Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
32 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

The Cambria Daily Leader" gives later news than any paper published in this dis- 1 trict. I

Advertising

■ 1 — ■■ T The London Office of the "Cambria Daily Leader" is at 151, Fleet Stree (first floor), where adver- tisements can be received up to. 7 o'clock each evening for, insertion in the next day's issue. Tel. 2276 Central.

ON A SIX MILE FRONT

ON A SIX MILE FRONT. British Advance 3,000 Yards. NEW TYPE OF ARMOURED CAR EMPLOYED. I I Bombs Dropped on EriSifiy Headquarters. TO-DAY'S BRITISH OFFICIAL. i Last night the enemy's trencnes j south-east of Thiepval, on a front of about 1,000 yards, including a strongly defended locality known as the Wimber Works, were cap- tured by our troops. This morning we attacked the enemy on a front extending from Boul- van Wood to the north of the Alb ert-Bapaume-road, a distance of about six miles. Considerable successes have already been obtained. Our troops have advanced some two I or three thousand yards at various places, and the attack is pro- gressing satisfactorily. A large number of prisoners have been taken. In this attack we employed for the first time a new type of heavily armoured cars, which have proved of considerable utility. Fresh aerial fighting has taken place. Four hostile machines were brought down in flames, and at least four machines were driven down dam- I aged. One hostile kite balloon was brought down last night, and one this morning. < Our aeroplanes co-operated with the advance, and from a close height fired on the enemy on the ground. Bombs were successfully dropped on three of the enemy headquar- ters and the railway station of I Bapaume was also successfully bombarded, much railway stock being damaged and one train be- ing destroyed. BULGARS ON THE RUN. I Dominating Position Taken by I Serbians. The Exchange Agency is informed that the following telegram, dated Thursday, has been received in Lon- don from Salonika:— The Serbians have taken the chief and. dominating Bulgarian position of Maikanidge. The Buigars are retreating in the direction of Florina. To the south they are also retreat- ing secretly. The Serbians have captured 420 prisoners. DEADLY ARTILLERY. I Bulgars Retiring at Many Points. Salonika (undated).—According to the statements of prisoners, the intensity and precision of our artillery fire inflicted heavy losses on the enemy, and at many points the Bulgars are retiring under the pressure of our infantry, which is succes- sively occupying the enemy's positions. Our action continues energetically. The Serbian successes west and south of Lake Petrisko continue, and they threaten to cut,the communications between Bul- garia and Greece. To-day the Serbian official bulletin eays: Our offensive con- tinued yesterday on the entire front with complete success." GREEKS AND BULGARS. I Paris, 1 nday.—According to a telegram from Salonika to the Matin," the 38th Greek Regt. at Seres and the 5th Greek Division, which were taken prisoners by the Bulgarians, asked to be interned in Germany, for fear of being murdered by the Bulgarians. But in spite of their re- quest, they are going to be interned in Bulgaria. THE EASTERN FRONT. The journal's ietrograd correspondent telegraphs that although the Russian com- muniques have been very terse for some days, activity continues to increase along the whole front. I BRITISH BALKANS OFFICIAL. BRITISH BA,.KAN,S OFICIA. Press Bureau, ibursday o p.m.—in a! telegram, dated September 14th, the General Officer Commandiig the British Forces at Salonika reports:— Early this morning our troops moved forward, after artillery preparation, through M-achukovo, and in tice of stub- born opposition captured a saient in the enemy lines to the north of th< village. Considerable ground was gained, and although the enemy counter-attacked our gains were fully maintained. We captured some German prisoners and machine-guns. FMachukovo is on the east bankof the Vardar within two miles south-ast of Ghevgeli, on the opposite side d the river.] BRITISH OFFICIAL. I General Hadqnarters,. France, Thrs-I day 11 p.m.—Tb?gemertn situation, is \n- j day, It p.m.-Tiio geiaeral r,,itua. t-i'o]3. -as III- I South of the Ancre reciprocal artillery bombardments continue. On the front between Arras and Ypres our artillery and trench mortars have been active. This morning the enemy fired a small mine near Mount Sorrel, and this evening exploded a mine near Neuville St. Vaast. Considerable aerial fighting took place this morning two hostile machines being brought down in flames, and one other fell to the ground. Ono of our aeroplanes is missing. —————— FRENCH OFFICIAL. Paris, Thursday, 11 p.m.—North of the Somme we have extended our positions on that part of our front opposite Combles, and have taken by assault, to the south- east of that locality, Le Priez Farm, organ- ised as a point of support of the enemy. Isolated and rather lively combats took place to the north and south of Boucha- vesnes. We have maintained integrally all nUt gains. South of the Somme we have made pro- grees with grenades to the east of Beilay- en-Santerre. On the rest of the front there is nothing to report.

ON HIS WEDDING DAYI

ON HIS WEDDING DAY. Bridegroom Found Drowned in the Thames. On the day he had arranged to be married at St. Andrew's Church, mz chester, Benjamin William Belsham, 47, a barman, of Manchester, was found drowned in the Thames near Vauxhall Bridge. At the inquest on Thursday the brother of the fiancee gtated that he attended the church with the bridal party, but the bridegroom did not appear and the police were informed. Belsham and his sister seemed to be very happy, and had ar- ranged to spend the honeymoon at Moro- cambe. He could not explain his death. Belsham had just received a good ap- pointment, he had plenty of money, and had no troubles. A brother, who lives in London, said he had received a letter informing him when the wedding was to take place. His brother mentioned that his fiancee was 32 years of age, and added, "I suppose I ought to be a few years younger, but 1 have every hope of being very happy." The jury returned a verdict of found drowned.

DESPERATE SCENES o

DESPERATE SCENES. ——— o Police and a Llnsaint Absentee. A violent scene which marked the arrest at Tlan-saint of an absentee under the Military Service Act was described at Carmarthen on Wednesday, when father and two sons and another man were brought up in custody on various charges. The cases were a se??pnce to the apprehen- sion of Charles Jones (31), of Welwyn House, Llanaint, who as an absentee was on Tueway fined Rl and handed over to the military. On Wednesday, Rees Jones (27), Wc-lwvn House, a brother, was also charged with being a military absentee, whilst Daniel Jones, the father, was charged with assaulting P.C. Davies, Ferry-side, and Abraham Jones, another brother, was charged with rescuing Rees Jones from Ihe police. John Powell, collier, Penv- bank, Llansaint, was proceeded against on two charges of assaulting P.C. Davies and Police-Sergeant Hodsre Lewis. P,ol i ce- S erqe. The Bench, after hearing evidence, fined Rees Joftee tIO (inclusive of t3 7s. 4d. expenses), and handed over to the military. f I Daniel Jones (the father) and John Powell were sentenced to three calendar months' hard labour. The charge against Abraham Jones was dismissed with a caution

IN BUCHARESTI I

IN BUCHAREST. Confsetence of the Capital in the Army. An undated Press Association War Special telegram from Bucharest, received Friday, says:—Two aviators. Sub-Lieut. Noel and Lieut. Lerneur, left Salonica to fly to Sofia. where they Iroped five bombs, and landed in Bucharest after five hours' journey practically without incident. The German wireless continues to spread fantastic reports saying the Royal Family are leaving Bucharest atid g-oing to take refuge in OalatK, or Jassy, and that all the Government offices are also being trans- ferred there. The wireless also makes out the capital is suffering from a dearth of foodstuffs and firewood. As a matter of fact, Bucharest is perfectly quiet and abundantly sup plied, and more provisions can easily be procured. There is no scarcity of any kind whatever. King Ferdinand is at Headquarters at the front, and the Queen visits the hos- pitals every day, and spends the greater nart of both day and night in a hospital fitted up in the royal palace here, looking after the wounded with incomparable de votion. All the Government office* and bank? are still here and carrying on business as usual. Of -course, the authorities have taken every step to assure the safety of the city against air raids. Public charity is being wonderfully organised. Assistance is given to the fami- lies of men w?o have bN'n mobilised, and there is no poverty. The spirit of the noo?* i" excellent, amd they have fnU 'em. fid in th.Ð,anny a.pdis.

EXPLOSION AT MUNITION FACTORY

EXPLOSION AT MUNITION FACTORY FIVE KIILLEQ AND 15 INJURED I An official announcement issued last night stated:— An explosion has occurred to-day at a factory where the manufacture of explo- sives on a small scale for the Government had recently been commenced. The casualties are not numerous, present reports recording five killed and 15 in- jured.

BLOOD AND TREASURE

BLOOD AND TREASURE. $ The Faiiure of the German I i War Loan. Amsterdam. Friday.—Another enoour- agement of the fifth, German war loan is published in the Cologne Gazette," this time by Admiral von Trupped, the former Colonial Governor. He says: Let us show our two latest enemies, Italy and Rumania, that they only arouse in us new strength and determination, and that the German -nation, in order to gain final victory, now, as heretofore, is prepared to sacrifice blood and treasure on our least vulnerable enemy, our enemy with the silver bullets. Our financial victories in former war loans had an effect like a victory in the field." The new war loan, Admiral von i Turppel says, should be the Hindenburg 1 i loan, and be a proof of the national conii- dence in the new leaders, Hindenburg and II Ludendorff.

ICONTRACTS SCANDAL

CONTRACTS SCANDAL. IJury Asks Judge to Censure Contractors. I I At the Old Bailej an Thursday Lucien Wm. Asselinij (44) was found guilty and Alfred Wm Nash (58) not guilty on a charge of conspiring with others to ac- cept bribes to show favour to Messrs. Hindes, of Birmingha,m and London, tooth brush contractors to the Army. The men were employed as viewer and ins- pector respectively at the Royal Army Clothing Department at Pimlico. Mr. Vaeliali, acidi-eszing the jury on As- eeling's behalf, said if people chose to thi-ust tiieii- money upon Aseeling, think- ing they were going to get some benefit, there was n. offence, unless it could be proved defendant received money on con. dition he was to do something for it Counsel suggested it was Hindes who sought out Asseling and offered to give him a large commission. The jury, having returned their verdict handed a note to the Judge, and after glancing at it his Lordship remarked:— You wish to censure the conduct of Messrs. Hinder and Bromley. I do not think you are singular in that respect." Nash was discharged. Asseling and another man named Wil- liam Lewis then stood their trial together on another charge.

TRAGEDY OF GRIEF I

TRAGEDY OF GRIEF. I Heroic Colonel Dies By His I Own Hand. i A very distinguished soldier, who I thought leas of his own wounds than he did of the loss of his men." This was the comment of the West- minster Coroner on Thursday at the in- j quiry into the tragic death of Colonel i Edwin Thomas Falkner Sandys, who was found in bed at the Cavendish Hotel with a wound in his head and a revolver in his hand. Colonel Sandys, a single man, aged about 4.0. led his battalion into action in the offensive on July 1, and was wounded. He had been wounded five times, and had received the D.S.O. Captain Lloyd Jones, of the same regi- ment, said that on leaving hospital Col. Sandys was greatly depressed because his battalion had suffered severely. He had never threatened suicide, but had said he wished he had been killed with his men. Captain Lloyd Jones received a letter from Colonel Sandys on September 6, which said:— 1% I have come to London to-day to take my life. T have never had a moment's peace since July 1." On the same day Colonel Sandys wrote to Captain J. R. Young, who was with him in the attack on July 1: "By the time you receive thie I shall be dead." A verdict of suicide during temporary insanity was returned.

NORWEGIAN STEAMER LOST I

NORWEGIAN STEAMER LOST. I A Lloyd's telegram says that the Norwe- gian steamer Athel has been sunk.

CAPITAL PUNISHMENT I

CAPITAL PUNISHMENT. I I Bdsbane, Friday.—In the Queensland Legislative the Assembly Bill abolishing I capital punishment passed its second reading.

i sUSPECTED OF PLOTTING I

i sUSPECTED OF PLOTTING. I Madrid, Thursday.—The Spanish autho- rities have decided to intern Mulai Hafid in the Spanish zone. He is alleged to be plotting with foreign elements in [Morocco against the French, Protectorate.

ANOTHER TWO YEARSI

"ANOTHER TWO YEARS." I Kok?tad (Cape Province), Wednesday. —General Botha, who is touring the I native territories, declared in a speech here that South Africa's relations and influence with the Imperial Government were never better than at present. He paid a tribute to the British Navy, add- ing: "We must not be discouraged :f the war continues for another two years. Our duty is to see it through in order that Germany may be unable to prepare another and a greater war."—Reuter.

CRISP AUTUMN AIR

CRISP AUTUMN AIR. There was a tonic in the weather on Thursday. In the crisp, clear morning, men threw out thrnr chests, breathed deeply, and declared they had not felt so well for months. Autumn had come like a healer, the cool, sweet air freshening the streets as ar aromatic spray restores the vitiated atmosphere of a sick room. Such was tl e vitality inspired by the sharp air that men and women walked faster and generally showed increased energy. A day like this does more good than all the drugs in tlie clieriiist'.s shops." said a doctor. This is the sort of air that tones up the lungs, tunes up the' .heart, and invigorates, tit entire emsteml-" j

3 REFUSED I

3/- REFUSED. I RAILWAY COMPANIES' OFfER TO THEIR I MEØ. MORE ABOUT LOCAL WACES I Press Bureau, Thursday, 8.50 p.m.—It is understood that at the resumed meeting to-day between representatives of the rail- way companies and of the railway Trades Unions, the former offered an advance of 3e. a week, in addition to the 5s. bonus given in October, 1915, and that the ques- tion whether anything more should be given should be referred to arbitration, This offer has not been accepted by the representatives of the men. I LOCAL EARNINGS. We are still receiving letters from local raiiwaymen dealing with the figures we quoted from a Manchaster journal with regard to the alleged earnings of mn (>nl, the line. Thus G.I1.G." tells that speaking for myself I am a second class signalman, and with 18 years' service, in receipt ot I 32s. 6d., bonus included. What is this compared with the co6t of living to-day. THE OFFICIAL RATE. The Britonferry branch secretary sub- mits ue an ofticial rate list of the best paid men in the district:— Signalmen, 23s. to 3Ss. (" I don't think," he adds, there are half a dozen signalmen in receipt of the latter rate in this diotrict"); shunters, 23s. to 32s. per week; pass, guards, 23s. to 33s.; goods guards, 26s. to 34

I TRAfiWLOADS OF DEAD II

TRAfiWLOADS OF DEAD. Ghastly Consignments From j the Front to Germany. Amsterdam, Friday.—According to intel- ligence received by the "Telegraaf from the frontier, dated yesterday, neivs Jj&d. been received from the Belgian shit?, border that 13 long trains full of dead and wounded soldiers, passed through to Ger- many the previous night. Two long trains conveyed artillery of both heavy and light calibre which had been put out of action.

GREETINGS IN WElSH1

GREETINGS IN WElSH1 Lloyd George Warmly Wel- comed at the Front. Writing in the Daily Express," Mr. Percival Phillips says:— During the present lull on the British front several iistinguished visitors, among them Mr. LloíTd George and the Lord Chief Justice, havv visited the Somme battle- field. I met them yesterday within the old German line;, studying the ground over which our troops advanced during the first phase of the great battle on July 1. They climbed a liik and picked their way among the British shell craters behind the German fron trench to a point which gave them a.view of the country round Mametz Wood and Contalmaison. They lunched on ration bread and bully bef, sitting on the edge of a German communication trench (Mr. Lloyd George insisted on taring exactly the same as the soldiers around him), while British 'howitzers systematically shelled the enemy east of Ginchv and German shells fell occasionally within view, behind the new front. i The War Minister was warmly welcomed by the troop? wherever he was recognised. Greetings in Welsh came thick and fast at one place, and there were facetious ques- tions about munitions. "Keep on sending us shells," cried one man. "We can use all you give us." I'll se, to that," responded Mr. Lloyd George.

THE BELGIAN FRONTI

THE BELGIAN FRONT. I Le Havre, Thursday.—The Belgian communique of this evening reports that the day was quiet on the Belgian front.

I ATTITUDE OF RESERVE I

ATTITUDE OF RESERVE. I Athens. Thursday.—In a conference with Entente diplomatists. M. Dimitra- copoulie maintained aa,attitude of. re- j serve regarding any immediate change in Greece's policy. His ambition to join the Cabiiwt is opposed by party leaders.

LABOUR AND COMPULSION

LABOUR AND COMPULSION. Melbourne, Friday .—In the Common- wealth Howe of representatives several Labour inenbers strongly opposed con- scription, uhiie others declared they would placp the needs of their country before everything else. Every member of the Opposition supported the Govern- ment. The lebate was adjourned.

FOF ALLOTMENTS

FOF ALLOTMENTS. Garnilwyd Farm, Sketty, the property of the Swansea Corporation, falls vacant on the 29th and at their last meeting the Housing Committee decided to accept an offer of an annual tenancy at a rental of S50 from Mr. Chris Jones, of ineath- road, who inend-ed running it as a poultry j farm. On ?lursday, afternoon the Parks Committee met the Housing Committee and induced them to withdraw the resolu- tion and let the farm on the same terms to the Parks Committee, who require it for allotments.

BRITOBFERRY FATALITY

BRITOBFERRY FATALITY. Richard Jm, aged 53 years, residing at 16, Mor gai-road, Melyn, Neath, a mechanic's hbouror, employed at the steel works, Brifccnerry, fell from a gantry about 20 feel high on Thursday morning. He was takrn to the Swansea Hospital, suffering fran injuries to the head, and detained. liter he died. 0"

NORTH OF THE SOMME

NORTH OF THE SOMME fUTILE ATTEMPTS TO STEM THE FRENCH ADVANCE ENEMY TROOPS FROM VERDUN Paris, Thursday.—Writing to-night on 1 the military situation, the Expert French Commentator" says:—After the important successes gained on September 12 by the French troops operating north of the Somme, and the counter-attacks— as fruitless as th-ey were desperate—which the Germans made to stem our advance, fighting slackened down somewhat to-day. The enemy certainly tried again to drive back our right and centre in the area of attack, and Hill 76 in particular foi-inod, their objective during the night. To-day detailed actions, albeit of con- siderable severity, were fought on both the northern and southern edge of Boucha- vesnes, which constitutes the most ad- vanced point of the salient now formed by our line north of the river. So marked a salient is bound to be a valuable spot. The defenders are marked and can hardly line out at all, while the enemy, on the other hand, has plenty of room to deploy considerable forces all round. So the enemy counter-attacked our positions, but cur men have the habit of not yic-ld-ijil- ground won, and this time once again, thanks to their untiring energy, held it in its entirety. Meanwhile, our advance was extending and consolidating our left wing, which ran from Combles to Ran- court, and formed a right angle with our centre, which again stretches, from Ran- court to Bouehavesnes. POWERFUL INFANTRY DASH. Our infantry in a powerful dash carried Le Priez Farm, a legular bastion fitted up with machine-guns, situated between Combles and Rancourt on the edge of the road connecting these two places. Thus we are brinpip.g our positions in this sector round and gradually enclosing Combles more and more. ENEMY RUSH UP REINFORCEMENTS In order to ease their army north of the Somme the Germans attempted a diver- sion south of the river, and at Verdun. but all their assaults were repulsed, cost- ing them very considerable losses; as, for example, in the case of a company which was completely decimated by our fire. Lastly, it is confirmed that the German counter-attaeks on September 13 were car- ried out by a division hurriedly brought up from the Verdun front. This shows the part played by the present battle in the general economy of the fighting. The Germans are reduced to the defensive everywhere, even on the Meuse, and proof I of it is found on the Somme.

VICTORY ASSURED I

VICTORY ASSURED. I ,o-p;e- M.B; sand's Trifttife to Armies of the Allies. Paris. Thursdav.—M. Briend, Premier and Minister of Foreign Affairs, in his speech to the Chamber and Senate to-day, said:— The developments of the war in the different theatres of operations show th:,t the Allies have from now henceforward gained an ascendency over the enemy which the sustained coordination of their efforts only serves to accentuate. The war has now reached n point and has afforded results which allow us to face the future with absolute conifdence. The brilliant victories of the glorious Russian i and Italian armies, those of the magnifi- cent British and French soldiers who are fighting on our front, justify us in all our expectations. The hour of reparation is approaching alike for the individuals as for the peoples on whom have fallen the blows of Germanic aggression. « Iprt us coldly face facts. The enemy is still powerful. He will defend himself with desperation and to the bitter end. He can and will succumb only to repeated blows. Nothing, therefore, should be omitted, and to keep on the right path we ought to redouble our efforts, apply our- selves more than ever to bring into pIny all the resources of the country, and to furnish all the means of victory to our armies. This work demands all our energy. The task whic'h remains to be accom- plished is a rough one, but, heavy as it may be, we shall be able to accomplish it; by our united efforts and by the aid of all the good will in which France is so rich." -Exchange.

I I I I I TEACHERS SALARIES

■ I I ■ ■ ■ I! TEACHERS' SALARIES. The Remuneration of Supple- mentary Assistants. An interesting oitcussion in regard to supplementary teachers iook place at a meeting of the Carmarthenshire Educa- tion Committee at Carmarthen on Thurs- day, over a motion of Mr. W. J. Wil- liams (Brynamman) that all supple- mentary teachers who have been engaged as pupil teachers, or have served under a School Board, or have attended a county school for one year, are to have their salaries increased by £5 per a.nnum." Mr. Gwilym Vaughan (Fryi^ nman) seconded, and Lieut.-General Sir James Hills-Jolmes. V.C.. G.C.B.. and Mr. i Mervyn Peel strongly supported. Mr. W. B. Jones (Llanelly) taid that some of the supplementary teachers en- gaged by that committee had had no training at all in the teaching of child. ren; some of them had been dressmakers and servants and such like, and very many of them were not able to write a correct sentence. The object of Mr. Wil- liams was to differentiate between those and supplementary teachers who had either been pupil teachers or in a county school, whose value compared with the others was much more than a:5 per annum. Mr. E. B. Lloyd (Bwlchnewydd): Why should we keep those unqualified teachers? It would be better to dismiss them, and then +r{'at all the supple- mentary teachers alike. Mr. R. II. Jones (Llangendeirne), said it was not prudent on the part of Mr. W. B. Jones to accuse the committee of having engaged teachers who were not able to write correctly. Mr. W. B. Jones-eaid. he did accuse the committee. -i i Mr. W. N. Jones (Ammanford) said the motion was one of the most reason- able brought before the committee for Bome time. Were it not: for the war he thought the supplementary ■ teachers ought to get a bigger increase. Rev. E. B. Lloyd withdrew an amend- ment that all supplemental-, teachers 1 < should be put on the same basis,.Mr. I < .Vtdlliams' motion was carried.

TODAYS WAR RESUMEJ

!TO-DAY'S WAR RESUME J Leader Office, 4.50 P.M. I The Bulgars are in retreat. Their chief and dominating position has been cap- tured by the Serbians, who have also captured 420 prisoners. Considerable ground has been gained in the Balloans by the British. They have taken a salient in the enemy's lines to the north of Machukovo, as well aa some prisoners and machine-guns. Opposite Comblee the French have ex- tended their positions. They have main- tained all their gains. The enemy has been rushing up reinforcements.

THE FALL OF KAVALAI

THE FALL OF KAVALA. I How Enemy Occupation Was 1 Brought About. Paris, Friday—A telegram from Athene states that newspapers there publish the following details of the occupation of Kavala and the capture of a part of the garrison by Bulgarians. On Sunday Ger- man and Bulgarian officers demanded the surrender of the town and the with- drawal of the Greek Army within 24 hours. The authorities and deputies for Kavala conferred and decided to transfer the Greek Army to Tliasos, but Gefleral Hassopoulos opposed this plan, and pro- posed to surrender the Greek Army to the Bulgarians. Col. Christodoulos re- fused to take such a step, and followed by 2,000 men, he asked the French ad- miral stationed at Thasos to send ships to transport his troops thither. In spitu of all the efforts of General Hassopoulos, 1,500 officers and men under the com- mand of Col. Christodoulos, left with other refugees. A telegram from Salonika received on Thursday recording the same events as reported above, makes it clear that Conn: Von Bothtiier's resistance is not succeed- ing in checking the Russian advance, and the ring which is partly surrounding the enemy's armies in the region of Halicz is hourly growing tighter, and more and more threatening for the de- fenders of the town.

WELSH MAN HUNTI

WELSH MAN HUNT. I German Prisoner Escapes in Breconshire. A German prisoner of war escaped from a Brcconshire camp at 1.30 on Thursday afternoon. A description of the man. a private in the German Army, was promptly issued kir. follows:— Name, Lcuckei; No. 2319; 23 years ol age; utt. Sin. in height; slight build; fair hair; pale compi.exion; dressed m I German ui!itoi-lu-grey coat and trousers, round grey cap, and tiluclier I boots, iour vaccination, marks on each arm. I He is believed to have made off in the direction of Grnelavr, and may reach ilay, Talgarth, or Brecon. Upon receipt ol this information the Chier Constable of Lnrconsiure (the Ron. iioic-llutliven) immediately motored down .to Luckhovveil, taking witn ililu two police blooduounds. There was a hot pursuit, and within a t-w Lours the fugitive was captured. Following his escape he climbed the Black Mountain anil descended on the Brb:unsillr ['lain. fie got on to the railway line between Talgarth and 'l'l1ree1 Cocks, where a gang of piatciayer? wcrf at work. Here he exchange a coat, which had been deposited on the gruund by a platelayer, leaving his grey military tunic behind. The platelayer shortly Afterwards noticed the exchange, and went to he police station at Talgarth and reported the matter. In the meantime the fugi- tive returned to the spot where he ex- changed coats for the purpose apparently of removing documents dnd postcanis from his own. The platelayers promptly I secured him and, conveyed him to the police station, where he was detained pending the arrival of a.military escort. The fugitive had made a direct route over cliSicult Welsh mountain country to the railway line, a distance of from eight to ten miles, in a little over two I hours. He escaped at about 1.30 and was l arrested at 3.15.

BLOCK COLLECTINGI

BLOCK COLLECTING. I Great Meeting of Insurance Agents. A deputation of the National Union of Insurance Agents met the Executive Committee of the Swansea Labour As- sociation at the Elysium Hall on Thurs- day to discuss the much vexed system of. block collecting recently introduced by some of the larger Industrial Assur- ance Companies. Mr. George Hallett prcáded. I Mr. Tom Thomas, organiser for South Wales, spoke at some length on the I pernicious system of block collecting and the introduction of women agents. He knew of one agent who was collecting( a debit of £ 22 10s. per week, and over £11 of monthly premiums and doing his clerical work on Sundays; for all this work he was only in receipt of 37s. per week. The officials tried to persuade this agent to accept another transfer to the value <,f t, 10s. He refused to accept the added responsibility on the **3»c,und that he could not do justice to the debit he had already to collect. Mr. Thomas described this new method of collecting as a vile system of sweating, and ap- pealed for the support of all trade unionists with a view to the putting down of ths new. system, which meant a big red uction in the earnings of the in- surance agents. Mr. H. Helbourne gave f.ome interest- ing figures c-howing what the agents lost and what the companies gained by the adoption of its new system. Mr. George Thomas also spoke. At the end several questions were asked and answered.

NEWS IN BRIEFI

NEWS IN BRIEF. I Barton Fair, held annually in Glouces- ter, has this year been prohibited. In putting a lighted candle on the floor to fcare beetles, Mm. Wesi, River-road. Holloway, set fire to her clothing and died from burns. Owing to the Guildhall not being avail- able for a sufficient time, another place will have to be found for the exhibition in the City of the remains of the wrecked Genua nairship. Cbarfred with having made false state- ments at a Hull hotel, Lillian Setterfield. a youn, woman, was sent to prieon for aix mODtb (her ?eco ? conviction), and a Greek seaman to tt moi ths. Kirkintilloch. Dumbartonshire, tribunal gave a moulder, two months' ex- emption, sayc the Glasgow Herald," in [)rdel' that he might be exchanged for his father,, who is on home service.

Advertising

GREAT DAY FOR THE FRENCH. Trenches Carried by Assault. Fighting on the Eastern Front. FRENCH OFFICIAL. Issued in Parie on Friday aftpra^n: — To the notih of tllil Sontmc ye?-'errt-iy. at the close (If th41 ehrftning in tc course an attack. our troops carried by assault a croup 1) .German trenches to the south of Ran., court., and pushed m '¡" as the outskirts of this village. During the night the Germans renewed their at* 1 aeks in the region oJ èlery. All of their ;¡ttemph sanguinarily- r"r"Jjid, n?taMy toward? th? southern • of Crest "6, wbere tKe enemy siK-.taincx-J heavy losses. To the south of th" IOQS, To the,ofh •. easily repulsed .a grenade att.u-K, to 1 h, north-east of Bolloy-«n-Sa-uterrc. Ec- tween the Oise and tHe Aisne a. surprise attack on an nemrncJi in the region of the Aisne a' surprise attack on an mercy trench in the region of Angrechy, enabled us to inflict some loss on the Germans'and bring back some prisoners. Un the right 'bank'of'the Jleuse. the enemy on two-occa-sions attempted to attack our line fo the west of thtvVa-ux. r* Foj t road. Out machine-gun. fire each time drove the Gerliians back t.o their barring centres. Everywhere.else on the rant the night was calm.  F rom, t he -Striima. to Army in the Ea?.—Trom the Struma to Lake Doiran the. cannonade .continues' rather violently on fhoth sides in the region of Mount Boles. On tie leit bank the Vapdar th3 l  r,- "i the Va.dar thaBritiBh troops engaged the Bulgarians,who; were- supported by contingents of ^jGrerman infantry, in a violent combdt,.wblich terminated to the advantage of the for-rati. iXakukovo was carried by assault, as well as two points to the north a this locality, of whioji the British hare, solidly established -c themselves. Otte hundred prisoners and 1 omacliino-gtns remain in our hands. On the riiki bonk of the Vardar rrcnch 'f"; troops capturi^.theeneoiy's trendies on a front of About 1,5>00 metres and shout 300 metres depth. To the east. of Ccrna the Serbians c<%tinue their progress to- wards Vetrenik and Kogmeckalan. To the west- of Loke Orsovo the struggle which has been engaged in for some dayp past between tle Serbian army and important Bulgarian forces has resulted in a. very brilliant s access for our Allies. Gorniceva was carried with the bayonet, as well as the greater part of the Malkanibze crest. The Serbian cavalry arc pursuing the routed Bulgarians and taken possession of the village of tkisu. tlim obliging the enemy to make a retreat lo more than 15 kilometres. In the course of the engagement the Serbians captured 25 cannon and p, large number of pri- soners, the total of which is not yet known. On our left wing the "Franco- Russian forces hare completely got rid of the Bulgarian conif.adji, who had, advanced as far as the vicinity of Koya-na to the whol e of region isouth of Lake Ofctroro," a distance of 60 kilo- mctrps. Four of our aerop?an?s dropped numerous, projectiles on Sofia. One of the machines, continuing its fligbt; alighted at Bucharest." m'l' SCEBTIS-G. 3.0—Knutsfprd 1, ftojau 2, Brown Prince 3.—Six ran. 9 to S 00 KntitefoTd. 3.30-Golden Staid 1, CAmherley 2. Poig. nant 3.—. Me. 9 to 1 winner.