Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 6 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
6 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

AMUSEMENTS. T 0 M t G H T The Production Exquisite! Harry M. Vernon (Creator of Mr. Wu w) presents the Musical Burlesque, JINClE BELLS, All-Star London Company,, including SYDNEY DE VRIES, Johnnie Fields, Bernard Dudley, Hugh Robinson, Cherry Hardy, Gerald Valentine, JEAN ALLI- STONE. Perfection Chorus. Smartest in the Land. Staged Gus Sohlke. Latest News and War Films. RAY WALLACE, Mimic-Away from the Piano. TUCKER, the Singing Violinist. SYMONDS v. RUUDMCK, Sep. 30 at 3 p.m. GRAND THEATRE SWANSEA. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 18th, 1916, Six Nights at 7.30, and MATINEE SATURDAY at 2.30 p.m. Herbert Jay and Anthony Ellis present the ¡ Celebrated Farce, entitled- A LITTLE BIT OF FLUFF. Preceded by Miss Jane Smith in her Monologue, YES, PAPA." Next Week.-MYLADY FRA YLE. THE PICTURE HOUSE. High itrnt. ( Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Clara Kimball Young in THE DEEP PURPLE. The Surprises of an Empty House, l Three-Part Vitagraph with a Star Cast. Startling Happenings in an Old Hotel. William Collier in Better Late Than Never, A Triangle-Keystone in Two Parts. Next Week- WHAT'S BRED IN THE BONE. CASTLE CINEMA (Adjoining "Leader" Office). Thurs., Fri. and Sat., 2.30 to 10.30. TO HAVE AND TO HOLD. A Thrilling Historical Romance in Four Parts. A Glance Backwards into the days when I I g men and brave women fought for the right of existence. Better Late Than Never. ¡ A Triangle-Keystone Comedy in Two Parts Monday Next- Miss BILLIE BERKE in PEGGY," The First Triangle Drama (exclusive to this Theatre). CARLTON CINEMA DE LUXE, Oxford Street, Swansea. OPEN DAILY from 2.30 till 10.31- A Thrilling Vitagraph Blue Ribbon Drama THE MAKING OVER OF GEOFFREY MANNING. Here is an Idle Son of the Rich who Proved Himself a Real Man. Pearl White in TH E PER i LS OF PAULI ME, No. 7, The Poisoned Chocolate." Monday Next- PEARL WHITE in "HAZEL KIRKE." ELYSIUM, High Street, Swansea. Thursday, Friday and Saday. A Thrilling Drama by the Nordisk Co., in Three Acts, ROOM 17, Series 1.—The Much Discussed Film, CABINET MINISTERS. Episode 2-The Great Trans-Atlantic Circus Serial, PEG 0' THE RING. In addition to usual All-Star Programme. Monday Next-Series 2 Cabinet Ministers ROYAL THEATRE, Wind Street. .Continuous Performance Daily, 2.30 till 11. Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Pauline Frederick in LYDIA GILMORE, I & Falnous Players Exclusive in Five Reels I and Full Programme. Monday- Marguerite Clark in Mice and Men." FOR SALE, Convenient for Trams and Stations: Jitandingr well up and Commanding Exten- sive Views of Swansea Bay. FREEHOLD RESIDENCE, BRYN MILL-CRESCENT, with possession. GORSEI NON. WELL- EQUIPPED LAUNDRY. Modern Plant, Gas. and Electricity; thriving I district, with scope for development; work- ing concern: possession. i i WEST END OF SWANSEA. DETACHED FREEHOLD RESIDENCE. Grounds extending to nearly three-quarters of an aero; south aspect; convenient for town; early possession. ■ — —— rJ10 LET, Lock-up Shop, Walters-road; X25-. X electric light. 1.=K-UP Shop. Uplands: low rent? Shop. Uplands: low rent. «, FOR PARTICULARS APPLY- John M. Leeder and Son, 'AUCTIONEERS AND SURVEYORS, SWANSEA. Tel.: Central 929. SAILINGS. CUNARD LINE to « UNJTED STATES AND CANADA. Connecting with the Canadian Northern Railway Syctem. "•DIRECT PA^SEIvUER AND FREIGBT SERVICES BRISTOL TO CANADA. Summer Service to Montreal. Connecting with Canadian Northern Rail- way System. "FELTRIA .Saturday, Oct. 30 iFOUA Tuesday, Oct. 3 Sailiue: from Avonmouth Dock. tCabin Passengers (XIO) and Cargo. "To Montreal. tTo Halifax. N.S., and Now York". ■*u LONDON TO CANADA. Summer Service to Montreal. [•tANDANJA Saturday. Oct. 'I ?'PA?ONIA .?.Saturday, Oct. 28 "Cabin (£10) and Third Class ( £ 15s.) Passengers. tAccommodation for refrigemtor cargo. Apply Cunard Line, Liverpool; 51, Bisiiops- «ate. London. E C.; 65. Baldwintreot. Bristol; 18a, Hish-street Cardiff; 141, Cor- jgpaation-strect. Birminjglwja- A SALES BY AUCTION. GARXLWYD FARM, TOWN HILL, SWANSEA. Messrs. James and James F.A.I., ARE instructed by Mr. Meakin, who is leaving tho neighbourhood, to SELL BY PUBLIC AUCTION, on the Farm, as above, on SATURDAY AFTERNOON, SEPTEMBER 23rd, 1916, the following Valuable Horses, Cattle, CROPS. IMPLEMENTS, ETC., viz.: 3 HORSES.—Bay Collier Gelding a Charlie," 14.1 h.h., 4 years old, a pro- mising animal and sound; Bay Mare a Dolly," 15 h.h., 8 years old, a splendid worker, and would make a good vanner; Chestnut. Roadster HorsD, 15.8 h.h., 9 years old, good worker in all gear. CATTLE.—Two young Fresh Galvers. PIGS.—Eight Splendid Weaners, 10 weeks old. POULTRY.—180 Splendid Fowls, in pens to suit purchasers. (Of a good lay- ing strain). HAY AND ROOT CROPS. HAY.—T wo Ricks of Meadow Hay, and one of Clover ditto. Corn.—40 Mows of Oats, and Two Cocks of Rakings. ROOTS.-40 Rows of Swedes, 20 Rows of Potatoes, about Four Tons of Beetroot. 1 Five Rows of Carrots, a quantity of Cab- bage and White Turnips. IMPLEMENTS AND HARNESS, ETC. Sale to Commence promptly at 2 p.m. Terms—Cash. Auctioneers' Offices: 7. Goat-street, Swansea. Telephone; 172 Docks. BRYNRHOS FIELDS, Near the Old Inn, PENLLERGAER. SALE OF HAY AND CORN CROPS. Messrs. James and James, F.A.I., ARE favoured with instructions from — Mrs. Harries (late of Brynrhos! Farm), to SELL by AUCTION, on the Fields al above, on MONDAY AFTER- NOON, SEPTEMBER 25th, 1916, the fol- lowing Valuable Hay and Corn Crops, viz.: HA. Y.-2 Ricks of Clover Hay, about 18 Tons. CORN.—35 Sale Mows of Black Tar- tarian Oats. Sale to commence at 4 o'clock p.m. Credit on Conditions. Auctioneers' Office6-7, Goat street, Swansea. Telephone 172 Docks. PENLAN FARM, DUNVANT, near SWANSEA. (Distant 3 minutee walk from Dunvant Railway Station, and 2 miles from the Tram Terminus at Sketty).. Messrs. James and James, F.A.I., ARE favoured with instructions from Messrs. Jones Brothers, who are giv- ing up Farming, to SELL by AUCTION, at the Farm, as above, on TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26th, 1916, the whole of their Valuable Live Stock, CROPS AND IMPLEMENTS, etc., viz.: CATTLE.—6 Dairy Cows (3 with Calves at their heels); 6 Storers-Red and White Cross-bred Yearling Heifer, a very hand- some Roan Steer, 3 Red Stetsr Calves, and 1 Roan Heifer do.; 1 Bull. HORSES.—Handsome large-sized Bay Shire Mare, 16.1 h.h., 7 years old, with massive bone and plenty of feather, war- ranted good in all gat; do. Bay Collier do. of fine quality, 15 h.h., 9 years old, warranted good in all gear, and served by General Buller"; a beautiful thick- set Bay Cob, 13.1 h.h., coming 4 years old, quiet in all gear; Handsome Bay Suckling Filly, by General Buller." 84 SHEEP.-50 Ewes, 2 Rams, 20 Ewe i Lambs, 12 Ram Lambs. 100 HEAD OF POULTRY, comprising 1915 Chicks of the following noted breeds: White Leghorns, Speckled Sussex, Rhode Island Heels, etc CROPS.—Hay—3 Bays in hay-house, about 20 tons, splendid harvested. Oate— 15 Mows of Black Tartarian Oats. Roots -5 Acres of Grand Swedes and Yellow Turnips, 2 Acres of Mangolds, and ii Acres of Potatoes. IMPLEMENTS AND HARNESS. Luncheon on the Table at 12 Noon. Sale at 1 o'clock promptly. Terms: Six months' credit on 6ums ex- ceeding k5, or the usual Discount for Cash. I Auctioneers' Offices-7, Goat street, Swansea. Telephone 172 Docks. SWANSEA and SKETTY. Sale of Properties situate in good Class Localities, well let and affording an excellent opportunity of Securing Pro- fitable Investments. Mr. J. Barron Pascee F.S.I., F.A.I., HAS received instructions to SELL by AA PUBLIC AUCTION, at the HOTEL CAMERON, on TUESDAY, the 26th day of SEPTEMBER, 1916, at 3 o'clock p.m. prompt, in Four Lots (subject to Con- ditions of Sale to be then and there pro- duced), the following Valuable Leasehold Dwelling-houses, Lot I.-All that Very Desirable Lease- hold Dwelling-house, Garden and Pre- mises, situate and being No. 4, BROOK- LANDS-TERRACE, SWANSEA, in the occupation of Mr. W. Coutts. at the rental of 02 per annum. The accommo- dation comprises: 3 Reception-rooms, 6 Bedrooms, Dressing-room, Bathroom, w.c., Kitchen, Scullery, Good Cellar, and the usual Domestic Offices. The property is, held under an Underlease from the 23rd March, 1887, for the term of 861 years, at the Annual Ground Rent of £4 6s. 2d. Lot 2.-AU that Well-built Leasehold Dwelling-house, Shop and Premises, situ- ate and being No. 6, TRAFALGAR- PLACE. BRYNMILL, SWANSEA, in the occupation of Mr. H. Jenkins, at the weekly rental'of 12-3. 6d., Landlord paying Rates and Taxes. The accommodation comprises: Shop, Sitting-room, Kitchen, Scullery, Bathroom, w.c., 3 Bedrooms. The property is held under a Lease from the 24th May, 1893, for a term of 99 years, at an Annual Rent of S3 8s. Lot 3.—All that Conveniently-situated Leasehold Dwelling-house and Premises situate and being No. 6, FFYNO- STREET, SWANSEA, in the occupation of Mr. S. Smith, at the weekly rental of 9s., Tenant paying Rates and Taxes. The accommodation comprises: Parlour, Kit- i chen, Scullery, Bathroom, 3 Bedrooms, The property is held under an U nderleasa from the 25th March, 1858, for a term of) 99 years (lees three days) at an Annual Ground Rent of £1 15s. Lot 4.—All that Very Desirable Semi- Detached Long Leasehold Dwelling-house, Garden and Premises, situate and being known as a HOLMEWOOD," GOWER- ROAD, PENYRHEOL, SKETTY, in the occupation of Mr. W. Thomas, at the weekly rent of 12s., Landlord paying Rates and Taxes. The accommodation com- prises: Sitting-room, Kitchen, Scullery, Bathroom, w.c., 3 Bedrooms. The house stands back off the main road from Swan- sea to Gower, and has a large Garden at rear. Held for a term of 999 years from the 29th September, 1911, at an Annual Ground Rent of 1;3. Further particulars may be obtained as to Lots 1 and 4 of Messrs. T. W. James and Co., Solicitors, 24, Goat-street, Swan- sea Lot 2, of Messrs. Adler and Perowne, Solicitors, 46-47, London Wall, London, E.C.; Lot 3, of Mr. W. A. Davies, Solicitor, Rutland-street, Swansea; and with Orders to View of Mr. J. Barron Pascoe, 6. Col- lege-street. Swansea. SALES BY AUCTION. TALARDD FARM, LLANDILO (Within 10 minutes' walk of Ffairfach and Llandilo Bridge Stations, on the G.W. and N.W. Railways). Exceptionally, Important and Extensive Clear-out Sale of 63 Head of Shorthorn Cattle, 8 well set Horses, 82 Shropshire Breeding Ewes and Rams, 6 Pigs, Modern Implements, Hay, etc. MESSRS. William and Walter James, F.A.I., HAVE been favoured with instructions from Mr. John James (who is retir- ing from Farming), to SELL by PUBLIC AUCTION, on the premises, as above, on WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th, 1916, the whole of his Valuable Live Stock, HAY, CROP, IMPLEMENTS, DAIRY UTENSILS AND HARNESS, etc.: 20 DAIRY COWS, and COWS and CALVES. 8 Grand Shorthorn HEIFERS, all of excellent colour, with Calves at heel. BULL.—Dark Red Yearling Shorthorn Bull, out of a Pedigree Milching Strain. FAT COW. 8 Two-year-old Fat Shorthorn STEERS. 16 YEARLINGS.—12 handsome and ex- ceptionally well-bred Yearling Shorthorn Heifers, all of good colour, with a Pedi-I gree Shorthorn Bull running with them; 4 Yearling Steers do., fit for the butcher.! 17 CALVES.-9 Shorthorn Heifer Calves and 8 do. Steer do., all of good colour. 8 HORSES. 82 SHEEP.—49 Cross-bred Shropshire I and Southdown Breeding Ewes, 25 fat j Lambs, 2 Yearling Rams, 6 Ram Lambs. 6 PIGS. IMPLEMENTS, HARNESS, DAIRY UTENSILS, etc. About 20 Tons of FIRST-CLASS HAY I offred in suitable lots. Luncheon at 11 o'clock. Sale to commence at 12.30 o'clock sharp. The Sale will start with the Hay Crop. Terms: Six Months' Credit for sums over S5, or a Discount of 5 per cent. per annum jfor Cash. Auctioneers' Offices: Llangadock, Llan- dilo, Llandovery and Swansea, Aug. 17th, 1916. CARMARTHENSBIRE. PARK AND BLAINA COLLIERIES, PANTYFFYNNON. (Close to Pantyffynnon Station, G.W.R.) j SALE OF VALUABLE SURPLUS COLLIERY PLANT. Mr. W. N. Jones TTAS received instructions from Messrs. I The Blaina Colliery, Company, Ltd. to offer for SALE by PUBLIC AUCTION, | on the Premises, on WEDNESDAY, SEP-' TEMBER 27th, 1916, the whole of their Surplus Plant, Machinery, etc., j Comprising Winding Engine, Air Com- pressor. Boilers, Drums, Haulage Engines, Vertical Engines, Gear Wheels, Coal, Cutter, Thin and Mixed Scrap, Washing Plant, Screens, Kibbler, Pit Cage Fangs, etc., etc. On View One Week Prior to Sale. Said to commence at 2 o'clock p.m. prom p t Catalogues can be had from the Auo- tioneer, Ammanford. August 28th, 1916. ROSTREVOR," 32, CASTLETON. MUMBLES. Mr. Arthur S. T. Lucas HAS been instructed by Madam Mitchell,. who is giving up House- keeping, to SELL by PUBLIC AUCTION at the above Itesidence on TUESDAY, the 26th of SEPTEMBER, 1916, a Quan- tity of Good Class Household Furniture, AND EFFECTS. Together with Pictures, Ornaments, China and Glass Goods, full details of the same appearing on the Auction Posters. Goods on view en the day prior to the Sale from 2 to 6 p.m. Sale commencing at 11.30 a.m. sharp. Terms: Cash. No Reserve. For Particulars apply to Arthur S. T. Lucas, Auctioneer and Valuer, 6, Rut- land-Street, Swansea, and at Mumbles. Tel.: Central 230. Estd. 1885. Pllnts Trade Marks and Designs Registered) No. 1,609. PUBLIC NOTICES. LEWIS ROBERTS (Deceased). ALL Pereons having any Claims or De- — mands against the Estate of LEWIS ROBERTS, late of CLOTH: HALL, YSTRADGYNLAIS, in the County of Brecon, Hairdresser, who died j on the 1st day of April, 1915, are hereby; required to send the particulars thereof i in writing to me, the undersigned, before the 9th day of OCTOBER, 1916. J. R. EVANS, (Administrator), Cloth Hall, Yetradgynlais. Rhyddings Congregational Church, Finsbury Terrace. SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 24th, 1916. HARVEST Thanksgiving Services Preachers.—11 a.m., Rev. D. EUROF WALTERS, M.A., B.D. (Swansea). 6.30 pan., Rev. J. T. RHYS (Pastor). SPECIAL HYMNS. I Gifts of Flowers, Fruit, Vegetables, etc., will be gratefully received between 5 and 7 o'clock on the previous Saturday eiening at the Church. As the whole of such gifts will be given to the Park Wern Military, Hospital, the Church earnestly appeals to the public for generous contributions. EBENEZER CHAPEL, Dunvant. FIRST Annual Chair EISTEDDFOD SATURDAY, SEPT. 30th, 1916. Adjudicatore.-Music, Messrs. Turner Thomas and Ivor Owen (Swansea). Literature, Wm. Guy, Esq., Penclawdd. Children's Choir (not under 30), "I Sing Because I Love to Sing (Pinsuti), Z4 4s. and a Gold Medal value £1 Is. Solos, Recitations, etc., 10s. 6d. Fretwork, Knitting, etc. See Programmes, by post Id. Hon. Seœ¡ W. Davies, D. Da vies, Penybryn, DL??ani: N?.—Closing date entries—Literature, Sept. 20th; Music, Sept. 28th. DON'T FORGET HERMON EISTEDDFOD at TRINITY, PENCLAWDD, NEXT SATURDAY, SEPT. 23rd, 1916. Chief Items- Chief Choral—(not under 30 in number); Opc Competition: Mixed Male or Ladies' Choir. Any Chorus or Anthem, Prize L5 and Silver Cup, value Ll 10s. Ohildrens 'Choir. "'The Stream the Flower" (Tom Price. Merthyr); Prize. 12 and Photo of Successful Conductor, value 10s. 6d. Champion Solo. El Is., etc. Passengers can return by the 10.20 p.m. train, Penclawdd to Swansea. stopping at ali, Stations. Sun Rises 6.48, Sun Sets 6.58. Lighting-up Time, 7.28. Subdue Lights visible from the sea at 7.28. Subdue other Lights at 8.58. High Water To-day, 2.51 a.m., 3.27 p.m. King's Dbck^30ft» 4in. a.m., 31ft. 5in. p.m. To-morrow, 4J- a.m., 4.30 p.m.

IN THE DOBRUDJA I

IN THE DOBRUDJA. A message from Bucharest re- ceived by us this morning suggests that Mackensen's successes in the Dobrudja are not only ovei, but that the Humanians have beei able to turn the tide of defeat. Ealier news was to the effect that the counter- offensive of the Russians and Iluma-nians had been completely effective. It is admitted by the Bulgarians that our Alliis retain their strongly fortified psition," while the Germans declarethat the fighting has come to a sandstill. The sort of standstill tie fight- ing has come to we can se by to- day's message. On Wednesay Ger- mans, Bulgarians, and Tuks were defeated, and they are reprted to be retreating southwards. The ex- tent of the defeat is not rvealed; let us hope that it is very subtantial, for with the coming of wintr—and snow has already f allen- ime iS all important.. The British and French ommu- niques indicate that, followng the great advance of Friday lat, and the beating off of the countemttack —which was on a big scale, md, it is said, entirely reminiscentof the historic days around Douamont.. Vaux, and Mort Homm—the armies of the Allies need to onsoli date their new positions. Rsn has interfered with operations agin, to what extent these may guee who are aware of the amazingl fine work done by our observatio bal- loons in directing the fire of te big guns. Sir Douglas Haig speks of an advance somewhere soih of the Ancre," after the splendl re- sistance made by the New ZaJand troops to the counter-attacks The German Staff report speas of fighting near Flere, west r, Les, boeufs, and north of Gambles.' The descjdption is a little vague,,ut it shows that the British hav im- proved on Friday's gains. We expressed the opinion yster- day that the King of Greece i still playing for safety. That vif is confirmed by all that has sinceeen allowed to come out of Greec< A dispatch to the Times uich has escaped the Greek censahip deals with the report, allowe to escape from a mysterious but aiho- ritative source, to the effect hat. the Government have notifiedthe British and French Governmits, through their representatives in London and Paris, of their inteiion to nght Bulgaria.' Simultaildoily, in order to suit the ideas of bse who are still under the infiince of the Streit-Gounaris-Dousmiis clique, an equally "reliable rept," from an equally authoritive source, has been allowed to eape to the effect that Greece cannotos- sibly intervene for two months-by which time, it is fondly believed;he Germans will have destroyed u- mania, and will have a sufficnt force in the Da-rdanelles to reier Greece's intervention impossibl Mr. Winston Churchill, whiis one of the problems of mocn statesmanship, is turning his atn- tion these days to an old 1000rof his-journalistic work. He is 100- view, month by month for ie "London Magazine," the coursof the war by land and sea, and ifie first of the series is to be the sl1- dard, we shall have at least one;- curate guide to the larger tendents of the war. There is a well-knoi hymn which bids us Count t: Blessings "—good philosophy us in the present day, when we i inclined to think impatiently of t slowness with which victory is coi ing to our arms. Mr. Churchill i vites us to look at the valley of mi fortune out of which we ha emerged into the day of hope. We have seen, he tedls us, th failure of the French offensive o 1915 in Artois and Champagne, ou own. unsuccessful efforts in tha year to pierce the enemy's lines ib the west; we have suffered th&,o grave shortage of munitions; WE] have seen the Russians stripped ot their conquests in East Prussia and, Galicia, driven from the whole War-i saw strategic front, and all Poland overrun by the enemy. We have seen the miscarriage of our enter- prise at Gallipoli, the utter collapse of the Balkan situation, the treason of the Bulgarian King, the destruc- tion of Serbia, the conquest of Mon- tenegro and Albania, the temporary alienation of Greece, the check in Mesopotamia. Never in the his- tory of war has a more formidable series of misfortunes fallen upon a confederacy without being fatal in its unity and success. It is only now, when we are out of the valley that we can see how dark it was there. It is only com- paratively recently that we have realised how tragic an affair Loos was. The moral should be remem- bered. It is to take long views and steady views, to be neither too elated over what looks like a sweep- ing triumph of a day, nor depressed over the misfortune of the hour. The British and French Armies have done great things since July. The German line in the West has been loosened and the enemy greatly embarrassed. But he is not defeated. French and English have attacked and captured in suc- cession t^ ree great defended lines of works upon which the whole energies of the German people hav ft been expended for nearly two years. As one military writer says, we have hacked our way through and have beaten in succession more than 50 of the best German divi- sions, including Guards, Saxons, Bavarians, Brandenburgers, Wurt- emburgers, and all the other tribes. Not a single one of the positions which we have taken has been re- taken by all the accumulated strength of the exclusively German Armies arrayed against us Until we have them on the march in the West, however, until we have recovered the ground they hold j in France and Belgium, until they are out of Poland, and smashed in the Balkans, it would be folly to i write of them as a defeated nation. In all probability the war could be ended to-morrow. Germ-any has had enough, and would be glad to negotiate peace terms. But what terms! Such a peace as we might secure now would be, in the elo- quent. words of M. Briand, a war peace, and generations to come would be the prey of unimaginable anguish, constantly threatened bv the vision of Germany again deal- ing the wicked blow which on this occasion has failed." And he added that such a peace would be an insult and, an outrage to the memory of those who had fallen. They gave their lives for the sake of the gener- ations to come. and in dvinsr thav 1 -oJ --0 have bequeathed that inviolable trust to the living. We also are bound by solemn words to pursue the war to victory. And victory is not yet ours, although its dawn has come. The wail of the Hungarians for troops for the Transylvania is be- ing attended to, and a concentration of troops is proceeding with great vigour. The problem is where these troops were brought from, and which is the line that had been weakened so much that a new front of over 250 miles could have been established ? Judging from the events on the northern front, a writer in Budapest thinks that the units withdrawn have come partly from the Zlota Lipa region. This supposition is confirmed by the re- ports that the Russians, having learned of the weakening of the front there, delivered successful at- tacks and pressed the line back a, considerable distance. Other units have come, no doubt, from the Italian front, and even from the Volhynia sector, as letters written to these units have all been re- turned in other cases it was pub- i Eshed that certain field post offices have ceased to accept correspond- ence for the Russian front for the present. At any rate, it is clear that the impatient entreaties of the Hungarians for troops ior Transyl- vania have been at last heard, and great forces are already there or ou the way to take up the battle with the Rumanian invading armies. The Swansea Board of Guardians as a rule are a model of what pub- lic bodies should be in the way of good behaviour, but yesterday they seem to have become infected by a germ from the Guildhall, and enjoyed themselves in a thoroughly hilarious way over such an unpro- mising subject as the appointment of the committee to visit Bridgend Asylum. Many compliments flew I about, and there was a good deal of talk about brain power, but in the end the Guardians recognised the superiority of the ladies in this de- partment, and unanimously elected two of them to do this important work. Wherein they showed wis- dom. Our correspondence columns have borne witness to the heat en- gendered by the teachers' strike in the Swansea Valley, but a notable feature about the letters has been that, in nearly all, the writers have pressed for a round table talk. We are glad to see that the Glamorgan County Council has now decided to enter into negotiations with the National Union of Teachers for the settlement of the dispute. At Thursday's meeting of the Council some of the members of the council appeared to be standing upon their dignity with regard to the arrange- ment of the conference. Does it mean," asked the Rev. Enoch Davies, of Penarth, that we are omg to ask the N.U.T. to be good aough to meet us?" There 'w' ere ies of dissent! We wonder why ? o one in the Swansea Valley orries a bit about the dignity of ther councillors or teachers; the Lain fact they have to contemplate that 800 children are without ihool instruction, that money is ing lost in grants which they will ive to make up-and that the hole miserable business could be ttled by sensible men in half-an- )ur's discussion.

MISSING NECKLACE I

MISSING NECKLACE. I iarch for a Tall, Handsome ) Girl. a certain tall, handsome girl twlio irs a large black hat can be found it hoped that the £3,000 pearl necklace at Victoria Station last Monday week the wife of a banker may be recovered. essrs. Price and Gibbs1 who, on be- ? of the owner, are offering a reward 2250 for the restoration of the neck- have bcpn told by a man that on member 11 he caw a tall girl, wearing) clothes and a large black hat, pick' n Wilton-rcad a necklace and walk r examining the fastening. Where ewent to he does not know. He fixes time as 6.30 p.m., the very hour at the owner of the necklace took a tab from Wilton-road, where she had t helping in the Soldiers' and Sailors' It, to her home in South Audley- S:, and where on arrival she missed tewellery driver of the taxicab. and the next ffave feen traced, and those concerned autifilied that the necklace was not dfed in the cab.

ECHO OF DR GBEEflY CASE

ECHO OF "DR. GBEEflY CASE." PLIGHT OF PERSONS CERTIFIES AS INSANE. PROBLEM FOR SWANSEA GUARDIANS I The Swansea Board of Guardians met at the Union Offices, Swansea on Thurs- day, Mr. J. H. Kosser in the chair. An echo of the Dr. Greehy case" was heard, when the clerk reported that he had discovered that several local cases now in Bridgend had been certified insane by Dr. Greehy." Mr. Jenkins pointed out that these cases could not legally be detained, and they would have to be re-certified. Mr. Wm. Owen moved that no steps be taken until the committee appointed to visit Bridgend Asylum had done so. and reported on the matter. Mr. Freedman seconded the resolution. which was carried unanimously. "A WASTE OF TIME." A communication was read from the Special Schools (Conference, to be held in October, inviting the Swansea Guardians to send representatives to the conference. The Rev E. O. Evans said that it was a waste of time. Mr. Wm. Owen heartily supported the invitation, and said that the conference was being held with a view to saving in- fant life. They proposed to deal with the children of all conditions. Mental and physical cases would be discussed. He proposed that the Board be represented The Chairman supported Mr. Owen, and said that in his magisterial capacity they often had to send weak-minded persons to prison because there was no place for them, The Rev. B O. Evane strongly opposed it. and characterised it as a u confen for a cup of tea and a nice little talk for these people." (Laughter). What would be the use of spending this money? It is a sheer waste of money," concluded Mr. Evans. Father Harrington pointed out that as yet the affair was an academic one. Mr. Owen: All things have to make a start. I don't think we should stint a pound or two. Mr. Abe Freedman seconded. Mr. W. A. Thomas proposed a direct negative, that the Board be not repre- sented. A general discussion followed. Cries of Vote! vote! were heard. Ultimately, on being put to the vote, Mr. Owen's proposition was carried by the chairman's casting vote. The Swan- sea Board will, therefore, bo represented. It was decided that the chairman of the Board ^Mr. It C. Jeffries) be sent. WANTED TO JOIN. I I A warm discussion arose over the ap- peal of Mr. Sidney Owen Davies, the chief relieving officer, which was heard at the West Glamorgan Appeal Court last week. It had been suggested by the military representative that Mr. Davies could be exempted provided that another official in the same class (Class A, active service abroad) could be spared. It will be remembered that Mr. Davies expressed his willingness to go, and had asked the Board to withdraw his appeal. In the meanwhile, Mr Davies had writ- ten to the Board, saying that he cer- tainly would not stay at home and see another man go in his place. He ex- pressed his sentiments in a plain state- ment to the effect that he thought h" ought to go. Mr. Owen said that it was quite tne letter that he expected from Mr. Davies, who would be the last man in the world to let another man substitute him. Mr. Davies had asked to go. and it would be injustice to allow someone else to go. Mr. Owen, continuing, said that Mr. Davies was an excellent ofifcer, and very intel- ligent, and if he were to go it would be a great loss to the public. He admired him for the letter. Mr. Owen concluded by proposing that Mr. Davies' appeal be with- drawn. Mr. J. H. Rosser supported Mr. Owen. Father Harrington moved as an amend- ment that the appeal he pressed. What did the want to appeal for in the first place if they were going to withdraw now. Mr. Harry Rogers seconded Mr. Owens' proposition. He said that if they were to allow a young man to go it would be dis- tinctly unfair. If anyone were to go out. side the old Training College any morning he would see many tragedies enacted. He greatly admired Mr. Davies for his letter. Mrs. H. D. Willinms seconded Father Harrington, and said that she thought that Mr. Jenkin3 (the Clerk) should bo considered Anyone would think that they had sent no one to fight for us," said Mrs. Williams. I think that the tribunal should make their choice. It is most absurd to send a married man when there are so many single men still work- ing in the town." Mr. Davies himself had three children, so it was a hardship. Mr. W. A. Thomas said that he was present at '"he appeal, and emphasised the fact that Mr. Davies had asked to go of his own 'free will. A VALUABLE SERVANT. The- Rev. E. O. Evans endorsed the opinion that Mr. Davies was a very valu- able servant, and it would be exceedingly difficiilt to find a substitute. However, there was only one course to adopt, and that was to comply with Mr. Daviee' re- quest a.nd allow him to go. Father Harrington ultimately withdrew his amendment, and it was unanimously decided that Mr. Davies be allowed to go. The Clerk (Mr. Llew. Jenkins) expressed the hope that Mr. Davies could be re- tained until the books were made up, etc. I A NEW ARRANGEMENT. I A matter which was raised at the Work- [ I house Visiting Committee by Mr. Owen a I fortnight ago created a discussion. It was proposed to revert to the old sys- tem of dealing with the cases at the com- mittee. Formerly there was one large committee which dealt with the cases; at present there are two distinct committees —the Visiting Committee and Revisory Committee. Mr. Freedman, as chairman of the Visit. ing Committee, stated that it was the com- mittee's recommendation that the present system of dividing the committee (one portion dealing with tho list of admissions and the other with the revision of cases), be discontinued, and that in its place the full committee deal first with the ad- missions and then with the revision of cases (as the Revisory Committee). Mr. Wm. Owen said that the work was at present not so well done as in the past. When there was a larger committee there was more likelihood of someone knowing something about the cases. Mr. Freedman said that Mr. Owen's allegation was unfair, as he could say of personal knowledge that the members of his committee did their work conscien- tiously. Father Harrington supported Mr. Freed- man, whilst the Rev. E. O. Evans said that in his experience as a Guardian the work was done better by the old method. Father Harrington: Well, all I can say is that the race must be deteriorating, and will continue to do so. He also held the view that Mr. Owen's and r. Luff's alle- gations were unfair. They had the doctor to support them when they .were at the meetings. Ultimately, Mr. Owen's proposition was modified to the extent that the cases will now be dealt with weekly instead of, as is generally the case at present, monthly. It was also decided therefore to delete the minute of the report of the Visiting Com- » I mittee which was, with that exception,- I unanimously adopted. I "Or REQUEST FROM NEWPORT. Jir. li. b. Miohell (Chairman of thep Cottage Homes Visiting Commitee) re-- ported that at the last meeting of the com- mittee, an application from the Newport Guardians had been considered, asking the Swansea Board of Guardians to board Newport children at the Cottage Homes, Cockett. The committee recommended that the Board inform the Newport Guardians that accommodation would be provided for 25 children on suitable terms being arranged. The ensuing discussion resulted in the matter being adjournedj until en- quiries have been made as to the xuotiver actuating Newport's rcnuest. I 'm. h LI VEL Y INCIDENTS. j- It) appointment oi a committee to visi, Bridgend Asylum resulted in one or two lively incidents following Mr. Roeser's ruling. The following names were pro- posed: !,fr. W. Owen, Rev. E. O. Evans. Mrs. A. Perkins. and Mrs. H. D. Williams. Proposing Mr Owen. the Rev. E. 0. Evans said that unquestionably Mr. Owen was the most capable gentleman on the Board to deal with the subject. He had paid a ? visit to Bridgend in the capacity of a counclUor. and had ?iven a most valuable report the Guardians. Mn Rr turned unon the Rev. E. O. Evans and vehemently informed him that Mr. Owen is not the only gentleman on this Board with brains: there are at least 19- members and they have each got brains- he doesn t monopolise them." (Laugh- ter.) Mr. Owen: I don't want to compete for this. Father Harrington: What do you mean, Mr. Owen? Do you mean to say that if anyone else is nominated you ar& not g-oing to stal(.]? Mr. Owen: No; what I meant w", thalb it is unpleasant work, and not anything to be competed for. Father Harrington apologised. Mr. Owen proposed the Rev. E. O. Evans. Mr. Luff thereupon proposed Mrs. H. D. Williams. Mrs. A. Perkins was also nominated. Several members then expressed the opinion that ono lady member and one gentleman member could attend. Mr. Rosser: For mvself I should prefer to go with a lady. (Laughter.) Mr. Rundle: It would be better for either two ladies or two gentlemen to attend. The Rev. E. O. Evans and Mr. Owen then withdrew. The Clerk: The names before me are itlre. H. D Williams, Mrs. Perkins, and the Rev. E. O. Evans. Mr. Luff: Mr. Evans has withdrawn. Don't you think, any of you, that Mra* H. D. Williams is as capable of attend- ing this meeting as anyone else. I- The Chairman: You are out of order, Mr. Luff. Mr. Luff: You think you've got the brains of the Board. Several Members: Order! Order! YOU WANT TO BE BOSS." Mr. Luff: You let others speak. Why can't you let me. You want to be boss of the show. (Cries of Chair, chair."). The Chairman: You are off the subject, Mr. Luff. Mr. W. A. Thomas: Why all this fuss about only paying a visit? When I wenti up, I thought it wm only that, only- ai matter of giving a report. Mr. Owen (heatedly): There is a differ* ence between the way you do it and 1. I am not responsible for what you do. I propose Mr. R-osser (Laughter.) Subsequently the two ladies named weral unanimously elected. OUTDOOR RELIEF. The Rev. E. O. Evans, on the notice of motion that for the duration of the war in Rule 3 (G) of Rules for Administration of ourdoor relief, 7s. be substituted for 5s., or from 20s. to 48s. per month," explained that every member of a household rl¡Ad be included in the relief. This Would j be an increase of 40 per oent. on the original scheme, which exactly corre- i sponds with the present increase in the price of commodities. Mr. Owen su?- I gested that they increase the benefits to > 7s. 6d., or 30s., inasmuch as the relief was more or less an old-age pension, and since that had been increased to 7s. Id. why should they not increase the relief the same. Mr. Evans en phasised the fact already mentioned that every member of a house- hold participated. Mr. Owen thereupon agreed to suspen d his amendment. Mr. Evans' proposition was accordingly I carried unanimously.

MUNITIONS COURT

MUNITIONS COURT. Workmen's Appeal for a Re- Hearing. I Mr. J. Vaugban Edwards presided at the South-West Wales Munitions Court, which was held at the Labour Exchange, Swansea, on Thursday afternoon. Ms. J. W. Thorpe was clerk of the court. An application was received from two workmen at a local works for a re-hearing of their case, which was refused on Sep- tember 12th. They contended that they did not appreciate the necessity of pro- curing legal aid and also getting corrobora, tive evidence. The Chairman stated it was an important application, for at the pre- vious hearing they had made a serious accusation that there was forced idleness at the works-,i controlled establishment. A re-hearing was granted, to take place on Thursdnv next. September 29th. WAGES OF BOYS. I Two lads, aged 14 and 15. were charged with leaving a controlled works during working hours—from 1.30 a.m. until 4.30 a.m., on September 8th. Their earnings for the last twelve weeks had been 25s. and 2Ps. respectively. One of the lads stated that an older boy- asked them to come over to a colliery about a mile and a half away to the latter's friend. Each of the defendants were discharged with a warning ABSENT FOR ELEVEN DAYS. I A fitter and turner of another works was f I fined for absenting himself for eleven days in September. The manager stated he had interviewed defendant, who stated he had had a little too much to drink. He was filled 30s., and asked to leave the drink aloe& I

SYMONDS v RUDDICK I

SYMONDS v. RUDDICK. I Tickets are selling like the proverbial hot cakes" for the contest between Svmonds and Ruddick, which takes place on September 30th, at the Swansea Em- pire. by kind permission of. Mr. Frank Allen, the managing director of Moss Empires, who is coming down from Lon- don to witness the contest, together with Mr. Bettinson and a party of bfficials from the National Sporting Club. Seats have been booked from all parts; in fact, as far distant as Plymouth and Leeds. Ruddick is training very hard on the out- skirts of Manchester, and is coming to Swansea early next week to put the fin- ishing touchy on a thorough prepara- tion. He is full of confidence, and in- tends making a bold bid for champion- ship honours. Young Symonds is at work at PI mouth, and expresses himself as very fit. He will be making the journey to Swansea on the day before the contest, as both men arc to weigh in on the Em- pire stage at 9 a.m on the morning of the 30th. The manager wishes to inform ticketholders that the admittance to all reserved seats with the exception of rin^ eide will be at the front entrance in Ox- ford-street,