Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 6 o 6
Full Screen
8 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

GREAT 7 DAYS' STO up w SALE STOCK SALE AT EDWARDS', COMMENCES TO-MORROW, Saturday. Two Excellent General and Fancy Drapery Stocks, secured at Enor- mous Discounts, will be offered at prices that represent only a small part of their real value. part of their real value. ■ The Stock of I Messrs. EMRYS DAVIES & Co., of New ) r Street, NEATH, amounting at ordinary ¡ prices to something like £ 1,050; came into the market consequent upon the calling up of the Groups for Military Service and the inability of the proprietor to realise in the time at his disposal It is important to note that I the Stock was purchased prior I to the recent heavy advances. v The goods are in perfect con- J dition, and are priced to sell at quite 60 less than present Market Value. I > The Surplus Stock of I A LONDON MAKER has proved, with- 1 out doubt, to be one of the most fortunate S purchases we have ever made, as the J goods have since gone up in price to an J enormous extent. The Stock is comprised of a complete variety of Ladies and Chil- dren's Smart Underclothing, Fancy Lace Goods, etc., all as fresh as the day they left the Factory. UWe guarantee every article I in this Stock faultless in every particular. In several in- stances prices will be less than half those asked in the ordinary way. All the Goods are BARGAIN PRICED in such a manner that an early visit will be WELL WORTH WHILE. DOORS OPEN on SATURDAY 9.30. EDWARDO' sTo111 STORES t? OXFORD ST.,  M t ? ? WATERLOO ST., kJJwansea. PAAKST?

Our Short Story j IC 296 I

Our Short Story. j ] I C. 296. I BY I I R. K WEEKES. I Maud Yea, mother pH Hasn't Jane come baclr. yet p" No, mother." Did you tell her to be in by nine ?" H Several times, dear—almost as often as I've told you," Maud added, sotto voice. It is most tiresome! She knows per- fectly well that it's not safe for me to be without my medicine in the house! Really, when she came in and told me that she'd had an accident, with the bottle, I could have had an accident, too, and thrown the pieces in her face. I don't believe she in- tended to come back; I saw such a nasty sly look in her face. I ffvel sure I am going to have another attack, too; I feel just like it. Maud. you are not listening; you are a heartless girl'" Yes, I am." said Maud, hastily. Besides, it's not fit for her to be out so late on this lonely moor! I should not dream of sending her, with such dreadful things happening continually, except to fetch my medicine, which is a necessity. I am nearly certain that was the prison pun just now. I can't think why you didn't hear it, Maud, you always say your ears are so keen." The bacon was sizzling, dear," re- turned Miss Heriot, mendaciously. She had heard the gun quite well, and knew that a convict had escaped from Dartmoor Prison, but she preferred to keep her mother in ignorance In foggy weather, convicts are continually bolting from the quarries. If the unhappy wretch gets off without being peppered by a sentry, the prison gun is fired, the alarm given, and half the men in the district turn out to j help the police. Natives of the moor grow hardened to these incidents; but the Iferiots were Londoners. Mrs. Heriot lifted up her voice to lament Maud's unkirdiiess, Jane's disobedience, and the absence of dear Jack, who always understood her so well. Jack was Maud's younger brother; there were moments- not many, but a few-when Maud wished ho had never been born. She accepted her mother's complaints with cynical patience, remembering what Mrs. Heriot had been in the days of their prosperity, and know- ing1 that it was not herself but her illness that spoke. Thick milky fog closed round the house, blotting out the lights of Donsland, a mile below them: blotting out also the glow in the sky which showed where Prince town stood among its barren tors. I This little villa, with a tiny pension, belonged to Mrs. Heriot for her lifetime only. Maud had before her a penniless future, unless she could provide herself by marriage. Sh3 was not a beauty, but ehe had a good figure, a pair of fine dark eyes, and glossy, abundant hair, which she wore brushed off her forehead in a rising, wave, and coiled smoothly 'behind' her head. She talked well and she danced well, and at twenty she had enjoyed herself in the mat- rimonial market whither Mrs. Heriot dragged her every season; but at twenty- nine her day was over, and the future looked grey. She was thinking unhappily of vhese things as she brushed her hair that night. Hers was a draughty little room facing the moor, and, of course, there was no fire. Thus it befell that Maud's numbed lingers presently refused to grip the brush, which dropped with a clatter. As 6he stooped to rkovt it, a part. of the floor hitherto hidden by the quilt came into her line of vision.-Her eyes remained fixed on the spot in sheer horror. There was a man—a 4rab, broad-arrowed convict beneath her bed! Maud did not look on herself as a I heroine. She would not have volunteered in any enterprise requiring dash and bold- ness: but in this unexpected danger she ) didn't lose her head. After the first shock, she stood up and resumed her brushing aI6 I though she had seen nothing. "He must have come here just by chancer-he can't know that we're only two women," she tho tight, with the lucidity of terror. "He'll keep close under the bed till he thinks I'm asleep, and then he'll crawl out and explore the house for a change of clothes and—mother!" Maud's heart stood still. She must keep him from Mrs. Heriot, at any cost. But to leav* the room without rousing suspicion? With strange swiftness came the memory of a neglected duty. Why, I dont believe I put out the kitchen lamp!" she exclaimed aloud, and threw up the window to look for its glare upon the fog. U Oh, bother ac- tion was her cry as she slammed down the sash; and, snatching up her candle, she walked out of the room, shut the door behind her, and collapsed upon the settle in the passage. Next minute Mrs. HerioPs bell began to ring, feebly irregular. Maud started up and ran to her mothers room. She found her struggling—not with another convict, as she had wildly imagined—but with one of her dreaded heart attacks: blue, speechless. For the next half hour she had no thoughts to spare from the urgencies of the sick-room; but when the first violence of the attack was spent, and the white, half-conscious invalid was for the moment out of imme- diate danger, Maud looked round with a kind of hopeless terror. The atack might recur at any moment, aDd there was no medicine in the house, her were there any means of getting a doctor. The invalid stirred and moaned. "My dnops," she murmured, "my drops—I want my drops, Maud." Maud tried to soothe her, but the fretful, complaining continued, wringing the girl's very heart. What could she do? After all, a convict is not a wild beast. If she were to throw herself on his mercy? Maud shivered. t But if her mother were dying? She got up irresolutely and opened the door. All was quiet in the house. Maud halted, dragged back by her fears; tfien Mrs. Heriot moaned again. The sound pushed her forward; she stepped oourageously across the passage and into her .(>Wn.'room. If the gentleman who is under the bed wHl kindly come out, I should like to speak to him," Dead ailenoe. Maud proceeded, with a slight quaver: I'm not going to hurt yon—I couldn't if I would; there's nobody in the house bat myself and mother, who's desperately ill. So please don't kill us. I want you to do something for me. If you will, I'll help you to get off—t&ere's a sirloin of beef in the larder." At the word U beef," there was a noise under the bed, and a head appeared, the valance draping round it like the frills of a sun-bonnet. Then the bedstead was up- faeft-vedg eeeminglj- by accident, for &e vie- 1 tim condemned the iron in a heart yunder- tone, and crawled out rubbing ibi head. He was a personable young" man, hlie eyes and fair, and his face was illumiiubed by a sort of nervous grin. I—I'm really irost aw'fly sory. I didn't mean to scare you." "Why, it's a gentleman! n gaapedMaud, so obviously relieved that the grin tecame yet broader. I say, are you going to hand m ever to the police ?" Aro you going to kill me?** "What a shocking idea! I 'eally shouldn't know how to set about it. But before we go any further-if you don't think me too pressing—how about that cold beef?" Cold beef! Maud gasped, "cold bef-" She sat down, helplessly shaking her lead. "It's no use," she said, resignedly "I simply can't cope with the situaion- simply can't. What I want to knw is whether you'll go and knock up the octor at Donsland for me ? It's on your -,Aty to Yelverton station. If you will, I'llgive you a suit of clothes and as much cold beef as you want. I wouldn't drean of taxing your kindness—only I r.ther think my mother is dying," she endec her voice breaking at the last word. Upon my word, you're plucky I'm not," said Maud, truthfully, 'I'm simply shivering and shaking." Will you promise to stand by me. and not give me away to the police?" Yes." Then I'll go." faud promptly wept into her hanker- chief. The convict eyed her in feaiand concern. Here, I say, Don't!" Tha he went doijrn on one knee and laid his and on 'her arm. Look, here, I'm only i for forgery; I'm not dangerous—wouln't hurt a wasp. Besides, I never did t at all, I'll swear I didn't. I am an inncent man, unjustly convicted." They all are, aren't they ? murlitred Maud. Now I don't call that kind of "d-I call it cynical," said the convict rep-vicli- fullv. But Maud would not listen t

Advertising

I Don't Pay Fancy Prices for Your RAINCOATS. SPECIAL DELIVERY THIS WEEK. MANUFACTURER'S STOCK OF 500 Ladies' and Gent. 's NEW TAN RAINCOATS (Guaranteed Reliable) Our j Worth Price, 45/. Theee Coats have the appearance of 3 Guinea Coats, and will wear equally as well. This Lot is probably the ast that Messrs. Penhale will be able to offer at above price for some time. The delivery also includes 151 BOYS' and GiRLS' RAINCOATS, to be I Cleared at 18/11. Worth 16/11. 50 BLACK WATERPROOFS (Beys and Girls), 12/11. We have also received this week -50 WARM- KINGSCOATS This OU\ Vorth j Week, 30/m t5/. These 50 have been marked nearly Cost Priee, as we want to Advertse our Kingscoat early so as to secure cus- tomers for the heavy preparations we have made for the WINTER TiADE. PENHALE, Coat Specialist, 232, High Street, Swarcea. 1

GLORIFIED RAT HUNT

GLORIFIED RAT HUNT DIGGING THE CERMANS OUT OF THEIR HOLES A Swansea non-oommissioned officer, who has seen a great deal of service in France, having been wounded, in an in- teresting letter home, writes:- What a time we have had since I wrote you my last letter. We have achieved one of the fiiJest victories of the war by the taking of the town which you read about. My word, it was a sight to see our boys going over at them. Grand isn't the word for it. We went into the line the night previous, and after the usual sorting out to places and customary instructions, everybody made themselves as comfortable as possible, and then commenced the period of waiting which is more trying to the nerves of the men than anything. Hours seemed like years, and still the time rolled on, with our artillery dropping shells of all sizes on their trenches, but Fritz was by no means quiet, as hp kept dropping a goodly number on our line. OVER THE TOP. At last the order came to get ready. Every man had previously seen to his rifle and bayonet, and also seen that his bombs were in good trim. Our artillery were to open up an intense bombardment of their lines at this hour. While they were doing that our boys got out of their trenches and walked to within a few yards rf the German front line, with our shrapnel ex- ploding right overhead them, but always shooting forward. Exact to the minute our curtain fire lifted, and we promptly jumped jato their front line. What was left of the Huns put up a very feeble fipht against our boys. The majority of them were in it-heir deep dug-outs, but down goes a smoke bomb, and a few mills bombs, and up they come crying merci,, merci, camerad, at the same time holding out watches, and, in fact, all their possesion* to be spared. A party was told off to at- tend to a few remaining dug-outs, and away we swept on our wav. GLORIFIED RAT HUNT- In a few minutes we had captured the village which had been a eore point for us for quite a long time, but nothing could stop our boys. In a very short time we were in their third line of trenches, and consolidating for all we were worth, and waiting for our artillery to lift their fire further on. The light was beeoming now mere like a glorified rat hunt, as we had to dig them out of aU sorts of holes in the ground. It was at this point th-aft one of my men was attending to a severely wound.d German, when a Hun pokes his head out of another dug-out and shoots my man through the leg. Needless to add, he didn't last long. After the curtain firp had lifted we pushed still further on and crossed over their fourth and fifth. and got up to their sixth line of trenches, which was our final objective, being on the top of a ridge, and commanding all the summnding country. Then commenced the job of digging ourselves in, which was done by moons of connecting up a crowd of shell holes which had been made by our guns. The men worked with a will, and in three hours we had a fairly good trench, but still we worked, and didn't stop until we had a trench eight feet deep, and then we had a rest, and waited for his counter- attack, but he had had such a terrible listing, and suffered such enormons casu- alties, that he had ito heart for any fur- ther action. I cannot give sufficient praise to our artillerymen, who did their work marvellously well; and as for our own boys, well, I don't know what to think of them. Great things were expected of them (that was why we were selected to take this particular town), but they surpassed all expectations, laughing and joking to each other all the time. Anyene would think they were in a Sunday School treat instead of one of the most furious battles of the Push." SHOWERS OF PRAISE. I We have had showers of praise from everybody, the Brigadierr, Divisional General, Corp Commander, right up to the top of the tree. We were relieved a few nights after the advance, and we are back a little way, trying to remove some of the mud and grime of battle, and inciden- tally having a rest.

Advertising

AD 00 190 CHOCOLATES I Nougat Montelemar I f ■SSs j # 1 -t h e name j?t dMcnbetthem c-vvb l-e

COAL CONTROLI

COAL CONTROL. I Clearing Away Some Mis- I conceptions. The Press Bureau on Thursday night issued the following:— Certain misconceptions appear to be current as the result of statements which have recently appeared in the press with reference to an alleged proposed scheme for the Government*; control of coal. Home supplies of coal are already dealt with under the Price of Coal Limi- tation Act, and administratively by the Board of Trade, and no change is contem- plated in this direction. Export and bunkers are controlled by the nation's committees, acting under Government direction, and supplies to France, Russia, and Italy are proceeding, ind will continue to proceed, under the existing arrangements. Lord Milner's inquires will lead to \loser co-operation between the va ri* ousI tommittees dealing with coal questions, )ut no change in Government policy is in ontemplation, although in the light of ,ny new facts which may arise the Gov- rnment cannot undertake that they will Lot find changes necessary from time to lme.

No title

A plentiful crop of parasol mushrooms I as resulted from the week's heavy rain I i Essex. Comprising 3,736 acres, New Lodge state. Windsor Forest, • realised over 1, (5,000 at Wednesday's Bale, but the man- j, )n itself was riot sold. <

Advertising

STUDEBAKERl: 5 CWT. DELIVERY VAN j PRICE £ 270 COMPLETE. j i STUDEttAJCER, kTDM < TM33, Creat Portland Strut, London, W ( — — 4 rer 92,000 was raised for the British < I tiers Red Cross Fund by a fair and afiultural jumblo sale at Famham. I Svey. I — "V —" i;   If I; /-pHE purity an d fres h ness 'I !? 1 ?? ?s c h oicest butter ?? is reflecte d in P h easant k ? Mar g ar i ne. ? At the table, in fact, wherever |g you use butter, you may sub. ?s stitute Pheasant Margarine Mrr J with equal satisfaction.? 1, ? with e q ual satis faction.  f !:x? •= < Do this, then you, too, willSay {1 ? ? Pheasant Margarine is butter in A  forces so richly equipped, as that which LADY' is responsible for the literary and musical R A V L E construction 01 U My Lady FRAYLE construction of My Lady Frayle. T Lb o Powerful Company of Well Known Favourites Include: < PHYLLIS LE GRAND, JAMES SALTER, HELEN ROSE INNES, HORACE LINGARD, DOROTHY MILLAR, I ALFRED W. CLARK. I FULL CHORUS. INCREASED ORCHESTRA. I MATINEE SATURDAY at 2.30. I SEATS MAY BE BOOKED IN ADVANCE. Thone 291. A I Prepare for the Bad Weather. 1 TO COLLIERY OWNERS, CONTRACTORS, f SINKERS AND MUNITION WORKERS. | DANN & CO. are now fully Stocked, and are qo + prepared to meet the requirements of all classes. We hold the Largest Stock in Wales of + Oilskins, Mackintoshes, Raincoats, *o ? v ? Pegamoids, Rubber Coats, d L' Boots an d Leggings. Orders Executed Same Day. I | Note Address:—$ oab., Aw CO.,1 t South Wales Clothiers and Boot Merchants and » Oilskin Manufacturers, S I 15, 16 & 23, Wind St., Swansea. Ii tEst. 1875. Tel. No. 593 Central. | Irinted and Published for the Swansea Press, Limited, by ABTHUfi PARREIA, HIGHAM. at Leader Buildings, Swansea