on the Somiag brought 200 prisoners to the French. French infantry have made an advanof in the Dorran region, the enemy offer- ing only a feeble resistance. A stubborn resistance to the Russian ad- vance is being shown on both wings of the enemy army in Galicia. The Italians have held their Carso line intact against enemy assaults.

ITODAYS NEWS IN BRlEFI

ITO-DAYS NEWS IN BRlEFI Kitchener Memorial Fund: 2230.000. Baroness Lambert (nee Rothpohild- died in Paris. Lord French inspected troops at Cork Barracks. £2:.14 was paid for a pair of brilliant ear- rings at Debenham's sale room. Mr. E. Ashmead-Bartlett has presented a grizzly bear irom Wyoming to the Zoo- logical Gardens. East African Protectorate is contribut- ing for the British Red Cross Society and order of St. John. ;\[rs..1(. Godfrey, of Letch worth garden city, has given birth to triplets-—two boya and a girl; the,latt-er has died. Two tram-cars laden with excursionists collided at Tipton (Staffs); the driver of one vehicle was badly injured. The Duke of Devonshire, the new Governor-General of Canada, will leave England about the middle of October. DUrIng a. destructive fire at a wheel- wright's works at Twickenham, an elderly employe dropped deid from excitement, Allotment-holders on the Duke of Devonshire's estate at Eastbourne a.re to be allowed to occ. ipy the land for another year rent free. Benj. Mayman. 30, medical student, of king's College Hospital, who was found with his throat cut at. Hoi born Tube ata- tiou, has died in hospital.

THE DOCKS TROUBLE

THE DOCKS TROUBLE. I Work to be Resumed Forthwith. The Swansea, trimmers met at the Elysium on Friday to consider the ten- tative agreement arrived at at Cardiff on Thursday hy the Central Trimming Board with regard to matters in dispute at the docks. After lengthy discussion and prolong" ed consideration, during which the whole of the negotiations were reported upon by the men's leaders, it was decided b ac- cept the arrangement come to to i-c"r the matter to arbitration failing a local agreement, a.nd to resume woik forth- with. The trimmers' meeting was fvLlie y one of the tippers, and they, too, tieuided W go to -W<)I.k.

I DUST IN COAL PITS

DUST IN COAL PITS. Miners' Deputation to the Home Secretary. The Home Secretary received on Thurs- day evening a deputation from the Miners' Federation of Great Britain, which had met earlier in the day at the Westminster Palace Hotel. A series of resolutions on technical matters were pre- sented to Mr. Samuel, including a sug- gestion that the Government should in- troduce at the earliest moment a Bill providing that. dust-proof trains should be used for the carriage of coal in mines as a precaution against coal dust and co-n- eequent dnger of explosions. Another proposal was that a largely in- creased numlier of sub-inspectors should be appointed from the ranks of the miners. Subsequently to a Press Association re- piesentative Mr. Robert Smiilie 6aid the questions raised by the deputation were exhaostively discussed with the Home Sec- retary. A-no, while pointing out the diffi- culty of passing contentious legislation ta the present time, promised to give every consideration to their views. "He also gave an assurance that all the points at issue which could be put right by regu- lations would receive the earliest pos- sible attention. The deputation which waited on Mr. Samuel included Mr. Winstone, Mr. Barker, and the ltight Hon. W. Abraham, M.P. (Mabon). Mr Samuel, Home Sec re- fary, was accompanied by Mr. Brace, M.P.. "Cnder Home Secretary, and Sir Richard Redmayne, chief inspector of milies. TRADE UNIONS AND WELSH COAl. PRICES. Although it is the intention of tho Labour party to obtain an early interview with Mr. Runciman upon his return from Italy on the subject of the concession re- eentlv made to the South Wales and Monmouthshire coalowners by the Board of Trade, steps are being taken by a numbe rof Trade Unions to liiing pre& sure on their own organisations to have the additional 2s. fid. Wi, ton in the price of coal for home coixsumntion witl^i awn.

THE KINGS CALLERSI

THE KING'S CALLERS. I The Prime Minister, Lord Bertie. Bri- tish Ambassador in Paris, and Lord Har- dinge. Permanent Under-Secretary at the foreign Office, had audiences of the King at Buckingham Palace on Thursdav. General Sir William Robertson, Chief of the Imperial General Staff. was also re- ceived by his Majesty.

SOLDIERS SIDECAR OUTINGS j

SOLDIERS' SIDECAR OUTINGS, j in connection with the ounded Soldiers' Sidecar Outings Club a social outing was held on Thursday afternoon, when the menilxu-s of the club invited their wives apd frrends to tea at Ox wich. The chair was taken by the energetic worker, Mr. IN-or I.. Roberts. Oxiord- st.reet. There were about 4.1) present. and an enjoyable afternoon was vent. The party partook of a splendid tea. which was followed by a musical programme, ar- ranged by the secretary (Mr. C. H. Jen- kins). during which Mr. Barry gave three of his popular comic songs. Mrs. Barry and Miss Thissen were the accompanists. Mr. Ivor L. Rolierts proposed a vote of thanks to the ladies, which was responded to by Mrs. Roberts. The Chairman at the close asked the ??thpring nnt to forget the outing next Thursday, to be given by Sir Alfred Moud.

Advertising

To-day's Russian Official. Western Front-Oil the front of tiio Zl,)t ,} Lypa to the west of Podhuish. tue enemy renewed the offensive whd c.m- i eiderable forces. The aitack was wiih- out success, and was repelled with great | enemy losses. On the river Bystritza f Siuot.vinskaia, "e occupied Lj siecstary on the western bank oi the river, in :Jw direction of A rdzeauz our troops oc- cupied a series oi heights. In the region of Korozmoj'o our troops, continuing their advance, approached the sumui'ts ot the mauntain-s in the vicinity oi Korozmezo. Caucasian Front.—The Turkish offeiv- In '• r"g":n f1 the west ot 1.,a1.; Van was easily repelled by cur tr-jops. I < 1 < )