Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 6 o 6
Full Screen
13 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

IT GRAND THEATRE, I SWANSEA. H ? NEXT WEEK, for Six Nights, at 7.30, and a H H MATINEE SATURDAY, at 2.30 JJJ MATINEE SATURDAY, at 2.30 1 GEORGE j) I EDWARDES I H COMPANY. 1 J BETTY I I A MUSICAL PLAY IN THREE ACTS. H ■ From Daly's Theatre. H In There is a charm and daintiness about BETTY ■& hH which is delightfully refreshing after the hurly- |pl gj? burly of some of the entertainments now in vogue.  ? BOOK YOUR SEATS, Tel. 291. BOOK YOUR A

TROMMELFEUERI

TROMMELFEUER. I THE BATTLE OF TO-DAY ITS FIRST AND LAST WEAPON I The High Commissioner has received a communication concerning the operations of the Australian Imperial Force in France, from which the following extracts are tal,-en:- France, August 21. The Germans call it Trommelfeuer- drum fire. I do not know any better de- scription for the distant sound of it. You will be sitting at your tea, the normal spasmodic banging of your own guns sounding in the nearer positions five, ten, perhaps fifteen times in the minute. Sud- denly, from over the distant hills to left or right there breaks out the roll of a great kettle drum, ever so far away. Some- one is playing the tattoo softly and very quickly. If it is nearer, and especially if I it is German, it sounds as if he played it on an iron ship's tank instead. That is Trommelfeuer—what we call in- tense bombardment. It is the method i which the German invented for his own use. For a year and a half he had the ( monopoly of it—our men had to hang on ps best they could under the knowledge "hat the enemy had more guns and more shell than we, and bigger shell at that. But at last the weapon seems to have been curned against him. No doubt his arma- ments and munitions are growing fast, but ours for the moment have overtaken them. And hell though it is for both sides —something which no soldiers in the world's history ever yet had to endure—it is better for us at present than for the Germans. I have heard men coming out of the thick of it say, Well, I'm glad I'm not a German." WHAT IT MEANS. I Now, here is what is means. The normal shelling of the afternoon— a scattered bombardment all over the landscape which only brings perhaps half- a-dozen shells to your immediate neigh- bourhood once in every ten minutes—has noticeably quickened. The German is obviously turning on more batteries. The light field gun shrap- nel is fairly scattered as before. But five point nine howitzers are being added to it. Except for his small field guns the German makes little use of guns. His work is almost entirely done with howit- zers. He possesses big howitzers—eight inch and larger-as we do. But the back- bone of his artillery is the five point nine howitzer and the four point two. The shells from both these guns are be- ginning to fall more thickly. Huge black clouds shoot into the air from various parts of the foreground and slowly drift away across the hilltop. A swifter shriek and something breaks lite a glass bottle in front of the parapet, sending its frag- meirts slithering low overhead. It bursts like a rainstorm, sheet upon sheet, smash, smash, smash, with one or two more of the heavier shells punctuating the shower of the lighter ones. The lighter shell is shrapnel from field guns. A couple of salvoes from each, perhaps twenty or thirty shells in the minute, and the shrieks cease. The dust ao-riffs down the hill. The sky c lears. The sun looks in. Five minutes later down comes exactly such another shower. A QUIVERING EARTH. I That is the beginning. As the evening wears on the salvoes become more fre- quent. All through the night they go on. The next morn.ing- the intervals are becom- ing even less. Occasionally the hurricane reaches such all intensity threSeems no interval at all. Towards dusk it swells in a wave heavier than any that ha-s yet come. All through the second night the inferno lasts. In the grey dawn of the second day if increases in a manner almost tinbelievable-thp dust of it covers every- thing: it is quite impossible to see. The earth shakes and quivers with the pounding. It is just then that the lighter guns join in with the roll as of a kettle drum- Trommelfeuer. The enemy is throwing out his infantry and his shrapnel is showering on to our lines in order to keep the heads of our men down to the last moment. Suddenly the whole noise eases. The enemy is casting his shrapnel and big shell further back. The chances are that most men in these racked lines do not know whether the enemy ever delivers that attack or not. Our artillery breaks the head of it before it crosses No Man's Land. A few figures on the skyline hopping from crater to, crater indicate what is left of it. As soon as they find rifle fire and machine guns on them the remnant gives it up as hopeless. And what of the men who have been out there under that hurricane night and day until its duration almost passed memory- I amidst sighs and sounds indescribable, des- perately tried? THE SOLDIER'S ANXiETY. I The mere noise is enough to break any I man's nerves. Every one of those shriek- ing shells which fell night and day may mean any man's instant death. As he hears each shell coming he knows it. He. saw the sight around him-he was buried by earth and dug out by his mates, and I he dug them out in turn. What can we do for him ? I know only one thing—it is .the only alleviation that science knows of. W? can force some mitigation of all this by one mean? and one alone—if we can give the Germans wor. The one anxiety in the mind of the soldier ie-h&Ko w? got L the guns and the shells—can we keep ahead of them with guns and our ammu- nition. That means everything. Those men have the nerve to go through these infernos provided their friends at home do not desert them. If the munition worker' oould see what I have seen he would toil as though he were racing against time to save the life of a man. (Passed by Censor.)

AMMANFORD COUNCIL I

AMMANFORD COUNCIL. I Representative on University Board I of Governors. At Ammanford Council on Wednesday night, Mr. J. Da vies presiding, the ap- pointment of a representative on the Board of Governors of the University Col- lege of Wales, Aberystwyth, again came up for consideration. At the previous meeting the appoint- ment was opposed in view of the alleged favourable treatment accorded to Dr. Ethe, the German professor, but after a lively discussion, the matter was de- ferred so that the Clerk might make in- quiries. A communication setting forth all the circumstances was now read from the Clerk to the College Council, but as it was marked "confidential," the Press were asked not to publish its contents. Mr. David Jones proposed, and Mr. Wm. Evans seconded, that a representative be appointed. Mr. J. Harries: We have hada full ex- planation, and a satisfactory explana- tion, I believe. The motion was passed unanimously, and Mr. T. M. Evans, M.A., was re-ap- pointed representative. The Finance Committee was selected to carry out the provisions of the War Charities Act. THE FIRE BRIGADE. I Recommendations were submitted in I reference to the reconstitution of the fire brigade, which is to consist of five or six members together with members of the local police force, and the sum of S:3 is to be paid in respect of each fire. A fire escape is to be provided, and the desir- ability of removing the fire station to a more central position is under considera- tion. Claims of members in respect of two recent fires were settled at a total of 27 4s., but one fireman had declined to accept an offer of 30s., and still insisted on payment of £3 3s., which he originally claimed. WATER SHORTAGE. I The Health Committee reported on the shortage of water at Hopkinstown during, the day time, and recommended that the l Ammanford Colliery Co. be requested to turn off the supply of water from their works every morning at nine o'clock and keep it shut off for a period of two hours every day. Mr. E. Hewelett, the managing director, wrote that it would be done, but pointed out that he thought the Council ought to give a sufficient supply to enable a large industry to have an adequacy, as well as to maintain sufficient pressure at Hop- kinstown. The Chairman said they were all agreed on that, and the Council had sug- gested that the colliery may put in a storage tank, but they would not do it. Mr. J. Harries asked if there was suffi- cient pressure at Hopkinstown now that the colliery was cutting off its supply for two hours, and the Surveyor (Mr. David Thomas) said no complaint had since been received. Mr. Evan Lewis suggested the possi- bility of taking a separate supply from Pentwyn-road. Mr. Wm. Evans: The Council were ad- vised that the effect would be just the same, inasmuch as they would be drawing from the same main pipe. And they would be throwing money away, being that there is a scheme pending. When that comes, the colliery will have sum- cient supply for a big industry, and of course, we will charge for it. A PROPOSED CEMETERY. Permission was received from the Dynevor Estate Agent to sink trial holes on Glynmeirch and Deri-bach Farms in reference to the proposed cemetery site. The Surveyor was instructed to proceed with the former only, the Latter being considered unsuitable so far as position goes. The Medical Officer of Health (Dr. D. R. Price) reported that during the months of July and August two cases of diph- theria, three cases of measles and Ger- man measles, and two c4se6 of pulmon- ary tuberculosis, were notified. The ex- traordinary epidemic of measles was now practically abated.

BUDDING MUSICIAN

BUDDING MUSICIAN. Industrial School Boy's Future. I Considerable hopes are entertained of the future of William Madden, of Morris- ton, one of the Bonyma«n Industrial School boys who has shown unusual musical ability, both as vocalist and in- strumentalist. He is a member of the ) brass band, and plays the euphonium. While in camp at Sennybridge, Willie sang at a concert in aid of wounded soldiers, and won golden opinions from among others, Dr. Jones, who was much taken up with the boy, and said he would watch with much interest his future career. Willie is now 142, and will re- main under the control of the Industrial School authorities until he is 16. Un- fortunately, he suffers from asthma, a complaint which, if not overcome, may seriously handicap the boy, whose voice I is favourably spoken of by all who have heard him. It is possible that some effort will be made to assist the lad's musical development.

II Our Short StoryII

II Our Short Story. II 1 1 'CAPTAIN' JOPE l l BY By S. BARING-GOULD. In former days, as late as in the first I half of last century, it was customary for I miners in Cornwall and Devon in quest of tin to form small companies of adventur- ers, and to secure from the Duchy the right to work in a certain tract of ground that was marked out on the moors as their allotment. Within these bounds they might turn over the-subsoil, sink shafts, run adits, set up waterwheel and stamp- ers, and make pans in which to wash the ore from the earthy and rocky matter that contained no metal. There were three or four of these pans, and the red water passed from one to the other, carry- I ing with it particles of tin along with such matter as was valueless, and this latter being lighter than the metal was swept away. The system of mining by these adventurers was very primitive; nevertheless, they made a good deal of money by it. Sometimes quite a small party of four to six adventurers would realise many thousands of pounds, which ¡ they divided pro rata among them, the captain," or head of the party, receiving a larger share than the rest. Such a "captain" was Jeremiah Jope, and ho was the head, or, as he would now be called, the frboss" of the concern, that consisted of six men only. The bit ? moorland il;pv had lighted on was at the head of a small river that took its rise in several small rills, dribbling down from between granite tors, in a very wild and lonely part of the moors. The usual way in which such men car- ried on their mining was this: They be- gan on the surface, and sounded and washed the rubble that had collected in and a-bout the streams, and which had been turned over by ancient workers in the Middle Ages. but which, with their rude methods, they were unable to com- pletely divest of the tin in the stones, and when they had exhausted the "stre.am- wick" heaps, to attack the solid rock. Now this cost much more labour and demanded an expense these poor men had not the means of meeting. They would then de- pute their captains" to try to induce men of some capital, to invest in their mine. He would take specimens, naturally the best he could select, and exhibit these to men who bad balances at their bankers, and speak of the prospects of the mine in the most hopeful terms, boast of the cer- tainty of making their money quadruple itself, and explain the reason—the only reason of his asking any to share in the VTofitsto be due to his inability to find the means to bring a lead of water to his workings, or to set up a wheel. He would invi-f-e the captain to visit the workings at I any day, without giving any warning that he was coming, and to judge for himself. In the fust half of the 39th century a fever of speculation had set in in the < towns near the jnWBrt, and .titilBi*, slide- 1 makers, and tradesmen of every kind were eager to embark their savings in the mines in the hopes of making a rapid for- tune. Accordingly, the applications al- most always met with a favourable re- ception. and a personal .visit to the place satisfied the investor that there was un- doubtedly a promising lode—a keenly lode, to use the local expression—ready to be exploited. What the adventurers then did was to employ the capital advanced them in supplying themselves with the re- quisites they desired, and then they would cover up the rich lode, and work along a vein that was thin and did not "bunch." As they made repeated calls on the share- holders, and the profits were ni}, these latter, after a while, became disgusted, refused to advance more money, and al- lowed the original adventurers to buy up their shares for a song. That done, they quickly deserted the unprofitable veins and worked the keenly lode to their own sole advantage. Cantain" .Tope had as his partners; Samuel Webber and Joseph Caunter. The men lived in rude huts they had erected near Wheal Consort, as the mine was designated, not from any wheel that had been set up, but from an old Celtic word thatsig-uifie-s a mine. There were two other partners, but they do not come into the story. Now, Samuel Webber was a married man, and had a daughter. Patience, a slender, very pretty girl, with bright hazel eves and rich brown hair. She brought dinner daily to her father, and the "cap- tain" could not take his eyes off her when she was at the mine. He was a man of forty, whereas she was not over eighteen. It is said that when a man of middle age falls in love, the passion in him becomes overmastering, as a general conflagration; whereas a, young man's love blazes up like a. bit of jyorse wherT a match is ap- plied to it, and soon goes out. "Captain" Jope did not for a moment doubt that his suit would be accepted, he being the "car- tain," and receiving a larger share of the profits than the rest; moreover, he had a very high opinion of the persuasive powers of his tongue—had he not wheedled half-a-dozen tradesmen into putting their money into Wheal Consort? And as to his own personal appearance—he looked in the glass, and it pleased him. But Tope had not reel-oned on the chance of anyone else admiring Patty Webber, and of Patty reciprocating the liking. In fact, for some time she and Joseph Caun- ter had come to the understanding that each was exactly suited to the other, and that no one eloo would do as well. When Jope opened his mind to Patience, she hurst out laughing, and told him he was an old fool and should look out to mate with one more his own age. And then it was disclosed to him that she had set her heart on Joe Cauntr. "Captain Jope was a stubborn man, not one to accept a refusal. He went off to consult Samuel Webber, her father, and to insist that it was an honour he was conferring on the girl; it was to her ad- vantage Unmistakably to accept him, and he expected her acquiescence, and that Webber should use on his behalf parental j authority. i "I don't see it, cap'n. I don't see it no j ways. I chose for myself, and my wife chose me. The Jittle maid shall go by her own fancy, and I'm not the man to force her against her will." Jope argued, browbeat, attempted to cajole. All was in vain, and he departed angry and with his heart full of resent- ment. Thenceforth he scowled at Caun- ter, and spoke curtly and roughly to Web- ber. A few weeks passed, and he made a fresh assault on the father, and attempted persuasion on the girl, only to meet with fresh rebuff. j Thenceforth he fumed and was full of I offended pride, jealousy, and resentment. Had not Webber and Gaunter been asso- "issa I ciates, whom he could not get rid of, he would have dismissed them from the mine. To make his bitterness more intense, he saw Joe and Patience together often. He walked her about on Sundays as her ae- cepted lover. His rage knew no bounds. It is hard to say which he hated most, the father or the lover. A few weeks passed, and one day Web-, ber and Caunter came to the mine. It was their care to work below. When the two men came to the shaft. Jope was there to let them down. The descent was in a crate, and a man turned a windlass with a cord, by means of which the crate was let down and hauled up. When they saw that the captain" was to work it, Joe turned to Webber and said something in an undertone, but Web- ber answered with a l,augh. Not he- not so bad as that." I don't trust him," retorted Caunter, and Jope heard these words. The younger man, however, made no further demur, but got into the orate with the elder, and Jope turned the windlass and they went down, the last to be seen Was their heads. Whether the words of suspicion had qtart the idra in the head of the cap- tain," or whether he had planned revenge before, was never known; but certain it is that, before the men were half-way down, the cord was severed and they were pre- cipitated to the bottom and dashed to pieces. An inquest was held. The cord was found to be frayed, and the coroner re- marked that it showed culpable negligence in there not being a chain instead of a cord. But in such small undertakings by little companies of adventurers cords were commonly employed, and the verdict was Accidental death." After the lapse of a. couple of weeks, "Captain Jeremiah Jope presented him- self before the widow and her daughter in his Sunday-go-meeting- suit and with a complacent smile on his face. I be cruel sorry for that there un- fortunate accident." said he. If Webber were alive he'd tell you as how I was on to have a chain or a wire rope times out o' mind, but the money was required for a stamper and it was put off and off. The others of the associates wouldn't hearken to me, and eo we went on-with the old cable. And now I be come to make you an 'andeome and liberal offer. I'll take the maid to wife and give you a home, old la(. 'Tisn't everyone as would do this. but I will." (To be Continued To-morrow.)

Advertising

THE CHEAPEST BOILER FUEL IN SWANSEA TO-DAY IS COKE BREEZE, 6/- per Ton Net Cash at Works, GAS WORKS, SWANSEA. Efficient either with or with- out forced draught. The Swansea Gas Light 6 Company's Boiler Plant, E working at 150 lbs. per sq. in. 8 on this fuel, is open for the I inspection of prospective 1 buyers of Coke Breeze. Bi Buy British Food and I keep your money in the country. ji FAWCETT'S PEARL BARLEY is grown on. the Yorkshire Wolds. Makes the best barley water, the drink for health and energy. Per settled packet, 4d. L_

FALL INTO ACID

FALL INTO ACID. Lewis Phillips, aged 54, of 24 New-road, Skewen, employed at the Cape Copper Works, was admitted to Swansea Hos- pital at 4.45 p.m. on Thursday suffering from injuries to the face and limbs caused by falling into a vat of sulphuric acid. At 9.30 this morning he was reported to be doing as well as could be expected.

No title

An attempt is being made to restore some of the London motor-omnibus ser- vices which were suspended when the petrol restrictions came into force. Sergeant George Macqueen, of the Royal West Surrey Regt., was knocked down and killed by a taxi-cab at Putney Heath-road, Wimbledon-common, about midnight on Wednesday.—Badeno Dom- P.sco, 57, a Belgian refugee, has been run, over and killed by a motor omnibus in the Strand.

SWANSEA ELECTRICITY

SWANSEA ELECTRICITY Proposed Supply to the Har- bour Trust. Lighting Restrictions and Revenue. f At Swansea Tramways and Elortric I Lighting Committee on Thursday after- r noon, the Chairman (Col. Sinclair) re- ferred to the suggestion of the Corpora- tion taking over the electrical supply of the Harbour Trust. He pointed out that the latter were quite willing to meet the Corporation in the matter and discuss possibilities, and he thought it wise to ask the Mayor to still further carry on preliminary negotiations on lines similar to what he did in respect of the Tramway Co. The Mayor: The position is that when I reported it to a meeting of the Trust, the Trustees were prepared without hesi- tation to entertain any proposals which might emanate from this committee, and I promised them I would ask this com- mittee to make a certain offer for the supply of their energy, and when the en- gineer is in a position to submit them we can then pasg them to the Trust. The Engineer was instructed to prepare a report for the, next meeting of the com- mittee. Permission was given to the Engineer to hold evening lectures in the demon-! stration room at the showroom, to which j the. employes of the Corporation and! their friends would be invited. It was intimated by the Engineer that he had given one of his employes a re- commendation to get into the army. He left and went to Canterbury, obtained a position there, and secured conditional exemption from the Canterbury Tribunal. Ald. Dan Jones pointed out that the firm in whose employ the man at present was, was under a penalty, as it was a breach of the Defence of the Realm Act to engage a man who was of recruitable age. REVISED TARIFF LIST. I Mr. W. Burr, the borough electrical engineer, reported that alterations had been made in the tariff list as would com- pensate for th. increased cost of produc- tion, as the additional cost of material, wages, etc., were borne almost entirely by the lighting consumer. In considering the matter, he said, the point should be borne in mind that a reduction in re- venue would immediately follow a reduc- tion in price, also that the income for lighting would be considerably reduced this year in consequence of the Summer Time Act and the new lighting restric- tions, in fact, he had been given to under- stand that the great majority of the light- ing accounts to date were 50 per cent. less than they were for the corresponding quarter of the previous year. Bearing these points in mind, he did not think the committee would be well advised 'to con- sider a reduction in the power rate at the moment. The great majority of elec- trical undertakings in the country had increased their charges for p4wer since the beginning of the war. lie fully ap-' preciated that the lower price at which electricity can be sold the greater must be the amount of work in store for them in the future, and as soon as the time was ( opportune he hoped to put before the committee a most encouraging tariff for II all purposes. Approval was given to the report. The Engineer also intimated that since the last report eleven new applications for supply had been received. EXTENSION OF PLANT. Upon the question of the extension of plant he estimated that the cost of the complete installation would be between S25,000 or £ 30,000, and the expenditure would have the effect of still further re- ducing the cost of production. The scheme would enable them to generate electricity as cheaply as any other gene- rating station working under similar con- ditions as regards output, head factor, and cost of fuel. The Engineer informed the committee that he h?d a scheme for early submis- sion to the committee which would bring the station absolutely up to date, and the money would be well repaid. The committee agreed to the principal of extension, and the matter will subse- quently be considered.

I LLANDILO COUNCIL I

LLANDILO COUNCIL. I At the monthly meeting of the Llandilo Urban Council the Clerk reported that he had a letter from the National Provincial Bank re the Belgian Fund. The account was overdrawn by £ 25. The Council was I morally responsible. People would write to the authorities to take the refugees away, as Llandilo was not now supporting them. Mr. Ben Hughes: That would be a shame. THE STOCK MART. if Messrs. William and Walter James, the auctioneers, had writtpn with regard to the mart stating that the pens were in- adequate for the stock. The matter needed immediate attention. There were hundreds of sheep at the last two marts that they could not pen. Mr. J. H., Rees f-aid there were over 1,700 sheep at the last mart. On the motion of Mr. D. Morgan, it was decided that the whole Council should meet the auctioneers. I THE SEWAGE TANKS. I The Rev. Iv L. Jones suggestpd that the sewage tanks near the electric light station should be examined at once. If the Streets Committee did not attend to it immediately extensive damage would be done. It was decided to visit the place-- THE TIPPING OF REFUSE. Mr. J. H. Reee asked if the Council had made provision for the tipping of refuse. They should have a plot of their own. It. was decided to let the matter stand I for the present. ELECTRIC LIGHT ENGINEER'S SALARY. The Electric Light Committee's recom- mendation that Mr. Bowen, the electric light engineer be paid at the rate (if 915(1 a year from the 1st of September, was unanaimou-sly adopted. Mr. A. E. Harries drew atention to tho need of the proper tar spraying of the town. At the request of Capt. Rober.ts a letter from the inhabitants of Crescent-road was read. It condemned the waste of publicil money. The method benefited no one but i those who had tar for sale. Trey trusted the Council would instruct the surveyor to discontinue it. Dr. Jones seconded Mr. Harries that I the necessary materials for tar spraying for next year be ready in April next

Advertising

1 I STUDEBAKER 15 CWT. DELIVERY VAN PRICE f-270 COMPLETE. I STUDEflfAKSHi, LTD., mom, Great Portland Street, London, W i ,1 J j In I lb. Packages Not only the best at 1/- per pound, but best at any price. For its purity, flavour, and f ?? quality, Pheasant Margarine j Jg? is absolutely incomparable. j ARC RINEI I PHEASANT  See packet w.h 1 PER LE. | red, white, and blue riband and {fa Ash your Pheasant seal. M ™ Grocer for Prepare for the Bad Weather* I I ffi TO COLLIERY OWNERS, CONTRACTORS, SINKERS AND MUNITION WORKERS. 1 @ ————— « DANN & CO. are now fully Stocked, and are. | Or prepared to meet the requirements of all classes. ,We ? hold the Largest Stock in Wales of ? -? ? Oi?kins. Mackintoshes, Raincoats  ? ? Pegamoids, Rubber Coats, §;  I Boots and Leggings. :J ? Orders Executed Same Day. § 8 4!3 Note Address:- + '@It.! DANN CO. @' 91 South Wales Clothiers and Boot Merchants and ♦1 Oilskin Manufacturers, 15, 16 & 23, Wind St., Swansea. 1 Est. 1875. Tel. No. 593 Central. r TEL., CE N. 3S4. ES i-iil 1858. j j The Cheapest House in Wales 1 FOR | PIANOS, PLAYER PIANOS, ORGANS, GRAMOPHONES, RECORDS, AND MUSIC. Pianos from 9/- Monthly. Organs from 6/- Monthly. v ROLLS OF SOILED MUSIC, SONGS, PIANOFORTE PI ECES Oft STUDIES, 5/- WORTH FOR 1/6 POST FREE. I GODFREY & CO., Limited, 22, ST. HELEN'S ROAD, SWANSEA. t Fashionable Footwear i-it..1 0 i VV ALLACES t. Special Display of BOYS' and GIRLS' BOOTS: ♦ for School Wear. Choice Designs in Fancy Top Boots and Shoes in all the New Colours. j I Children's BOOTS and SHOES in Great Variety. Agent for K Service Boots, Lous, Delta, &c; j otus, l ta, &,e,. t SEE WINDOWS. f I — ] t 230, High Street, Swansea, j1 And M U M B L E S. .v..v.

CONCERT ON THE SANDS I

CONCERT ON THE SANDS. I Swansea Visitors' Patriotic Effort.; A successful al fresco conocrt was held I on Swansea Sands on Wednesday evening. The entertainment was organised by visi- tors, consisting of Messrs. Henry Lewis (Brynmawr), David Jones (Treharris), and W. J. Davies (Treherbert), and the chair was taken by the Rev. Rees Jenkins (Tredegar). In his opening remarks the chairman spoke effectively of the debt of gratitude which we owe to our "ToTnniies" who arc giving their lives in Flanders so that the people at home might rest safely. An excellent miscellaneous programme was given by the following artistes:— Misses Eva Risslake, Doris Lucas, Doris Mitchell, and M. Rees (Penclawdd); Messrs. Wm. Davies (Brynmawr), Evan Richards (Ammanford), David Jones (Tre- harris). Mr. Davies proved himself a particulsfrly versatile raconteur, his witty) anecdotes being most amusing. At the conclusion of'the concert a col- lection was taken in aid of the Swansea Y.M.C.A. wcunded soldiers fund, and! realised tl 17s. 3d. Thanks are duo to 1 the party for the effort which, in prov-id. ing refined amusement on the sands, 1i1 added to the funds of, a deserving cause. I

NATIONAL MOTOR VOLUNTEERS I

NATIONAL MOTOR VOLUNTEERS. I Glamorgan Battalion-Swansea & District I No. 2 Squadron. WEEKLY ORDERS. I To-day (Friday), 8th inst., company drill at Brynymor," at 7.45 p.m. prompt. Monday next, the llth inst., 7.45 to 8.15 p.m., ambulance drill and instruction, at which all members arc specially re- quested to be present. At 8.15 to 9.15 p.m. same evening, signalling practice.. Wednesday, the 13th inst., shooting practice, 7.45 to 9.15 p.m. Officer in charge, Squadron Sergeant-Major Balsnon, next for duty, Secticn Commander A. S. i),tvid.-Cliarl-es T. Ruthen, Squadron, Commander. September 7, 1916. .Printed and Published for the Swansea jj 'Pr8g, Limited, by ARTHUR PARNELL I HIGH AM, at Leader Buildings, Swansea.