Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 6 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
27 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

The Cambria Daily I Leader" gives later news than any paper I published in this dis- trict.

Advertising

— f The London Office of the "Cambria Daily Leader" is at 151, Fleet Street (first floor ), where adver tisements can be received up to 7 o'clock each evening for insertion in the next day's issue. Tel. I 2276 Cental.

OUR PEACE TERMS

OUR PEACE TERMS. Unmistakable Reply to America. REORGANISATION OF EUROPE. The text of the Allies' reply to the U.S. Peace Note was published I Da Thursday night. It is a strong and unmistakable document. Our chl"ef war aims are set out. as follows :— Restoration of Belgium, Serbia, and Montenegro, with compensations. Evacuation of Invaded Territories, with reparation. I Restitution of Provinces formerly torn from Allies. v Liberation of peoples now under foreign yoke. Expulsion of Ottoman Empire £ c.rope. i The following is the text of the reply [Translation.] The Allied Governments have received the Note handed to them on December 19, 1916, by the Government of the United Statoe. They have considered it with care due both to their own keen sense of the gravity of the preeent time and to the sincere friendship which unites them to the American people. In a general way they desire to declare their respect for the lofty sentiments in- spiring the American Now, and their w hole-hearted agreement with the pro- posal to create a league of nations which shall assure peace alid justice throughout: the world. They recognise all the benefits which will accrue to the cause of humanity and civilisation from the institution of inter- national arrangements tiesigned to prevent violent conflicts between nations, and so framed as to provide the sanctions neces- sary to their enforcement, lest an illusory security should serve merely to facilitate fresh acts of aggression. OUR DESIRE FOR PEACE. But a discussion, of future arrangements .for assuring a durable peace presupposes a satisfactory settlement of the present conflict. The Allies cherish a desire as deep as that of the Government of tlit United States to see an end put as soon 813 possible to the war for which the Cen- tral Empires are responsible, and which inflicts such cruel sufferings upon humanity. But in their judgment it is impossible to obtain at this moment such a peace as Will not only secupe to them the repara- tion, the restitution, and the guarantees justly due to them by reason of the act of aggression, the guilt of which is tiitxi upon the Central Powers, while the-very principle from which it sprang was under- mining the safety of Europe; but also at the tame time such a peace as will enable the future of the European nations to be established upon a sure foundation. The Allied nations are convinced that they are not fighting for oelfich interests, but, above all, to provide safeguards for the independence of peoples, for law and tor humanity. NEUTRALS' LOSSES. The Allies are fully conscious of the losses and suffering entailed by war on neutrals as well as on belligerents. They regret them, but cannot consider them- selves responsible for them, as they in no wav either desired or provoked this war; they are doing all in their power to reduce in every possible way the damage occa- sioned by it, so far as they can do so under the inexorable pressure of provid- ing for their own defence against the violence and the devices of the enemy. They note with satisfaction the declara- tion made to them that the American com- munication is not in any way connected in its origin with that of the Central Powers transmitted to them on December 18 by the Government of the United States, In- deed, they did not doubt the determination -of that Government to avoid any appear- ance of giving even moral support to the responsible authors of the war. OUR AIMS, AND THE ENEMY'S. The Allied Governments feel it their duty to challenge in the most friendly, but also in the clearest way, .the analogy drawn between the two gioup,6 of belli- gerents. This analogy, based on the public declarations of the Central Powers, is in direct conflict with the evidence, both as regards responsibility for the past and guarantees for the future. President Wilson, in alluding to this analogy, did not, of course, intend to adopt it as his .wn. If any fact of history is clearly estab- lished to-d ay, it is/the calculated policy of aggression by which Germany and Austria-Hungary sought to en-sure their hegemony ot Europe and their economic domination over the world. By her de- claration of war, by the instant violation of Belgium and Luxemburg, and by her methods of warfare, Germany has proved that she systematically scorns every prin- ciple of humanity finds all respect due to •mall States. CHALLENGE TO CI VI LlSATI ON. I More and more as the struggle has pro- gressed has the attitude of the Central Powers and their allies b,>(\n a constant challenge to humanity and civilisation. Is it necessary to recall the horrotg that marked the invasion of Belgium and of Serbia, the atrocious treatment under- gone by the invaded countries, the massa- cres of hundreds of thousands of inoffen- sive Armenians, the barbarities inflicted upon the peoples of Syria, the raids of Zeppelins upon open towns, the destruc- tion by submarines of passenger liners and merchant vessels, even under neutral flags, the cruel treatment inflict,d on prisoners of war, the judicial murders of Miss Cavell and Captain Fryatt, de- portation and enslavement of civil popu- lations, etc The perpetration of such a catalogue of crimes, regardless of the reprobation of mankind, will purely explain to President Wilson the protest which the Allies here make. They eonjnder that the Note which thoy have handed to th- United States, in reply to the German, Note, answers the qaestion put by the American Govern- ment and constitutes in their own words a public avowal of their views as to the teraw upon which the war might be con- cluded." DETAILS OF ALLIES' ArMS. I But President Wilson expressed a further wish: he desired the belligerent Powers to state in the full light of day the aims they have set themselves m proaeeuUag tie war. Tifa^ kllies find no c a difficulty in meeting this request. Thesr ■ aims in this war are well known, for they have been repeatedly expressed by the heads of their several Governments. These aims can only be formulated an detail, with all the just compensations and indemnities due for the losses suf- fered, when the moment for negotiation arrives. But the civilised world knows that they include, primarily find of necessity:— The restoration of Belgium, of Serbia, and of Montenegro, with the compensa- tions due to them. The evacuation of the invaded territory ( in France, Russia, and Rumania, with fit- ting reparation. The reorganisation of Europe, guaran- teed by a stable settlement, based alike upon the principle of nationalities, on the right which all peoples, whether small or great, have to the enjoyment of full security and free economic development, and also upon territorial agreements and international arrangements so framed as to guarantee land and sea frontiers against unjust attacks. The restitution of provinces or terri- tories formerly torn from the Allies by force or contrary to the wishes of their inhabitnants. The liberation of Italians, Slavs, Ru- manians, Czechs and Slovaks from foreign domination. The liberation of the peoples who now lie beneath the murderous tyrrany of the Tu.rks and the expulsion from Europe of the Ottoman Empire, which has proved itself so radically alien to Western civili- sation. The intentions of his Majesty the Emperor of Russia in rtgard to Poland have been clearly shown in the proclama- tion which he has just addressed to his armies. ATTITUDE TO GERMANY. I It is hardly necessary to add that, while it is the wish of the Allies'to rescue Europe from the brutal encroachments of j Prussian militarism, it has never been their intention, as has been alleged, to seek the extermination or the political ex- tinction of the Germanic peoples. The ?chi,&f aim of the Allies is to assure peace ou those principles of liberty, justice, and [inviolable fidelity to international obliga- tions, which have never ceaeed to inspire the action of the United States. With this high end in view, the Allied Governments are each and all determined to put forth all their strength and to en- dure every -sacrifice in order that they may press to a victorious close a conflict on which, they are convinced, depend not only their own safety and prosperity, but the very future of civilisation. ———— GERMANY'S VIEW. Peace Mots References to I Ireland. Amsterdam. Friday.—A Berhu telegmm says:—Yebt?rday a Note was handed to th? rep re&Mjta fives of neutral (]()vern-I ments in B?rim regarding the reply of the Allies to the German peace proposals. The Note says the form in which the Allies couched their communication makes a reply to them impossible. The German Government, however, de- sires to inform neutrals that the Central Powers have no reason to enter again into controversy as to the origin of the war. History would judge on whom the blame of tho war fell. 1 he Note refers to the u encircling policy of England, the reranc*he policy of Fronde, Russia's aspiration after Con- stantinople, provocation by Serbia, the Serajevo murders, and Russian mobilise I i joT,RL-uter. TEXT OF THE NOTE. I -?ew ?'?' Thursday (receive Friday). —The remaining portion of VTermany's Note to n?uira?. in r?p}y to the Entente's answer ?t the German peace pT?p

OUR PEACE TERMS

-1 Turkey, and the. dismemberment of Bul. garia. The sincerity which the enemies d, nied to the four )Ihed Powem recalled the fte of the hish people, the destruc- tion of freedom and independence of the Boer Republics, the subjection of NoOrth. cm Africa by England. Prance and Italy, the suppression of foreign nationalities in Russia, and 'the oppression of Greece. j INTERNATIONAL RIGHTS. Regarding the alleged violation of Inter- national rights, the four Allied Powers had no rigihtto protest against it, who from the beginning of the war trumpled upon r?h?, and tore ?p treaties. The starvation campaign agaiiuft Germany and the pressure of ?hp neutrals exercised in England's interest was no less grossly contrary to the rules of Intern ational I jaw and the laws of humanity. The four Allied Powers would prosecute the fight with calm trust and confidence in the good cause until peace hed been &ned. Reuter. ————— AN IMPUDENT OFFER. Evacuation of Belgium-at a Price! Geneva, Friday.—An Exchange Tele- graph Company message says:—The Gazette de Lausanne" publishes a statement on good authority to the effect that the German Governinent is prepared to evacuate Belgium and the French territory occupied by its troops in ret-urn for Belgian Congo. In re. v • n for an -independent Poland, j 'h? Government is a-??o pTPparpd to make j concessions to Russia, in other directio.lls, ¡ prob&hty at the expense of Tuxk?q. 1

AUSTRIA HUNCARY I

AUSTRIA HUNC(A)RY I NO MILK FOR BABIES; MEAT AT 4s. 5D. PER LB. An Italian semi-official report (Admiralty, per Wireless Press) deals with the latest news of the internal con- dition of Austria-Hungary. The message says:— Berne.—In spite of the confidence shown by the Aiietro-Hungarran Press in the early adhesion of the Entente Powers to the peace proposals, the truth has found its way into all classes of the Austrian population. A letter received from Vienna, and which escaped the Censor, describes the state of mind among the civil popula- tions, and the complete demoralisation. There is no more milk for infants, and mortality among them has increased inordinately. There is no more meat to be had, unless one pays 12 kroner per kilogra--iiin,- (about 4s. Sd. per lb.); the means of transport, are diminishing; cloth- ing materials and shoes are running short; begging iis very common and pitiable; the confidence of the people in victory has dkwnpesred because how can the Empire poss:bly iind new men rabble of taking up arras for future battles? Evidence of the complete submission of Austria to the orders of Berlin adds to the irritation and di6trust of the people in its Government. For some it appeared from reports in the Tyrolese Press as it- Nature, with its avalanche and disasters, only inflicted damage on the Italian camps in the Alps. To-day the Meraner iaitii-ng admits that the railway of the Brennero has been cut off for the greater portion ever since December by formidable avalanches, which destroyed trains, stations, and troop barracks. A letter from an officer now in the sector of the Paur Sarca confirms that the number of victims was considerable. Zurich.—Every day the Eeichspost." has a new solution to offer to its readers on the subject of peace. To-day that paper gets excited about the principles of nationalisation, and allots to Italy the possession of Malta and Corsica. This in- terest is dictated by the conviction that peace is near. The Budapest Hirlep" ib of opinion that Italy desires peace at any price, be- cause she would be under the menace of Austria and Germany.

4010160 CASUALTIES I

4,010,160 CASUALTIES. -———— German Army Losses Since Outbreak of War. The following ie a summary of the Ger- man casualties reported in the German official casualty lists during the month of December, and also the totaJ since the war began:— Dec. Total. Killed and died of wounds 15,160 909,665 Died of sickness 1,154. 57,459 Prisoners 1019. 229,741 Missing 15,395 284,115 Severely wounded 11,553 530,991 j Wounded 4,601 296,564 Slightly wounded 32,490 1,486,02At Wounded, remaining j with units 6,729 215,605 Total. 88,291 4,010,160 The above figures include all German nationalities, Prussians, Bavarians, Saxon and Wurtembergers. They do not include naval or Colonial casualties.—Press Asso- ciation.

COLLIERS STRANGE DEATH

COLLIER'S STRANGE DEATH. Extraordinary Affair Near Neath. A story of a painfully sudden death has I been reported by the police from Onllywn, a little mining village near Neath. It appears that Edward Mortimer Garth, an unmarried collier, aged 42, re- turned home from the colliery on Tjjurs- day, and was taking his usual bath near the kitchen fire. Shortly afterwards, his landlady—Mrs. Wheeler—came 'down- stairs and discovered Garth stripped to the waist and his head immersed in the tikth of water. She called to him, but receiving no reply, she went into the atrfpt, aind called in a man named Albert Watkins who, on raising Garth's head out of the water, found he was dead.

A CARDIFF SENSATION I

A CARDIFF SENSATION. Summonses under the Defence of t'hle Realm Act have hn issued against a former assistant-master of the Cardiff High School for Boys, and they are re- turnable before the stipendiary magis- trate (Mr. T. W. Lewis) next Wednesday. The charges arise out of the search made, under warrant by the police at the rooms of the assistant-master a few weeks ago.

No title

The Bishop of London is to dedicate war .■shrines in Station-road and St. Anne's- road. Harrow.

DEUTSCHLAND FAILS TO GET HOME

DEUTSCHLAND FAILS TO GET HOME IZOOO,000 IN COLD ON Duou A R D I £ 2,000,600 IN GOLD 9t MABO I (By a Naval Correspondent). The Deutschland left New London, on I Tuesday, 21st November. If ill had gone well with her she would hive reached Bremen, her home port, at the very out- side, in 20 days, that ie to tay, about the 9th or 10th of December. For her out- ward journey she left Bremea on 10th Oct- ober, and, although she was reported as having been delayed by an i-c-tident. to her machinery just as she woe, leaving the; German harbour, ahe reached New Lon- don shortly after midnight on 1st Novem- ber, or 20 days for the whole passage. On her previous voyage, Iron Baltimore to Bremen, the Deutschlani only required 16 days, but, even taking the longest time, viz 20 days, the Deutscaiand is now a full month overdue. On the passage from aerroany to the j Connecticut port the Deitschland carried a valuable cargo of American securities in addition to State documents, for the Ger- mail Embassy, at Washington. On the j return voyage, which she has not yet com- pletedt the commercial submarine is re- ported to have had on board gold to the; value of £ 2,000,000, in addition to nickolli and rubber. The type of craft, of course, is not capable of carrying either great weight or cargo which involves much j bulk, cargo room beiijg limited, and weight is a nicely-balaucid proposition in l a submersible. END OF U-LINER FLEET. I The grim fact is daily more impressive I on the quays of Bremœ and' Hamburg that the Deutschland is four weeks over- due. Her failure ends -he German mer- cantile submarine fleet, for the Bremen, which signalled Heligoland on Monday, 14th August, on her fir6t passage to America, has never sinw reported either to her home port or to tie German Ameri- can agents at New London. The cargo the Deutschland was carrying homeward is said to have representee in money value and in the desperate requirements of Ger- many for munitions, at the cargoes car- ried on previous trips. Her failure must therefore be a stunning blow, especially after the salvos of enthusiaam her first I .success was roeeived wi th. COLLISION TALE A BLUFF? One curious circumstance notable about the Deutschland is that when she left Bremen a message was sent out that she had met with an aceideit just as she was leaving the harbour. When she left New London :t will be recaUed a sensation was created by the report cabled to this ooun- try that she had been in collision with a tug and had bad to put back for repa-irs necessitating a four da.ys lay up in dry dock. Amongst seafaring men neither re- port was believed, more especially the American report, "which was simply re- garded as a. piece of German bluff and trickery to try and hool-wink and throw some dust in the eyes of the bull-dogs • who roam the Northern Seas. If the story was intended to put the British patrol off ita thess watch for a moment let alone the lour days the Deutschland was supposed to have put i back for repairs, it was a very thin one. From the Pentland Fir-th to Norway, the eyes of the British Fleet are those of Nuifc- quam.

PARIS ZEPP ALARMI

PARIS ZEPP ALARM. -d O ? City Warned, BlltNO';ÅjrA craft Appeared. Paris, Thursday (recerived Friday).—In- formation having been received from the l front that enemy Zeppelins wer,, proceed- ing southwards, the prescri bed measures of precaution were taken in Paris this evening. The alarm wa.s given at 6.45 p.m. The sound of the bugles informed the inhabi- tants of the possibility of an aerial attack, and the police immediately caused all lights to be extinguished throughout the city. No enemy aircraft having appeared, the mgnal thftt the alarm was at an end given at 7.40 p.m.—Press Association War Special.

MR ROGER BECK I

MR. ROGER BECK. Mr. Roge-r Beck, who has been lying seriously ill at his residence at Langland for over a week, was reported on Friday morning to be progressing very favonr- ably. He had a distinct change for the better 011 Thursday.

GRIEF FOLLOWS JOY j

GRIEF FOLLOWS JOY. Just after he had n coniratulated by the mayor as Islington Tribunal on the war honoiire, won by his two offirer 6ons, j .Mr. E. Smallwood, J.P., L.C.C. was called rto the telephone, and there learned that one of the sons, Acting-Captain E. B. Smallwood, Military Cross, was killed in action last Sunday. j

r RUSSIAN AMBASSADOR DEAD

r RUSSIAN AMBASSADOR DEAD) The death occurred in London on Thursday night of Count Benckendorft, the Russian Ambassador. It wac, just fourteen years ago that Count Bejickendorff came to this country from Copenhagen, as Ambassador, in suc- cession to the late Baron von Staal. His activity during the great crisis caused by the Russo-Japanese War was highly creditable to him, for it laid the founda- tion of that rapprochment between Russia and Great Britain which subse- quently matured into an Entente. He lost a eon. in the preeent way, and in April laet was decorated by the Tsar with the diamond insignia of the Order of St. Alexander Nevsky.

I SUICIDE TO HELP WIN WAR

SUICIDE TO HELP WIN WAR. At an inquest held on Thursday at Bethna] Green on the body of William Platt Ball, age 72, said to be an author, who committed suicide by taking poison, an extraordinary letter left by deceased was read. Deceased wrote:—" I am taking poison to end my life, as my oilments are be- coming unbearable, and as being by far the simplest of the problems before me. I also wish to leave what little property I possess to my Mind niece. If I were to live this woui- disappear. By my act I shall be helping to win the war, as I shall be economising by saving the whole expenses of living. I shall therefore in this be patriotic, although I oonfes6 it is Dot my deciding motive." A verdict if Suicide during temporary titsanity n was returned. [ r s •

1300 YARDS OF TRENCH i

1,300 YARDS OF TRENCH BRITISH SWEEP FORWARD NEAR BEAUMONT HAitiEL BRITISH OFFICIAL. I GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, France, Thursday, 9.15 p.m. A number of minor enterprises were undertaken by us again last night, with excellent reeults. South of the Ancro we entered th. enemy's trenches at two places in the neighbourhood of Grandcourt, and se- cured prisoners. Early this morning a. local operation north-aaet of Beaumont-Hamel on a lar- ger scale met with complete success. An enemy trench was carried by our troops on a front of three-quarters of a mile, and our positions established. An enemy counter-attack this afternoon wag caught in the open by onr artillery and broken up with low. One hundred and seventy-six prisoners, including four officers, have been taken by us in the course of these operations in this area. The enemy trenches were also entered by Tig last night east of A rnientieres and north-east of Ypres. Many casualties were inflicted on the enemy. Artillery activity has been marked in the area north of Bouchavesnes and In. the neighbourhood of Le Sars, Beaucourt, and Fouquevillers. TO-DAY'S FRENCH OFFICIAL. I The night was calm on the whole of II the front. FRENCH OFFICIAL. I PAE-ls, Thursday, 11 pjn. Artillery actions took place in Upper l Alsace, in Woerre, and in the region of Verdun. It was quiet on the rest of the front.

THE U BOAT MENACEI

THE U BOAT MENACE. —————. ————— Sir J. Jellicoe Says Greater Than Ever. Admiral Sir John R. Jellicoe, Fir»t Sea Lord of the Admiralty and until recently Commander-in-Chief of the Grand Fleet, I was on Thursday preeented with the l Honorary Freedom of the Fishmongers' Company. In the absence, through illness, of the Prime Warden (Sir Matthew I Ingle Joyce), the presentation was made, on behalf of the Court, by Mr. R. L. Tow- good. At a luncheon which followed the cere- mony the Acting Prime Warden proposed the health of Sir John Jellicoe, who, in reply, made an important spee,d1. He sketched the services required from the Navy in present-day warfare, and oon-I trasted the conditions with thoee of Nel- son?s time. He 'described the enemy's/ boaet of apajchiB? the North Sea for cur Fleet a$being without j?tiS-aMe bMM." On only one occasion had the Germans Tentured eumciently far vnth than' ma.in fleet to give the British an opportunity to engage them. On August 19, 1916, they cama within measurable distance of the EngHah coast, but tumed back presum- ably because the presence of our Fleet was reported by their aircraft. "The sub- marine menace to the merchant a&rrioe,'? he said, "ie far greater now than at any I period of the war, and it requires all our energy to combat it. It must and will be met. » The rieit of the German ffigh Sea Fleet recorded officially in the Press of August 21. The light cruisers Nottingham and Falmouth were torpedoed on that occasion. It has not been publicly stated previously, however, tha; the enemy came within measnreable distance of the Eng- lish coast.*

HARRY THAWS RASH ACT I

HARRY THAW'S RASH ACT. I Philadelphia, Thursday. Harry K. Thaw tfjas taken to hospital to-day, after attempting to conunit 6uicide by cutting his wrists and throat. The police had been searching for him for some days, to arrest him on New York indictments for the kidnapping and flagellation of a 19-year-old youth from California. When Thaw made the at- tempt on his life the police had sur- rounded the house in Weet Philadelphia where be and the youth were living.— Reutei.

HOME GROWN FOOD I

HOME GROWN FOOD. I The War Agricultural Committee for the Western Division of Glamorgan met on Wednesday, at the district valuer's office, Northampton-place, Swansea., County County Councillor W. J. P. Player being in the chair. It was decided to circularise all the farmers in the district in order to obtain a census of the land under the plough at present, and to see how this area could be increased to meet the re- quirements of the Government. Meetings of farmers will shortly be held in various I centres throughout the district, when the plans will be discussed.

ROSE ONCE IN 72 YEARS I

ROSE ONCE IN 72 YEARS. By the death of an old Ia.dy this week in Scarborough, at the age of 94, a remark- able tragedy of disappointed love has been brought to a close after 72 years. When elie was 21 years of age she con- tracted an engagement which did not meet with the approval of hpr father, who forbade it. The young lady in her disappointment took to her bed, where she remained until her death, except that on one occasion she rose to leave Cam- bridge for Scarborough. She never suffered from an complaint until the end, when she was ill for only, two days.

TEA 16s A POUND

TEA 16s. A POUND. A glimpse of what life is like in Brue- sels at the present time is revealed in & letter which, in spite of all enelhy restric- tions, arrived in London yesterday. "All the gaiety of this little Paris has gone long ago," eays th? writer. "Our fir?t consideration is how to get enough to eat. I have seen no white bread for two years. The price of necessities ig given am 5ol- lows: I Butter is 8s. a pound. Coffee 13s. a pound. Tea 16e. a pound. ¡. Eggs as only 4d. each. Soap 2s. a small tablet. Cheese, lard, flour, and potatoes," adds the writer, are unprocurable. Coal ha,, become a veritable black diamond, and we have built soup kitchens for the poor in every public square. New orders 'r-. ?,4 iiai-t- or & -6 are continually being issued by the Ger- mans, and now no Belgian is allo-wwsg to Jbe out of doors aiter 7'.30 at night. i

TflBAYS WAR RESUMEI

Tfl-BAYS WAR RESUMEI Leader Office, 4.50 p.m. The text of the Allies' reply to the United States Peaoe Not which was published overnight, leaves no doubt as to our attitude. In a nutshell it demands the reorganisation of Europe. Hunger is rampant in Hungary, where meat is fetching 4s. 5d. per pound. There is no milk for the babies. According to a Geneva telegram, the Ger- mans are prepared to evacuate Belgium and tho occupied French territory, bat I they want Belgian Congo. The British have swept forward near j Beaumont Hamel, and have gained 1,300 yards of trenches- It is officially stated that the Greek Gov- j ernment has definitely accepted the j Allies' ultimatum.

BRITISH ACTIVITY I

BRITISH ACTIVITY. I A Whirlwind Bombardment I on Western Front. (From the Press Association Special I Correspondent, British Headquarters in the Field, France, January 11th). The series of operations which began with the capture of two posts and 58 pri- soners, described in my message of the 6th met., were continued during Wednes- day and to-day ( Thursday) with complete success. As the result of the two days' fighting we have taken just over 300 pris- oners, of whom six are officers. About 25 per cent, of these are Prussians, the re- mained belonging to the 5th Bavarian Division. The gain in ground, whilst not large in extent, is of ifrst-class, tactical importance. We have captured various posts and trench elemetits of the German front line system, which gives us domination of high ground, and at the same time deprives the enemy of observation over a large area, of our positions. The fighting was organised on the same lines as those already des- cribed, but on a more extensive scale. Our heavy batteries have been playing I intermittently upon these positions throughout the past week, and in each case the infantry advance was heralded by a whirlwind bombardment. The resis- tance was of a desultory order, the enemy fighting well in places, and surrendering freely in others. Our casualties have been extremely light for the results at- tained. Indeed, most of these have been incurred repelling the counter-attacks by which the Germans have sought to re- trieve their losses. Considerable captures 01 provisions ana stores and dug-outs were taken. OBJECT OF OPERATIONS. I These operations mark an interesting de- parture from raids which have become so I common all along our front. A raid con- sists of going over into enemy trenches, inflicting as much damage as possible, getting identification as to troops in posi- tion, collecting a few prisoners, and thfen I returning. These attacks in Beaumont Hamel are aimed at giving the mastery of j positions and incidentally have attained all, and a good deal more, than the Ol.- jective of any raid. The effects of such tactics upon the morale of the enemy is great, being carried out as they are under conditions of weather and ground, when he counts upon a respite at least from the activity of our infantry. In a correspon- ding degree the spirits of our men are raised by their success for there is nothing tho British Army more essentially desires just now than an opportunity to get on with the war as the beet answer possible to all German talk about peace.

SWANSEA WAR LOAN I

SWANSEA & WAR LOAN. I Application Forms" Going I Like Hot Cakes." Swansea townspepole on Friday, from the labourer to-the doeksman, are taking their part in the new War Loan. Every post office in the town, every bank, and every stockbroker, had copies Iof the prospectuses, and from 9 a.m. I clerks handed out the application forms, many of which were filled up on the spot, and handed over the counters with cheques or ca?h on deposit. The banks particularly were busy, it is understood, and the clerks had quite, a brisk time answering questions from in- tending investors. I think," said a prom-inent Swansea stockbroker on Friday morning, H hat be- tween 60,000 to 100,000 application forms 1 were sent to Swansea. It is a. little early yet, but I believ it, is the opinion on I 'Change, too—that they will go like hot cakes."

uI WHIST FOR WAR FUNDSI i

u- WHIST FOR WAR FUNDSI Successful Dhves "at ii Swansea. j Nearly 500 people took part on Thurs- j day evening in the last of the series of three nights' whist drives at tho Hotel Metropole, Swansea, in aid of the local '1 prisoners' of war fund. The event was a great success, and at the close of Thurs- ) day night's proceedings the Mayor (Aid. | David Davies) warmly thanked all who j had lent their assistance, and pointed ,,en4.-ra t (lwire to out that there was a general desire to I hold another similar event at an early date. The Mayoress (Mrs. Dd. Davies) pre- sented the prizes, the winner-s being:— 1st (Ladies): Mrs. Hughes, Kilvey- terraee (186), umbrella, presented by Mr. E. Theophiius; 2nd, Mies Greatnex, Brynmill-crescent (18-1), sitting by Mr. A. Colquhoun. 1st (Gent's): Mr. W. L. Gardiner, 9, King Edward-road (180). case of six silver sfih knives and forks, given bv Messrs. ¡ Fulton and Co.; 2nd, Mr. Yeo, St. Thomas (178), cushion, presented by Mrs Sparrow. Aggregate priz.es-lst (Ladies): Mre. McKelvie, 7, Carlton-terrace (432), gold watch presented by Messrs. J. Da vies, Ltd.; 2nd, Mrs. Hughes, 20, Kilvey-ter- race. 27 lib. hagyi of flour, given by Messrs. Weaver and Co. Gent's: 1st prize lv?ld in abeyance,, Mr. W. Gardiner and Mr. W. Turner both claiming scores of 433. The cards are I being checked, and the result will be an- nounced later. Gent's 2nd prize, Mr. F. Taylor, BryD- road, water colour or oil painting, pre- sented by Mr. O. Yanstone. V.T.C. prize: Mr. T. A. George (421), gift of 10s. 6d. from Mor Perkins.

A SWANSEA SUDDEN DEATH I

A SWANSEA SUDDEN DEATH. I The Swansea Borough Coroner has j been notified of the sudden death of John Welsh, who for many years was a m,-tal dealer. Welsh was found dead 011 that pathwiy in King's-lane, High-stree]L 00 11 Thursday night. t

Advertising

THE-RAFA-VICTORY. Press Association mecwa ^aia Victory, which vas due io -ciiy sapretpe Ttu-fci oat oi Sinai. Oppcsicj troops tvera res'ilars, ana caLp-hr-ed. include com- manttar aad Gre&men' oiacdrs. Otfi losses were comparatively •ligh'i- T' :f::1 troops adranoed OOlll:1e.in is o-cv^rs. to-day's. Russian (Admiralty, perWfrel.3^3 Fra:s). Qp January 11th, t.ao in attacked our reaps pi1 ;ated east of to village d l"ilzeer- Th*. attack, was repulsed f.t and 4.f¡t. ef Oitsfc the 6APtly attacked ilia Hv-Uiaa- iartc on tlèR.in;r Kastino, font bsa/tei feoir. Is this region tins threw haclt the enemy t'Jo versts k.. wards the ecmth. The attacks by the enemy on tl River Sachitza and eo-ath-east of tho IUvo;" Btizea were also u.nsnocer:ful. SAW MUCH SERViCE. Neath Dafeir,dent's Proud Hcccrd. A ranxSrkahle record of vras eaid to have been made by John Osven Morgan, who appeared fit Neath on Friday in-khaki, as defanda,t in s de- :s*rti