Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 6 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
30 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

TLe Cambria toDaily Leader gives later news than any paper published ID this dis- trict.

Advertising

The London Office of the "Cambria Daily Leader" is at 151, Fleet Street (first floor), where adver- tisements can be received up to 7 o'clock each evening for insertion in the next day s issue. Tel. 2276 Central.

BIG ZEPP RAID 1

BIG ZEPP RAID. 1 SIX AIRSHIPS OVER EAST AND SOUTH-EAST ENGLAND  I ENEMY GRAFT HIT. The following communique was issued by the Commander-in-Chief of the Home Forces at 1 o'clock this (Friday) morning: Several airships crossed the east and southeast coasts of England shortly before midnight. A number of bombs were dropped, but so far no report of casualties or damage has been received. CASUALTIES AND DAMAGE. Official Report. The following communique was issued by the Field-Marshal. Commanding-in- Chief the Home Forces, at 10.30 this morn- ing:— Six h-notil-, airships raided the east and south-east coasts of England at intervals between midnight and 3 a.m. One airship made her way westwards well inland, and the remainder carried out inroads over the coast. The number of bombs dropped by the raiders is as yet uncertain. Several are reported as having been directed againfit ships at sea. The damage affected by the raiders is slight. In one locality a railway station and several houses were damaged, and two horses killed. At another two houses were wrecked. The total casualties have not yet been reported. Up to date nine persons have been injured, some fatally. Anti-aircraft guns came into action at certain points, both on land and from ships on the sea. Some of our aircraft went up in pursuit. One aeroplane succeeded in firing into a raider at close range, but she eluded her pursuer in the clouds. A further report will follow. WAS THE RAIDER HIT? Flames That Lit Up the Sea. I A correspondent of the Press Association in a south-east coast town says;- Shortly before 2.30 on Friday morning, the sound of airship engines was heard approaching this part of the coast. For some time the searchlights, which were brought into operation, failed to- locate the raider, hut it was eventually picked up. and for the space of three minutes it "was clearly visible flying at a great height and steering in a north-easterly direction. A number of shells were fired, but it is not known whether 6he wa.s hit when passing over the sea. A number of heavy explo- sions were heard, and flames lit up the for some distance. The raider tried to drop bombs on shipping in this part of the sea, but it is not known whether any of the vessels were hit. People were awakened, And Lustily dressed and went on to the eea front, where they had a good view of the raider. A correspondent in a south-eastern town f,ay,s.-A Zeppelin appeared over this dis- trict at 1.4.5 this morning. She was picked inn by searchlights, AM Oitt unli-airuiai1 ob Uno bo-hanhd her, but unsuccessfully. tehe disappeared in a north-easterly direc- tion after having dropped a number of explosive bombs. I MAN KILLED: BABY UNHURT. The Press Association south-eastern correspondent 6ays altogether between 15 and 20 explosive bombs were dropped in that district, two houses being practically demolished. The occupiers of one, which as completely wrecked, were absent at I ttime, but in another house three per- sons are reported to have been killed and several injured. In one case where a bomb wrecked the upper floors of two houses the body of a man was afterwards found, but a baby extricated from the debris was apparently unhurt. The Press Association representative BaysThe sound of Zeppelins was heard fisar a south-east coast town about 11 c'clock this morning. It was not actually overhead, but the whirring could be heard drawing closer until the explosion of hombs and the booming of guns announced its arrival. Towards the west flashes came like lightening, and buildings shook, while the inhabitants thronged the streets. Sud- denly all was quiet, and the Zeppelin ci'iud be heard again apparently on the return journey. ON THE WAY HOME. Amsterdam, Friday.—A message from rfes, in AmeJand, states that early this pieming two airships passed over the island proceeding eastwards. A message from Sluiski1^ near the Bel- ;iä.Il frontier, states that this morning at seven o'clock an aeroplane flew over Dutcll territory coming: from the west, aild d-isappeared in a north-westerly di- ction. A message from Texel stat-es that at tix o'clock this morning a Zeppelin crossed the island, proceeding north-east- war d,s.-Press Association. SIX ZEPPELINS OVER HOLLAND. I Maastricht, Thursday.—Yesterday after- noon about six Zeppelins were seen flying at a great height towards Liege. Between half-past nine and ten o'clock last night a Zeppelin cruised over Meeraeen, east of Maastricht, and was fired at by the fron- tier guards. The Zeppelin came from the direction of Heerlen and disappeared to- wards Ouelle and Littard.

SILVER EXPORT PROHIBITEDI

SILVER EXPORT PROHIBITED Melbourne, Thursday (received Friday). —The Commonwealth has prohibited the exportation of silver without special per- mission. The Federal Council has congratulated Mr. Hughes on the success of his mission to Great Britain

GERMAN VESSEL CAPTUREDI

GERMAN VESSEL CAPTURED. Stockholm. Fi-i(!ay.-A qwrAi,,Il pilot pamed Hoeghom. who was on hoard the German steamer Desterro when she Wa6 captured by a Russian submarine, affirms t'hat, tho, seizure took place within Swedish territorial waters, and that the submarine was flying the Swedish flag. The Swedish Government is enquiring into the facts.

CHEAP RABBITS I

CHEAP RABBITS. I rfarvept being well in qwiiw now, an in- road has bepji made into the plague of rabbits which has been growing in many _art" of tie country, and is due to the :act that practically all gamekeepers of nihUry age h-ave joined the colours. Never was suck rabbit runlling"  in t?mf ?f t? Ra? Anglian harv?t lnlds aa du ring the present week, an4 ^bl»ts are being soid in one town at as 0. eacl1.

f RENCH GAINS 1 HELD

f RENCH GAINS HELD. FIERCE EBfflY ATTACKS SERCIANS' SUCCESSES TO-DAY'S FRENCH OFFICIAL. North of the Somme our troops con- solidated themselves during the night on the ground conquered north and north-east of Maurepas. South of the village the Germans launched a violent counter-attack on Hillock 121, occupied by our troops. Mown down by our artillery and machine-gun fire, the enemy was unable to reach our lines at any point, and suffered heavy losses. Some 60 prisoners, including two officers, fell into our hands as the result of this attack. The total num ber of unwounded prisoners taken by us in this sector ex- ceeds 350. Between the Avre and the Aisne. artillery fighting was rather heavy during the night, in the region of Roye, Lassigny, and Moulain- sous- Touvent. On the right bank of the Meusa, both artilleries were very active in the region of the Thiaumont Wor k. About two o'clock a German at- tempt against Fleury suffered a complete check. In Apremont Forest, a somewhat lively bombardment of our trenches was followed by an at- tempted att-ack, which was stopped dead by our curtain fire near Chau von court. An enemy surprise atack on one of our small posts failed under our fire. Air Operations.—During yesterday one fo our pilots brought down a German biplane, which crashed to the tarth near Grenecey (north of Nancy). SERBIAN OFFICIAL. Paris, Friday.—~A communica- tion issued by the Serbian Head- quarters on Tuesday, and received on Friday says:— An artillery duel is proceeding on our right wing. In the centre our offensive is de- veloping successfully. The Bul- garians are being gradually- pressed back on the frontier. We captured 208 prisoners of the 3rd Bulgarian Division. All the enemy's counter-attacks on the frontier were repulsed. All the enemy's attacks on the left wing were also repulsed. Our troops occupied the positions I selected by headquarters, each unit holding the point assigned to it.-Prenss Association War Special.

MPS COME TO BLOWS a

M.P.'S COME TO BLOWS. a- Amazing Scene in Hungarian House. Copenhagen. Friday.—A telegram from Vienna indicates that the disagreement be- tween the Hungarians and the Austria-ns is increasing. "Yesterday the Cabinet held a meeting which lasted from 10 o'clock in the morning until 4 in the afternoon. A stormy meeting of the Hungarian Par- liaÆent took place last night. The mem- bers of the Opposition violently attacked the Government, and during the whole of the sitting there was a deafening uproar, and on several occasions the Deputies came to blows. The chairman was power- less to maintain order, and it was only due to complete exhaustion of members that the sitting terminated.—Exchange Special.

TROUBLE OVER CAMERA I

TROUBLE OVER CAMERA. James Norman Di?nes Latoucbe wa? re-J manded at AMf?-?ho? on Thursday on a J charge of being in ?]n?a?')?? tx?ss?SMn of? a camera, and taking photographs within a prohibited area, that of the Royal Air- craft Factory, Fai-nboroogh, on Wednes- day..

THE LOST HOURI

THE LOST HOUR. It will be advisable, writes a corre- spondent, to regain the lost hour on the night of September aO-October 1 not by putting the dock bach an hour but by putting it forward eleven hours. "Nearly 90 per cent, of the clock., affected are striking clocks and these wil-l be smashed if the hands are put back an hour."

IN HOSPITAL AT SALONIKAI

IN HOSPITAL AT SALONIKA. Private Frfd Piiz-r,-hafit,. a Louglior man i who served with the Oxford an^ Bucks Light. Infantry, is wounded in the I-efti arm, and 1:< in an English Hospital at. Salonika. He is the son-in-law of Mr. David R-oes, who liv4,kq at J, Grove-place, (Srlanyrafon, Pontardulais, and hrother-in- law to Pte. D. Collins, who was severely wounded at Aisne, who also lives at Pon- tardulais. Mr. Reee has a son as well! serving with the Royal Marines.

SKETTY LADYS WILL I

SKETTY LADYS WILL. Mrs- Pyarea Rigby, of Wvoming, Eaton Orove, Swansea, formerly of Gower-roacl Sketty, Swansea, who died on Mav 3rd has left £ 1,019 17s. nd. Probate of thp will dated February 23rd. 1903, with a codicil of June 2öth, 1914. is granted to Charles Leonard Righy, tjie husband, and Richard Spriggs, of 27. Park-road, Lough- borough, Leicestershire, engineer. The testatrix leaves fhe whole of the pro- perty in trust for her husband for life, or until he shall again marry, with re- mained to her children, or on failure of u,fj¡nl) to her brothers.

FOUGHT FOE WITH 11 FISTSI

FOUGHT FOE WITH 11 FISTS I SWANSEA BOYS' KETTLE; WELSH LADS AT THE MOUTH OF HELL Special to the Leader." Thrilling stories of many acts of hero- ism performed by men of the Welsh regi- ments are told by comrades who have re- turned from the front. a The enemy exploded a mine," said a non-commissioned officer of .the Welsh fusiliers. A detachment of our regi- ment was pushed forward to occupy the crater. They advanced in face of a ter- rible hail of machine-gun bullets. They; got to the crater, but once there they were only at the beginning of their i troubles. The enemy brought up superior forces. They opened a very heavy barrage fire at the same time, and very shortly the Welshmen were completely isolated. Thinking they had the Fusiliers trapped, I the enemy pressed on to the attack. The Welshmen stood up to them. The first attack was broken under our rifle fi iv. A vigorous bombing attack followed up by a bayonet charge broke the second attack, I aud the third was smashed under iifle fire alone. In it/he intervals between the attacks the Welshmen worked like niggers, and made their position as strong. as human beings could make it. When the next German attack came the Fusi- liers met it with a steady fire. When it came nearer they hurled bombs at the foe. and inflicted very heavy losses. In spite of that the enemy fought their way into the crater. Then began a. terrible struggle at close quarters. The Welshmen had to fling their foe- men out bodily, and those who resisted were tackled under something as near the Queensbury rules as you can expect Swansea lads to get. It was rough and ready, but effective. The enemy were routed, and no more attacks were made that night. Towards morning urtillery fire swept across the position with great violence. Our chaps liud made themselves fairly secure, and tiiey lie id on without, mucli difficulty until reuei ca.me towards noon the next day." TWO MEN CAPTURE TEN. Two chaps oi our regiment.' said a private of rue South vV aie.s borderers, 1 "had a strange adventure, 'i.iiey loet their way, and stumbled on a German pool", liiey tiiougiit it Ix'lS( to brazen it out, though there were ten oi one enemy, bo they raised their ritiee, and eailecl on the enemy to surrender. The Huns were a bit taken aoacK, but were a.s meek as lambs, and consented to be led oil. The party set out to Unci its way to our lines, and as our cllaps didn't ieel quite sure 01 the way they let the eueiuy xuaiie the pace without i let ring them oe any the wiser, boon they begai^to see familiar signs, and knew they l were right, but they akso saw a party of the enemy approacning. They sought reiuge in some ccrub before they were seen, and warned their prisoners that if they made the shgiicest attempt to escape or communicate with their comrades, iUv-v woutd be shot regardless of consequmces. In a few minutes the Germans pa/sseit without discovering the hidden men, aiifl the party resumed its journey, the two Welshmen bringing in their prisoners without any further trouble." Three men 01 Llie welsh Regiment," said an ofifcer, were captured during one of our hard fights. They were taken into the enemy's lines. During the night, when the .British artillery opened fire and everything was confusion in the German trenches, the Yvelshmeii thought they would make a bid for liberty. Seizing a favourable opportunity, they dashed from the dug-out where they were kept, and, running along the trench, got over the parapet into what one of them called safety. Here they were exposed to the fire of our guns as well as to the fusillade of bullets sent after them by the Germans. They dashed through the hail of death, and soon got clear of the enemy's trenches. The Huns were afraid to foliow because of our artillery fire, and very soon the Welshmen were completely out of danger. They had many narrow shaves. Two of them were wounded, but otherwise they got through little the worse for their I adventure." I FISTS AND FEET USED. During some difficult operations in which the Welsh Fusiliers were engaged a number of wounded had to be left out! in the open for a time. One chap insisted i on going out to help them. He started under heavy fire. He made very slow pro- gioss, for the enemy concentrated all their fire on him. Every minute we ex- pected to see him killed. He was hit slightly before he had pone far, but he kept on his way, dodgins' death at every turn. Finally he reached the wounded men, and started doing what he could for them. He was by that time near enough to the enemy's lines for them to guess what he was after, and it is to their credit that the tire seemed to slacken a lot from that moment. It was only the shell fire from which there was any) danger at that time. The brave chap then started to assist the wounded to get back to our trenches. He helped several in this way, and was starting back for an- other trip when he was struck by a frag- ment of shell and killed." A handful of men belonging to the Welsh Regt. had to meet a sudden attack of the enemy in force. The odds wre at least tell to one, but the Welsh lads never flinched," said an officer. Thpy hnrlpd back attack after attack. The enemy came back for a final assault, delivered with greater fury than anything that had pre- ceded it. The positinn was deluged with i liquid fire. Machine-guns were brought up and mined bullets on the defenders. After that the enemy delivered a furious assault. They made their way into the position, and there was a terrible hand- to-hand struggle between them and the Welshmen. It was hand le-hand in the literal sense, for the focrirn gripped each other in deadly embrace and struggled on until death finished one or the other or both. After a hard tussle in which fists and feot were as freely used as any- thing efse, the Welshmen ftung their opponents back, and got a fittle more elbow room. The respite, however, was very brief. The Iluns came forward again. The Welshmen | (Con-tinued at bottom of next column), j

FOUGHT FOE WITH 11 FISTSI

met th^ em with a furious fusilade of bombs and the rush was stopped dead. It was re- newed. Fkimbs and bullets broke it onoe more. But very shortly afterwards the Huns dashed forward again, and the death gr? and grapple was i?newed. The Welsh- men fought with the courage of lions, and were determined not to yield an inch be- fore the farious attacks of the Huns. The latter vere a6 stubborn as mules, .and in fpite of ihei¡ tJ'ible losses they held on to the position they had entered for some hours. Still the Welshmen had no thought of giving in. They gave the Huns no rest. Sometimes they, bombed them, occa- sionally bayonetted them, but always har- j-assed them somehow. At last Welsh bravery had its reward. The enemy drew off suddenly at first, but as they came under fhe fire of our machine-guns their retreat quickened, and gradually became a rout. II INTO THE MOUTH OF HELL!" Some of the South Wales Borderers were going through the mill in one of our hard fights," said a sergeant-major. They were in a particularly exposed position. The place was hell on earth, with no more shelter than you could ex- pect from a few blades of scorched grass. The W elh lads stood it very well for a time, but when the moment came to resume the advance it was clear they were not as bright as "they might have been. The officer in charge of the com- pany placed himself at their head and gave the order to advance. He was struck down almost at once. At the same time a. terrible blast of shell fire swept across the ground. The company hesitated. The wounded olticer raised himself to a sitting IKTsition and cried to the men Welsh- men, never let it lie said that you turned your hacks on Germans. Forward to victory The men hesitated no longer. With a rousing cheer they swept forward under the leadership of the young officer who had succeeded to the command. They got it Jell hot all the way, hut they never wavered again, and soorf we saw them cl ose with the foe. They took the section of trench they were after in a fine bayonet charge, and drove out an enemy force nearly twice as large as their own. Then they scittled down to tlie inevitable lyoin- bardment. Their trench was pounded with shell fire. for nearly 36 bonrs. The men held their ground tenaciously. For a time it was almost impossible for relief to reach them, and they knew it, but they knew n lso how much depended on their steadfastness, and that relief would come in the end. So they put their backs into their job, and flung back repeated rushes of the enemy which followed the bom- bardment. They held their ground man- fully and finallv relief reached them." I (Passed by Censor).

THE MINERS LEVY I

THE MINERS' LEVY I SIXPENCE PER WEEK TOWARDS CONVALESCENT SOLDIERS. A PLEA m EXPLANATION (By Our Mining Correspondent.) I am asked to ylear up a very important point concerning the appeal winch is being made to the workmen of the Anthra- cite District for a contribution of 6d. per week for eight weeks. There is in some places, it seems, a misunderstanding as to the object of the proposal, and, as the district meeting of delegates is to be held at Swansea te-iuorrow, it is all urgent matter to explain the nature of the ap- peal, what is proposed to be done, and, emphatically, to aiiay misapprehension. At the last monthly meeting there was a vote taken upon the scheme propounded by the Red Cross representative, Lieut.- ) Colonel Herbert Lewis, and although there was a majority for it, the necessity for securing the legitimate two-thirds majority led to the decision to postpone the final vote until to-morrow, in order to give Mr. Herbert Lewi an opportunity to visit the men at the collieries to lay his case Ijeforo tiieni.' This he has done, and it is hoped t lie decision of • last month will now be continued. Hut it is evident that at seme colliery lodges an idea has got abroad that the scheme is merely one to get Ix'hind the decision of the Cardiff delegate conference —held some time ago—which was against a levy towards providing a convoy of motor ambulances for bringing wounded soldiers from the fighting line to the base for treatment. Now, nothing of the kind is intended. The motor ambulances are to lie provided by the Government, at the Government expense. What fli* present; scheme concerns is the fuartherance of an appeal to assist in getting funds to help the work done at convalescent: homes for wounded soldiers in South Wales. There are such hom* es at Neath, Carmarthen, Porthcawl. and three other places in South Wales. They are not under the si net militarv disci;,line and conditions oi the military hospitals, and it is said they are doing excellent work, which is seen in the rapid and highly satisfactory recovery of the men, and addi- tional funds would further help on the work, and enable those in charge to pro- vide for a larger number of soldiers who have been wounded or stricken down in fighting our battles. What is a->ked for is 6d. per wee for eight weeks, making what is known as a I" tour-chilling I am told that Ni-Iten l,ietf.-Coloii(#l Her- hrrt Lewis and Mr. J. D. Morgan, J.P., were addressing a meeting at Tarieni this week, the need for some such explanation as this was manifest, for the misapprehen- sion that had. arisen there may have pre- vailed at soim otliea collieries. j

ALLIES AGREEMENTI I

ALLIES' AGREEMENT. Franco-British Conference at Calais.. Press Bureau, Friday.—A conference took place yesterday at Calais between the French and British Governments, when a complete agreement was arrived at on all subjects with which the confer- ence dealt. An arrangement was concluded with regard to payments abroad, and the main- tenance of the Exchange between the two countries. The British Government was represented by the Prime ?Unister, the Chancellor of I the Exchequer. Mr. Montagu, and Mr. McKinncn Wood, accompanied by the Lord Chief Justice and the Governor of the Bank of England.

CHEAPER TO KEEP AWAKEI

CHEAPER TO KEEP AWAKE! From September 1 the charges for I sleeping berths between London and Ber- wick and Carlisle and places beyond will be increaised from lOs. to 15s., and for places south of Berwick and Carlisle from 7s. 6d. to 10s.

RUSSIANS TAKE nl ulff tKE MUSHI

RUSSIANS TAKE nl! ulf\f t.K E MUSH 2,333 TURKS PRISOtiERS GERMANY REPORTS NEW ALLIED DEFENSIVE ON THE SLrBET14 Petrograd, Friday.—It. is an- nounced that the '.Russian;- have re- sumed their advance throughout the entire Asiatic front. The Turks have evacuated Bitiis. —Wireless Press. RUSSIAN OFFICIAL. 1 etrograd, 'J imrsday evening.—The situ-i ation on the Western front is unchanged, On the Caucasus front our troops, closely following up the enemy in the region of Lake Van, entered the town of Muh, Lik- ing prisoners. According to fuller reports i I A, arrived of the battle in he region of Rayat. where we surrounded portions of the 1111 Turkish Division, capturing the 11th Turkish Kegiment, including the commander, 50 officers, 1,600 men, and nearly all the remnant of the 12th Turk- ish Regiment, together with two staff offi- cers. several senior officers, and 650 men. In this battle we also captured three guns and three machine guns. OFFENSIVE ON THE SERETH. Copenhagen, Thursday.—The Berlin Lokal Anzeiger's correspondent, at JIeadquarters reports that the Russians have resumed the offensive on both sides of the Sereth River. On Monday evening the Russians again began violently attack- ing the army of General con Boehm Er- molli. The offensive is developing on the whole, eastern front of Galicia.

ARMED YACHT ZAIDA I 0 I

ARMED YACHT ZAIDA. 0 British Auxiliary Lost in Alexarcdretta Gulf. Press Bureau, Thursday, SA.S p.m.—The Secretary of the Admiralty makes the fol- lowing announcement.— H.M. armed yacht Zaida, which was on detached service in the Gulf of Alexan- dretta, where she has been destroying petrol stores, etc., has been reported as being considerably overdue. A recent German official communique | stated that a patrol boat had been sunk in those waters. There is no doubt that this information referred to the Zaida, as news has now been received through Turkish sources that four officers and 19 men of her crew have been taken prisoners. There is no information as to the fate of the remainder of the crew, two officers and eight men. It must be assumed that they are, lost.

WHY MECCA REVOLTEDI I0

WHY MECCA REVOLTEDI 0 Shameful Action of Turkish Government. Cairo, Wednesday (received Thur,day). -rh,e Grand Sherif of Mecca issues through his local agent a proclamation to the Moslem world explaining the motives prompting his action. The Sherif dwells on the shameful actions of the Turkish Government and on the fact that so many of its subjects have beam sacrificed inno- cently, but the lust of the Committee of Lnion and Progress was unsatisfied until it departed from obedience to the precepts of the Koran. The committee caused the garrisons of holy cities and of Damascus to break the fast of Ramadan, and with the intention of sapping the foundation of Chalipat,e. Deprived the Sultan of the honour of choosing his personal suite, but he hesitated to helieve the recital of their wickedness until it was upon to all men to j see that the rulers of Turkey were Envfr j Pasha, D'.Temal Pasha, and Talaal Bey, who hanged one day twenty-one of the most honourable and enlightened Mos- lerns. Moreover, they had no reason to exile and torture the innocent families of these men and rob them of their possessions. [The declaration ends with an invocation for the weleare of the Faith and the Faith- fill. Times War Telegram, per Press Association (Copyright).

THE CARLISLE EXPERIMENT

THE CARLISLE EXPERIMENT. In connection with the Carlisle experi- j mailt, the Liquor Control Board de- cided to take over the business of Messrs. Hope and Bendie, wine and spirit mer- chants, as a distributing depot for supply- ing drink to private houses. The premises are within a few yards of the Gretna I Tavern, the new model refreshment house. A very large bottled trade is carried on at Carlisle, war workers living in the sur- rounding district being supplied from the city.

ROMANCE OF LLOYD GEORGE

ROMANCE OF LLOYD GEORGE Paris, Aug. 24.—Under the titic- "The Romance of David Lloyd George," the i U Pigaro" publishes an article showing the progressive evolution of the Seoretirv for War. The following is a striking pas- sage:— "A defetniined pacific formerlv, we see him to-day Minister of one of thp most formidable military marines in Furooe. The anti-conscriptionist and absolute par- tisan oi voluntary enlistment for thp Army was the first in the presen t Cabinet to recognise the necessity of compul«»orv ser- vice." The article concludes: u M r. Lloyd George has in him the genius which attains everything. This Welshman, whose career grows every day, is a power- ful personality."—Renter.

FELO DE IS E I

FELO DE IS E. I A verdict of felo de se was returned at the inquest held at Bamsley on Thursday on .lack .T0ne-s, a miner. aged 6, a married man. of Bamsley, who died from the effect of laudanum pf)isonin. Jones and Nora Hellewell, aged lR. danghter of a local publican, had been missing from their homes since August 11. They were found in a field at C'a \vt horp'\ lel( i at CA%?-t h <)rp(, near Barnsley. on Tuesday morning, sue fering from poisoning, and were r(-noverl to hospital. The girl has recovered, but the man dietl shortly after admission. Jones had been an intimate fripnd of the girl's father. who said he would have trusted him with his life. Letters written by Jones and the girl spoke of the lovely lioii-is-, they had cti- joyed, anrl stated that fhev had decided f" die together as they loved each other so i m

TODAYS WAR RESUME

TO-DAY'S WAR RESUME QII Leader" Office 4.50 p.m. Six Zeppelins raided the ea&t and south- east coast last night. Several houses and a railway station were damaged, and two houses wrecked. Nine persons are i-eportcd injured, some fatally. .No infantry fighting is reported from the Balkans. The Bulgarian Government issues a highly imaginative communique in which victories are claimed. Another fine British success has carried our position 300 yards nearer Thiepval. Many prisoners have been taken. The French, by a new assault, have taken the whole of Maurepas village, and ad- vanced a mile and a quarter beyond, and they took prisoners. On the Verdun front they have made progress beyond Fleury. Tlie Russians, after defeating four Turk- ish divisions, and takins prisoners, have taken the town of Mush. The Turks have abandoned Bitiis. The British armed yacht Zaida has been ink uie Gulf of A lexand; • 'ta. l There i" delirious joy ill Germany at the report that t.he Deutschland has re- turned. I

EYES ON RUMANIA

EYES ON RUMANIA. -0-. Germany and SVS. Bratiano's I ntentions. Amsterdam, ThursdaL-A Bucharest telegram published by the Berliner Tageblatt" says the temporary tranquil- lity apparently prevailing in Rumania must not be interpreted as meaning that that country does not think of interven- tion in the war. M. Bratiano will cer- I tainh- interi-ene on the side of the Entente, but it appears that the %arioiis Govern- ments have not yet come to an understand- ing on the que'ti«n whether Rumania at the peace negftiatiou? ?aH have a co- decisive or only an advisory voice.- Renter. CENTRAL TOWERS' MINISTERS. Amsterdam, Tuesday Night.—A ??P- i gram from Cologne states that the King of Rumania yesterday recei n'd the Ger- man and A nstrian Ministers at Bucharest in private audience, first separately, then iointlv. It was the longest audience ever granted by the Rumanian King to foreign Ministers. THE KAISER SNUBBED. Berne, Aug. 23 (received yesterday).— According to information received in dip- lomatic circles at Berne, the Kaiser wrote to the King of Rumania announcing his intention to send Duke Albrecht of Mack- lenburg as a special envoy to discuss the situation with King Ferdinand at Bucha- re6t. Duke Albrecht was the Kaiser's envoy to Bulgaria before Bulgaria's treacherous decision. The Rumanian Government, in response to the Kaiser's letter, notified the German Government that it was undesirable to send Duke Albrecht on this mission, be- cause the King, l>cing a constitutional monarch, would be guided by his Minis- ters. The Rumanian Government, it was added, would prefer to receive any com- munication that Germany thought fit through the ordinary diplomatic channels. W ireless Press.

I I ENTHUSIASM DEAD

I ENTHUSIASM DEAD. German Deserter's Striking Story. Amsterdam, Friday.—The "Telegraaf" publishes a long story of a German deser- ter, showing that the treatment of German soldiers by their superiors is daily getting worse. The enthusiasm of the iirst days of war has disappeared, and everybody, says the deserter, meditates how bes; he can terminate the war as far as he him- self is concerned. Soldiers are punished for the least offence, and the greater the misfortunes of war, the harder they aie treated. The deserter bitterly complains that the feeding of the soldiers leaves everything to be desired. They sometimes have to subsist on a loaf of so-call?i bread for three days. Field kitchens are within reach, but many have no supplies. lIe tur- ther relates that there are hardly any strikes in big factories, because the work- men are always under the menace of being sent to the front in case of revolt. Finally the soldier declared that during the earn- j paign in Belgium he never saw a Irnnc tireur, and he never spuke to a -ol(iiei- or officer who had seen one. Ore always heard of franc tireurs from other people. For our officers, he aid. it has become a fixed rule. He is a civilian, and therefore a franc tireur.

I j SURPRISE FOR THE SAILOR j

j SURPRISE FOR THE SAILOR, j A wounded soldier, walking with the aid of a stick. pleaded guilty a-t Old- stroet on Thursday to being drunk and was bound over in £ 2 to be of good be- haviour for 12 months. A burly sailor, who hobbled to the front I the court and offered to pay the £2, was pleasantly surprised to learn that it was not necessary to pay anything.

CHARITIES TO BENEFIT I

CHARITIES TO BENEFIT. Large bequests to many charitable insti- tutions were made by the will of Mr- Edwin Jones, founder of the drapery firm of Jones and Higgins, Rye-lane, Peekham. who died on June 5, aged seventy-eight. The gross value of the estate was £ 186,644. To eight institutions, mostly in London, he gave > £ 500 each, and to nine J;250 each. The residue of his property is to accumu- late until the death of his wife, when he gives £ 2,000 to King's College Hospital. £1.000 each to five other institutions, £ 500 each to five, and -L2,iO each to eleven.

THE EMPTY WORKHOUSEI

THE EMPTY WORKHOUSE. A movement is on foot for the closing of workhouses in North Essex owing to the small number of inmates. At Dun mow Workhouse, with accom- modation for 500 inmates, the number bha fallen to 102, and at Halstead (only a few miles away) there are 65 inmates in an institution with accommodation for 250. Similar reductions in inmates are reported to have occurred at Braintree and Lexden. Dunmow Guardians have decided to make an offer to the Halstead Board to receive all the Halstead paupers M boarders at Dunmow Workhouse, and eo enable the Halstead institution to be closed and the staff dispensed with. It was a Iso decided to call a meeting of other adjoining poor-law unions to see what further economy coujd be effected by com- bination.

Advertising

SHATTERED TURKS. Russians Pursuirtg Defeated Foe. TO-DAY'S RUSSIAN OFFICIAL. i Western Front.-tt about midnight ) on August 21 tlx. in the region svntb ot ¡ 'l'siriu, the enemy, after fierce artillery fire, launched all on our treii'hCL-. The attack w^« stopped by-our advanced 315 the direction of Kovel, in the region of the village af click, t he enemy made attempt* to re-unic ihe ottV'.isive. and was repulsed. Caucasian Frort.-Oiir offensive west ii Luke Van is continuing. In the diroc- ticn oi Mossul we are pursuing the rem- nant ij.i -,he dispersed Turkish division. W ireless Press. ,.SV ING IN \\n:\ A 1 1 t q i