Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 6 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
43 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

1 The 44 Cambria Daily Leader) gives later news than any paper pubhshed in this dis- trict.

Advertising

—ii The London Office of the "Cambria Daily Leader" is at 151, Fleet Street (first floor) w here ad ver- tisements can be received up to 7 o'clock each evening for insertion in the next day's issue. Tel 2276 Central.

ITALIANS GOIN G AHEAD 1

ITALIANS GOIN, G AHEAD. 1  PsQt? Cadorna's Plan. PREPARING FOR DEATH- BLOW TO TRIESTE.' Smrm Success. TO-DAY'S ITALIAN OFFICIAL. I The Italians are continuing their ir- resistable push. The infantry is advancing, after formidable artil- lery preparation, towards Duino, which is now under a terrific bom- hardiiitrnt, and its fall is believed to be mujanent. JDuino is the key to Trieste, and an important railway junction where the transport of the Austrian troops to the! various fronts is now concentrated, and military authorities believe that General! Cadorna is preparing for the death-blow of Trieste.] TO-DAY'S BRITISH OFFICIAL. Yesterday evening, by a surprise at- tack, we captured an enemy trench east of Gueudecourt, and secured our position. During the night we carried out a successful raid on the enemy trenc hes near Arras. TO-DAY'S FRENCH OFFICIAL. To the south of the Somme the ar- f tillery duel was rather lively in the sectors of Lihons and Chilly. The surprise attack carried by us v on the German trenches to the west of Laucourt was entirely success- ful. On the right bank of the Meuse the night was relatively calm. In the day time yesterday, on the violence of our bombardment which has been prolonged during several days past), and Without waiting the attack of our infantry, whose pressure was making itself more and more felt, the enemy evacuated Fort de Vaux. In the course of the afternoon very great explosions were observed. At night, our infantry, which had approached to within a very short distance, occupied the important I works without any loss. The ring of the exterior of the fort at Verdun is now re-established, and is solidly held by our troops. There is nothing to report on- the rest of the front. AVIATION. I On the Somme front one of our three-seater aeroplanes attacked in the region of Hallaines, a group of six enemy machines, and suc- ceeded in bringing down enle of them. ARMY OF THE EAST. On the left bank of the Struma, the British troops, following up their successes, have taken by attack j the village of Alitsa. Intermittent cannonade without in- fantry action on the rest of the front. One of our scouting squads which had come immediately to the help of one of our aeroplanes, brought down a second adversary machine and compeiled the others to make off. An enemy aeroplane, struck by the fire of our special glns, fell in the forest of Nonnepinck (west of Mulhausen). j

REPORTED OCCUPATION OF EKA i EH hM

REPORTED OCCUPATION OF EKA i EH hM Athens, Thursday.—The Government has sent reinforcements to Ekaterini, which is reported to have been occupied by Venizelist forces.—Keater.

AN IRISHISMI

AN IRISHISM. Notwithstanding the fact that the parlies had got married, a jury in the Belfast Sheriff's Court gave a verdic-t for plaintiff for £ 150 in a breach of promise case. On Thursday this verdict was set aside in the Dublin High Court.

TORPEDOED OR MINEDI

TORPEDOED OR MINED. Athens, Thu-,sda-Acliniral DartigeJ Du Fournet to-night issued a communique which states in substance that as a result of investigations into the attacks on the two Greek steamers, it can now be stated that the vessels were torpedoed or struck hy mines emanating from a vessel belonging to Germany or her allies.

THE NAMELESS SOLDIERI

THE NAMELESS SOLDIER.' Known only as the nameless soldier," because he had destroyed his identity Marl- and refused all information about himself, the man who has been charged at Willesaen as an absentee has been the sub- ject- of about 400 inquiries, mostly from women whose husbands have deserted them. He still says he is unable to re- member his name, and on Thursday he was handed over to the military authori- ties.

ON THE STRUMA I

ON THE STRUMA I CAREFULLY PLANNED OPERATIONS SKIL- FUllV GAhBltO OUT. NOTABLE BHlTtSH SUCCESS I The Press Association's special corre- spondent with the British jleadquarters ill Macedonia, in a teiogram under Wed- nesday's date (received i'riday), says:— Our troops on tiie Struma iront yesterday undertook an offensive whioh met with the reward it deserved. Our carefully elaborated plants wero skilfully cai-i-ie(i out. We pushed forward our line several kilometres, captured an important village j and over 300 prisoners, and tsst&blisned ourselves withui striking distance of the Rupel i'atjs at a practically insignificant cost. What is more, the enemy is so llli- pressed with our superiority in artillery that he seems inclined to acquiesce in the fait accompli and to leave us in undis- puted possession oi our yams. The general features of the operation much resembled the successful offensive w llÍch gave ub Zir Baia and ienikoy, but on this occasion there were secondary opera- tions along practically the whole Struma front which iniheted loss, besides distributing the enemy very greatly. T'iie weauier was most unfavourable, und might reasonably have justified a postponement of the assault. RAIN. MUD, AND COLD. But it taices more than ram, mud. and cold to disturb the spirit of our men. A night's torrential ram and a long wait in the early morning hours in sodden clothes and trenches half full of water are not conditions particularly favour- able to stimulating military ardour. IVevtrthelcss the men were not lacking in dash when the order was finally given to ad vance, and they carried out their programme without a hitch. Barakli Gzujuia is the most important hamlet on the plain of Serres, between Series and Demir Hissar. It covers over a square mile of ground, and the popula- tion is largely Bulgarian, with the repu- tation of zealous comitadjis. It had been etrongly organised for defence, being pro- tected by a network of trenches and a oonsiderbie amount of wiring, blightly south of the village is a farm called Dolaaetcliiftlik, in a wood divided by a nullah which was part of the enemy defences. The Bulgarians seemed to have had suspicions that trouble was brewing in spite of the inclement weather, because at about 4 o'clock in the morning they kept a couple of searchlights playing with the object of detecting any movement, but apparently they failed to observo preparations for an assault. As usual the ai-tillery began it. VILLAGE OUTFLANKED. Soon after daybreak a s harp and short bombardment swept the Bulgarian lines, and must have tended to unsettle the j nerves of the men thus aroused in the cold. bleak morning. The rain had gone off temporarily, but there was a wintry chill in the air. The infantry advanced to tie attack at the appointed hour, at- tacking the defences frontally. While, however, the attention of the enemy was thus occupied, a stronger body of troops moved round in a north-westerly diroc- tion, outflanking the village, where re- sistance collapsed as soon as the retreat was cut off, the majority of the defenders surrendering. The' Bulgarians at the farm of Dolaptchiflik bolted when they realised that the village was lost, and thus within an hour the whole objective had been achieved. —

RUSSIAN FLAG DAG I

RUSSIAN FLAG DAG. I Swansea and a Bed in a Petro- grad Hospital. Another flag day is to be held in Swan- sea, this time the proceeds going to the help of our brave Allies, the Russians, j Mr. T. L. Jenkins, the Swansea Flag Day secretary, has received a letter from the j Flag Day Executive Committee whicli says: Russia is sorely in need of the hest hospital accommodation, jnd we are asked to provide funds to endow more beds in the Anglo-Russian hospitals at Petrograd. We are hopeful that we will he able to raise at least X500 for one bed, to be known as the Swansea Bed, with the borough coat of arms attached. Tho Russian Flag Day is tit& national move- ii)ent.-iniiiigtirat.c,d under the auspices of Her Imperial Majesty the Empress i Alexandra Foodoroona, to place on record I Britain's great appreciation of the splen- did valour and heroism' of our Russian Ally by raising funds to maintain tho Ar.glo-Russian hospital at Petrograd, and relieving in other ways the sufferings of the "Russian wounded" The Mayor is being approached, and if he considers the weather favourable tho flag day will be held to-morrow '(Satur- day). The ward superintendents are:— Alexandra: Mrs. John LewIS and Mrs. Silence. Brynmelin: Miss Kate Williams. Mrs. Manselton James, and Mrs. Howells. Castle: Mrs. I*a,wson Evans. East Mrs. Denning, Mrs. Cunniffe, and Mr.s. Hill. St. Helen's: Mrs. Geo. Hemming, Mrs. St. lleleii's: Afrf3. T l erniii, ii, Mrs. Sr, John's: Mrs. W. J. Harries, Mrs. T. Griffiths, and Miss Jeffreys. Victoria: Mrs. Ruthen and Mrs. Morris. Mumbles: Mrs. D. W. Thomas. Sketty: Mrs. Llaw John and MrH. Smith.

LONDONS DEARER BREAD I I

LONDON'S DEARER BREAD. The Press Association is informed by! the Incorporated Society of Wholesale i and Retail Bakers, London, that the price of bread will he increased on Monday ,i*,Pa-(-c l ori -M onf l -ly next by one half-penny, namely from lOd. ft* 10.UI. per quartern loaf. j

SERVED LORD CARDIGAN I

SERVED LORD CARDIGAN. William Child, aged 80, who was Lord Cardigan's servant in the Crimea, was re- turned at the head of the poll for a pension from the City of London General Pension Society. Queen Alexandra, the Lord Mayor, and Sir Edward Clarke all rrave their votes j: to Child, who is in failing health and re- duoed circumstances. I

THE STORM j

THE STORM. j The storm which broke over the country on Thursday of last week is still raging iu South Wales, and to-day the hays of the channel are raging furies. and the foam-capped waves are beautiful in their grandeur. Old salts along the Gower coast, and the hardy fisher folk of Mumbles declare that the storm is the I' longest, in duration of .any within their meiWy.

GERMAN EXCUSES FOR VAUX

GERMAN EXCUSES FOR VAUX. 9, UNSUITED FOR DEFENCE" I THE ENEMY FIGHTING LINE WITHDRAWN Vaux Fort has been abandoned by the! Vaux Fort has bPen abandoned by the Germans. The evacuation, the news of which comes only from enemy sources, j or the capture, was inevitable after the French victory before Verdun on October 24.th. when with the winning of Douau- mont our Allies got possession of a domi- nating poition on the ridge. The Fort. was practically surrounded on all but the northern side. FRENCH OFFICIAL. I Paris, Thursday, 11 p.m.-North of the Rom me a fresh operation carried out by u", in the afternoon between Lesboeui's and Sailly-Saillisel brought off an appre- ciable gain ot ground and 200 more pris- oners The total iluint)er of prisoners taken by us since yester-iay in this sector is 736, including 20 officers. We have aleo taken about ten machine- iruns. BRITISH OFFICIAL. France, 9.10 p.m.—To-day the enemy shelled our front in the llebuterne and Arras regions, and our own artillery was active south of Armentieres and Ypres. A number of enemy batteries were bombed yesterday by our aircraft. One hostile machine was driven down, and one of our own machines is missing. GERMAN OFFICIAL. I Berlin, Thursday.—Front of Prince Rupprecht of Bavaria.—On the northern sector of the Somme artillery activity re- vived considerably locally. A British at- tack north of Courcelette was completely repulsed. French attacks in the sector oi Lesboeufs and Rancourt gave a minor ad- vantage to the enemy. North-east of Morval and on the north-western border of St. Pierre Vaast Wood they were bloodily repulsed. Our troops, despite aoi obstinate resistance, advanced in the northern portion of Sailly. Front of the German Crown Prince.—. Artillery fire on the right bank of the Meuse repeatedly increased to great violence. The French especially directed a fierce, destructive fire against Fort Vaux, which was evacuated last night by order without our troops being disturbed by the enemy. Important portions of the fort were blown up before evacuation.—Press As- sociation. GERMAN EXCUSES. I Amsterdam, Friday.—The Berlin corre- spondent of the N ieuwe Rotterdamsehe Courant," in a telegram, dated November lat, which only reached the journal yes- i terday afternoon, says:— This evening, at stoven o'clock, I was informed that to-night (November 1st) the I' fort of Vaux will be evacuated according to plan. From the same source the corr-pon dent? received the following information:—The significance of Fort Vaux did not justify severe sacrifices in itself. The terrain near Vaux is unsuited for defence on the west and south. For these reasons Vaox was evacuated, and the German fighting line was withdrawn to a line which- is less exposed to the enemy fire. FIGHTING IN SPITE OF WEATHER. Paris, Friday.—The Expert French Commentator writes:— In spite of the wet and windy weather which continues on the Somme front, the sector of Ives Boeui's and Sailly Saillisel remains the centre of uninterrupted ac- tivity. Laat evening our troops made fur- ther interesting gains in the direction of Le Transloy, thus threatening still more that village, which is one; of the principal points in the defence of Bapaume. The constant success of our efforts will be noted as a very encouraging symptom, and a detail which deserves to be empha- sised is the very high figure (73G) of Ger- man prisoners taken in less than forty- eight hours, and in secondary fighting. The number of prisoners is an evident sign of tho demoralisation of the enemy.

A MUMBLES CHAPEL

A MUMBLES CHAPEL. The second reading of the Bethany Bap fist Chapel, \^est Cross, Mumbles, Bill is down for second reading in the Lords on Tuesday, as are also several Bi-lls relating to charities and trusts of chapels in North Wales.

MASS FOR IRISH DEAD

MASS FOR IRISH DEAD. Dublin, Thursday.—A mass for the repose of the souls of men executed during the late rebellion was celehrated this morn- ing at the Franciscan Church, Dublin. A large number of people was present. After Mass members of the congregation visiter! Kilmainham, where the executions took place and offered up prayers outside the prison. There was no excitement.

WORDY SKIRMISH

WORDY SKIRMISH. Brisk Little Battle at Neath Police Court. A wordy skirmish between Supt. Ben Evans and Mr. W. A. Levson solicitor at Neath County Sessions on Friday was a prelude to the hearing of a summons for an alleged assault. When asked if he was going to call any witnesses, Mr. Leyson said he was going to cail P.C. Evans. Supt. Ben Evans: I object to Mr. Ley-' son acting in this way. Every other solicitor asks the permission of the Superintendent to call a police officer as a witness. I am not going to allow one of my officers to be eommande-ered in this way. The Clerk (Mr. Kempthorne): Yes, You should have asked the Superinten- dent Mr. Leyson I am going to ask his leave now. Supt. Evans: You are not going to order the police about. I had hoped you were improving. Mr. Lcyaon: Evidently, I have not made a good impression upon the Super- intendent this morning. Supt. Evans: You are not the Superrn- tendent of police. I am. Mr. I/eyson: And you are not super- intending the legal profession of this town yet. Supt. Evans: Neither are you. The Clerk Now, now; let us get on with the business without squabbling. i The assault case, in which Fred Lewis, a schoolboy, and John Butler, labourer, both of Aberdulais. cross-summoned each :)t-lH'r then heard, resulting in Butler being fiued lOa. J

FORESTS DISAPPEAR

FORESTS DISAPPEAR RESULT OF RELENTLESS ITALIAN BOMBARD- MENT. AUSTRIAN LINES PASSED Udine, Friday.—The whole front of the Carso lias'assumed the aspect of a furnace under the relentless Italian bombardment which, when in rd at a distance resembles the ceaseioss ;1 oi drums. The Italian iniantry were beyond praise. It is diffi- cult to say wh; ther they displayed greater bravery on the rocky precipitous peaks or in the plains, where they were buried in a redish mud up to the waist. The action of the artillery was so effective that in some cases the landscape has entirely changed. Thus the forests on top of the Voliki liribacli have disappeared, while at other places hills have been divided into fresh peaks by the exolosion of shells. AUSTRIAN LINES PASSED. When the Italian infantry reached the line of the. Austrian entre nchments, it WW3 impossible to discover entrances to the subteriMinean passages, which were abso- lutely buried, together with their de- fenders. In some places the Italians went beyojid the Austrian lines without realis- ing that they had passed them, everything being destroyed as by an earthquake. ->- _A _011.&

n CASUAL TOMMY

-n- CASUAL TOMMY. Where are you going r" asked the officer. Just going for a stroll down to the dressing station," the man replied. lie was wounded in five places.—" Weekly Scotsman.

FACULTY OF INSURANCE

FACULTY OF INSURANCE. The Commission set up by the Faculty of Insurance to inquire into the working of the Insurance Acts have decided not to visit Wales, as the ground has been covered by the evidence of Mr Baker and others for the district. Mr. J. Hodge, M.P., has been deputed to draw up the draft report.

WOMEN PATROLS

WOMEN PATROLS. A series of resolutions urging reform in cinemas have been passed by the National Federation of Women Teachere. Among the suggestions is one that a portion of the auditorium should be reserved for children only, and that women patrols or women police should be in attendance. Further, that no child should be admitted after G p.m.

BOY SPECIALS

BOY "SPECIALS." The Oldham chief constable has decided to dispense with the services of the local boy scouts. A sliopk-eener complained to a councillor that one night two boy scouts entered his place, asked who was the owner, and stated that he would probably be summoned on account of a liyht shining into the street.

STATE COFFEE HOUSE

STATE COFFEE HOUSE. A State cofTcv-honse was" opened at Long- town, Cumberland, on Thursday, by Sir Robert Allinson. This is the latest development of the Control Board's ex- periment in State ownership of the liquor traffic now being made in the Border dis- trict. This model coffeehouse will be run on similar lines' as the model public-house, the Gretna Tavern at. Carlisle, except that no intoxicants whatever will be solci. The. drinks, however, include an experi- hlent in a teetotal beer, which has been christened shell beer.

IN MALE ATTIRE

IN MALE ATTIRE. At .an EdgAvare-road corner this week I saw a neatly made little woman attired in a brown coat an dtrousers. She was pre- paring to clean the plate-glass windows of a large s hop. Passers-by izave her a curious but friendly snvile. A few minutes afterwards I met a diminutive woman, of middle-age, dressed from head to foot in imitation of oiir khaki uniform, except for a very short skirt. Her puttees were put on with an awkwardness that was simply grotesque. Ought there not to he a sumptuary rule against such caricatur- ing of the Kind's uniform ?-" Lorna," in the" B-ritidl Weekly."

FOOD SLIDING SCALE

FOOD SLIDING SCALE. At the Rt. Pancras Hotel, London, rail- way managers met a sub-committee of the National Union of Railwaymen Ex- ecutive, and discussed with that body the question of the adoption of a scheme for a food sliding f;al(' arising out of the re- cent war Iwnus granted to the men. Mr. T. E. Morris, Ystrad, represented the South Wales railwaymen. The proceed- ings -were private, but it is understood that the matter .was discussed in all its aspects, though no concrete arrangement was arrived at. The railway managers and the men will now each discuss the ] position with those they represent, and a' further joint meeting will be called at an earlv da-te. I ——-

IGERMAN CLAIMSI

I GERMAN CLAIMS. Amsterdam. Friday.—A telegram from Berlin states that the German Naval General Staff has issued the following communique:— On the night of November 1st and 2nd German light naval forces from bases in Flanders advanced against the com- mercial sea route between the Thames and Holland. They stopped several steamers for examination, and took two suspicious vessels to harbour. A third v-sseel, which had received orders to follow them. has not yet arrived. On their homeward journey some of our torpedo boats were for a short time un- successfully shelled by four Rritish". cruisers. Our forces returned at full strength and undamaged.

WHEN FORT VAUX FELL I

WHEN FORT VAUX FELL. Fort Vatix was one of the strongest of the workfi protecting Verdun, and after the fall of Fort ]f>auaumont became the lcey-poiilt on the north-eastern front. After a bombardment, of 2ti hours the Germans assaulted the positions near it on June 1. By Juno 2 the eneiny had isolated it, but a small force of French troops under the heroic Major Ravnal held the vaults and bomb-proofs and re- solutely refused to surrender. From June -2 to 5 fighting of the most stubborn and bitter character proceeded in the cellars and subterranean pas- sages. bnt on the Rth the endurance of the garrison was exhausted and the Ger- man^ fought their way in. The loss of the enemy in its capture must have amounted to thousands of men. while not far short of lirilf n 'million shells must have been fired iuto it.

DARING CAPTURE I BY OUR MEN

DARING CAPTURE I BY OUR MEN. STEAMSHIP TAKEN FROM PRIZE GREW. ENEMY DESTROYERS FLEE The Secretary of the Admiralty makes the following announcement.— 11.45 p.m.—The Dutch steamship Oldambt vim captured by the enemy la?c night kthe ist?, near the ?orth j=rr? Lightveesel. A prize crew was put on board, and the ship was being taken to Zebrugge. When about daylight to-day (the 2nd) some of our light scouting crait overtook her. The prize crew made an attempt to blow her up, aud they and ti-f v u. k>"t > 7C boats. The prize crew, consisting of one officer and nine men, were taken pris- oners, and the ship was taken in tow by one of offr vessels. Five German torpedo-boat destroyers which arrived on the scene, presumably to escort the prize into port, were en- gaged, and at once put to flight. 'The Oldambt was then towed for five hours until she was within six miles of the Hook of Holland, when she was taken in charge by a Dutch tug.

IWELSH ARMY CORPSi

I WELSH ARMY CORPS. i Committee Saves L37,,000 by Contracts. London, Thursday Night.—Members of the iinance and clothing committee of the Welsh Army Corps who met in Lon- don this evening, considered the final accounts as approved by the Army autho- rities, and heard some striking state- ments as to savings which had been effected in contracts. These will be made public in a few days, but it is unofficially stated that a sum of £ 37.000 has been saved by judicious contracts. Sir Ivor Herbert, Bart., presided, and among those present were the Earl of Plymouth, Mr. Timothy Davies, M.P., and Mr. Owen | Owen, the secretary. —————————

I CONSCRIPTION REFERENDUM

CONSCRIPTION REFERENDUM Melbourne, Thursday.—The referen- dum results are still incomplete, the totals so far bccing;- No: 1,016,806. Yes: 939,228.

I CONSTANZA BOMBARDED

CONSTANZA BOMBARDED. Amsterdam, Thursday.—The Bulgarian official communique, issued yesterday, isay6 that four enemy warships bom- barded for 20 minutes the town of Con- etanza. Our coast batteries forced the enemy ships to retire. The enemy caused neither loss of life nor damage.

IHUGE PROFITS ON SHIPS

I HUGE PROFITS ON SHIPS. The Kaifuku Maru, a steamer of 3,000 tons gross register, built at Middles- borough a quarter of a century ago and sold before the wa.r for S:9,000, has now been resold for £ 150,000. The Gozan Maru, a more modern ves- wei or 3,500 tons gross register, has jus; been sold for £ 175,000. In 1913 she realised £ 21,000. ——

ITHE SPRING SONG

I "THE SPRING SONG." I The picture we published on Page Four of our issue on Thursday is that of Mr. Ralph Lynn as Paul Dartignac," the leading male character in The Spring Song." By the way, The Spring Song" is not a musical comedy, and has nothing to do with music, with the ex- ception of what emanates from the orchestra incidentally. But it is one of th06e mad and merry rollicking farces that only the French can produce.* Be- sides Mr. Lynn, there is Mr. Bruce Win- ston, Mr. E. M. Robsoii, Miss Ada Blanche (of Drury Lane fame), Miss Eva Balfour, who has up to recently been the leading actress in the Movies, and last, but not least, our Miss Hannah Jones.

I POTATO SHORTAGE

I POTATO SHORTAGE. No Necessity for Present Prices. If the Government would treat the potatoes like the hay, there would be a solution of the present difficulty." This view upon the potato shortage was expressed to a "Caml)ria Daily Leader reporter on Friday by a prominent local potato merchant. There is a marked shortage," he added, and there is not the slightest doubt that it is due to a rumour which hns gained currency that by Christmas the potatoes will rise to 3d. per lb., and the farmers are consequently withholding supplies in the hope of getting a better price later on." The present price of £13 a ton, he con- j sidered, was entirely out of reason com- pared with the t7 10s. charge a fortnight j ago. "-There is no necessity for the price." he concluded. In some parts-in Gower, | for instance—disease is prevalent, and potato dealers have hsd to suffer losses through so many of the supplies being bad."

I PENTRE MOUNTAIN SLIDEI

PENTRE MOUNTAIN SLIDE. The Proceedings in the Chancery j Court. The motion in resect of the landslide on the Pentre Mountain was again liefore Mr. Justice Younger in the Chancery j IHvision on Friday. The action was1 brought against Corv Bros, and tV> Ltd., j which had a right of tipping colliery spert on the mountain, and it was alleged that this was sliding and causing great Mr. H. Terrell, K.C.. said he now ap- peared for the Rhondda Urban District Council, and no must ask for time to com- plete the evidence. There was, however, a grave public nuisance, and it. was neces- sarv that the matter should be dealt with speedily. Mr. Clausen, K.C.. for the owners of the land, raid he had only just received the defendants' evidence, a.nd suggested the motion should stand for a week. Mr. Tomlin, for the defendants, said they were willing and anxious to do everything to stop the slide. His lordship directed the motion to stand over for a week, and suggested that if the parties were as reasonable as they seemed to he. the whoh? matter might be settled before next Friday. If it was, it might be mentioned to him at anf hime. )

TODAYS WAR RESUMEI

TO-DAYS WAR RESUME I Leader Office, 4.50 P-m Tho British have gained a signal miftofgj on the Somme. On Thursday evening, by a surprise attack, we captured as enemy trench east of Gueudecourt, audi secured our position. A 6uocessful raid was carried out during the night on enemy trenches near Arras. The Russians have sustained a set-back on the Kovel front, 1.500 prisoners being captured by the enemy. Battles are still in.progree& The Italians have scored a great victory, having made an important advance in the Carso on a six-mile front. qver 4,700 prisoners have been taken. Con- tinuing their irre&istable push the infantry is, according to to-day's report. advancing, after formidable artillery preparation, towards Duino. A. story of British daring is told by the British Admrialty. A Dutch steamer was captured by the., lle1llY near tho < Hinder lightship. A pil-e crow vi-a put on b?aid and the shi?. -wag  taken to Zeebrugge. Some of our light scouting craft overtook and captured her, the prize crew being taken pris- oners. German destroyers, which tried to effect a rescue, were put to flight. An Athens message says that the Greek Government have sent reinforcements to Elsatirini, which is said to have been occupied by Venizelist forces.

TODAYS NEWS IN BRIEF I

TO-DAY'S NEWS IN BRIEF I War Saving Certificates sold in the week ending October 21 numbered 1,402,044. A pearl and diamond necklace, lost by Mrs. Ronald Grigg in the Isle of Wight while hunting la&t January, has just been picked up intact by a labourer in a field at Merstone. Chiswick teachers with salaries not ex- oeeding tl75 have been granted war bonuses of 10s. per month, plus 5s. for & wife, and 2s. extra for each child, up to three. Samuel Gillan, who took part in the Crimean War with the naval division, died ion Thursday at Freshwater Bay, Isle of Wight, after a short illness, aged 91. Three women, aged 84, 83, and 82, re- ceived long-service prizes for farmwork at Williton and Dunster (Somerset) Agri- cultural Association's annual exhibition. Pentrechwyth A.F.C. v. Mount Plea- sant A.F.C., to be played on the former's I ground.- Pentrhwytl: W. J. Thomas; B. Owen and T. Davies; J. Varney, G. Rees and 0. Leyslion; S. Maunder, J. H. Thomas, D. T. Edwards (captain), W. Hopkins and E. Morgan.—Kick-off at 3 o'clock.

I MR LLOYD GEORGE I

I MR. LLOYD GEORGE. I Becomes Patron of Swansea U.S.B. On 30th Octobor, Commandant Maggs, of the Swansea. United Service Brigade, inviting him to become a patron of the Brigade, in succession to the late Earl Kitchener, who when Minister for War was a patron, Commandant Maggs has now re,(--eive,(i the following letter from one of the War Minister's secretaries-- U I am desired by Mr. Lloyd George to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 30th ult., with its enclosures, and to say that he will be very pleased to become a patron of the Swansea United Service. Brigade."

BREMENS FATE I

BREMEN'S FATE. Deutschland I Commander's Admission. (" Times" War Telegrams, per Press Association, Copyright). New York, Thursday (received Friday). —Captain Ivoenig. commander of the sub- marine Deutschland, confessed to inter- viewers at New I/ondon last evening that the Bremen had been sunk., He was qliite sure she was-not captured by the British, but refrained from divulging the source of his knowledge that she wassllnk as the result of an internal accident. Captain Xoenig boasts that on this voyage he passed close to Kirkwall, and dodged be- neath a handful of auxiliary cruisers "right in Scapa Flow." U53 was sent to American waters, not to search for the Bremen, but to defend her in case of attack.

TIME ON OUR SIDEI

TIME ON OUR SIDE. I The Times correspondent on the Western front save:—I lunched, in a hut in the mud. with a brigade which has just come in after two months' rest, and was enormously struck by the spirits of both the officers and men. It was one of the officers who said to rop:-u I see that ITindenburg says that we can't beat Germany "in 30 years. Well, perhaps we can in the 31st."

WAGES DISPUTE OVERf

WAGES DISPUTE OVER. f The wages dispute at the Neath Corpo- ration Gas Works was on Thursday satisfactorily settled by raising the maximum from £2 5s. to £ 2 10s. and doubling the war bonus of Is. and 6d. to each .dependent. When required to work holidays the rate of pay will be on the time and half scale.

WE A W AIT S A M P L ES

WE A W AIT S A M P L ES. In March last it was, announced that the Treasury had under consideration the issue of new tl and 10s. notes of dis- tinctive design, but so far they have not appeared. Inquiries at Somerset House on Thurs- day produced no official reason as to why there had been so much delay, but it was stated that the new notes would be in circulation within two months.

DUTIES FOR THEC MEN I

DUTIES FOR THE-C MEN. I "All the Cl men will -be over in France next year," said Lieut. Wrent- more at East Ham Tribunal. In an appeal on behalf of a C2 man, Mr. Maclean. M.P., the chairman of the House of Commons Tribunal, remarked to the military representative (Captain Antsey): They are not calling these men up now, are they?" Captain Antsey: Except under the substition scheme. Under this scheme men in C2 and C3, B2 and B3 are being used to put in the place of men in better classification, who are taken out of civil employment and put into the army. The Deputy Chairman: They are to be exchanged? Captain Antsey: Yea

Advertising

MINES IN THE BALTIC. Russian Warship Reported Damaged. Stockholm, Thursday .—The Stock- holm's Daghlad states that German submarines were righted near Helsing- fors last week, and succeeded in getting past Ova It org U Svealv^rg). The battle- ship N>}¡ast(\p)l is reported to hare been damaged by a raiiio. Tlie Sevastopol si a liatiWmp or 23,300 displueeniAPt. Laid down in 1909. s he has a deeigned of 23 knots, and carries a principal armament of twelve 12in. guns. AUSTRIAN LOSSES. Rome, voy .ed that the Aust rian losses in the » offoinivc I The Italians are stlengthening tlieir newly conquered position?, and have repulsed several counter-attacks, in- flicting heavy I-i-ses on the enemy.. RUMANIAN OFFICIAL. Guns and Material Taken. In the Trabava Valley there have been violent enemy attacks 011 our left trie, Our troops have maintained their positions. To the of the Al* lighting con- tinue.- violently over Tlie 'front. T,) the west oi Jiul our pursuit con- tinues. We have cap* 1.1 red four more guns and much more war material. SWANSEA STOCK EXCHANGE. There ha«? been 1 fair amount 411, busi- ness put through the Sw?nsaa Stock ft*, chang-o to-day. liaLis were wliet: liery shares ?ood. Rhj miiey shares, (Jwaua-cae-U u. wen New, ai(i..D. Davis Ordinary shares were in dfernanj. NEWILVEKET .MEETING. 3.0—Invincible 1. Brown Prince 2, llaff- ide 3.— ? ran. 4 to 1 winn«r. 5.v>—Dark Opal Jorum 2, Blair Athol S.-t r4iu 3 T'j. 1 winner. TO-DAY'S RUSSIAN OFFICIAL. Enemy Being Pushed Back. Western front.- A battalion of one of our regiiaent* v.iocceded -in pushing back the cjioiiiv who hnd occupied th* part of our front on the west bretil, of the Stokhod. Transylvanian Tlu-atre.No news has Dohroda.— No events oi importance have occurred. OXWICH WRECK. At inquest on captain verdict of ao cidentally drowned was returned. it ;'f', I V -■