Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian Daily Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
41 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

TO OUR READERS. » READERS. # Owing to the reduction In the > supply of news paper, in corsc- quence of the Government restric- tions, readers are requested to place definite orders with their newsagent or bookstall to reserve copies of the CAMBRIA DAILY I LEADER" to assure regular delivery and avoid disappointment.

Advertising

The Cambria Daily I Leader gives later I news than any paper I published in this dis- trict.

THE BREACH a

THE BREACH a IN HIHDENBURG LINE. Foe's Dear and Futile Attacks. A RETIREMENT ELSEWHERE The great battle opened yesterday by Si.r Douglas Haig has already had import- ant results, and last night's official report Oives the splendid news that Our troops penetrated a sector of the Hindenburg line, and main- tained themselves there against all attacks. TO-DAY'S BRITISH OFFICIAL. General Headquarters,. France, 12. 11 p.m. The village of Fresnoy and our posi- tions which we have captured north and south of it, were sub- jected to severe counter-attacks yesterday evenipg. All our positions in this neighbour- hood were maintained, and the enemy repulsed. Severe fighting has taken place 111 ,the neighbourhood of Bullecourt. East of the village the enemy made a heavy counter-attack at 9.45 last night upon the sector of the Hindenburg line captured by us yesterday morning. The attempt failed completely, and the enemy's attacking troops lost heavily. Fighting" has also taken place during the night in the neighbourhood of Cherisy and astride the Arras- Cambrai road. In these areas our troops were com- pelled to fall back from the ad vanced position captured by them during the day. tWe made further progress during the night north-west of St. Quen- t.in and north-east of Hardicourt, where we captured MalakoS Farm. JO-DAY'S FRENCH OFFICIAL. trhe night was marked by great ar- tillery activity in the region to the north-west of Rheims. In Champagne we made fresh pro- greft in the woods to the west of Mount Corniilet, and repulsed with grenades an enemy attack on one of our small posts. There was intermittent artillery activity to the south of Moron- villers. On the left bank of the Meuse two surprise attacks on the advance lines, one on Mort Homme and the other on the'Avocourt Wood, enabled us to bring back some prisoners. West of Mort Homme we stopped dead an enemy attempt. In Lorraine there were patrol en- counters towards Embermenil and Donevre. Too night was calm on the rest of the front. Aviation.-During yesterday our pilots brought down live German aeroplanes. A German aeroplane yesterday threw several bombs about 10 p.m. on Dunkirk. There \Vere no victims and no damage re suited. IMPORTANT GAINS. Village Full of Germans Cut Off. (From the Press Association Special Correspondent.) War Correspondent's Headquarters, France, Friday. Throughout the warm clear night the guns have continued to boom without in- terruption, and the frequent bursts of machine gun and rifle fire have told of attacks and counter-attacks along various parte of the long front of the British offensive. There has apparently been but little in the situation, howevor, since last night's communique was issued We have made small but important progress in several epots. On the south bank of the Scarpe our troops have pushed for- ward, overcoming the resistance of the machine gun posts which abound along this road, and have established them- selves in the sunken road near to reives Mill, which has a dip of 9 feet and offers "good possibilities of offensive defences." At Roenx. which is directly opposite this new position, the Germans still remain in the fiercely contested Chemical Works, but w(\ have got a series of i".ts astride the ground east of this place. The position around Bullecourt remains oourioua and interesting. East of the place our troops are in strength right across the Hindeburg line. a sector of which they hold, running in the direction of Queant. Thence our line forme a sort of a disjointed salient around all but the northern entrance to Bullecourt, which is reported to be full of Germans. The en- ffliy is thus in an enclave which seems Hangerous to his possibilities of retire- Northwards we have consolidated c? gains in and beyond Fresnoy. '??c struggle for Oppy continues, and hai Produced a somewhat striking 6itua- tion. To the north of the village a con- siderable length of trench, being at pre- cent untnable t-i either side, owing to mutual concentrations of machine pun?. The weather continues beautiful, but inclined to I)e hazy. THURSDAY'S BRITISH OFFICIAL. Thursday, 10.20 p.m.-Fitree fighting has token place throughout the day, from west of Queant to the north of Fresnoy, four miles east of the village of Vimy. The enemy has again employed large iwwrres of men and and has de- livered repeated counter-attacks practic- ally along the whole fron.t. The hostile forces have suffered heavily from pur concentrated artillery and machine-gun fire, both while assembling prior to attack and during the actual assault. In face of hostile resistance our troops this morning penetritm a sectM of the Hindenburg line west of Queant, and maintained themselves there all day against constant and powerful counter- attacks. Fnrbher process has a.? been mad in fche neighbourhood of Cherisy, astride the An'as—Cambra.t bank of the Scarpe, where positions which have changed hands ?rf. ouently. and were defended with great I determination are now in our possession. On the left of thp battlefield we have captured the village of Fresnoy arid The enemy positions "south and north of the village, on a front of two miles. Wo have also gained a footing in the cn?my s tnnch rv%tem north of Oppy. rro?rp?s has been made at other points and li?i-, b(,?n niido at Dilpr points In addition to the enemy's severe losses in killed nnd wounded, we have captured several hundreds of prisoners. Great activity in the air oontinnw. Four German aeror>l;iT>e= were brought down yesterday in air fighting, and south er hos- tile machine was shot down in o-j-r lines. In addition, our aeroplanes drove down five other enemy machines out of control and destroyed four German kite balloons. One of our machines is missing. ————— — 1 2,000,000 MEN AT GRIPS. J Headquarters (France) Thursday Even- ing.—I dare say that this very day there are 2,000,000 of fighting men at death grips on the two sides of the front of the British offensive. The latest: reports I hear are of fierce fighting in Bullecourt, on the outer edge. of wliith our troops have established them- selves, and of a very heavy counter-at. tack which has driven us back through [I Cherisy again.—Router's Special Service. I GERMANY'S 6,000,000 ARMY. I Col. Repington (now in France), writing to the Times" AAVS :-The Germans are still very strong; in fact, stronger than they have ever been. It is not open to us to reckon that they have less than 1,500,000 men in the field on both fronts, 500,000 on the line of communications, and 1,000.000 men in the depots of Germany. They have. increased the number of their divi- sjoll. in the West to 155, and of thi§ num- ber there are 68 divisions between the sea and the Oise. The German strengths are also fairly well maintained, and the com- panies average 200 rifles.

IFUTURE OF EMPIREI I I

IFUTURE OF EMPIRE. I ■ I I What the Great Conference I Has Done. I Resolutions arrived at by the Imperial War Conference, which is approaching tho end of its labours. are published. One of these relates to the future constitution of the- Empire. The conclusion was come to that this should form the subject %f a special Imperial Conference as soon as possible after the war, and that the i-iglit i of the Dominions and India to A ade- quate voice in foreign policy should be recognised. The purport of other resolutions is in- dicated in the following summaries:— The Admiralty to work out immediately after the war what they consider the most effective scheme of naval defence for the Empire. In the interests of the Empire's safety, prompt consideration and concerted action should be givent of (1) the production of axi adequate food supply and arrange- ments for its transportation. (2) control of natural resources within the Empire. (3) economical utilisation of such natural resources through processes of manufac- ture carried on within the Empire. The development of Imperial resources on the principle that each part of the Em- pire, having duo regard to the interests of our Allies, shall give specially favourable treatment and facilities to the produce and manufacture of other parts.

ITHE COWARDS CASTLE

I "THE COWARD'S CASTLE." I Swansea Publican's Attack on a I Bishop. At the annual conference of the Licensed Victuallers' Defence League at Derby on Thursday, Mr. Morris, Neath, doscribed Wales as the cockpit of all dis- putes on licensing. As a Nonconfor- mist," he said, T complain of Noncon- formist intolerance." Mr. Harry Rogers, Swansea, eaid the Bishop of LlandafF made a statement in tho House of Lords—to which his lord- ship was not elected—(laughter)—that out of 1,100 boilermakers 600 or 700 were con- stantly absent from work through drun- kenness. He was pofitel,y asked to indi- cate the exact locality where they coukl bo found, but no reply was forthcoming. The boilermakers' representatives in Car- diff challenged him to substantiate his I statement. Did he do so? The bishop's idea of fairness was to take refuge in the coward's castle of silence.

AN IRISH MILK BULL I

AN IRISH MILK BULL. I To Mr. T. W. Russell, in the House o' Commons on Thursday, Mr. Byrne ad- dressed the following question:— Is not the right hon. gentleman awitrc, that large quantities of milk recently con- sumed in Dublin are now being exported to this country?"

IWOMEN AND WAR MUSEUM

WOMEN AND WAR MUSEUM. A ladies' committee has been appointed to co-operate with the National War Museum Committee, with Lady Norman as chairman. The other members are Lady Haig. Lady Mond, Miss Conway, Miss Olwen Lloyd George, and Lady Askwith.

I CAPT BATHURST RESIGNSI

CAPT BATHURST RESIGNS. I Captain Baihurst has tendered his re-I signation as Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Food, but has been in- vited to reconsider his decision. The matter will remain in abeyance until j he return of the Prime Minister from the Continent.

HIGHER AGE LIMIT 1j

HIGHER AGE LIMIT? 1 j The raising of the age limit is again the subject of conversation in authoritative circles. This time. I believe (says Club- lUan in the Pall Mail Gazette "), there is some foundation for the rumour that the Government intend to raise the age to forty-three. At any rate, an order has gone out to certain important hadged departments that no more men under that I 11,40 are to be taken on.

TINO S LAST CARD I

TINO' S LAST CARD I PRO-ALLY PREMIER RECALLED IN ufiEECE Athens, Th ursday.—M. Zaimis (a friend of the Allies; has accepted the task of forming a new Cabinet. He will take the-, oath to-morrow. M. Zaimis is taking the portfolio of Foreign Affairs, and M. G. lullis returns to the Ministry of Finance. Wednesday. -It is learned on reliable authority that the views entertained by M. Zaimis tendiag to a satisfactory solution of the grave internal crisis have found an echo in the highest quarters.-Reuter [Recent Athens telegrams have stated that the King might instal M. Zaimis in place of the Germanophile Lambros as a last resort to save the present regime. -Ni. Zaimis was Premier of the non-political Cabinet which held office from June to September last.] DESTROYERS HANDED OVER. Paris, Thursday (received Friday).—In- ] struct ions have been given by the Ministry of Marine for I Hiding over two Greek de- st rovers to the Provisional Government at Salonika. 'They will be manned by Greek officers and senmen, and will assure com- munication between the Provision il Gov- ernment and the islands under its autho- rity.

I I CORPSE CONVERSION I

CORPSE CONVERSION. Captured German Doctor's Views. Among the prisoners captured in the recent fighting was a German Army doctor who seems to have talked very interest- ingly on the subject of the conversion of corpses. Apparently he- was not aware of the current controversy, and discussed the ?uhjcct rca-onably, s?Y.r? that it was an Entirely natural thing to do to convert human bodies, but, of course, not horses, as these were too valuable for food pur- poses. Horses' bones only might be used. He was of opinion tkat probably the censors did not jierinit the German people to know too much about it. The doctor wa-s quite serious, and took a merely scientific and utilitarian view of it.

RING OF DEMOCRACYI I

RING OF DEMOCRACY.I, German Publicist Points Out! Danger Light. Amsterdam, Thursday.—In an article in th., Zukunft Ilerr Maximilian Har- den. discussing the entry of the United States into the war. says:— President Wilson's speech announcing the entry of the United States into the war will be printed in school books along- side the speeches of Demosthenes, Cicero, Pitt, Mirabeau. Robespierre, Bismarck, and Gambetta, and will surpass them all. The interevention will have the most far- reaching effects, it the war does not end before America has completed her pre- parations. The milliards of men who are now hostile to us will not depart humbly to their homes before, the gigantic weight of the United States has been thrown into the scale. What is our best "Wctree ? A clearer re- cognition of realities, a return to the free- dom of dignified Criticism, a setting in order of Germany's house, and it may no longer be an abomination in the eves ot the world. Democracy rings. us round. Tho responsibility for the peace which may be concluded must be borne, not by one prince nor by one famliy, but by the entire nation, with unbended neek. Reuter.

THE PROCLAMATION

THE PROCLAMATION. How Swansea Will Carry Out King's Wishes. The reading of the King's Proclamation- will be obserevd in Swansea churches and chapels on Sunday. At St. Mary's Church the Vicar will read it from the pulpit immediately before the sermon.

THE BISHOPS WIFE

THE BISHOP'S WIFE. Libei Action Against Her Dismissed The hearing concluded in the King's Bench on Friday of the action brought by Mr. Walter Bailey, Post Office civil ser- vant, of London, claiming damages for alleged libel from the Right. Rev. Lord William Rupert (jascoyne Cecil, Bishop oi Exeter, and his wife, Lady Florence Cecil. The alleged libel was contained in a letter written by the Bishop's wife to Mrs. Gould, of Deptford. The jury, without leaving the box, found for defendants, and judgment was entered in their favour with costs.

EXPLOITATION j

"EXPLOITATION." Swnasea Workers en Bread and Other Questions. At a branch meeting of the National Amalgamated Labourers' Union at Swan- sea, represent)ng transport workers and dockers, a resolution was passed empha- tically protesting tlguill-st the exploita- tion by capitalists ot the workers of this country," and condemning the action of the master bakers of Swansea, expressing the opinion that the price of flour did nor warrant the increased price of bread, terming it 1. an exploitation of the people's need," and in conclusion urging the Government to take full control im- mediately of land, shipping, foodstuffs, fuel and elotllilig.

i 11 MR ASQUITH ON PARTY

NO MORE FRENCH PASTRYI

NO MORE FRENCH PASTRY. PARIS, Thursday (received Friday). The Council of Ministers to-day ap- proved all the measures proposed by the Food Controller, including the closing of pastry shops and biscuit factories, prob- ably from May 10th.—Reuter.

DROP IN MEAT PRICES

DROP IN MEAT PRICES. One of the first effects of the entry of the United States into the war is a reduc- tion in the price of foreign meat. The United States firms which bring Argen- tine meat to this country have voluntarily come to an agreement with. the British Government to fix prices for River Plate mutton and lamb. The wholesale prico I agreed upon is lOd. a pound for mutton and lid. a pound for lamb. representing a re- duction of 3d. and 4d. respectively on the prices ruling in the middle of Aoril.

IN PARLIAMENT IN ARIAMENT 1

IN PARLIAMENT IN ARIAMENT ..1 ENCINEERS ON STRIKE IN LANCASHIRE :1 House of Commons, Friday. Mr. Stephen Walph informed Mr. Gil- bert that 234 deputy Commissioners or j sub-Commissioners assisting the National Service Department were giving their ser. I vices free. CHINESE LABOUR. I Mr. Kellawav stated in answer to Mr. Snowden, that a number of Chinese work- men had been found in employment at certain Glasgoy ironworks. They were ships firemen who had been recruited in London. Iristructione, had been aent to the firm to remove the labour in question. ENGINEERS "DOWN TOOLS." Mr. Anderson asked the Minister of I Munitions whether it was the caee that nearly 30,000 engineers in South Lanca- shire had ceased work, and her he was aware that this stopptfgfewae due to the inaction of his department extending over a period of mix, wetke concerning a dispute affecting 500 Engineers at Caetle- ton, Rochdare, which was first notified to I the Ministry on March 13th, and his re- fusal to intervene in this dispute where the cause of the trouble had been the re- fusal on the part of employers to comply with the regulations under Schedule 2 of the Munitions of War Act, and in view of the serious and spreading discontent created, what action he proposed to take to enforce on these employers the regula- tions issued by his department. Mr. Kellaway, who replied, said he was a.ware a considerable numoor-of on- gineers were on strike in South Lanca- shire, and that this dispute was one of the causes of the trouble. It was not cor- rect that the department refused to inter- vene. The men's rep-resentativels through the Government had been told th§t, fail- ing a settlement, the Ministry of Muni- tions Tribunal would act, but it was obviously desirable in the interests of all parties to exhaust every means of con- ciliation before taking other steps. At- tempts at conciliation having failed, the Ministry of Munitions on Thursday lodged a complaint against the firm with the Munitions Tribunal. I BILLETING OF CIVILIANS. I The House went into Committee on the I Billeting of Civilians Bill, which deafe with the power to billet persons engaged on work of national importanoo was j agreed to without amendment.. I A KNOWLEDGE OF HOUSING. I On Clause 2. which relate* to the con- stitution and duties of the Central Board, Mr. Anderson moved to provide that the Board should include representatives of people who would be directly affected by the Act, Sir L. Worthington Evans eaid I he was silting tOo provide that the B

I I CHINA FOR WARI

I CHINA -F_OR WAR. I Cabinet's Unanimous I Resoluti.0 -!M  PEKIN, Wednesday 1 (Rtiv Friday). The Cabinet has ?n-mimcnsty pas

EFFORT TO STARVE US 1

[EFFORT TO STARVE US. 1 I Lord Curzon Says U-Boat Policy Will Fail. There is no militarv front in any part of this world-wide war in which at prrsent the enemy is not retreating," said Lord Curzon, addressing the Primrose League on Thursday. "It may be said that these advantage* are more than compensated by the sub- marine peril. Certainly it is a formidable menace. The Germans believe that within a few weeks—the date has actually been published-they will succeed in starving us and our Allies into surrender. Neither now nor in a few weeks nor in a few months nor this year, nor, should it la,st as long. next year, do I believe :t to be in their power to effect this result They may drive us to compulsory rati on i ns*. That in all probability will come I even think it ought to come."

BOYS UNLUCKY FIND I

BOYS' UNLUCKY FIND Dynamite Accident and the Sequel. There was a sequel to the .Faglesbush alley dynamite accident at Neath County Sessions on Friday, when .Tames Morgan, Ynyemardy, the owner of an unused quarry, was summoned for keeping ex- plosives wilhout a Home Office certificate. Inspector Morris said the defendant ad- mitted keeping a box'of detonators in the shed, and inquiries at Melyncrythan showed that three bov-two of whom had been 8erior-.1;v injured, broke into the shed, stole (he detonators, ayd whilst try- ing to explode them in the Eagles bush Valley they met with injuries which I necessitated their removal to Swansea hospital. Defendant was fined 20s.

ITHE CLERKS FUTUREI

I THE CLERK'S FUTURE. I II Gipsy Woman Sent to Hard Labour I at Neath. A hawking gipcy named Emily Jones. entered the office of the Skewen brass foundry, offered to foretell the fate of Richard Howells, clerk, and eventually walked out with four half-crowns of the office money which ehe had persnaded him to tic in a handkerchief- Meanwhile she had told Howelte he would marry on the 1st of May. When she left he fol- lowed and told the manager, who got the gipsy to return three of the half-crownt. At Neath Court on Friday Jones was sent for two months' hard labour for ob- taining IOK. by a trick, Supt. Evans re- marking that she wao a very wicked woman, and had been convicted 17 times since 1890.

IHUGE SHIPPING PROFITSI

HUGE SHIPPING PROFITS. I In the House of Common* on Thursday, Mr. Currie (Leith, U.) stated t;hat he had been told of a case in Scotland where a firm of shipowners mide a clear. profit of a million and a half sterling, and gone out of business altogether.

IMR McKENNA ANOFINANCE I

IMR. McKENNA A-NO-FINANCE. The Morning Post" gives publiovfcy to a rumour in circulation in the City to the effect that ore Ion? Mr. itekenna's nanie may be associated in a very ddinite manner with practical finance, one report being to the effect thnt lie may be joining the board of the London City and Midland Bank.

279 LIVES LOST

279 LIVES LOST TRANSPORT SUNK IN EAST MEDITERRANEAN The Secretary of the Admiralty on Thursday made the following announce- ment:— The British transport Arcadian, with tioops on board, was torpedoed by an enemy submarine in the Eastern Mediter- ranean on April 15 and sank in five minutes. Nineteen officers, 214 other ranks, 10 naval ratings, 34 crew, and two civilians are missing, and are presumed drowned. All the next-of-kin have been informed. [The Arcadian was a vessel of 8,939 tons, owned by the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company, rog-istercd at Belfast, and built in 1899 by Messrs. Vickers, Son. and Maxim (Limited), Barrow. It was a steel twin-screw boat. with wiroleag installa- tion.]

ALL FIT FOR FRANCE

ALL FIT FOR FRANCE. Every Man Passed Liable to Go Abroad. It ww officially admitted in the House of Couumns a few days ago that Cl and C2 men, who, according to their medical classification, were fit for home service only, had been sent to France for work behind the lines, and it was added that in view of the faot that these men had to pass another examination before embarka- tion and that the labour work abroad wua no more strenuous than JJiat in Eng- land, the C category regulations would be modified. This modification has been embodied .n new classification cards that are being printed. The following is the new definition of C men:— C men fit for service nt home or in North-Westem F/urope, but not fit for goneral een-icfr- (1) In garrison or labour units. (2) hi latmir units or on oomm(lnd i garrison or regimental omploymen. (3) On aed?ntAry ork. such K? dNb, ortkylies, sanitary duties, storemen, cooks and batmen. 1 It is clear from this definition that every man now passed for any form of military service is liable for service m Franee.'

PARK TRAGEDY

PARK. TRAGEDY. Burning Grass Causes Landore Child's Death. Mr. J. C. Morrie,(Borough Coroner) hold 'm inquiry at the Coroner's Court, Swan. sea, on Thursday. into the death of Violet Hawkins (3), 59, Castle Graig. Landore, who died at Swansea Hospital on Monday from burns sustained from burning grass. Corp. Wm. Henry Hawkins, Welsh Regt., identified the body as that of his daughter, t.nd stated- that he went out I wifti his wife on Monday. When he ar- ¡"F"t.b.a.-acident had happened. There were three children, and they had been left in charge of their grandmother, Ann Vernon, who said that the deceased I And her brother went to Llewelyn Park to play. Witness was in Lhe house when che heard some screams, and upon investi- gation found the deceased in flames, but before she irciched the deceased two men had wrapped a coat around her and ex- tiriguish«xl them. Dr. Louden, of the Hospital, said there werff extensive burns, only the facp and the feet e-,caping. The cbild dipd the P.vne evening from shock following burns. The Coronpr stated that there was no evidence to show how the grass was set on  h e grass was set on fire. The juiy returned a verdict in accord- ance with the medical testimony.

iDOG TAX TO BE INCREASED

DOG TAX TO BE INCREASED. The owners of dogs nre not after all tc [ escape the burden of additional taxation. Mr. Bonar Law announced on Thurnday night that legislation is to be introduced which will slightly increase the existing dog licences and effect a very considerable increase in the cort of all new dog licences.

APOLOGY FOR ARGENTINE

APOLOGY FOR ARGENTINE. Buenos Aires, Thursday.—The Argtn- tine Government has received a Note from the German Government expressng-regiv' for the sinking of the Argentine sailing vessel Monte Protegndo, and stating thai an Imperial squadron will at the first op- portunity. as i mark of respect, salute i lie Argentine flag.—Router.

TORPEDO FROM SEAPLANES

[TORPEDO FROM SEAPLANES. In connection with the statements con wining the sinking of the steamship Gena Jr torpedo discharged from a German seaplane, we are informed by the Ad- rairalty that this method of attack was first praetie?d successfully by Eoval Air Service pilots in August, 1915, who «ink several ships in the Dardanelles by torpedoes from seaplanes.

500 NEW UBOATS i

500 NEW U-BOATS. i Mr. J. Bernard Walker, editor of the Scitntific American," speaking in New York on Thursday night, said it was more than likely that Germany had ncaring completion 5M submarines of the D5P type, which visited Newport last autumn, and that within six months she could 700 ail xvt and 1,200 in a year.

BEER FOR THE ARMY I

BEER FOR THE ARMY. Beer is brewed for the Army Cantee-n Committee in excees of the 10,000,000 barrels authorised for the country, and Captain Bat-hnrnt states that it averaged 5,000 barrels a week for the first three weeks of Aptil. There was on February 23 sufficient malt in the country to satisfy the requirements of brewers down to the end of November.

THE FUTURE OF FLANDERS

THE FUTURE OF FLANDERS. AMSTERDAM, Friday. A Berlin telegram state6 that the Main Committee of the Reichetag yeeterday dis- cussed the Belgian question. A joint resolution of all sections demanded that the necessary measuree should be promptly taken for the immediate re- patriation of Belgian workmen who had been compulsorily deported to Northern France. A Conservative speaker said: What- ever form Belgium may take. we are con- fronted with the question whether the coast of Flanders shall come under our influence, or that of England," and urged I his friends to demand thie ooast.-Reater.

j TODAY S WAR RESUME I I

j TO-DAY S WAR RESUME I «*> — If Leader" Office, 4.50 p.m. The British made further progress last! night north-west of St. Quentin and north-east of Hargicourt. We have effectively dealt with a heavy counter-attack. upon the sector of the! Hindenburg line which we oaptured yesterday. Furious fighting has also taken place during the night in the neighbourhood j of Cherisy and astride the Arras-Cam- I brai road, and in these areas our troops j were compelled to fall back from the advanced positions captured by them during the day. China is for war against Germany, tli«f Cabinet having passed a resolution for jj an immediate declaration. 1

I nI I 10DAYS NEWS IN BRIEF I

n I I 10-DAYS NEWS IN BRIEF I By burning refuse instead of sending it to totintry "tips" LTw sliaiu Council has t>aved £ 100 in six months. In the last three months there were tifty-one tires in the City, an increase of twelve On the corresponding period of last yeux. Dardanelles Commission sat agiyn at the House of ixjrds, Mr Ashmead Bartlett giving evidence. In the Diocese of Worcester 482 clergy- men out of 604 have offered themeelve.s for national service. Reply to Butte, (Bryllamnian). Write Mr.. Walter Roes, Norwood, NeatJi. Records only contain the name of the half-back who actually played. Washington, Thursday (received Fri- day).—President Wilson has selected four railway experts to accompany the Ameri- can Commission to Russia.—Reuter. Arthur Francis fetowe, Britonfe'rrv, de- scribed as u conscientious objector, was at Neath on Friday fined £ 2 and remanded to await a military escort on a charge of being an absentee. The Germans have discovered a sub- stitute for 6brc compused of dextrine, glue, gelatine, minerals, and washing blue. The mineral which is added is calcium carbonate in the form of a fine powder. At Holborn on Thursday niyht Lilly Beynon. of Taibach, boxed a draw with Louis Ruddick, of Leeds. Up to the 10th round Beynon led. Afterwards Ruddick improved, but he had all his work cut out to earn a draw. Melbourne, Thursday (received Friday). —The election campaign is being con- ducted with the greatest keenness. The Nationalists expect a double victory. The public-houses cloae throughout the Com- monwealth OIl Saturday (polling day).— Ki-uter. Thmp displays," said Lord llevt-uport, •» tlie House of Lords on Thursday night, "have to go." The Food Contro.'hr was referring to the lavish shop window dis- j pl,iys of sweotf, and confectionery, which he described as a continual affront to the public. Mr. Richard Watkins is to speak at the Total Abstinence, inciting jat tl»Q Ragged Swhool. Swansea, on Saturday eveniny, on the various remedies suggested for the control of the liquor trade. At Landore the other day, Mr. Watkins said he was prepared, under certain conditions, to consider State Purchase. There are many in Swansea who desire enlighten men', upon this matter, and Mr. Watkins is 1 j fund of information upon 11" q UfstiPH.

I NEW GERMAN RUSE I

NEW GERMAN RUSE. I I Spy Serpents Take Form of Peace Doves. General Alexeieff, the Russian Common- der-in-Chid. hin; arrived on the v i "r it front. An order of the day is issued bv General ISrussilof fwarning the ■>oldiers j against having relations with the enemy, who thus endeavours toain information rsgaiding Russian defensive organisations, BRUSiLOFF'S ORDER. Petrograd Timisday (received I :'id;ivV --An orier of the day issued by Genera! Bms-iloii relates tlie arrest of enemy onus- saries, who hid come to the.Russian lines ostensibly to fraternise with Russian sol- diers, and discuss peace torn: with them. Questioning invariably elicited that, their real ob,iect ,r&s to examine the Russian defences and ateortain the number and disposition of troops, guns. iiid machine- FlinS. and the state of the Ru-si.m moral. Many spies were provided 11 cameras u»r the purpose of recording "brotherly) in Renter General Brnailloff warns the iroops that the-enemy is striving to profit "from the] shaken Ru^-inn discipline and the ex- re-sivelv confiding disposition of the R \15- jan soldier. There should be only one answer to any attempt to stnrt infer- course," adds General Brusiloff, nojueiv, the bayonet and the bullet."—Press eiation War Special. I A DAY OF CONTRASTS. PETROGRAD, Thursday (roceived Friday). The evening papers declare that the Provisional Go\eminent is united in its responsibility for (he Note to the Allied Powers, and its action is supported by the Executive Committee of the Duma. Numerous demonstrations in favour of the Provisional Government were held up to a late hour t'tis evening. The Presi- dent of the Duma spoke of the enemy, who threatened the Fatherland, and ex- horted the people to conduct the war to a victorious end, worthy of the great Russian people. All the speeches were warmly received. At present the tendency is manifested in favour of the formation of a Coalition Cabinet. j' During the night the Executive Com- mittee of the of Workmen and Soldiers was present- at the Council of the Pro- visional Government. Goneral Alexieff has arrived in Petro- grad. Altogether the day has been one of |- strong political contrasts. While many meeting were held in support of the Pro- visional Government, workman on leaving the factories marched in procession j through the principal streets, bearing red flags with inscriptions hostile to the Government.—Reuter.

THE INDEMNITY MIRAGEI

THE INDEMNITY MIRAGE. AMSTERDAM, Thursday. j ■ (Received Friday), During yesterday's sitting of the Reich- stag, Herr Zimmermann (National Liberal) according to the Berlin papers, welcomed America's financial support (,f the Entente, because," he said. we ehall be better able to recover from them a large indemnity." Herr Zimmermann was severely criti- cised by the Socialist Herr Keil for his foolish words.-Rent.,er. )

Advertising

BRAVE VALLEY LAO. Mayor of bNnntoa pret.euted M-Uv tary M-dal to Mrt. Tlioma-b' Jamas, Gv*aun-cae-Gur^-eu, at Mi*, Guildhall this -afternoon. It was ven W li&r eon, A.B. Evua JaT!1, R.N.V.F., for contpicuout, bravery io tie teld, asd who has gineo died, ComJuaiider Ikjwti and the Mayor paid tribute thio, bravery of tàe d",eaeed 7-outy m. I -i V r. NEWMARKET MEETING. Bettir.s:: 7 to 2 Bramble Twi? ?nd Cla< S?tc. 4 to 1 Athdin? ?n,! Uopcius '0 to 1 At; Serene and Elevator. 100 to 7 otbers. i 3.0—SOUTH PARADE 1. WJIJ.TAJI THE BEAU 2 MELINDA 0 3 Also ran La Flotte, St. Ronald. John Jaekett, Glenalvon. Snootiere. Walpole, Landmark. Gunton. Life's Romanee B(tf ii!«r: 3 to ] William ithe Beau 5 to 1 Landmark, 6 to 1 Melinda. ? to i South aracle 1 to 1 Glenalvon. Sabotiere, and John' Jaekett, 10 to 1 La Flotte 100 to 6 others.

ADMIRALTY REFORM

ADMIRALTY REFORM. Formation of a War Staff. It is understood that reorganization or a considerable scale ie. talcing place at tlu Admiralty.. The principal change is the formation of a War Staff. each of wlto^t. members will be free from depart men till duties of any kind. It will.probably ti- clude one or more distinguished' otiico; s of the younger school straight from'tl't'e Fleet. Special iittention is being given to the strengthening of the Submarine De- partment. There is reason to believe that number of business men of proved or- ganizing capacity are to assist the Ad- miralty in two important branches of it& work-the direction of ocean-going traffic and the curply of material. The second task will be carried out in conjunction with a roorganise 1 Inventions Board.;The changes are nearing completion (ekeLyiF. the Times "), ana it is hoped that they will lead to greater success in dealing with the submarine menace.

MORE TRAINS TO MUMBLES

MORE TRAINS TO MUMBLES. An augmented service, chiefly affect- ing Sunday trains, begins on the Mumbles Railway on May 6th. Down trains after dinner will leave Rutland- street at 2.5, 3.5., 4.5, 5.5. 5.50 6.40. i.8C a" 8.30, and up trains at the 8Allit time* frotr the Pier. with the addition of or* at IUI. On week days the fi.5 and I p.ffi- do.r.. and 7 and 7.40 p.m. up train* will run to and from the Pier.