Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun

A PHP Error was encountered

Severity: Warning

Message: A non-numeric value encountered

Filename: views/newspaper_view.php

Line Number: 100

1 o 6

A PHP Error was encountered

Severity: Warning

Message: A non-numeric value encountered

Filename: views/newspaper_view.php

Line Number: 103

https://cymru1914.org/cy/view/newspaper/4102413/1" title="Next Page">Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
35 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

Fhe ° Cambria Daily Leader" gives later news than any paper published in this dis- trict.

Advertising

The London Office of the "Cambria Daily Leader" is at 151, Fleet Street (first floor), whereaa ver- tisements can be received op to 7 o'clock each evening for insertion in the next day's issue. Tel. 2276 Central,

GREAT SERBIANI SUCCESS

GREAT SERBIAN I  SUCCESS. Good News From Salonika. GERMAN ARTILLERY ACTIVE. TO-DAY'S BRITISH OFFICIAL. I The following dispatch was issued from the General Headquarters in France at 11 a.m.:— Last night Stuff and Schwaben Redoubts were heavily shelled by the enemy. During the night two small raids were carried out against enemy trenches in the neighbourhood of II Loos. TO-DAY'S SERBIAN OFFICIAL. The following Serbian official was issued by the Press Bureau this afternoon: Salonika, 19th October, evening:— On the 19th of October, we con- tinued our attacks on the Sokol mountain. The Army of Voivoda-Mishitch has made an important success in de- feating the 44th and 28th Bul- garian Regiments, occupied the villages of Brod and Veleselo (two miles north of Brod) and captured four machine-guns, three guns, and 80 prisoners. TO-DAY'S FRENCH OFFICIAL. I On the Somme front no infantry ac- tion was reported in the course of the night. The artlitlery duel continues with activity in the region of Sailly- Saillisel, and in the Balloy-Ber- nay sectors. In Lorraine we easily repulsed some surprise attacks on our outposts in the region of Bezaides. The inght was calm on the rest of the front. ARMY OF THE EAST. From the Struma front to the Varda there was intermittent artillery duels. On the left bank of the Cerna the Serbs, continuing their march to the north of Brod, gained a bril- liant success over the Bulgars. The plateau and the village of Vel. geselo was carried by assault Dy our Allies, who put to rout im- portan tenemy forces. The losses sustained by the Bulgars are very high. In the course of this action the Serbs I captured three guns, several machine guns, and about 100 I prisoners. EGYPTIAN OPERATIONS. I The Secretary of the War Of&ce makes the following annou11 le, e 'T,t .•egarding the Egyptian operations I Forty-five were captured on the 17th by one of our patrols in the Dakii after a brisk en- counter TO-DAY'S BRITISH SALONIKA I OFFICIAL. Two hostile patrols have been cap- tured on the Struma front. North of Heohori damage was in- flicted on the enemy's positions by our fire. On the Doiran front there was ar- tillery activity on both sides. 1 .1 ? t RUMANIAN SUCCESSES. I Enemy Everywhere Repulsed. A Renter's telegram from Bucha- rest dated Wednesday says:— The enemy continues to attack with violence all along the Car- pathian front, but has everywhere been repulsed with heavy losses. The enemy now seems to be mak-I ing considerable efforts in the | Kroluch valley, but without any I chances of success. Seven German guns captured from the Turks in the Pobrudja are now being exhibited in the town. EAST AFRICAN OPERATIONS.! Advance of Belgian Forces. From the Special Correspondent: .? the Press Association in East? Africa:— Morocco, Thursday.—The last l enemy post north of the Central Railway has been cleared out and the specie captured. The consolidation of our gains ;s proceeding rapidly. General Van Caventer is in touch with General Nortliev. Mikingani, Lindikissutu, and Kis-j saki are in our hands. The Bel?ums h:?-e advanced from Tabora to Sikonge, 40 miles suuth. t

GUNARDER SUNK I

GUNARDER SUNK. I BIC LINER'S PASSENGERS AND CREW LANDED The Cunard liner Alaunia has been sunk. The passengers, about 180 in num- ber, including women and children, were landed, and the captain and 163 of the crow have also been saved. The Alauuia was a vessel of 13,405 tons gross, built at Greenock in 1913. She sails under the British flag, her port of registry being Liverpool. NORTH SEA PROWLERS. I The Norwegian steamer Sten, of 1,045 tons, is reported to have been sunk. The Times n correspondent at Copen- hagen telegraphed on Thursday that the Swedish sailing ship Greta had. been set on fire by a German submarine in the North Sea. Her crew have arrived at Predriksit-Aven in the Norwegian steamer Herald Haarfayer. Copenhagen, Thursday.—Steamers and fishers to-day arriving in Scandinavian harbours from the North Sea report that German submarines are operating every- where. At the entrance to the Skagerack live large submarines were observed.— Exchange.

TROUBLOUS TOOTH

TROUBLOUS "TOOTH." Italy Holding Newly-Won I Redoubt. Thursday's Italian offical report says:- On Mount Pasubio almost incessant attacks and counter-attacks took place, all preceded and supported by extremely violent bombardments. Yesterday morning the enemy succeeded in breaking into the redoubt on the Tooth of Pasubio, but was promptly driven out, after a hand-to-hand struggle. About 100 prisoners, including nine officers, one gun, and one 4in. howitzer, were taken as a result of yesterday's fighting. Along the remainder of the front only artillery actions took place. On the Oarso we captured some prisoners and a machine gun in the course of small skirmishes. Hostile aeroplanes dropped bombs on Borgo, Carinzia, and on our lines east of Gorizia without doing any damage. Our aviators destroyed an enemy kite balloon at Castel San Giovanne (Ivanigrad), cast of Comen.

COs AND MANUAL LABOUR

C.O's AND MANUAL LABOUR. Emolovment in West Wales. There are at present over 90 conscien- tious objectors employed OIL waterworks in W ffli- l ales. They include all sorts a.nd conditions of men—school masters, M.A.'s, B.A. a, artists and musicians. Many of them hail from Liverpool and Birming- ham. The evenings are enlivened by enter- tainments.

jSWANSEA GUARDIANS

SWANSEA GUARDIANS. t The Supply of Milk. The Swansea Guardians, on Thursday, I decided unanimously to recommend to their Agricultural Committee that milk oows be kept on their farm to supply, as far as possible, the Tawe Lodge, the Cot- tage Homes, and Graig House. This would mean a saving of S84 7s. 9d. per month. A member remarked: H This is true economy. The matter will come up for consider- ation at the committee on Tuesday next.

ANOTHER WELSH PIT DEAL

ANOTHER WELSH PIT DEAL? Th-ere have been active dealings in the I shares of the Rhvmney Iron Company,) Ltd., and of the Powell Duffryn Colliery Company at Cardiff recently, and on Thursday rumours were rife on the Cardiff Exchange of the impending merging of the Rhvmney Company with a large colliery concern, either the Powell Duffryn or the Cambrian combine.

AN ANCIENT GIANTI

AN ANCIENT GIANT. An interesting archeelogical find was made at Ardee (near Drogheda) on Thurs- day, when during excavations workmen discovered large sktbs of stone shaped like c,offins. When opened one was found to contain a skeleton of great size, as well as son'.c? small stones of pecular formation. Other coffins opened contained utensils of various kinds, made of stone and metal.

WHAT RUSSIA DIDI

WHAT RUSSIA DID. I Speaking at Lord Heath's house in Lan- caster Gate on Thursday on his recent visit to Russia, Mr. Stephen Graham said I that in reply to his inquiry Mr. Lloyd George had told him that in his opinion I General BrusilofFs forward movement was one of the most brilliant things of the war. It saved Italy, brought Rumania I in. and very possibly saved Verdun.

RED CROSS DANCEI

RED CROSS DANCE. I An enjoyable Cinderella dance took l place at the Albert Minor Hall. Swansea., in connection with Madame J. Davies' dancing class. A large number of ladies and gentlemen congregated in the deco- rated hall, when Mr. W. Jones carried out thp duties of M.C. Mies C. M. Davies war, the pianist, and during the evening Miss Radford rendered selections on the violin. The catering was carried out by Mr. Williams, Mansel-street, and the pro- reed -? were in aid of the local Red Cross fund.

CARING FOR THE PENNIES I

CARING FOR THE PENNIES. I Amsterdam, Thursday. -R

DOYLE BEATS BEATTIEI

DOYLE BEATS BEATTIE. I The matins of E?die R&attio. Glw, I and Kid l?oyle. Nf?vaatlc. at L'vRrpool K?adinm on Tb?rsdny ni?t providM a ?rnfic c?ptoat b?fo'? a crowded ?.tend- ant, the event being of twenty rounds' duration for the welter-weight ohampion- ship of the North, each having previously defeated the other. Doyle had the better of the earlier sessions, and a, desperately hard contest ensued. Both finished well and strong, and the popular verdict was giv'" in favour of Doyle on points. Next [ week Zioyle boxes at tho Swansea Empire.

I SOMME BATTLE

I SOMME BATTLE SIR D. HAiC REVIEWS THE SITUATION. RECORD OF STEADY GAINS AND INCREASING ASCENDENCY. While there is no great news from the Somme battle area, there is an inspir- ing review of the general situation by General Sir Douglas Haig. The Com- mander-in-Chief of the Expeditionary Force tells us in clear terms what has been achieved and the manner of the achieve- ment. He refers to the capture of one village after another, the nature of the fighting, and goes on to demonstrate our aerial and artillery superiority. SIR DOUGLAS HAIG. Press Bureau, 10.40 p.m.—The following telegraphic dispatch, dated Thursday, 6.10 p.m., giving a summary of recent opera- tions, has been received from General Headquarters in France. The summary of October 3rd brought the account of the operations on the Somme battlefield down to the last day of Septem- ber. By that day we had advanced well beyond the crest of the main ridge which runs from Thiepval to Sailly Saillisei. From the line held the ground slopes gently to a shallow valley which runs north-westward from near Sailly Saillisel to about 2,000 yards south of Bapaume, and then turns westward and joins the valley of the river Ancre at Miraumont. From the main Thiepval-Morval ridge a series of long well-marked spurs run down to the valley described above. The most im- portant of theee is the hammer-headed spur immediately west of Flers, at the western extremity of which stands the tumulus called the Butte de Wariencourt. Lying across the main trend of the ground another well-mark e d spur runs from Mor- val north towards Tliilloy, passing 1,000 cast of Gueudeoourt. Behind this spur lies the German fourth position, to get within assaulting distance of which it was necessary to carry Le Sars and these two spurs. These were held as intermediate positions by the enemy, every advantage being taken of sunken roads, buildings, and the undulating nature of the country. EAUCOURT L'ABBAYE. On September 29 we carried Destremont Farm, 300 yards south-west of Le Sars and just north of the Alhert Bapa-ume road On the afternoon of October 1st we ad- vanced our line on a front of 3,000 yards, occupying the buildings of Eaucourt l'Abbave, 1.400 yards to the south-east ot lye Sars. The struggle in this neighbour- hood continued with great severity during the night, and early in the morning of October 2nd the enemy had regained a footing in be place. During the whole of .next day and night the battle fluctuated, but by the following morning we had suc- ceeded in finally clearing the buildings ot the enemy. On October 6th we won the mill north- west of Eaucourt l' .A.bbave. On the afternoon of October 7th, in con- junction with the French on our right, we attacked on a wide front between the Albert-Bapaume road and Lesboeufs. We drove the enemy from Le Sans, carrying positions al;* to the east and west of that village. After severe fighting between Gueudecourt and Lesljoeufs we forced our way forward from 600 to 1,000 yards. I FIGHTING HEAVY AND PROLONGED. The period since that date has been oc- cupied in winning ground between Le Sars and Lesboeufs, up the slopes of the low ridges already mentioned. In the area between Thiepval and Le Sars we have made steady progress and nave gradually won a series of strong positions. The fighting has been heavy and pro- longed. The enemy has resisted stub- bornly until 'surrounded in one pJaoe after another, and large numbers of prisoners have fallen into our hands. During this period we have had to repel repeated counter-attacks. Generally these were stopped by our artillery and machine gun fire, but when they did suc- ceed in forcing a way through the barrage j and reaching our linear they were thrown back by our infantry rifle fire with heavy losses. On only one or two occasions did they manage to regain a footing in a trench, and then they were promptly driven out again with the bayonet. OUTSIDE SOMME AREA. Outside the Sonune battlefield our troops have shown great activity in trench raids. Between Ypres and Loos over 60 raids have been carried out, in which we have secured many prisoners and inflicted heavy casualties. The captured during the fortnight bring the total prisoners in the Somme battle- field since the beginning of July to 28,918, and in the action of October 7th one divi- sion alone, which had previously had many days' hard fighting, took eight officers and 474 other ranks. OUR AERIAL SUPREMACY. ] The weather during the course of the operations reviewed has been consistently unfavourable to aircraft. Heavy rains and strong south-westerly winds have lowered the visibility and have rendered their work matt difficult. Yet in spite of such adverse conditions our machines haw made many valuable reconnaissances and have repeatedly attacked with suc- cess enemy lines of communication, am- munition dumps, and troops on the move. A captured document, emanating from a German Army Headquarters, in acknow- ledging the superiority of the British air- men, suggests methods of reorganisation, whereby it is hoped that it will be pos- sible at least for some hours to contest the supremaev in the air of the enemy. ARTILLERY SUPERIORITY. I Assisted by our aeroplanes our artil- lery has continued to play a notable part in the. fighting. It has established and maintained clear superiority over that of the enemy. It has supported our infantry attacks, and has disorganised the enemv's arrangements behind his front lines, and hindered the arrival if his reserves and supplies. It allows him no rest by day or night, and materially assists in that wear- ing down of his moral which is vital to success in battle. On many occasions during the period under review the battle has resolved itself into isolated struggles. In these and in the main advances our infantry have shown their wonted endurance and devo- tion. Captured documents bear clear tes- timony to the effect of our continuous artillery fire and to the dash and discip- line of our infantry attacks and the quality of our men.

No title

A railvruy portpt and a clerk were, at Wimborne Assizes, sentenced to 12 and six months' imprisonment respectively f{)r defrauding bookmakers by means of back-coded" time on telegrams.

THE SHELTER OF THE COLLIERIES

THE SHELTER OF THE COLLIERIES." I COMBED-OUT MUNITION MEN IMPORTANT DECISION BY THE MINING TRIBUNAL (By Our Mining Correspondent). Mr. J. Dyer Lewis, H.M. Mines In- spector, presided over a sitting of the Miners' Tribunal for the Western and Anthracite area. at Swansea on Friday. With him, acting as assessors, were Mr. Guy Warren, for the coalowners, and Mr. J. D. Morgan for the workmen. Capt. Harold Williams represented the military authorities. At the outset, Mx. Dyer Lewis briefly gave the necessary explanations as to pro- cedure, and pointed out some very impor- tant matters to be attended to in future by the authorities at the various col- lieries. The most notable of these, per- haps, was the instruction that a list of the names of all for whom exemption from military service was claimed must be posted up at the pithead. LOST EXEMPTION CARDS. Subsequently, in the course of the ex- amination of Mr. Lewis, of the Gwen- draeth Collieries, it was stated that one of the workmen had lost his exemption ca.rd. Mr. Dyer Lewis remarked that he had already had two or three applications for duplicate exemption cards from another colliery, and had supplied them. He was now instructed that he should have charged one shilling each for such cards. Mr. E. Hewlett submitted a list of men put on at the Amman ford pits since the la6t batch was dealt with by the court, and it was passed. Some other applications having been dealt with, a definite query was put in writing, on lie ha If of a oolliery manager, as to whether men who had been dis- charged last. week from mii-iiition works could be employed at the oolliery at which they had previously been working. The President said he would like to have the opinion of the military representative on a case of that kind. NO UMBRELLA FOR DISCHARGED MEN. Captain Williams (to the manager): Theise men have been "combed out" of the munition works, and now you are letting them come under another "umbrella by employing them at the colliery. The Manager: No, we have not employed them. We want to know whether, we can do so.'Certain men were discharged from the munition works last week and are now ask- ing us to reinstate them. We ask, can we do so? Capt. Williams: I submit that as they are men who have been combed out." they cannot return to the shelter of the collieries. They undoubtedly left the colliery to go to the munition works in order to earn more money. They did not care about the output of coal, then Now they are combed out, not to enable them to return to the collieries. but to enter military service. They have been combed out for the Army. The Manager: So far as we were con- cerned, in August and September, 1914, times were rather bad. and men left. It is a matter of opinion, of course, as to why they left. They were dismissed last Saturday. So we cannot employ them? Capt. Williams: No. Have you em- ployed any of them? The Manager: No. They have applied for work, and we are asking whether we can. The President: Well, you have heard the answer of the military representative. TINPLATERS IN THE PITS. A point arose as to tinplate workers who have recently returned to collieries, and, in one case, a lively discussion took place between the military representa- tive and the oolliery representative, who in this case happened to be from Llan- gennech. A man who had worked for 18 months or two years in a local tinplate works had now returned to the oolliery, and exemption was sought for him. Capt. Williams opposed the applica- tion, and it was refused, but in a subse- quent dialogue the military representa- tive suggested that if, in two or three cases, the colliery management found two or three single men instead of these men, the exemption would not be opposed. AN IRISH BULL AT A WELSH COURT The parting shot of the colliery work- men's representative, as he left the witness chair, was: All these married men are married—see," and there was hearty laughter when Captain Williams smartly replied: "Yes, I see" Mr. D. Davies, Abercrave Colliery, ap- plying for the exemption of two men and two boys, the latter being 18 years of age, was asked by Capt. Harold Williams if he could not put other men to do the work of these hauliers. Mr. Davies: Yes, if I could get men. but I cannot. Mr. J. D. Morgan: The Home Office have exempted men of this class Capt. Williams: I merely ask if that i6 so, because I would not contest the cat;A at all if they are definitely exempted by the Home Office. The president thought Mr. Morgan was right, and would look up the instruction. CLEARING UP POINTS. Another point cleared up was the fact ¡ that exemption cards did not now con. fine the recipient's employment to the particular work which he was at when ex- empted. If a pumpsman lie came an en- gineiuan. or a man was taken from under- ground to surface work. said the presi- dent, the exemption still held good, so I long as the man was employed at a colliery. From Mountain Colliery. Gorseinon, there were exemptions claimed for men! who had been colliers for years, and in 1 order to prove that fact, Mr. Grenfell, the Western Miners' agent, appeared with the colliery clerk, and the exemptions asked for were granted by the Court.

THE VORWAERTS I

THE VORWAERTS." I The German paper V-nrv.-nertr," for- merly the organ of the rebellious Socialist I minority, and which had been suppressed, has Dow reappeared, but in the guise of a Soci&I?t maiority organ.

BEREFT OF BRACELETSI

BEREFT OF BRACELETS. I Amsterdam, Thursday.—A telegram from Berlin in the Kolnisehe Volks- xeitung says that: yesterday, the anniver- sary of the battle of Leipzig, the Chamber- lain of the German Crown Princess appeared at the Gold Purchase Office and hailed over a large number of gold orna- ments, including bracelets, chains, and brooches. The ladies of the Court followed the example of the Crown Princess.- Rooter.

IGREEK EVENTS

I GREEK EVENTS BIG SECESSION FROM ATHENS GARRISON Athens, Tlyirsday (delayed).—Twenty- five officers and 600 soldiers of the garrison at Athens have gone over to the National movement, and left for Salonika. The papers announce that Janina has also de- clared for the revolutionaries, but official confirmation of this information is lacking. A Reuter message says:—French marines left their headquarters and patrolled two main streets of the city and then returned. The Reservists, who were everywhere, did not interfere with the French, but mal- treated those who acclaimed them. The Greek police avoided interfering. In Stadium-street, soe wlk i'T3 of the Marines showed hostility, and the com- manding officer ordered the bluejackets to surround them. Those arrested were ex- amined and eventually released, excepting three, including the Palaco veterinary surgeon, who carried a revolver and bad made insulting remarks about the French. It was evident the Reservists were beyond control and disposed to take the law into their own hands. Their attitude being a dangerous factor in the situation, they will be responsible for any further mea- sures taken by Admiral Du Fournet.

YM m SWITZERLAND

Y.M. m SWITZERLAND. I Ex-Swansea Official's New Appointment. Early this week we gave some interest-1 ing figures relating to the splendid re- cord of the Y.M.C.A. work for the. troops in the North Wales area which is under the supervision of Mr. J. Glan Griffiths, Bonymaen (late assistant at Swansea). We now have the interesting news that I Mr. Griffiths has been asked to ir'der-! take similar work with the wound: and invalided soldiers in Switzerland. \r., understand that Mr. Griffiths has accep- ted the invitation, and is making ar- rangements to take up the new work at an early date.

I THE PRICE OF MILK

THE PRICE OF MILK. I A Defence of the Swansea I Milk Vendors. Mr. Fred Gambold, treasurer of the Swansea and District Milk Vendors': Association, writes us: 1 wish to point out that you are quite misinformed regarding prices of milk from farmers to the dairymen of Swan- sea. You state that milk is bought at 1.3. Id. per gallon. I challenge you to find a single dairyman in Swansea buy- ing at the price named. You seem to mix up the West Glamorgan Dairy Farmers with us. To my knowledge none of the West Glamorgan milk supply icomes into Swansea, but is sold in the Swansea Valley. The greater part of the milk that is sold in Swansea comes from Carmarthen, and the price paid to farmers there is Is. 4d. per gallon from the 1st of October; in several instances Is. 5d. is paid. WJhatever the public may do, no milk vendor can retail milk at less than 6d. per quart and pay his way after making allowance for bad debts and waste in the delivery of milk. Another matter you are wrongly informed about is that the feeling in the trade was not unani- j mous, and that there was a diversity of opinion. Nothing is further from the! truth that the meeting was unanimous. There was no other alternative for j honourable traders but to sell at a living profit, 6d. per quart. I was at the meet- ing, and have yet to hear who this philanthropist of a gentleman was that I had to'sever his connection with the association, and is now selling at the reduced price. Whoever he might be hie object is to increase his trade by a black- leg system, and not to do the public a service. I may say this, on behalf of the Milk 1 Vendors' Association, that if you can by any means get what we as dairymen have failed to do, that is, get the farmers to reduce the price of milk to Is. 2d. per gallon, we as an association are prepared to sacrifice 2d. per gallon and sell at the old price, 5d. per quart.

T I QUEENS ZEPP RELICI

T QUEEN'S ZEPP RELIC. The Queen has presented an aluminium brooch made from the German airship brought down at Cuffley, to be sold at the Red Cross Gift House.

DO CKS FATA L ITY I

DO CKS FATA L ITY. A fatal accident occurred at the South Dock, Swansea, on Thursday night. It appears that whilst William Davies (66), of 9, Sloan-street, was working near a! coal-hoist, he was struck on the chest and head. He was immediately taken to the Hospital, but upon arrival it was found that he had succumbed-

THUNDER OF THE GUNS

THUNDER OF THE- GUNS. Renter's Amsterdam message says: The Reuter's Amsterdam message says: «The Telp?raaf learns that on Thurla\ artil- ? Ipry activity in Flanders was continupd uninterruptedly and with increa.sed vio- j lence. There ha, not been a moment's lull' in the thunder of the guns."

DUTCH NO TRUCK MOVE i

DUTCH NO TRUCK MOVE. Amsterdam. Wednesday.—From to-day the two chief Dutch railways prohibit the, ertrance into Germany of their trucks. The reason is said to bf- that Du teh trucks, espociilly t h c- large covered wascofls, which are extremely useful for transport purposes, are often detained for long periods in German territory.

MEDICAL EXPERT ON TNT I

MEDICAL EXPERT ON T.N.T. At an inquest at Faversham on Thurs- day on a. young woman who died from T.N.T. poisoning. Dr. Benjamin Moore, of the Medical Research Committee's staff, said only one person in 100 or 200 was sus- ceptible to T.N.T. poisoning. Sickly look- ing persons who had been at the work for over a year had not had T.N.T. sickness.

I THE COUNTESSS FINE I

— THE COUNTESS'S FINE.  I?ady Dro?heda was on Thursday fined 40s. at Westminster Court for having driven a motor-car in CromweJU-road, S.W., at a peed of over 29 miles an hOur' on 0<3toh?r 3. Ther0 was, it %??d, one pre- vious conviction. A solicitor, in expressing Lady Drogheda's regret, explained that she was driving an officer to the railway ■ station to catch a train. I «

TODAYS WAR RESUME I

TO-DAYS WAR RESUME II Leader" Office, 4.50 frA*, Important successes 'have been gained ty1 the Serbians. The army of Coigoda- Mishitch has defeated the 44th and 28th Bulgarian Regiments and has occupied the villages of Brod and Veleeeto. A Bucharest message, dated Wednesday, says that the enemy continues to attack with great violence all along the Car- pathian front, but has everywhere been repulsed with heavy losses. A British Headquarters message reports that the Germans have heavily shelled the redoubts of Stuff and Schwaben. During the night two raids were carried out against enemy trenches in the Leigh- bourhood of Loos. In East Africa the Belgian forces bave made a big advance. Tho consolidation of our gains is prcce^-diug rapidly. There have been further developments in Greece. Twenty-five officers and 600 men of the garrison at Athens have gone over to the National movement and have left for Salonika. In his review of the Somme battle Sir Douglas Haig supplies a record of steady gains and increased ascendency.

THE 9id LOAFI

THE 9id. LOAF. Swansea Bakers Say Rise is Inevitable. It is inevitable that in the course of a few days ttere will be a further rise in the price of bread at Swansea. The ques- tion is to be considered by the Swansea Master Bakers' Association, the members of which feel that it is impossible to con- tinue the existing price of 9Jd. per 4lb. loaf. It is not only flour that is crush- ing the baker," confessed a local baker to the Cambria Daily Leader" on Fri- day, but outside expenses. Coke is now costing me £1 2s. 6d. a ton, whereas before the war it was 13s.; I am paying 9d. for yeast, compared with 60.. and the horse costs me 25s. a week to keep, whilst I was only paying 12s. in pre-war days. We cannot sell bread at the price."

A MURDERED TROOPER

A MURDERED TROOPER Disgraceful German Act in I East Africa. The Colonial Secretary has received a report on the operations in southern dis- tricts of German East Africa, in which the following passages occur:— On June' 8 Colonel Roger attacked the enemy and put them to Sight. Just before the action a most disgraceful incident oc- curred. A trooper of the Second South Africa nRi fles captured by the enemy was tied to a gun-wheel, beaten by a native under orders of a European, and then shot by seven bullets. He died two days later, having been quite conscious, and was able to make depositions. The officer in command of the enemy force was Captain Count Falkengtein, and it is believed that we have here as pri- soners three Germans who were present, one of whom is probably guilty of murder."

SWANSEA BUILDER I

SWANSEA BUILDER. I Funeral of the Late Mr. Wm. Bennett. The funeral took place on Friday after- noon of the late Mr. Wm. Bennett, of the firm of Bennett Bros., builders, St. Julian's, Sketty. The Revs. A. Wynne Thomas, Mr. Sparrow, and Mr. Lewis officiated. The mourners were: Messrs, H. and F. Bennett (sons), Messrs. John and Ben Bennett (brothers), Messrs. A. Bennett, Hy. Simons, J. S. Saunders, Dd. Grey, D. R. Evans, J. Langlois and others. A large number of floral tributes were received, one hailing from friends at Calgary. The cortege left the house at 2.30 p.m., for Mumbles Cemetery, the I)carere, being the old employes of the firm. The body was interred in the family vault. Mlr. D. G. Phillips was in charge of the funeral arrangements.

CARMARTHEN SESSIONS

CARMARTHEN SESSIONS Munition Worker With a Badli Record. I At Carmarthenshire Quarter Sessions on Friday Mary Jane Jenkins was charged I with unlawfully wounding Thomas Henry Goldstone. of Llanelly. Mr. D. Roes pleaded for the prosecution, and Mr. Marlay Sampson defended. The jury found the defendant guilty of common assault only, and she was bound over. A BAD RECORD. I May James, 17 years of age, a munition worker, who was conn-irted on October 16th at Llanelly, was charged with stealing two Treasury notes, a gold ring, and a bangle, valuc.(l tl 10s.. the property of Frank Stevenson. Defendant had a very bad record. Supt. Jones said that defendant had been previously sent to the Salvation Army Home at Aberystwyth, bpt had come out and had since earned her livelihood by certain means. She was sent to-the Borstal Home for three years. BOUND OVER. I Piohard Pkinnpr (74), was charged with  unlawful wonndin? Richard Evans. In view of his advanced age, the Bench bound I him over. MUNITION WORKERS ALLEGATIONSI David John Daniels, 17, a labourer. and I Samuel Cohen, also a labourer, both of Llanelly. wert, charged with assaulting Hilda Morgan (17), a munition worker, of Rock-street, Swansea, in a munition train. Mr. Villiers Meager prosecuted, and Mr. Llewelyn Williams defended. (Proceeding.)

MR KING MP CHARGED I

MR. KING, M.P., CHARGED. I Mr. Joseph King, Liberal M.P, for North Somerset, is to appear at Bow-street to-day in connection with an alleged contraven- non of the regulations under the Defence of the Realm Act. Mr. A. H. Bodkin will prosecute for the Treasury.

HUNGARYS WAR LOANI

HUNGARY'S WAR LOAN. I Amsterdam, Thursday.—A fifth Hun- garian War Loan will shortly be issued. The previous loans, issued at 2! per cent, below par and bearing 6 per cent. interest, or at 9 per cont. below par and bearing 1ij per cent, interest, have brought in a sum equivalent to L2M,40,1)40. »

Advertising

J MR. JOSEPH KING FINED. Mr. Joseph King. Liberal M.P. for j } North Somerset, appeared at Bow-ef. POliCê Conrt to-day before Sir J. Met. ineon on tbrM summonses tinder the Defence of the Realm Act for alleged regulatione of the Act. He was fined "100 and 25 guineas C05t. j J J VON KLUCK RETIRES. Amsterdam. Friday.—According to the Cologne Gazette." General ron who mi. formerly Commander F'r- -.f 0% j haj reotirixi an appoint- iriont as chief of the Sixth Pomeranian | Infanfrr Bofcimwit, X. í9. i THE SERBIAN GOLD MEDAL. ] The King of Serbia lifts awarded thfc i Serbian Medal to Lar.ce-Corpl. Alfred Laker, R.A.:M.C.. for distinguished eer- i vices with the British Mediterranean Force. Baker was formerly professional to the Limps field Golf Club, Surrey, and has been with the Mediterranean Forc-t- for 19 iuonthb. íARKIJ'" ŒETr:Œ, I Retting 2.30: 3j to 1 Strrshcon, 10 to 1 | VTOTmleisfatCTr, 8 i.) Crbi>ievV Wax. Tip Vip Tip Sarson (10D £ .—18 tan. j 1. f'lycjouth '2. St, Lec 3.—?. i i ♦ *•