Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 6 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
41 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

The Cambria Daily Leader" gives later news than any paper published in this dis- trict.

Advertising

The London Office of the "Cambria Daily Leader" is at 151, Fleet Street (fir floor), where adver- tisements can be received up to 7 o'clock each evening for insertion in the next day's issue. Tel. 2276 Central.

KIN G S SPEECH

KIN G' S SPEECH.! OUR SINGLE ENDEAVOUR The Vigourous Prosecu- tion of the War. I PARLIAMENT PROROGUED. I The King's speech contains the follow- illg My Lords and Gentlemen, The vigorous prosecution of the war must be e ti-igit* favour until we have vmdiciafer of tlie Government. COLONEL LOSES HIS COMMAND. Mr. Ian McPherson, in announcing the report of the court appointed under the Army Actf Amendment would be pub- lished immediately, gave a resume of its hndings. Second-Lieut. Barratt is die- tinctly exonerated. In the case of Brigadier-General Owen f Thomas, the Secretary for War expressed the hope that he would recognise that the action taken in his case was due to the military requirements and not to un- due influence. With regard to the lady mentioned, she was -not in the jurisdic- ion of the military authorities, and the Secretary for War thought that he could not do better than leave the decision of the court to speak for itself, lie agreed that General Sir H. Mcinnon was actu- at.ed by good motives. Col. Delm Rad- "liffe is removed from his command. In the case of Sir James Bowans, that officer has been informed of the displeasure of the Government, and he would be re- tained as Quarter-Master-General on ac- count of his good services. THE PROROGATION. Parliament was prorogued until Wed-' nay, February 7th. U.S. PEACE NOTE. Sir William Bylea asked the Leader of the House if lie could make any statement to the House ahout the reported Note from the President of the United States in reagrd to Germany's peace offer, Mr. JSonar Law &aid he thought it must bft obvious that this was a question which could not be dealt with except in consul- tation with o-ur Allies. It was absolutely impossible for him to make any state- ment at present. POSITION IN GREECE. Mr. R. McNeill asked whether the fact that the Allies were in diplomatic rela- tions with M. Venizelos would make any Material change in the situation in Greece. Lord Robert Cecil said it was one of the advantages of the new arrangement by which we were to receive agents of a diplomatic character from M. Venizelos that we should, be able to discuss with them the exact position which M. Veni- seloe' Government holds in Northern Greece. Mr. Lynch: Will the right hon. gentle- man inform the JlOu6e whether the dilatory and dangerous policy now being Pursued in Greece is motived by dynastic D6. Lord Robert Cecil (warmly): I have •■Iready told the hon. member and the llou that the insinuation 1015 a cowardly insinuation to make, aDd that it is a lutely untrue. (Hear, hear). Mr. Lynch: Mr. Speaker, on a personal explanation I make no insinuation, but a declaration. The Speaker: That is not a personal ex planation at all, it is merelj a repetition 01 the attack. I warned the hon. member Ollce or twice, for he is always asking the Same question, that he is not entitled to toake charges of that kind except on a Proper motion. NATIONAL RESOURCES. Mr. Bonar Law, questioned by Mr. Hoffgo regarding the new Director of National Resources said arrangements for the constitution of this post have not yet been completed. The new Director ] Would not be a member of the Govei-ii- tueiit. He did not know whether he would rece ive a salary, but he thought it only tight that a salary should be given. THE PROROGATION. The King held a Privy Council at Buck- Lhghain Palace on Friday for the proroga- tion of Parliament, and other business. The Council was particularly interesting a',4 being the first at which Mr. Lloyd (Continued at foot of next column.)

KIN G S SPEECH

George was present in his capacity as Prime Minister. Other Councillors were: Earl Curzen of Kedleston, Lord Crawford (Lord Privy Seal), and Colonel Sir Fred- erick Ponsonby, with Sir Almeric Fitz- roy (the Clerk). His Majesty signed the proclamation proroguing Parliament until the early days of February. His Majesty also signed a proclamation re- stricting the import of arms and auto- machines, and disposed of other ?busit.32; connected with the war.

EGYPTIAN TOWN REWON I

EGYPTIAN TOWN RE-WON I RAPID BLOW THAT SURPRISED I THE TURKS I EGYPTIAN OFFICIAL. I Town Recaptured from Enemy. I The Secretary of the War Office I makes the following announcement: OPERATIONS IN EGYPT. I The Egyptian town of Lresel-Arish was occupied by our troops after being for over two years in the hands of the enemy. From the fact that they had con- structed a very strong entrenched position at Mafjii-d, covering El iV :«h. it appeared that the enemy ad n'erv intention of catering a stubborn resistance. It would seem however, that the rapidity of our advance com- pletely upset their calculations, as it forestalled the arrival of their reinforcements. They abandoned their position before touch with t,heir outposts was established. The recapture of this town from the Turks is a serious blow to them, both from a moral and a military point of view. TO-DAY'S FRENCH OFFICIAL. There, was a rather lively artillery engagement in the region of Louvemont, on the right bank of j the Meuse during part of the night. Everywhere else there is nothing to report. ARMY OF THE EAST. There were patrol engagements on the Struma front. The artillery duels continued in the region to the north of Monastir. —

OVERCOME BY EMOTION

OVERCOME BY EMOTION Melyn Schoolmaster Collapses in Court. At Neath, on Friday, David Jones Davies, headmaster of the Melyn Schools, summoned Thomas Edward Thomas, col- lier, Melincrythan, for assault and using indecent language. Mr. Shipton prosecu- ted. and in detailing the story of the assault made a pathetic reference to the complainants' son, Major Davies, who was killed at the Front. This overcame the complainant, and the hearing was, suspended until Mr. Davies recovered. Mr. Davies apologised to the Bench, re- marking that it had touched him on a tender spot. Giving evidence, Mr. Davies said de- fendant called at his school on Monday morning, and asked him to promise that he would not beat his son if lie came late to school. Witness said he could not make such a promise, and defendant became abusive, used most filthy lan- guage, and struck him in the chest. Defendant said he went to the school to ask the headmaster a simple question, and alleged that he was not treated properly. He denied the assault and the use of in- decent language. The headmaster's story was corrobo- rated by two schoolboys—Bertie Pearce and Fred Jack.son-and two assistant teachers. Defendant said he went to the school to protect one of the eleven motherless children. He was a coliery examiner, and II his reputation bore inspection. The Bench imposed a fine of £2.

OUR NEW WAR LOAN I

OUR NEW WAR LOAN. I The text of the Bill to make further provision for raising money for the war was issued on Thursday, and authorises a new loan of ?250,000,n00. to bear korrt. of interest that the Treasury think' nt.

DANNY MAHERS WILL I

"DANNY" MAHER'S WILL. i Mr. Daniel Aloysius Maher, of The Kraal, Woriington, Mildenhall, Suffolk, the famous American jockey, left property valued at £ 5,933, with net persojialty, £ 4,958. By his will, made oil Septemlier 1 ] 0. 1914, he left the whole of it to his wife.

ISEIZED BUT RELEASED I

SEIZED, BUT RELEASED. Amsterdam, Thursday (received Friday) —A Berlin official telegram says:—During a cruise in the Iloffden on the night of December 19th-20th, our Flanders sea. forces brought into Zeebrugge the Dutch steamer Otti Tetrax, bound from Rotter- dam for England. Examination of the! steamer showed that it carried no contra- band, whereupon the vessel was released at noon, and continued her voyage.

UTILISING THE PARKS I

UTILISING THE PARKS. Several days ago I stated (cays a Lon- don correspondent) that Sir Alfred Mond, as First Commissioner for Works, had his eye on the utilisation of the public parks for food producing piirpose* Certain London papers fond of claiming triumphs are now loudly calling for a tilling of the parks. When Sir Alfred? scheme sees the light? as it probably will do after the ex- pcrts have worked upon it, it will sur- prise these papers a? well as a good many I other people.

FULL OF HOPE I

"FULL OF HOPE.' I Paris, Friday.—M. Lamenain, Deputy for Lievin, who has, just arrived in Paris, having beon -relxltriatekl from Germany, has made the following state- ment to a representative of the "Matin "The heart 0 four feHow citizens, who have been living under daily shot and shell, has remained sound. All are full of hope. There is les distress at Lievin than i at many other places at a distance from the front. Feeling that -our soldiers are close at hand, the people of Lievin await the future with confidence."—Press Asso- ciation War Special.

ARMED MERCHANTMEN I

ARMED MERCHANTMEN I CERMANY WILL TREAT THEIR CtiEWii AS HRATES Paris, Friday.—The latest news from Munich states that following upon the declaration of Lord Robert Cecil relating to ilia arming of British merchant vessels, the German Government has decided, in future that these ships will be sunk with- out warning, and their crews treated as Corsairs. WHAT IT MEANS. I According to Webster's Dictionary, a Corsair is a privateer, especially a Turk or Saracen of the Barbary Coast, autho- rised by his Government to prey upon the commerce and harry the shores of all Christian nations. In England and Europe, a Corsair was generaly considered and treated as a pirate. Hence the word has come vo mean a pirate.

CELEBRITIES DEAD I

CELEBRITIES DEAD. I Journalist Who Represented II Three Constituencies. The Press Association says that Mr. Harry H. Marks, editor and chief pro- prietor of the Financial News," died on Thursday night at Mount-etreet, Berkeley-square, London. Born in April, 1855, he had represented the St. George's Division, Tower Hamlets, and the Isle of Thanet Division of Kent in Parliament, as a Conservative, and he was also a J.P. for Kent. His publications included Leaves from a Reporter's Note Book," and The Case for Tariff Reform." The death occurred on Thursday even- ing, at his residence, Fitzwilliam-etreet, Dublin, of Sir Benjamin Whitney, Clerk of the Crown and Peace, for the county of Mayo. Dr. Charles Russell, for 20 years editor of the ? Glasgow Herald," who lately re- tired, died in Glasgow on Friday. In May, 1902, Dr. Charles Russell was elected a member of the committee of management of the Press Association in place of the late Sir John Willox, M.P. The death occurred from pneumonia of Mr. James O'Kelly, at his residence in London on Friday morning. Mr. O'Kelly, who wa? 73 years of age, had represented North Roscommon for about 30 years. He l had had an interesting career, and was formerly an .offiœr in the French Army, which lie quitted soon after the fall of Paris. In 1870 he entered the journalistic world) and became the editor of the "New York Herald."

BIG STEAMER SUNKI

BIG STEAMER SUNK. I Lloyd's report that the British steamer I Itonus has been sunk. [The Itonus was of 5,3,10 tons gross register, and beTOtiged to the British India Steam Navigation Co., Ltd., being Ii .registered at Glasgow.]

KILLED WITH A RAZOR I

KILLED WITH A RAZOR. In a street altercation at Hastings on Thursday night, a Canadian soldier was killed with a razor, his throat being badly slashed. The police are searching for a soldier who is alleged to have taken part in the affair.

COKE STEALING NUISANCEI

COKE STEALING NUISANCE. I There were 19 cases of fuel stealing from the neighbourhood of Llansamlet at Neath County Sessions on Friday. Supt. Ben Evans said the women were a n uisanto i the management, and they even stole the coke out of the furnaces. It had kept two policemen busy watching and preventing the th-efts.A fine of 20s. was imposed in each case.

FRENCH HIGH COMMAND I

FRENCH HIGH COMMAND. Paris, Friday.—According to the I, Matui,? General Pelle ha* been replaced at Headquarters by General Pont. and I will receive the command of a di?sion. On the arrival of General Lraute,e new 1 Minister of War, in Paris, other changes will be effected. Among other things the vacancies caused by the departure of Generals Nivelle and Gouraud will be I filled.

TURNOVER OF 1300000

TURNOVER OF 1300,000. An appeal was heard by the House of Commons Tribunal on Thursday on bo- half of a single young man, aged 23, datl- i fified C3. and employed in the Central Meat Market. On his behalf it was stated that he was the right-hand man of a very large busi- ness with a turnover of £ 300,000 a yoor:¡ dealing largely with Colonial rabbits and English and foreign poultry. The deputy chairman said that, in view of the importance of food supplies, the case would be adjourned until March 1.

I TRIBUTE TO GENERAL FOCH

TRIBUTE TO GENERAL FOCH. Paris, Thursday (received Friday).— The name of General Foch, Commander of th? Group of Armies, ha? been inscribed on the list of holders of the Military Medal. An official notice, accompanying the award of the medal, says: H An incom- parable tactician, an accomplished com- mander. he rendered his country the most eminent services both as commander of the covering troops before Nancy, at the outbreak of war, and as commander during the battle of the Marne. By his unswerving tenacity, indomitable energy, and remarkable talent in manoeuvring, he succeeded in defeating the enemy's plans and in shattering his efforts on the Yser. Since then he has shown by his successful leading tlinT he knew how to carry to a bappy issue the operations which he directed as Commander of the Group of Armies/'—Press Association was Special.

CAPTAkN BLAIKIES CASE

CAPTAkN BLAIKIE'S CASE. ) Amsterdam, Friday.-Couiit Reventlow, commenting in the "Deuche Tages- zeitung on Mr. Bonar Law's announce- ment that Capt. Blaikie, of the Caledonia will not share the fate of Capt. Fryatt, says: Until we receive further news we shall doubt the correctness of this re- port. and shall moreover regard it as a deliberate falsehood, and in view of its purpose, an English demand. After re- viewing the facts as represented by the German submarine commander who sank the Caledonia, Count Reventlow con- tinues: This short description suffices to prove the Caledonia was not an auxiliary cruiser, tilid could not be treated as such, if only in view of the attitude of the vessel. Count Reventlow demands more light on this affair, and declares Capt. Blaikie deserves the death of a franc tireur after his perfidous attitude, which was con- trary to international law.

PEACE TALKJ

 PEACE TALK..J GERMANY WILL STATE HER TERMS. American Note. U. S. Press Calls it a I Mistake. The Hague, Thursday (received! Friday).—Acting on a seini-officizill hint, the papers to-night announce that should the Allies' Note not re- ject the offer of negotiation, or should it leave the door open, Ger-1 many has decided to make known the .chief peace terms immediately. U.S. PRESS CRITICISM. I President Wilson's Note to the belligerents is given upon Page Two. However strongly the Press of the Entente Powers may protest against some of the assumptions of the Note, we may oongratulate ouraelv-es that President Wil- son has to listen to loader protestations in his home Press. Ortside the circle of pro-German newspapers there is much criticism of the President's course. The Tribune and Herald consider that the Note wil.1 have,a pro-German effect. The Tribune describes the message as a veiied threat to the Allies." It! heads its article A Mistake," and says: We profoundly regret that President Wilson should at this time have been, moved to make any gesture which, how-! ever honestly intended to promote the! cause of peace, will inevitably tend to complicate the situation. a AMERICAN FEARS. I Mr. Lansing, the Secretary of State, has made a statement exphtining that Presi-; dent Wilaon? Note to the belligerents ? declared that the situation for neutrals was becoming increasingly criitcal, tnd that the United States itself was being drawn near the verge of war. The follow- ing is the text of Mr. Lansing's state- ment the reasons for sending the Note were a,c; follows:—It was not our material in- terests that we had in mind when the Note was sent, but rather our own rights, which are becoming more and more in- volved* by belligerents on both sides, so that the situation is becoming increas- ingly critical. U I mean by that we are drawing nearer to the verge of war ourselves, and there- fore we are entitled to know exactly what each belligerent seeks in order that we may regulate our conduct in future." HAS WILSON SEPCIAL INFORMA- TION? President Wilson's Note was, writes a diplomatic correspondent, in process of preparation before Germany proffered her invitation to so-called peace negotia- tion. It is possible that PQefcident Wilson may have received special information from the German Government and is aware of the extent to which tla,?ll', are prepared to go towards reparation, resti- tution and guarantees. WHAT BERNSTORFF SAYS. Count John Bernstorff, the German Am- bassador, declares that the Note conil. him that a peace conference is certain. "BRITISH INACTIVITY." Mr. Frederic William Wile conteqds that Germany's 29-month-old propaganda in the United States has achieved its supreme victory. The President has been induced to promote Germany's growing desire for peace palpably because tho overwhelming bulk of American public opinion unquestionably supports him in doing go. j And why does it support him? Because American public opinion, for twenty-nine months without a day or a night's inter- ruption, has been systematically, cun- ni ngly, and relentlessly worked in favour of the German cause. It has been possible to vlork" it. not only because of restless German activity, but because of British inactivity. BAD PROPAGANDA TO BLAME. A distinguished American commentator now visiting England says in The Times" that the correspondence sent by the British Foreign Offioe. to the America*' State Department might have been a pul- pit from which the genuine idealism of the cause of the Allies might have been sent deep into the hearts of a people who, in spite of a 'superficial commercialism which plays at business with the same child-like zeal with whioh the Englishman plays at sports, are nevertheless at heart the most fanatically and even absuldly idealistic people in the world. But what has been the nature of the Foreign Offioe communications to America? Technical, aloof, barren. ONE WAY OPEN. If the President of the United States de- sires that the war should end now, the Morning Post" suggests to him that there is one way open. H Let him range himself on the side of the Allies and help to defeat Germany, or let him -range him- self on the side of Germany and help to defeat the Allies. But if he is net pro- pared to fight upon the one side or the other we confess we are unable to in what way he can assist in the settlement of this matter." "TOO EARLY." Dutch Minister and the Cause of the War. The Hague, Friday.—In the Second Chamber yesterday, the Minister of the Interior declared that it was still too early to inquire into the cause of the present war. It is certainly of interest for us," he said, that if fresh principles of I nternaticnal relations are to be estab- lished, Parliament should share the re- sponsibility with the Government." The Minister of War, speaking on the question of preparedness, expressed his' high satisfaction at the preparedness of, [the forces. J

BIG TRENCH RAID

BIG TRENCH RAID: MARKED ACTIVITY FROM SOMME TO ANGRE. OUR AIRMEN DROP TOO OF BOMBS I (BRITISH OFFICIAL.) ( GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, I France, Thursday, 10.20 p.m. Last nigiit a strong hostile raiding party approached our lines opposite liens. Only a few of the enemy succeeded in reaching our trenches. These were promptly ejected and the hostile party driven off. Our casualties were very slight. South-west of Armentieres a party of our troops successfully entered the enemy's trenches. Over 50 prisoners were taken by us in the course of the raid north of Arras, re- ported in yesterday's communique. To-day artillery activity has continued being especially marked along our front between the Somme and the Ancre and in the neighbourhood of Ypres. The improvement in the weather yes- terday led to considerable activity in the air. In the course of the raids carried out by our machines a ton of explosives was dropped on points of military importance behind the enemy's lines. Much fighting took place in the air. One enemy machine was destroyed and I six others driven down damaged. Four of our machines Ltrq missing.

STRANGE CONDUCTI

STRANGE CONDUCT. Collier Causes Exciting Scene at Neath. There was an exciting scene during the hearing of a case at Neath County Sessions on Friday. It appears that a man named Owen Harries was refused admission by the janitor, according to the custom of the court, whilst a case Was proceeding, when he became abusive. Police othoers ordered him to desist, and eventually there was a struggle in the corridor. Women and children became hysterical, and two women were knocked down the passage steps and fainted away. P.C. Jones, of Melincourt, was roughly handled by Harries, and had his overcoat completely torn off his back. The scene sent women shrieking, and it is without parallel. Later Harries, a collier, now living at Bonymaen, was brought before the court charged with persistent cruelty to his wife. Matilda Harries, Burnside, Neath. His face bore evidence of the struggle in the corridor, and his demeanour quiet. Mr. Windsor Williams, who prosecuted, said the parties had been married nino years. The husband had a violent temper, and had never provided a home for her, but lived with his mother. Complainant said defendant had been continually cruel towards her, threatened to cut her throat with a razor, and locked her out. PLEA FROM THE DOCK. Defendant from the dock pleaded with his wife to return to look after him and the baby, but she refused, and the Bench granted a separation order, and fixed maintenance at 15s. a week. I ■

A SHIPBUILDING RECORD

A SHIPBUILDING RECORD. A wr-time record for shipbuilding is claimed for Messrs. Workman, Clark, and Co. of Belfast, who built a 6,000-ton steamer in .three months, and had her ready for steam trials a week later.

I 59 KILLED IN MINED SHIP

I 59 KILLED IN MINED SHIP. Copenhagen, biirsday.-Aemrdi-ng to the Gefle Dagblad," the Finnish steamer Skifket has been sunk by striking a mine in the Guif of Bothftia near Abo. Fifty- nine persons were killed and only one saved.—Exchange.

IBARON REUTER KILLED

BARON REUTER KILLED. It is announced that Baron Hubert Julius de Reuter was killed in action on November 13 while serving as a private in the Black Watch. 1 He was the only son of the late Baron Herbert de lleuter, the head of Reuter's I News Agency, and was 38 years old.

I FRENCH SOLDIERS XMAS

======== FRENCH SOLDIERS' XMAS. General Nivelle has given orders for the following additions to be made per man to the rations of the troops on New Year's Day:- Shoulder of salt pork, tIb., two biscuits, wine 1 pint (extra), champagne, one bottle to four men, one cigar, two, oranges.

IA NEUTRAL VIEW

I A NEUTRAL VIEW. Geneva, Thursday.—The Volkereclit," of Zurich, referring to the Allies' refusal of the German peace proposals, says.— We are to-day in the presence of a new phase of the war, which will be the worse and more terrible for the bel- ligerents. It may place neutral nations not only in a grave economic situation, but also in danger of war."

ININE CHRISTIAN NAMES

NINE CHRISTIAN NAMES. An actor with nine Christian names, which he gave as Isaac John Penny Cyril I Chambers Edwardes Fielding Green Clut- jton Williams, was at Manchester on Thursday committed to the Sessions on charges of obtaining money by false pre- tences and was fined for giving faisle particulars to a landlady and at an hotel. — —

LUXEMBURG SLAVE RAID i

LUXEMBURG SLAVE RAID. Amsterdam, W,-dn-c.-day.-Depgrtations have been started in the Gi-and Duchy of Litxemburg. Five hundred young men and a few children of fifteen, i, as s-me men of fifty-two, have been taken from the villages. Among the number are many invalids. Practically all leave their familtes unprovided for. The Luxemburg Government intends to issue a formal protest.—Exchange.

rTWO PAIRS OF SHOESI

TWO PAIRS OF SHOES. In the uniform of a soldier, William Morris Jones appeared in the dock at Neath Sessions on Friday, cTTarged with obtaining two pairs of shoes by false pTe- tences from Alfred West, Taibach. Supt. Evans said accused represented bimsRif to be a wounded soldier, and on receiving the s hoes left the district. He was appre- hended at Skew on. Accused was remafided l in custody until Monday,

TODAYS WAR RESUMEI

TO-DAYS WAR RESUMEI Leader Office, 4.50 P.M. I President Wilson has addressed a Note I to belligerent nations inviting them to state the. terms on which peace will be acceptable to them. The Note has met with a cold reception from the American Press, and among other things it is characterised as a mistake. Railway journeys will cost more, and the third-class fare will be Hd. per mile. The object is not to obtain more re- venue for the railways, but to restrict travelling. Greece has sent a very friendly" Note to the Allies, asking for the terms re- lating to reparation, and asking them to raise the blockade. The message comas from Athens, and is dated 19th Decauk- ber. The British Mesopotamia Force is bom- barding Kut-el-Amara. The Egyptian town of Lresel-Arish, which has been in enemy hands for two years, has been occupied by our troops, whose rapid advance prevented the enemy making a stand. German, papers report that should the Allies Note not definitely reject the offer of negotiations, Germany has decided to immediately make known her chief peace terms. Parliament has been prorogued until Wednesday, February 7tli.

TODAYS NEWS IN BRIEF I

TO-DAY'S NEWS IN BRIEF I Burying in a garden C27 in gold which belonged to his father, a boy told the Acton Bench that he used to draw £4 or £ 5 a week and spend it with his com- panions. Lieutenant-Colonels C. W. Clark (Koyal Artillery), J. V. Campbell, V.C. (Cold- stream Guards), and J. C. Robertson (Aus- tralian Force) are gazetted brigadier generals. The funeral arrangements for the funeral of Mr. Sidney Curnow, which was reported in the Leader" on Thursday, j were in the hands of Mr. D. G. Phillips, j Dillwyn-street. ) An accountant told the Middlesex Tri- bunal on Thursday that in the last six weeks he had been ill lor three weeks and had spent 11 days flf; witness and 10 days as juror at the Old Baiky. "As the money was gone it was gone and it was no good making a fuss," said a labourer at Thames Police Court in ex- plaining that he did not complain to the I' police of heing robbed-of £ 45 in a White- chapel-road lodging-house, Mr. Neville Chamberlain, Director- General of National Service and Lord: Mayor of Birmingham, on Thursday pre- sentod to PHvate Turrall, V.C., an em- grossed and framed resolution ot-tjie citv I council, TurraU's mother being present. I Mr. Sam Aptod, who was head grounds- ( man for the Surrey County C.C., the Oval for over a quarter of a century, died, ¡ on Thursday at Reigate. Over 45,000 peopJp | attended hi* benefit match in 1910. anil Ii'- Piince of Wales subscribed to the fund. I Scm year ago he. was oonsulted with regard to tlie cricket pitches at Swansea. )

IGRAND JURIES MAY GO I

GRAND JURIES MAY GO. Sir F. E. Smith, Attorney-General, on I Thursday in Parliament said he sympa- thised with the proposal to do without I grand juries at assizes and quarter ses-I s ions, and hoped to announce the decision I in Januarv. I

I WOMENS WAGES I

I WOMEN'S WAGES. I I Dr. Addison, Minister of Munitions, ip I a new Older dealing with women on men's work in munitions, confirms the guarantees given last November. Women employed on the work of un- skilled men will, be paid tl a week of 4S hours, with 6d. an hour overtime, and higher rates may be given to women en semi-skiJloo. 6poeially responsible, or j specially laborious work. I

I MNtSTERS SECRETARIES

I M!NtSTERS' SECRETARIES. I Dr. Addison, the Minister of Munitions, jhas appointed Mr. W. S. Glyn Jones, M.P., 1 to be the Parliamentary private secretary jto the Ministry, in succession to Mr. F. Kellaway, M.P. He has also appointed Mr. H. H. Piggott and Mr. M. Heeeltine to be his private secretaries. I Mr. F. Kellaway, Parliamentary Secre- tary to the Ministry, has appointed Mr. P. Barter to be his private secretary.

INOT CALLED UP YETI

I NOT CALLED UP YET. I I An employer, appealing to a London tri- [bunal on Thursday for one of J'is work- men, said that another shop ot his was being managed by his son. Chairman: Has your son obtained ex- emption?—No sir. He has not been I called up. ? Not been called up?" echoed the chairman, astonished. No, sir," was the unexpected reply. He is 60 years of age, and I am 85."

WALKED THROUGH WINDOWI

'WALKED THROUGH WINDOW I P.C. Brindal told the Stipendiary (Mr. ) in. LIeufer Thomas) at Porth on Thurs- day that Thomas Bowen, a Mardy col- lier, charged with being drunk and dis- orderly, had staggered against a plate- glass window in High-street, Ferndale, and smashed it. Defendant said he had undertaken to pay for the damage, and the case was ad- journed for a month to enable him to I do 60.

I A TOWN WITHOUT WHISKYI

A TOWN WITHOUT WHISKY. I The Liquor Control Board announced at Carlisle on Thursiiy that the sale of spirits for consumption either on or -.ff the premises at Longtown will be dis- continued unTIl further notice at the request of t'he Ministry of Munitions. Longtown, nine miles north-west of Car- lisle, has a railway station, markets, horse I fair, and petty sessions court. Now a I well-l rilt town, it was a poor village not II many years ago.

I MEDICAL EXAMINATIONSI

MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS. I Mr. Caradoe Kee3 011 Monday succeeded at the Sout Ii-Western (London) Police Court in obtaining a favourable decision on the point that an attested man who had I been medically rejected, nnd who bad iiot, received a notice to submit to medieaj re- examination before the 1st September, was exempt from military service. The question will to-day be put to the Under- Secretary for War if it now proposed to release frcfrn Army service all the men in a similar position who have recejitly been I called to the colours.

Advertising

DRIVEN INTO SEA. Russian Sirssssss on Land and Sea. TO-DAY'S RUjSIAN OFFICIAL, (Admiralty, per NTareless Pr). Rumanian Froat.-on the left of tho Danube active attempts by th^> enemy to :1Had- us were repulsed by our fire*. In the Dobrudja the enemy, with superior force?, attacked with de- tachinCTifs along the whole front. After a stubborn rcsit*anco oar detachments coittmeccod to withdraw northward* By 11 daring attack by one of the regiments, the juulgars, who advanced east of Lako Daboday, were throwio into Lalro Ibolota* The gxtete-r part of them iv-oft drowned, and m were taken pntaaeres Biack Soa^—In tl>e Black Set oft. hare sunk two Tarkish motor gunboat..