Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 6 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
17 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

AMUSEMENTS. TO-NIGHT f Messrs. F. & H. Reeves present a Musical, Revneicai, Laughette, entitled— HIGH EXPLOSIVES I In Five Explosions. Guaranteed to Kill with Laughter and Wound Nobodv. Ca-J^includes ROBERT REILLY, HARRY MAXAM, KITTY EMSON, Lulu Copping, Regina Williams, Ernest Ball, John Me- 1 Mahon, Louis Bland, Russell's Eight Fire- crackers, and a Shrapnel of Feminine Beauties. Latest News and War Films. THE MAPLES, Comedy Duo. JEN LATONA, In Light Comedy Songs, self-accompanied on Concertina and Piano. « SYMONDS v. RUDDICK, Sep. 30 at 3 p.m. .———————————————————————— :GRAND THEATRE SWANSEA. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 4th, 1916, Six Nights at 7.30, and « MATINEE SATURDAY at 2.30 p.m. C. W. Somerset in the Great Drama,  THE S!LVER K!NG. I THE SILVER KING. m  ? Next Week.-Return Visit of the George Edwardes Co. in BETTY." THE PICTURE HOUSE. High Street. OIl Thursday, Friday and Saturday. < A Masterly Photo Version of the Word m Famous English Novel by Mrs. Craik, J' JOHN HALIFAX, GENTLEMAN. A SUBMARINE PIRATE. i The United States Navy furnished a Sub- marine (a Real One) for this Picture. ) Y D CHAPLIN becomes the Admiral of the Private Submarine. CASTLE CINEMA (Adjoining Leader Office). Thurs.. Fri. and Sat., 2.30 to 10.30. MARY PICKFORD in a 1-Part Drama, < THE ETERNAL GRIND, A Piekford Classic, Grave and Gay. Pictures of the Zeppelin Disaster. A SUBMARINE PIRATE, A. "Sensational 4-Part Triangle-Keystone, showing an actual Submarine at work. Science and Comedy combine to make this play unique. Monday Next- I CHAPLIN'S Burlesque en "CARMEN." TARLTGN CINEMA DE LUXE, Oxford Street, Swansea. TO-DAY from 11 till 10.30. CONTINUOUS PERFORMANCE. THE BATTLE OF THE SOMME. and fhe ZEPPELIN DISASTER The CARLTON GRAND ORCHESTRA will Play Each Day from 11 till-10.30. OXFORD Electric Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Grand Varied Programme, Including Wonderful Pictures of the DESTRUCTION OF THE ZEPPELIN. With SCENES and INCIDENTS. E L Y S I U M. High Street, Swansea. '7 Thursday, Friday and Saturday. The BARSSCOURT AFFAIR (In 3 Acts). GREED.—GAUMONT GRAPHI C,- LITTLE LADY LAFAYETTE (Comedy). —SEPTEMBER MOURNING (L-Ko Comedy) Thurs. Next-The Children of the Ghetto. Commencement of the Great Circus Serial, Peg o' the Ring. ROY A L THEATRE9 Wind Street. Continuous Performance Daily, 2.30 till 11. Thursday, Friday anW Saturday. TRAPPED BY LONDON SHARKS, A Great Drama in Five Parts. ZEPPELIN DISASTER shown in PATHE GAZETTE. GREED (Chap. 18), and Full Programme. Sept. 14, 15 and 16- THE BATTLE OF THE SOMME. MONEY. DON.T BORROW IN YOUR OWN TOWN, JLJ' where you and the lender are known. Reputation without blemish beats bounce. £10 to £10.000 lent privately by the old. eetablished B.F.C.. who are approved and ncommended by the Press Elg Loan 10s Monthly £100 Loan J52 Monthly £50 Loan JB2 Monthly £ 600 Loan £ 4 Monthly Prospectus and Press Opinions free. Pri- vacy guaranteed.—THE BRITISH FINANCE 0:.).. 20. Bridge-street, Bristol. Tel. 1675. SAILINGS. CUNARD. LINE CANADA. M&ECT PASSENGER AND FREIGHT SERVICES WNttecting wit'i the Canadian Northern Railway System. BRlto'IOL TO CANADA. Summer Sel-vice to .Montreal. Connecting with Canadian Northern Rail- way System. tFELTRIA "8aturday, Sept. 23 tFOHA Tuesday, Oct. 3 Sailing from Avonmouth Dock. tOabin Passengers (£10) and Cargo. LONDON TO CANADA. Summer Service to Montreal. tAUSCNIA .Saturday, Sept. 23 "VOyLE .Saturday, Oct 7 tCabi.i (£10; and Third Class (L6 10s.) Pas,scngert. Ausonia has Accomodation ior Refrigerator Cargo. 'Cargo only. Apply Canard Line, Liverpool; 51, Biehops- gate. London. E C.; 65, Bald,villtreet. Bristol: 18a, High-street CardiS': 141. Cor- poration-street, Birmingham; and Cana- dian Northern Railway System, London, Liverpool, and Glasgow. LLANGYFELACH jj MART- and Monthly Pig Market, I on MONDAY NEXT. EDUCATIONAL. I SWANSEA TECHNICAL I COLLEGE. Principal- W. MANSERGH VARLEY, M.A., D.Sc., Ph.D. DAY UNIVERSITY and TECHNOLO- GICAL COURSES in Metallurgy, and Chemical Engineering, in Civil, Mechanical, and Electrical En- gineering, and in Pure Science, I for the COLLEGE DIPLOMA or the LONDON B.Sc Degree. Courses for the FIRST PROFESSIONAL (MEDICAL or DENTAL) EXAMIN- ATIONS. Fee for any Course tiO 10s. per annum. Session Opens ]8th September. EVENING CLASSES. In' all Departments: SCIENCE, TECHNO- LOGY, and COMMERCIAL Classes in Chemical Plumbing, Dressmaking, etc. Special Coursc-s for Teachers. Fee for any Course, 10s. per Session. Enrolment Week*: MONDAY, SEPT. 11th, to FRIDAY, SEPT. 15th. Classes Commence 18th September. SATURDAY MORNING CLASSES IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. College Calendar Free at the College or Public Library. WM. JAMES, Secretary. THE MUNICIPAL SCHOOL OF ART! AND CRAFTS, ALEXANDRA-ROAD, SWANSEA. Director—W. GRANT MURRAY, A.R.C.A. (Lond.). SESSION COMMENCING MONDAY, 11th SEPTEMBER, 1916. The Instruction given in the School includes— ARCHITECTURE, PAINTING, SCULP- TURE, DESIGN & CRAFT SUBJECTS. COURSES. 1.—Courses for Professions: Architecture, Sculpture. Painting, and Design. 2.—For the Training of Art Teachers. 3.—Drawing Diploma Courses for School Teachers. 4.—Etching, Aquatint, Mezzotint, etc. а.—Miniature Painting. б.—Architectural Course for Architects' Pupils, etc. 7.—Monumental Sculpture. 8.—Wood Carving and Gesro Work. 9.—Painting, Decorating, and Sign- writing. 10.—Jewellery, Enamelling, and Decora- tive Metal Ti-t(?rk. 11.—Embroidery and Art Needlework. 12.—Lace Making. 13.—Sketching from Nature.\ 14.—Classes for General Art Education. FEES FOR EVENING CLASSES. Whole Session (3 terms), 10s. per Term, 5s. For Day Students' Fees, see School Prospectus. Prospectus, giving full particulars of Classes, Free Admissions, Prizes, Scholar- ships, etc., may be obtained free on ap- plication at the Education Offices, 9, Grove-place, or at the Glynn Vivian Art Gallery, Alexandra-road, Swansea. A. W. HALDEN (Secretary). Education Offices, Swansea. 4th September, 1916. BOROUGH OF SWANSEA. INTERMEDIATE AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION. BOYS' SCHOOL. Headmaster—J. Trevor Owen, M.A. The NEXT TERM will commence on THURSDAY, the 14th SEPTEMBER, 1916. The ENTRANCE EXAMINATION will be held at the GRAMMAR SCHOOL on WEDNESDAY, the 13th SEPTEMBER, at 9.0 a.m. The HEADMASTER may be seen by i parents at the School on WEDNESDAY, the 13th SEPTEMBER, between 9.0 and 12.0 noon. GIRLS' SCHOOL. Headmistress—Miss L. M. Benger, M.A. The NEXT TERM will commence, on THURSDAY, the 14th SEPTEMBER. 1916. The ENTRANCE EXAMINATION will be held at the GIRLS' SCHOOL, WAL- TER-ROAD, on WEDNESDAY, the 13th SEPTEMBER, at 9.30 a.m. The HEADMISTRESS may be seen by parents at the School on WEDNESDAY, the 13th SEPTEMBER, between 9.30 and 12 noon. Entrance Forms and Prospectuses can be obtained at the Secretary's Office, Grammar School. W. JAMES, Secretary. SUCCESSFUL CAREERS for those equipped with Commercial Knowledge. THE SWANSEA COMMERCIAL SCHOOL (The Be Bear Schools, Ltd.) Uires Practical Training in Shorthand, Typewriting, Book-keep- ing and Accountancy, English and Precis Writing, Business Methods, Commercial Arithmetic Comrrrercial Oorrespondtnce, Handwriting, French. DAY AND EVENING TUITION ALL'THE YEAR ROUND. Apply The Principal, CASTLE BUILDINGS, SWANSEA. Tel. Cen. 567. Anl at so-n, QUEEN-STBEET, CARDIFF. PUBLIC NOTICES. rpENDERS arc invited for DRIVING CROSS MEASURE from Green to Big Vein. Dimensions 10ft. x 8ft., dipping 3in. per yard. Approximate distance, 30 yards. Hand boring. Also another Cross Measure from Pumpquart to Triquart Seam, 7-ift. x 6ft., rising 18in. per yard. Approximate distance, 100 yards. Power drills. Apply, The AMMANFORD COLLIERY Co., Ltd., Pontyberem. TENDERS are invited for DRIVING a DRIFT from the Five Feet Seam to the Six Feet Seam. Distanco to bo driven, 21,0 yards more or less, dipping 18 inches to the yard. Width of drift at base, 12 feet; above tram, 10 feet; near roof, 8 feet. Height above rail, 7 feet. Full particulars to be obtained from the Manager, LOUGHOR COLLIERY CO. (1910), LTD., Caeduke Colliery, Loughor. SWANSEA RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL GARNGOCH ISOLATION HOSPITAL. APPOINTMENT OF ASSISTANT NURSE. fFIIE above Council invite application^ for the position cf ASSISTANT NURSE at the above Hospital, situate at Fforestfach, near Swansea. The salary will be S25 per annum, with uniform, and rations, and laundry allow- ance. Applications, stating age, experience, etc., together with copies of three recent testimonials to be forwarded to me, the undersigned, j not later than Monday, the 25th day of September, 1916. Dated this 7th dav of September, 1916. EDWARD HARRIS, Clerk. District Council Offices, 34 AlexandJ»-xoad. Swansea PUBLIC NOTICES. 1 CARMARTHENSHIRE. PARK AND BLAINA COLLIERJES, PANTYFFYNNON. (Close to Pantyffynnon Station, G.W.R.) SALE OF VALUABLE SURPLUS COLLIERY PLANT. Mr. W. N. Jones HAS received instructions from Messrs. The Blaina Colliery, Company, Ltd., to offer for SALE by PUBLIC AUCTION, on the Premises, on WEDNESDAY, SEP- TEMBER 27th, 1916, the whole of their Surplus Plant, Machinery, etc., Comprising Winding Engine, Air Com- pressor, Boilers, Drums, Haulage Engines, Vertical Engines, Gear Wheels, Coal Cutter, Thin and Mixed Scrap, Wastiing; Plant, Screens, Kibbler, Pit Cage Fangs, etc., etc. On View One Week Prior to Sale. Sale to commence at 2 o'clock p.m. prompt. Catalogues can be had from the Auc- tioneer, Ammanford. August 28th. 1916. GORSEINON. Sale of a Leasehold Dwelling-house and Premises in the Centre of Gorseinon. ?!ess?. tpoerrdUoJih;' I HAVE Received Instructions to Offer for SALE By PUBLIC AUCTION I (Subject to Conditions of Sale to be Pro- duced), at the MARDY HOTEL, GOR- SEINON, on THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14th, 1916, at 7 o'clock in the Evening, the Very Desirable LEASEHOLD Dwelling-house and Premises, Known as BRON HAUL," Alexandra- road, Gorseinon, recently in the occupa- tion of Mr. John Davies. The Property has been recently erected and occupies a Commanding Position on the Main Road, rear the Cross, and con- tains on Ground Floor: Three Large Rooms, Scullery, Pantry, and Usual Offices; on the First Floor: Four Large Bedrooms; and is held under a Lease for 99 Years from December, 1898, at the Low Annual Ground Rent of 46s. Possession can be Given upon Comple- tion. For Further Particulars, and to View, apply to the Auctioneers, Swansea-road, Loughor, and Coldstream Villa, Llanelly; or to Mr. C. H. Newcombe, Solicitor, 41, Wind-street, Swansea. Sun Rises 6.25, Sun Sets 7.31. Lighting-up Time, 8.1. Subdue Lights Visible from the sea at 8.1. Subdue other Lights at 9.31. High Water To-day, 2.56 a.m., 3.36 p.m. King's Dock-32ft. 9in. a.m., 34ft. 4in. p.m. To-morrow, 4.20 a.m., 4.51 p.m.

NOTES AND COMMENTSI

NOTES AND COMMENTS. A pause seems to have como upon the Alliad front between the Somme and the Ancre. Sir Douglas Haig reported last night that the enemy spent the day shelling in the rear of • ourline s-el,"ldQuee, of his nervous- ness, and his expectation of what is still to come. It is good to realise, from the succeeding paragraph of the British communique, that the days are gone when our men had to stand by their guns waiting until the country had awakened to the need for greater munition supplies. Our artillery replied effectively, we a.re told, and, assisted Dy aBrial observatidinL, 'siiccf^s^liyyde^lt with the enemy's batteries." What stories there are, between the lines, here. We can picture our brave balloon observers pressing closer and closer, our daring airmen de- spising the German shrapnel ringing round their machines, and sending to earth information which pre- sently was to mean disaster to the enemy guns. Half the enthralling narratives of the war are covered up in- these matter-of-fact sentences in the communiques. The French re- port contains a descriptive word this morning. South of the Somme, the enemy has been so staggered by the violence of the French fire that he failed to launch any counter-at- tack. Thus, with what we sometimes call" on the Western fronhIt will not be long continued -att-ention goes to-day to the eastern and southern theatres of war. In Eastern Galicia there has been another great rout of the.Aus- tro-Germans, and Berlin admits thai, in the neighbourhood of Halicz we withdrew to a position pre- pared further back." Rumania ap- pears to have suffered a reverse, ft severe one according to the enemy report; but we ought to await the communique of our newest ally be- fore we accept the claim. We are being dosed this week with revised and up-to-date versions of Starving and Discouraged Germany. The old tales of riots and hungry people are being freshly dressed, and set out in the windows for our com- fort. A German Socialist anti-war leaflet entitled Hunger is said to have been circulated broadcast in the enemy country appealing to the German people to insist upon an immediate peace. Whilst it is probably true that the blockade, and the requirements of the armies, are making the food problem daily more pressing, we would do well not to attach too much importance to these signs of growing revolt. Some sort of a similar case could be made e coul d be ma d e out for the delight of the Germans were they to have a summary of the pacifist utterances in this country, and the protests against the increas- ing price of food. The truth seems to be that the German has reached the first stage of doubt. He must be distressed at the sign Rumania has given of the tendency of the war to set against him. He must be puzzled at the displacement of Von Falkenhayn. He must be wondering why another eastern sweep has not come off. By and bye, he will want to know why he was told that the Allied offensive in the West was definitely broken. A month or so ago a great wave cf optimism spread over the land re- garding the length of the war. Its circles rippled as far as France, where the rank and file expected events to lead to an early decision. > I Yox,, hQwver", contains a succession of unknown factors, and to-day we I see that victory is not so nigh our grasp as the most hopeful, had im- agined. We have not yet exhausted the best of Germany's fighting material. The prisoners we take are by no means the young and old men some war experts told us made up a large part of the present armies. And whilst they are utterly demoralised by our gun fire, and come into our lines in a pitiably- reduced state, when they recovar they do not talk as though they have given up hope. We have a long way to go before we break the spirit of the German soldier. We shall have to increase our gun-power un- til, in words used once by Mr. Lloyd I George, we can crash our way through to victory. It is the only I method. To expect a German eco- nomic collapse is to expect the re- I mote thing; and this despite the re- ports about the reluctance of the people to subscribe to the new war loan. It is the general tendency of the war even more than the results upon the Somme that we should watch now. Col. Feyler, the well- known Swiss writer, calls attention to this tendency. For the past eighteen months and more, no pressure has been applied without very soon evoking a counter pressure which re-established something like equilibrium. We know the history of Ypres, of Neuve Chapelle, of Loos, and of the French offensive in Champagne. Whatever superiority either side managed to assert at a particular point was very shortly cancelled cut by a reinforcement or redistribution of the enemy's effec- tives. But here as one critic emphasises, we have an operation now in its third month and cover- ing many miles of ground which not only surmounts the resisting power attracted to it, but actually gains increased momentum with the dura- tion of the struggle. Whatever local checks .it may encounter, and however gradual its geographical progress, it attains more and more to the accent of mastery and to the note of the inevitable. So that, although the wearing- down process may take longer than the hopeful think, although Ger- many will stubbornly resist until she sees the end inevitable, we have reached the top of our ridge, just as the soldiers have oome to the sky- line on the Somme. Since the be- ginning of the year, according to one contemporary historian, there have been four great episodes in ,this battle of Europe, to be called respectively 'by the' names of Ver- dun, Galicia, Gorizia, and the Somme. All have gone in our favour, and each is intimately con- nected with the others. The great defensive victory of the French at Verdun upset all the schemes of the German General Staff for the cam- paign of 1916 and determined the fact that they would from hence- forth lip, on the defensive in the The, failure of the offensive in the Trentino and the great rally which brought the Ital- ians to Gorizia left Austria hope- less against Brussiloff and in deep perplexity between her different fronts. The offensive of the Wes- tern Allies on the Somme threatens the Germans with a new peril and renders it totally impossible that they can detach any considerable force to go to- the rescue of- their allies in other theatres of war. The other day we allowed our Neath correspondent to urge the claims of his town to the National Eistedd- fod. Now our Llanelly representa- tive writes that, in accordance with the wish of the Llanelly Cymro- dorion Society the local Borough Council have had under considera- tion the advisability of inviting the National Eisteddfod Association to hold the Welsh festival of 1918 at Llanelly, and have decided to con- vene a public meeting, at an early date, to discuss the matter. This is is a step in the right direction, as t,he success of the event will largely depend upon the co-operation of the townspeople themselves, and moreover it is necessary to secure a substantial guarantee list, which can be more easily obtained when there is some semblance of unani- mity about the invitation than otherwise. As was to be expected, there is a difference of opinion as to whether the time will be opportune having regard to the uncertainty which ex- ists as to the future of the ti rip late trade. Those who are pessimistic on the point need to be reminded that the conditions cannot possibly be worse than in 1895, when the McKinley tariff upset all calcula- tions with regard to Llanelly's staple industry, but, this notwith- standing, the eisteddfod which was held in the town that year consti- tuted a record from financial and other standpoints. It should be remembered also that, although Llanelly is still very largely depen- dent upon the tin and steel trade, it is not quite so dependent upon it as it was in 1895, because other indus- tries have cropped up. Further- more, the population has increased enormously in the meantime, so that there will be an infinitely larger number of local inhabitants from whom support can be reasonably ex- pected. Taking all these things into account, there seems to be no sub- stantial reasons why Llanelly should not seek the privilege of having the eisteddfod of 1918 held within its gates. It will be interesting to see what attitude the burgesses adopt when they are, at the public meet- ing, invited to express their views on the subject. The pros. and cons. will doubtless be fully thrashed out, but it is worthy of note that the in- fluence of the Mayor (Lady Howard) will be in favour ei the invitation being esfour

TOMMY THE FISHER

TOMMY THE FISHER ] A CREAT MORNING AT THE SOMME POOLS THERE came a time, between divi- T sions, when the labour section had very little to do; a week's rest be- fore what the R.S.O. predicted would be a real slogging go at the railhead. Disci- pline relaxed. The men did not greet the young sun quite so early. They had their chance to turn over for the beauty slumber. They strolled past the yard as though their backs had never ached there. They had time to read the English news- papers and to criticise the great, un- knowing British public. They held a continuous debating society within the hospitable shelter of the Y.M.C.A. hut, and they planned the future of the cam- paign. Thus two schools of thought quickly revealed themselves. There were those who argued that the war would be over this year; there were others who held that the initial four years of a war were always the worst. The first, build- ing upon their theory of an early end, believed that there would be no more "leave"; the other lived in daily hope of a trip to Blighty for six days. Then something went wrong somewhere. The occasion is too recent to give details. All that need be said is that the strategy of war took second place to warm dis- cussions upon camp etiquette. Somebody was too adjectival regimental. Somebody would be told off if he wasn't careful. The old adage about idle hands was having yet another illustration. The diversion came none to noon. It was a providential day when "e met Jock returning from the ponds carrying an immensely long rod and two little fishes. An epoch-making day, for" e all became fishermen. And this notwithstand- ing the insults calmly thrown at us by Jock, who had whipped every burn in the Highlands. You're going to fish, are ye?" he said with a pitying smile. Ye wouldna' land a minnow, not one of ye, not if the thing asked ye to. Ye'll better waste your time on some other sport like marbles." What was this but fuel to our impa- tience! Jock had to be shown. We would vary Army rations on the morrow with a fish breakfast. There were several in- quiries whether the Y.M.C.A. library boasted a cookery book. Alas, alas, for its imperfections. But no matter. We would manage. The fishing facilities of the valley are unrivalled. The ponds teem with fish. Tommy's description was that they were abso-bally-lutely lousy with fish. There were notice-boards in the water whieli the sergeant explained warned fishermen off the grass, but we thought no great shakes of the sergeant's French, and anyhow, so we said pathetically, no Frenchman would grudge a poor English Tommy a fling in the water. And even if he did. We agreed to regard the notice-boards as danger-signals to bathers. We went fish- ing en masse. We went fishing with home- made rods, with splendid bamboo sticks supplied at Monsieur Ambroid's etude, even with a pole loaned from her washing ground by Madame the Washerwoman. Behold us, then, marching through the village! What excitement. What com- motion among the children in the school- yard. What advice hurled after us by kindly natives. What offers to cook our fish. We fancied a note of raillery in the advice and offers, and like Britons, we determined to catch more fish than ever the ponds delivered up before. For were we not well-armed, each according to his notion? Some of us with sweetened dough begged of the baker's wife; some trusting to worms; others with their faith in the maybees they would find among the hazel leaves. What an afternoon for fishermen! The trees cast long shadows over the ponds. Plop-plop-we heard our victims leaping. Flies covered the quiet waters. Soon we bad scattered around, and found the haunt we favoured. Soon the rods were out—but not so eoon the lines. This is not the place in which to speak of the "words" between Sanitary and Checker over the mingling of their lines; even that incident resolved itself satisfactorily. We fished. It was pleasant under the trees, pleasant to watch the float upon the quiet waters. The guns seemed far off this after- noon. How peaceful was the world. When I awoke, the banks were deserted. Afterwards I heard that my brother ifshers had gone to camp by a back road, and that they had threatened to punch Jock's head off when he asked whether there would be fish for tea. But not so easily were we discouraged. Boys of the bulldog breed were we. When Taffy told us that one night he had landed a two-pounder and cooked it for supper we told him he was several degrees of a liar, but we believed he had caught—some- thing. Hope remained strong. And so one day, when it was suggested that we might have a fishing competition and a sweepstake, prizes for the first fish and the heaviest, we jumped to the idea. We met in the raw morning, just as the dawn came, and we got to the ponds before the mists had cleared. We settled down grimly to business. x Five o'clock: Still hoping. Six o'clock: Hard at it. Seven o'clock: General agreement that it was a rotten morning for fishing. At half-past seven the Checker shouted like an excited Frenchman. We saw him dancing with glee. We were eaten up by jealousy. "A "bite!" he cried, "a bite! And I've got him! Sure enough he had. It was a beautiful fish. Checker guarded it carefully. We paid over the sweepstakes. Checker held the fire francs all the way to camp. There we encountered Jock, who viewed the catch, and drily inquired since when herrings had changed their habits and could be had in the valley ponds. We suspect Madame. of the hotel to have been in the plot. Anyhow, we got the sweepstakes back, and whatever Checker paid for his fish-HE didn't have it for breakfast. The fsh in the ponds were left undis- turbed for quite a long time after our competition. f JL D. W. I

SWANSEA I

SWANSEA. A large number of Swansea people still think that when taking the Police Court oath it is necessary to kiss the Bible. In one of the districts ol Swansea there is a Belgian refugee who h&s been called upon to pay income tax. He is employed at one of the works. Seaman David John Davies returned home on leave on Wednesday to his home at Mount Pleasant, Swansea, after serving some time in the North Sea. Tho annual school treat in connection with Tabernacle Chapel was held on Thursday afternoon, when tea was pro- vided and afterwards an excellent concert was given. The continued reports in the press as to the action of the police and military in various parts of the country in the matter of rounding-up eligibles is perturbing a certain set of nuts" in the town. Presiding at a meeting of the Swansea Tramways and Electric Lighting Commit- tee on Thursday, Col. f-inclair remarked that he had tried the experiment of using electric light instead of gas, and had found the former much more economical. The fine weather of the past few days has brought with it a new crowd of holiday-makers to Swansea. A good many of these visitors are staying in the west- end of the town, and the language of the Cymry is again a familiar sound in the streets. If the boys in the trenches could only see the happy and smiling faces of the crowds of young women who arrive at a Swansea station at an early hour in the morning after doing a night's work in a controlled establishment, they would feel considerably heartened, and rejoice in the thought that the women of the coun- try were ungrudgingly doing their part (writes a correspondent). A party of local men who made the journey by brake to Port Eynon the other day found themselves in an awkward position on reaching their destination. They were, it is said, asked by the police to produce their exemption cards, or to show why they were not in the army. They were much perturbed when they realised that they had left them at home. They were, in consequence, detained at the Police Station for some hours, but after inquiries had been made at Swansea they were released. The members of the Swansea Bay Sea Angling Association arranged a fishing i competition for the wounded soldier8 ot Langland and Victoria Hospitals, Mum- bles. Fifteen soldiers took part in the competition, which resulted as follows:— 1st, Private Luton; 2nd, Corpl. Easby; 3rd, Pte. Morgan. The prizes were given by Messrs. H. Atkinson, Sports Depot, Union-street, Swansea. Mr. J. A. Smith, Clarence House, Swansea, and Ben James, Swansea Old Brewery. The soldiers were subsequently^ entertained to tea. A very enjoyable afternoon was spent. The news has just been received by cable of the sudden death of the wife of Mr. Sydney A. Joyce, of Calcutta, India, after an operation for peritonitis, which took place in Perth, Australia, where Mrs. Joyce was on a visit. Mr. Joyce is the Calcutta manager for the British Wes- tinghouse Electrical Manufacturing Co., who, with his wife, left Swansea just three years ago. Mrs. Joyce was the elder daughter (Nellie) of Mr. and Mrs. James Bailey, Heathfield House," Swansea. A strange coincidence is that the death took place on the fifth anniver- sary of Mrs. Joyce's wedding day.

GROVESEND I

GROVESEND. Ratepayers in this district are anything but satisfied with the progress made by the contractors-the Gorseinon Electric Light Co.—to light up the village. In the lalest communication from the company to the Llandilo Talybont Council, the secretary writes: "We are proceeding with the work of wiring and completing with the exception of fitting up brackets and lamps." When the restrictions are withdrawn, the company say, they will be able to finish, the contract in two or three days.

CARMARTHEN j

CARMARTHEN. j The Rev. H. Melhuish, chaplain at the South Wales Training College, Carmar- then, has been appointed chaplain to H.M. Forces With reference to a complaint made at the Carmarthen Town Council, about the burial of a carcase, the sanitary inspector reported that it was the duty of a Cor- poration workman to see that carcases were buried' at the manure heap.—Aid. David Williams asked what was the good of having officials to look after these matters if they did not do so.—Dr. Bowen Jones (medical oftTcer): I do not think Mr. William, knows what he is talking about. He seems to think that he knows everything. We had better have him to look after the whole of the affairs of the town.—Councillor D. Williams: I am hero to see that the health of the town is looked after. I

GORSEINONI

GORSEINON. I The funeral of Mrs. Evans, age 46, wife of Mr. Lewis Evans, Cloth Hall, Alex- andra-road, Gorseinon, took place on Wed- ne-sday afternoon at Kingsbridge Ceme- tery. The Rev. W. Talfan Davies, pastor of Libanus, assisted by the Rev. W. Mor- gan, Brynteg, officiated at the house, chapel, and graveside. Among the mourners were the husband; Mr. and Mrs. Hughes, Ynyshir (uncle and aunt); Mrs. Griffiths, Ynyshir (aunt); Mrs. Davies, Llwynypia; Mrs. Howelle, Mrs. Jones, and Mr. and Mrs. Graham, Llwyny- pia (cousins); Mr. and Mrs. Edwards and T. J. Edwards, Llanelly; Mrs. Williams and Mrs. Harries, St. Clears; Master Ed. Thomas, Llwynypia; Mr. and Mrs. Evans, Crugybar; Mrs. Lewis and Mrs. Morgan, Llandilo; Mr. and Mrs. Evans, Llanelly; Mr. and Mrs. Rees, Penyrheol; Mr. and Mrs. Evans, Groveeend; Mr. and Mrs. Evans, Tongwynlais; Mr. and Mm. Wil- liams, Newbridge; and Mrs. Davies and Miss Davies, Clydach Vale. There were many floral tributes. A.B. Seaman Siias Howells is spend- ing a few days furlough at his home in Gorseinon. The latest batch of recruits for the Army and Navy received a splendid send- off from the station on Wednesday even- ing.

LLANDILOI

LLANDILO. I In connection with the forthcoming marriage of Miss Myfanwy Davies, daughter of the Rev. W. Davies, The Walk, to Mr. T. Evans, Lampeter, the Tabernacle and Capel Newydd, the two churches to which her father ministers, have subscribed as. wedding presents re- spectively S:20 and £ 11 10s. The recent heavy rains experienced locally whilst annoying to farmers anxious to harvest their crops, viewed from a fisherman's point of view, are not without certain advantages. The water in the Towy has been for some days every- thing that could be desired, and judging from the smiling faces of Isaak Walton's disciples as they leave the banks of the river homeward bound, many satisfac- tory baskets have been obtained. The writer on Tuesday last saw two very fine sewin landed by Mr. T. A. Griffiths. One well known local fisherman during the last week-end grassed a very fine sewin when lie noticed another sPecimen rising to a fly near by. Thinking his first cap- tive was dead he hastily put it in his basket and recommenced operations, but instead of hooking an additional fish the other hopped through the lid of the basket and eventually got away. Luckily there is no record kept of the fisherman's remarks following this unfortunate ex- perience. t

LLANELLY

LLANELLY. At tp monthly meeting of the LlanellJ Board f Guardians' on Thursday, Mr. W, J. Nevil, J.P., presiding, a system ol elassifieaion of certain diseases in the inlirmarywas decided upon. A resolution calling up-n the Government to make tb4 maintenance of sol(liere, land sailors in lunatic asynma a national charge, waa adopted. Mis Margaret Jones, Trimsararv was appointee assistant nurse.

POFT TALBOT

POFT TALBOT. A review of tie police was held at the Port Talbot County Police Station on Thursday. Actinj P.S. McGovern has been promoted b the rank of police sergeant. P.S. XcGovern was stationed at Llanduff for 10 years, and was known to possess great detective ability. For two years he has been stationed at Port Tai- bot, and has been actively connected with the administration ot; the Aliens' Restric- tion Order at tho Docks. His well-earned promotion was delayei by the war.

MUMBLES J

MUMBLES. ,J An important meeting ot the Swansea Water and Sewens Committee, which is being looked forward too with keen in- terest locally, will be held on Thursday next, when a discussion will take place on the question of the supply of water to the Mumbles- A fine Thursday can always be relied upon to provide an extra influx of visitors to tho Mumbles, and yesterday proved to be no exception to the rule. The bays attracted their usual complement of bathers, and other attractions were well patronised.

PON TAR DU LAIS

PON TAR DU LAIS. llie torthconiing loth annual nrasa band championship contest on September 16, in connection with the West Wales Association, promises to be a great suc- cess. Blaengwynfi (the runners up in la.st year's contest), are determined to win the blue ribbon from their old rivals, Gwaun* caegurwen. Brynamman, Cwmainman, Ammanford. Ystalyfera, and other bands, are also putting in special practises for this important event. It iB expected also that Gorseinon, where a good band has been recently formed, will be repre- sented for tjie first time at the contest. The financial proceeds will be devoted to the local Heroes' Fund. At the la.st meeting of the Llandilo Talybont Parish Council, Mr. Alfred Morgan, Pencefuarda, presiding, it was decided to get counsel's opinion as to the legality or otherwise of the Council en- closing a portion of common land for public purposes. There is a very large acreage of Common in the parish, and this is now, and has been for many years past, freely encroached upon by private individuals. The expenses of the recent Local Government Board inquiry totalled S7 9s. 10d. With reference to the roadside water at Pontlliw, the District Council have fulfilled their obligations, and the County Council ig now to be asked to finish their part of the contract.

NEYLAND

NEYLAND. At a meeting of the Neyland Urban Council Mr. W. E. Evans said that the ferry service between Neyland and Pem- broke Dock was now so bad as to become almost a public scandal. He moved that they ask Mr. Hitchings to meet the Coun- cil and state his views on the question, and if they could get no satisfaction with him they should go further and see the captain superintendent of Pembroke Dockyard on the matter. He fhought they should amalgamate with other Councils to get the matter remedied. Mr. Roach se- conded, and the motion was carried. Some surprising statements were made at the monthly meeting of the Neyland Urban Council during tlto discussion upon a recommendation of the Public Health Committe that the question of securing a resident doctor be considered. Mr. Roach said previous to the coming of Dr. Dundaa there were two resident doctors in the town, but Dr. Dundas bought the two p-artices. He had had several assistants, but they had left, and the town had for some timA been without a doctor. People had paid for their treatment under the National Insurance, and they ought to have proper medical treatment. The chairman (Mr. J. V. Harries) said that Dr. Dundas was Poor Law doctor for Neyland and three other parishes, medical officer of health and panel doctor for the whole district, in addition to which he had his private practice and also a practice at Milford. He thought when the doctor had an assistant he should send him to Milford and stay in Neyland himself, as he held all the public appointments. It was eventually decided to write Dr Dundas to attend a special meeting of the Council and discuss the matter with him.

AT THE TRIBUNALS

AT THE TRIBUNALS. The Combing Out of Single Men, LLANELLY BOROUGH. A meeting of the Llanelly Borough Tri. bunal was held on Thursday evening, Aid. D. James Davies presiding'. The military representatives were Capt. H. G. Morton Evans and Aid. Nathan Griffiths. The majority of the applications dealt with were from unattested married men. The "lilercury" Printing Oo> appealed for a compositor. It was stated that the man was in a reserved occupation, and had a special knowledge of Welsh grammar. The firm were printing oo

THE MEXICAN BORDER

THE MEXICAN BORDER. Washington, Thursday.—Fifteen thcow sand guardsmen who returned from the Mexican border recently have been ordered out for Federal service. The guardsmen still on the border will remain there for the present. The movement is believed to presage an early withdrawal of the puni- tive expedition to Mexi-Reu-ter.

CALL TO SOUTH AFRICANS

CALL TO SOUTH AFRICANS. Johannesburg, Thursday.—Sir William IIoy, general manager of rail ways and har- bours, addressing the Railway Rifles, said that 4,008 South African railwavmen were on active service, and that a request had now come from the Imperial Government for the dispatch of two companies of rail- waymen for service in France.-Reuter.

No title

Dudley, Worcestershire, will be one of the iiine towns in the country to have the automatic telephone.