Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
33 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

TO OUR READERS. Owing to the reduction in the supply of news paper, in conse- quence of the. Government restric- tions, readers are requested to place defiriite orders with their newsagent or bookstall to reserve copies of the "AMBRIA DAILY LEADER to assure regular delivery and avoid disappointment.

Advertising

The Cambria Daily .Leader" gives later news than any paper published in this dis- trict.

MORE CAPTURES

MORE CAPTURES. FRENCH HAU LS IN MINOR OPERATIONS. Futile Enemy Attacks. HEAVY LOSSES INFLICTED ON ASSAILANTS. TO-DAY'S FRENCH OFFICIAL. To the south of St. Quentin the enemy artillery, vigorously at- tacked by ours, showed itself ac- tive during the night. There were patrolling contests to the north of Urvillers. In the region of Laffaux we made a great deal of progress and took 40 prisoners. [We repulsed several German coun- ter-attacks in this sector. On the Tanclere and the, plateau south-east of Courcy, we captured by grenade fighting several trenches. To the east of the Oivry, well-exe- cuted operations gave us some ground and 250 prisoners. In Champagne the night was marked by violent reaction by the enemy. Three strong counter-attacks, pre- ceded by a bombardment, were lodged by the Germans in the region of Moronviliers. Our barrage and machine-gun fire reduced to naught the attempts, and cost the enemy very heavy ldsses. Twenty prisoners remain in our hands. The night was calm everywhere else. Aviation.-Since the 16th of April, ten aeroplanes and two captive balloons were brought down in aerial combat by our pilots. .TO-DAY'S BRITISH OFFICIAL. Friday, 11.20 a.m. Pur troops gained ground during the night, in the neighbourhood of Viilersguislan. Elsewhere there is nothing of special interest to report. LAST NIGHT'S BRITISH OFFICIAL. General Headquarters, r ranee, lhurs- day, S.45 p.m. We improved our position slightly last night south of Monchy-lo-Preux. To-day our troops made further pro- gress east of Fampoux and in the enemy's tranches bo nth-east of Loos, where we pgain capt tred prisoners. South of Lens an enemy bombing: at- tack upon one of our advanced positions was successfuly beaten off. The total number of guns captured -o date is 228. LAST NIGHT'S FRENCH OFFICIAL. Paris, Thursday. 11.0 p.m.: Betwen th? Somme and the Oie. there were rathe- violent artillery actions. North of the Aisne the enemy, under our strong pressure, continues to fall back towards Chimin—D«-s— Dames. Our troops occupied in the course of the day the villages of Aisy, Jouy, and Laf- faux, and keep in close contact with the enemy. Condooourt has also fallen into oar hands. In the region of Hurte Boise, after brisk fighting, we captured a support point to the north of this farm We here captured 501 prisoners and two guns of t50mm. To the west of Borneri court we made substantial progress, and took about 50 prisoners. In Champagne the artillery fighting was ^Veoutinued with great, violence. In the Massif de Moronviliers we e. tooded ou.r position to the north of Mont Haut, and repulsed two German counter- attacks in this region and of Mont Cor nillet- To the north-west of Auberive ,our troops brilliantly captured on a front of 2,000 yards a strongly-organised system of trenche connecting this villagp with Moronviliers Wood and drove back the ouemy to the southern outskirts of Vau- dfesincourt. One hundred and nfty pri- soners were taken in the course of this action. In Arg-onne an enemy attempt on one of our trenches towards Olante was easily re- puIs ,J. Our artillery fighting was very lively at times in the rsgion of Vauquois and on the left bank of the Meuso towards Pcad Man. Everywhere else the day was quiet. THE ENEMY'S PERIL. The Press Association correspondent with the French Headquarters says the whole enemy position facing West is threatened from the rear by the capture of Vailly and the advance beyond Catel. Every yard of the ground is being bitterly contested by the Germans, who are sus- taining tremendous looses. GERMAN OFFICIAL. Thursday night.—To the south-east of Arras firing has been more lively. On 'both sides of Craonne the artillery duel Jias been more intense. French attacks along the Aisne—Marne Canal have taken place, ithe sbrongst of these being directed against Brimont, and failed. In .Champagne our counter-attacks compen- sate for the enemy gain of terrain to the lporth-wec,t%of Auberive. BELGIANS BUSY, TOO. BELGIAN OFFICIAL. PARIS, Thursday, (Received Friday). The following official communique was issued to-night:— In front of Dixmude the artillery duel has been violent in the course of the day. More to the south, towards Steen- etralte, there has been lively fightin:r with bombs.-Press Association War Special. RUSSIA'S GOOD WISHES. General Alexeiff, Russian Commander- in-Chief, has telegraphed to General ^fivelle congratulations on the great vic- tory and his ardent wish that the Rus- sian Army vnil be able to take part as soon as possible. General Nivelle, replying, refers to the splendid conduct of the Russian Brigade in France. -Q- I TO OUTFLANK FOE. Less Dramatic, But Still a I Spiendid Day. PARIS, Friday. The Expert French Commentator writes:—The fourth day of the French offensive between Soissons and Auberive was as successful as the preceding days. The abominable weather is not stopping the magnificent ardour of the troops, whoso vast mameuvre continues favour- able with the object of outflanking the re- doubtable positions the Germans hold be- tween the Oise and the Rheims plain. The enemy is yielding slowly but constantly under the pressure of our infantry and our powerful artillery. A brilliant operation was effected north- east of Soissons,, which is now completely freed, for the nearest point of the front is ten kilometres distant. Our front in this region turns from north to south from Neaville-sur-Margivai as far as Missy-sur-Aisne, and from there our line turns west to east along the Aisne, and reaches on the north the village of Ostel. Yesterday our troops captured in that section the village of Nanteuil la Fosse, two kilometres fast of Margival, and then the two neighbouring armies, working in conjunction, attacked, the one towards the cast and the other towards the north, two si(tei of the angle. They effected a junction in such a way that the vast pocket formed by the German line in the positions in the bend of the Aisne was emptied of the enemy, and occupied by our troops Now our front at Neuville- sur-Maignon turns west to east. passes Laffaux (which is ours), and Maircles. Naxeuii-le-Foi-se, Saucy, and the villages of Jotiy and Aisy, and ttirni again at Ostel. The powerful fort of Conde, on the Aisne. also fell into our hands. From this double movement, skilfully combined and perfectly successful, the ground rcconq ue red in the triangle attains nearly seven kilometres in depth, with an area of more than 35 square kilometres. It is therefore a brilliant success for our troops. Near Craonne other interesting pro- gress was realised in the region of Hnrto- bise Farm, where 500 prisoners were taken, and also north of Rheims, near Bermeri court. In Champagne we continued our advance in Moronviliers Massif. Further to the east, before Auberive, two kilo- metres of wonderfully-organised trenches fell intc our hands. Between the village and Moronviliers Wood our troops reached th? outskirts of Vaudesineourt, taking 150 prisoners The German Staff tried to hold up the advance by numerous counter-attacks, notably on the Plateau of Vanslery, and Mont Cornillet, but all attempts were stopped by our barrage fire with san- •guinary losses to the enemy. The futility of the counter-attacks, and the number of prisoners taken, and the quantity of I material abandoned, indicate that dis- order is beginning to make itself felt among the Germans, and this will increase at the same time as the victorious push is developed. An enemy communique has been obliged to acknowledge a success, but makes it only a partial one. On the British front the offensive has slackened somewhat, nevertheless our Allies are still progressing along the Searpe, near Lens The recapitulation by our British friends of the guns which they have captured since the month or April is edifying, for they have taken no less than 2S8 pieces of artillery of all calibres. Everywhere our Allies are en- gaging in local actions, which are con- stantly to their advantage.—Press Asso- ciation War Special.

BOAST AND DESPAIR

BOAST AND DESPAIR. [ .e Undercurrents of German Feeling. Amsterdam. Thursday.—In an article rejoicing over the result of the sixth Ger- man War Loan, the Koelnische Zeitung says:—We Germans are not to be de- feated. Our enemies should finally note that fact. They must see that they can never hold out, and that we are ready, with clenched teeth, to exert onrselves to the utmost, and to risk our all in order to win. Shall we now (the article proceeds) during two months of especial economic hardship (Germany will never die of star- vation all the same) bring ourselves to that pass which the superiority of our enemies, both in men and war material, has been unable to accomplish in close on three years? Never, never can or sliall this occur. Let us hold out this couple of months and we shall be the goal, and we can then put our fingers to our noee at envious England and America, who are gorged with our blood. I I-I THIS ENDLESS CONFLICT." On the other hand, in another part of its issue the same journal says .—There is only one way out of this endless conflict. We must be strong. Wo should not yield anything whether on any battle front, either in France or here in the German Empire. If we do not keep up the proved strength and inflexible will of our people during the coming critical weeks in double measure, if we do not also show the enemy the absolute invio- lability of our inner front, then the great hour of summer will pass fruitlessly and the war will go on indefinitely Nothing must be left undone. "WE CAN NEVER CONQUER." t Paris, Thursday.-The German news- papers are fur from sharing in the optimism and braggadocio of the Head- quarters Staff. The Swabian Tag- wacht," the organ of the Wurtemburg Socialist Party, says there is no further need of concealing the truth. We can never conquer, and it is useless for the people to be deceived any longer."

WELSHWOMEN AND SERVICEI

WELSHWOMEN AND SERVICE I Lady Mack worth, the Welshwoman's National Service Commissioner, addre.sed a gathering at Brecon to further the movement for securing women for the land, and made an eloquent appeal tor all women to enrol at this critical period in the country's history. She thought that instead of women going on the land as a temporary expedient they would become a permanent necessity. (Applause.) Mr. Stapledon, the organiser of the women's committee for Brecon and Rad- nor, pictured the coming of women on the land as a revival of the influx of the rural population. The Hon. R. C. Devereux presided over a representative attendance.

THE PEACE CRY i

THE PEACE CRY AUSTRIA rAV BE FORCED TO NEGOTIATE GERMANY'S DIRE FLIGHT. I The persistent rumours emanating from Switzerland and Washington as to the desire of Austria-Hungary to seek peace, either separately or jointly with the other Central Power, must not be dismissed as altogether improbable (writes a corres- pondent in the "Morning Post"). It is common knowledge that Germany and the Dual Monarchy, and. still more, Turkey and Bulgaria, are drifting rapidly towards military and economic exhaus- tion. In the Monarchy disaster confronts the people. Reduced food rations, the utter lack of the raw materials of indus- try, tite scarcity of all., the necessaries of life, weariness of the war, the losses, the continual fall in the exchange, and the consequent stoppage of imports, the re- cent reverses in the West, and, above all, the fear of a new and free Russia—all these things point m one direction, thar is to say, to the necessity for securing an immediate peace even at the price of severe sacrifices. EXTREME URGENCY. Tho question of peace is one of extreme urgency for the Central Empires, for within six months' time. or even a shorter period, famine and revolution will pro- bably sweep away Hchenzollerns and Hapsburgs in one common catastrophe. Peace must come soon, for it is now clear to every German that the submarine warfare, with America taking part in the war, even if far more successful than it has been during the last ten weeks, will not bring England to her knees, as was so confidently expected. The Germans are well aware, moreover. that in a year's time. when Germany will have used up all her reserves of men and money, so that gaunt famine stalks over the land. millions ot troops will be avail- able from America. Peace, then, must come this year; the only question is how- it is to be obtained. AUSTRIA'S PLIGHT. There is no improbability in the sugges- tion that Germany is instigating Austria- Hungary to start a peace move on her own account, and save what there is left to bo saved. Peace Austria must have sooner that people here realise, and un- less Germany helps her to get it she will have to get it herself. The best* terms could be obtained by means of a separate peaoe. This, however, will be reserved as the last trump card to be played against Germany, and only final despera- tion will counsel it. THE BERLIN STRIKE. 300,000 Men Affected; Food Concessions. From the latest report regarding the Berlin strike it appears that the strikers numbered about 300,000. The fact that even the- Wolff Agency gave the number as 125.00U shows the seriousness of the movement, which, as I hav« already tele- graphed, is also illustrated by the con- cessions to the strikers which had to be made by the authorities. Commenting on the affair, the Tage- blatt of Berlin remarks Yhat far-reach- ing concessions with regard to co-opera- tion in food distribution have been made to the workers so that it may be said that the German food policy has been put on a democratic basis. The V orwartö" states that last Mon- day's strike was completely successful in more than 300 munition factories. A despatch from Copenhagen to several Dutch papers says that a strike broke out also at Leipzig as a consequence of the decrease in the food rations. AN EMPTY STOREHOUSE. After the war Germany will resemble a big storehouse which has been completely sold out, says the German Conservative newspaper Die Post." STILL ON STRIKE. AMSTERDAM. Thursday, (Received Friday). The Lokalanzeiger yesterday even- ing announced that there were 250.000 men. belonging to five great factories, still on strike, but that almost all these men decided to resume this morning. The Vorwaerts reports that the men and women of the Deutsch Munitions in Berlin have decided not to resume work. The "Cologne Gazette reports that various strikes took place at Liepzig.— Reuter.

MUNITION WORKS FIRE I

MUNITION WORKS FIRE. I No Casualties; Little Damage. I The Press Bureau announces that a fire broke out in some sheds adjoining a muni- tion factory in the north of London early this morning. The fire was followed by some slight explosions, which caused no loss of life or injury to a.ny person, and only insignificant material damage.

IA CRISIS IN SPAIN I

A CRISIS IN SPAIN. I Premier Tenders Resignation of I Cabinet. Madrid, Thursday.—The Spanish Cabi- net has resigned. Count Romances, the Premier, declared that in view of the political circumstances as a whole In had submitted the resigna- tion of the entire Cabinet to the Sover- eign- In political circles the opinion prevails the Cabinet crisis will be settled without any change of policy, and that the Liberals will remain in offico.-Reuter.

MEAN THIEVES I

MEAN THIEVES. I Trevor Thomas, High-street, Morriston, and .Tosiali John, School House. Llansam- let, pleaded guilty at Neath County Sas- sions on Friday to stealing three live fowls, the property of Morris Downer, shailter, Church-street. Llansamlet. You are a mean couple of tliieves." commented the presiding magistrate (Mr. E Lyons Thomas), and you will have I to pay 25 clacli."

MOTOR MECHANICS I

MOTOR MECHANICS I At the Swansea Borough Tribunal on Thursday a taxi proprietor appealed for one of his drivers, who was also the only mechanic. Applicant, it was stated, was 28 years of age, married, and in Class A. The proprietor said that he had invested X7,000 in the business, and a large num- ber of his men had gone.-Throo months. The application of a local firm of im- porters on behalf of a motor mechanic and driver (33). married, and in Class A, was not a.ented to. The military agr-ed not to call him up for a month. Out of six drivers, fivehad already joined up.

THE ENTRY OF AMERICA

THE ENTRY OF AMERICA BITTER ATTACK BY PRESIDENT EF REiQHSTAC Amsterdam, Friday.—The President of the Reichstag, Heir Kaemph, at a meet- ing of the Progressive Peoples, referring to submarine warfare, said it was better than being mastered by America. Presi- dent Wilson showed himself a masked enemy at an early period, but it was only iu the message of April 2nd that he dropped the mask. Regarding his policy, it was difficult to describe his sophism and hypocrisy. The English plan of starvation did not trouble him, as he wanted to sell American foods in England, but when we began to cut off the English coa.st a causus belli existed for him. Yet he asserted he did not wage war against the German people, but only on its Gov- ernment. We ha.Vo tl^T" conviction," he con- cluded, "that th< war is approaching the end. The Russian revolution has brought advantages, and the idea of peace given in the Kaiser's Easter messages pro- gresses. We do not desire conquest. If we only secure our frontiers against at- tacks as experienced in 1914. we can be satisfied."—Reuter. )

l FRENCHAD PiRACY

l FRENCH-AD PiRACY. ( 1,053 Voyages; Osily Four I Ships Lost. PARIS, Eriday. I The weekly return of French shipping lo?es is as follows: During the week end- ing April 15th, 2?0 merchant ships of over 100 tons, of all nationalities, entered French ports, and 803 left. Two vessels over 1,000 tons and two under 1.600 tons were sunk. Five vessels were attacked unsuccpssfnil; one fishing boat was sunk. -Pres-3 Association War Special.

IUS ARMY SCHEME I

I U.S. ARMY SCHEME. I I "foB to Be-in Where Britain Began. WASHINGTON, Thursday. (Received Friday). Mr. Chamberlain, Chairman of the Senate Military Committee, to-day sub- mitted his report on the Government Mili- tary Service Bill. The report favours a selective draft system for raising and maiut lining the required force of 600,000 with the utmost expedition. The report mentions Great Britain's experience, aul i says: "It would be folly for us, in the light of their experience, to begin where they tyegan."—Reuter.

IBIGAMY CHARGE

I BIGAMY CHARGE. I Ex-Si^aftsea Postman's Wife Committed for Trial. A story of a former Swansea postman's love romance was related in the Merthyr Police Court "on ^Friday wlren Mary Jaiio Price, of Dowlais. was charged on a war- rant with bigamously marrying a soldier —Wm. Balla,ha.ii-her husband, Wm. Grorge Price, being then alive. Evidence was given that Price married defendant at Merthyr in December, 1897, and was soon afterwards transferred to Swansea. In September, 1914, the defen- dant married Ballaghan. describing her- self as a spinster. In cross-examination Wm. Price said he and his wHo lived at Swansea for some tune. He did not po«e as a jingle man while there, but admitted receiving letters subsequently, when be was in the South African War, from a young lady named Jenkins. Witness denied that his wife left him at Swansea as a result of his carrying on with other women. Inspectof Lanib said that when arrested defendant admitted marrying Ballaghan. but said she thought her husband was dead, as she had not heard from him for some years. Defendant, who reserved her defence, was committed for trial at the next Assizes.

37 YEARS SERVICE I

37 YEARS' SERVICE. I Llanelly Lady Teacher Honoured. I Miss McCreadie, head teacher or the Bynea. infants" school, has been presented with a suit case and a gohi •" • mnd brooch to mark the occasion de- parture for a ¡S(,joul'n ut Anr" McCreadie, who has been six months' leave, has been in the «•»;»joy of tho County Education Committee tor 37 years

PRIMROSE DAY I

PRIMROSE DAY. Celebrations at Swansea Constitu- tional Club. The members of the Salisbury Constitu- tional Club. Swansea, celebrated Primrose Day on Thursday by holding a smoking concert. Aid. J. Hillard presided over a large gathering of ladies and gentlemen, and an exceedingly interesting musical nrogramme was taken part in bv the Misses Sel Jones (contralto), Elsie Bowen, Nancy Ilarman, Campbell, — Cole, Madame Evelyn Parker, Mrs. Scott, Mdrne. Lockley, Bert and Beryl (dancers;. Messrs. Mines and Pavies (comedians), R. H. Rec-s, J. B. Andrews, Sid Jones. P. Price. W. J. Williams, J osiah Thomas, and Master Curran. During the evening Mr. D. Villiers Meager gave a short ad- dress. The a CM uinpanisit was Miss Amy Loxton.. A live fowl was put up for auction during the interval, and realised X8 13s.

AN UNPOPULAR DECISION

AN UNPOPULAR DECISION. The chief contest at the Liverpool Sta- dium on Thursday was between Arthur Bishop (Caerphilly) and Steve Kavanagii (New Tredegar). Fifteen rounds were scheduled, and a sidestake was at issue. Bissliop won on points. The decision caused a scene, the crowd hooting for some time.

MR LEONARD BYASSI

MR. LEONARD BYASS. I Mr. Leonard Byass, whose appointment I to an important position under the Ministry of Munitions has just been an- nounced, is the managing director of the Eagle, Bryn and Cwmavon Brick Works, Port Talbot, and he was also managing director of the Cribbwr Fawr Colliery be- fore it was sold a few months ago to Bald- win's, Letd. He is a brother to Mr. S. H. Byass, J.P., of Messrs. R. Byass and Co., Mansel T in works, and lives at Porth- cawl. Mk Mr. Leonard Bya.c? has 'h il in London for the past six weeks, and We work upon which he is engaged is, we understand, the control of coal supplies to munition works.

AMERICA DAY

AMERICA DAY" HISTORIC GATHERING AT SWANSEA THE KING AT ST. PAULS. It is America Day to-day. Through- out the country there are manifestations of good will towards the great Republic, and of appreciation of its entry into the war. In Swansea the American fiag has been flying side by side with the Union Jack. There were no services of dedication in Swansea, but at noon Swansea docksmen met on 'Change, when speeches of good will were delivered, and the American Consul responded. It was a "-f, inspir- ing gathering. Mr. E. P. Jones (prei- dent of the Chamber of Commerce), who vccupied the chair, was supported by Messrs. M. K. Moorhead (American Con- sul at Swansea), Mons. le Bars (French Consul), A. E. Moffatt, Major Harries, W. G. Foy, Lieut. John Hod gens, H. S. L. Cook, W. T. Farr, S. Stephens, Coun. \V. Owen, Talfourd Strick, A. R. Dawson, W. Turpin, H. Goldbergs etc. The Mayor rent a letter expressing sympathy with the object and regret for inability to at- tend. The President also expressed apology for absence on behalf of Sir Griffith Thomas and Mr. Roger Beck, and re- marked that America regarded their entry into the European conflict as a matter of necessity in the principles of common humanity and in the mainten- ance of the freedom of the whole world in the face of a brutal aggressiveness. America's entry was the turning point of the war. America's action would cement lrienclship between the two countries. There must arise a better understanding, a better cohesion, that must go far in the future to preserve the peace of the world. (Cheers.) A RESOLUTION. Major G. S. Harries proposed the fol- lowing resolution:— That this Chamber desires to place on record its deep appreciation of the deci- sion of the United States of America to enter into active co-operation with the Allies in defence of the principles of freedom and humanity against the grave danger which has threatened them. Major Harries said America's entry afforded the greatest pleasure, for the result would be a friendship which could never be severed. We know to-day," said Mons. le Bars, in seconding, "that America from the first moment felt and knew that we were right." (Applause.) What Britain felt. so ab/j did America fee". Deep down in the heart of the Ameri- can nation, said Mr. S. Stephens, was the consciousness that they could not for a single moment remain neutral when right and wrong were in conflict. They were on the side of right. America, said Mr. A. R. Dawson, had been assisting all the time, and, her entry branch- out a great mor force, th3 natural result of which would be to make the world a happier place for men to Iiv" in. The resolution vras carried with great enthusiasm, and in response, Mr. M. K Moorhead, the American Consul, thanked the Swansea docksmen, on behalf of the United States, for their groat cordiality. "During the past three years," he wenc on, "I have been confined to a straight- jackeit of official neutrality, and as I have listened to all the fine tributes to my country, I felt as if I had been released fron the dark dungeon into the free air of a true liberty." (Cheerf.) The sight of the two flags flying together had a greater significance than the entry of America into the war. It meant that the two countries he.d joined in a union which would prove stronger as fhe years pas.sed by. Britain had been lighting the good fight for the past three years, and America had come in' to d<. what was necessary no matter what it cost. (Cheers.) The gathering concluded with the sing- ing of the Battle Hymn of the Republic and "God Save the King." AT ST. PAUL'S. Fighting BishopJs Strong I Sermon. THe great Anglo-American eervice at St. Paul's Catlvodral took the form of humble intercession for victory. The King and Queen came specially from Windsor, and the procession was witnessed by thou sands. There were direct representatives "i President Wilson, and the gathering was almost exclusively American. The preacher was the renowned fighting Bishop of the Phillipines. The Welsh Guards' Band played in the Cathedral. The clergy were headed by the Arch- bishop of Canterbury. Special prayers had reference to the King, President Wil- son, and the rulers of Allied nations. The Bishop of the Phillipines said it was a poor, unworthy cause which they could not commit to God witfi confidence. America was taking its part in the ration's fighting not only for their laws, religion and society, but also for the com- monwealth of mankind, and the battle for the right, assumed new proportions for a victory. And a victory that was God's was in sight England's children came back to-day to pour all their experience of a century and a half of independent life with gratitude at the feet of their mother., Their sympathy for the sufferers had risen into a participation in their suffer- ings, and to-day they stood side by side in a common fight. They had to quarrel; sometimes quarrels were euphemistically called misunderstandings," but Ameri- ca's quarrel with Germany was not a mis- ¡ understanding; it was an understanding.

BURRYPORT COUNCIL I

BURRYPORT COUNCIL. I At the meeting of Burryport Council on Thursday Mr. David Arnold was elected chairman for the yeAr and Mr. Thomas Davies vice-chairman. The following were appointed chairmen of committees:— Mscsrs. John Leyshon, A. E. Taylor, S. Rces. John Davies. R. T. Hammond, R. G. Thomas, Paul. Davies, and F. J. Morgan. Councillor McDowell has presented the Council with a llag staff and flag.

BODY IN CANALI

BODY IN CANAL. I The body of Frank Evans (41), collier, Hawken's-row. Neath Abbsy, was re- covered from the Tennant Canal on Fri- day. Mr. L. M. Thomas held the inquest on Friday afternoon, when evidence was given that deceased had been out of work for several weeks through indisposition. The spot hefving been described as dangerous, the jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned. i

j TODAY S WAR RESUME

j TO-DAY S WAR RESUME Leader Office, 4.50 p.m. During last night the British made pro- gress in the neighbour hod of Villers Guislan. Elsewhere there is nothing of special interest to report. An Amsterdam message, dated Friday, says the President of the Reichstag has made a bitter attack on President. Wil- son who, he said, showed himself a m&sked enemy at an early period.

IGUZZLING AND WASTE I

IGUZZLING AND WASTE. Capt. Bathurst's Warning to the Nation. Captain Bathurst, Parliamentary Sec- retary of the Food Control 4 si'jtii lng at G.*foi u, described thS present food position as serious, and said that the outlook during the next tour and a half months was by no means free from anxiety. We should have to become a more largely self-contained country in the matter of foodstuffs than we were to-day. Ho urged that special consideration should be given to the poor in the matter of bread consumption, and he complained that there was guzzling and waste in cer- tain directions when economy was essen- tial in the interests of national efficiency. Mr. T. R. Ferens, M.P., announced at Hull on Thursday that he had received definite information from the Ministry of Food that unless great economy was exer- cised in wheat and flour there would hardly be enough to go round until the next harvest.

IUNHEARD APPEALS

I UNHEARD APPEALS. *3^ interesting West Wales Tribunal Point.. Captain Cremlyn raised an interesting point at the Carmarthenshire Appeal Tribunal 011 Thursday. He said he was informed by Captain Margrave, recruiting officer for the local sub-area, that a num- ber of appeals had been kept back by the Newcastle Emlyn local tribunal since last year. Seven cases had been waiting to be heard for nine months, five cases for seven months, and five for four months. The cases had never been tried. He wished to ascertain whether there was any method by which the county appeal tribunal could compel the Newcastle Emlyn Tri- bunal to hear these, cases forthwith. The Clerk (Mr. J. W. Nicholas) thought the appeal tribunal had no such power according to the regulations. Captain Cremlyn said he mentioned the matter in order that notice of it should be taken by the Press, and that authority might fle given 10 the appeal tribunal to take act-ion in such cases. The Clerk said Captain Margrave could appeal against the adjournment of the i.-asea. Captain Cremlyn: They have never been adjourned, but simply not brought OIl at

I ORPSE AT ICORPSc FATI

I "èORPSE AT." I-CORPS:c?- FAT. I I German Senior and His Margarine. Among the statements compiled in authoritative quarters and circulated to the Press on Thursday is the following by a sergeant of the Kents wounded in last week's battle and just returned. Speak- ing of the German prisoners, he said: One of them who spoke English told me—I don't know that it's true—that even when they are dead their work is not done. They are wired together in batches then, and boiled down in factories as a business, to make fat for munition making and to feed pigs and poultry. Then other fulk eat the pig? arid poultry. Something like cannibalism, isn't it P This feHow told me that Fritz calls his margarine corl)sa fat' because they suspect that is what it comes from." Thus apparently even the German soldiers callously accept the existence of the Corpse-Utilisation business, which was admitted by the war correspondent of the Berlin Government-controlled "Lokal- Anzoiger in its issue of April 10th.

TINPLATE MAGNATE I

TINPLATE MAGNATE. I  Mr. L. R. Beaumont Thomas  Leaves Nearly Half a M'!?o?. j Property of the value of with net personalty of X389,753, is left by the late Mr. Richard Beaumont Thomas, ot The Glade, Engleiield Green, Surrey, and Alvington Court, Lydney, Gloucester, formerly of Dennel Hill, near Chcpstow, Mon., and Brynycaerau Castle, LlaneJIv, managing director of Messrs. Richard Thomas and Co., Ltd., of London and South Wales, the largest steel and tin- plate manufacturers in the country, who died on February 14th, aged 58 years. The will is proved by Mrs. Nora Con- stance Beaumont Thomas, the widow, the Rev. Henry Robert William Anderson, of SO. Red cliff-gardens. South Kensington,. and Charles Bathurst, ot Lydney Park, Lydlley, Gloucester. The testator gives eight ordinary shares and eight preference shares in the Mclin- griffith Company, eight ordinary shares in Richard Thomas and Co., and four ordi- nary shares in the Newport Tinplate Company to the executors in trust to apply the income theof during 25 years following Iii6 death for or towards the advancement or support of some religious, educational, or temperance object or in- stitution in the counties of Gloucester, Carmarthen, and Glamorgan, or one or two such counties as they in their abwv lute and nnc0nhûlkd .discretion shall think fit to &lc:t. such objects or institu- tions being selected from time to time by them. On the expiration of 25 years the shares or the capital they represent are to form part of his residuary estate.

THE FREIBURG RAID i

THE FREIBURG RAID. A Swiss paper reports another Freiburg raid. Four or five German machines were I driven across the Swiss frontier, where one was brought down by Swiss fire. The report adds that details of the recent raid prove that the north portion of the rail- way station, where an ammunition train I. was blown up. was destroyed.

CONCESSION TO FARMERSj

CONCESSION TO FARMERS. j It is announced by the Ministry of Food that the Wheat, Barley, and Oats Prices Order, 1917. does not apply prior to May 12, 1917, to bona fide transactions in grain intended for seed when the buyer is a grower and makes a declara- tion that he requires tho grain for such purposes. t

Advertising

I THE SPANISH CRSSIS. '(niter's Madrid nje^isuge received, his afternoon, Kays the new Cabinet took the oatfc dlis MINERS AND SERVICE. Miners' delegates fn London to-day agreed -that vhihr. anxious to give the military all rea:n- aid, they wrp> of epiaion that nimnlm o?.-lis?ation and injury i? trade cot?Id only bo óbtnmM. ;J.'nd in- i;iacle m4ld OnlY be obl-amnd. bv r*? craning as far as jwsacb frcni men who liad COW4 to pits froat "tra-ae., Ön August, 1?1-t, ruitrncra were recommende-i to arrange employers$b obtain 'itaner-fellic^ t It is understood [wyui-a Wales delont-s remained nc-utral in the TOting.

NEYLAND LICENSEE

NEYLAND LICENSEE. Remarkable Allegations by Wife. Thomas ■■E.'vans, Nevlaud, and formerly of C win am an, was summoned by his wife at Abercynon on Thursday for persistent cruelty. Mr. William Ivenshole was for the com- plainant, who stated that her husband vent to Ney 1 and twelve months ago and tcok tlip -Ne,v Inn, which he was able to do with her money. She also had to eon- tribute 5s. a week under an affiliation order against her husband. Since Christ- inastide he had ill-treated her. and his relations with a servant girl were more chan they ojght to be. Evider;ce was given by Tydia, Griffiths, of Neyland, to the effect that defendant had abused his wife, and went for rides i.l'a, motor-car with a servant girl. The Stipendiary (Mr. R.' A. Griffiths said that, while recognisiv^- that. no further evidence as to cruelty wss necessary, he did not think that the bench had eay jurisdiction in the matter, and, therefore, could not dMi with it.

JUGGLER AND THE ARMY

JUGGLER AND THE ARMY. Chained at Swansea 011 Friday with being an absentee, Robert Thornton Tecs, music liall- juggler, produced a cer- tificate of total exemption issued, by the Middlesborough Tribunal. Capt. Harold Williams, for the military, said that the defendant, being an Australian, thould have put his case before the High Com- missioner. the tribunal having 110 power. The Bench decided, however, that it was not their business to annul the certificate, and the case was dismissed; Mr.sllenry Thompson, for the defendan-t. said Tees ireatly appreciated the courtesy shown him by tho military authorities.

HOME AFTER FEVERBOUT

HOME AFTER FEVER-BOUT. Pte. Lew Jones, the well-known Pontar- dawe forward, is home after long stay ac Salonika. While in Salonika he was siezed with fever, and was laid up for about eight mouths. He is now quite well again.

CHEST AND ARMS 6 II

CHEST AND ARMS. 6 'II" Othcial news has readied Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Lewis. Tynycae, Alltwen, Pontar- dawe, that their son. Pte. Willie Lewis, of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, has been wounded in the recent big push in France. He has been wounded in the chest and arms. and is now in the way to cne Oil the English hospitals.