Teitl Casgliad: Herald of Wales

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 16 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
13 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
A FORTUNE GONE J

A FORTUNE GONE. J ALL SPENT IN ENJOYMENT. At the Swansea. Bankruptcy Court on Siriday, before the- Hegi^trar Oir. D. Waiter R-eos ), John Alexander Stratton Boyes, of 31, 'Malrern-terrace, Swansea, appeared for his public exami-Tii.tim. His gross liabilities, due to e leven un-i secured creditors, amounted to £ 194 18s. 4d. There were no assets, except 7s. 6d. cash at bankers, leaving a deficiency of £ 194 10s. lid. AiJewanee Stopped. Debtor, in repiy 1-0 tiie ufhcial Jwv | ceiver (Mr. H. Pieat,) isaid ho was new working as a iurnaeeinan at the Crowett- ton Steelworks. The caiw of hlb failure was the stoppage or an allowance last August by the trustees of his late ?UMr's will of ?12 a month. He received I that ?lio??mcc lor fnnr or live yMns, and it was stopped beca??c he could not repay a lo.m from the Swansea M?rcanii? B.tnk. He ?t&rted borrow- mg from the bank three years ng?. The largest amount he received at o? time was ?0, an

BRITONFERRY LANDLORD

BRITONFERRY LANDLORD. Story of a Bedroom inoictont. A well-Known rJriton Jberry man, In the person of Albert J. Jones, landlord of the White Lion Hotel, was the de- fendant in a paternity case which was! heard before the Deputy-Stipendiary at Mountain Ash Police Court. The com- plainant was Catherine Savage, who re- sides with her parents in Thomas-st., I Miskin, Mountain Ash, and whose case was presented by Mr. Win. Kenshoie, of Afcerdare. Mr. Trevor Hunter (in-j structed hy Mr. Perkins, of Aberavon), was tor the jlefence. lu her evidence Miss Savage, a pre- possessing young woman oi 19, said a male child was born on the 28th of laet March. Albert J. Jones was the father of the child. She went into service ar the White Lion Hotel, Briton Ferry, on the 12th of January, 1913. On 0th Tuesday. mh May, 1913, defendant came into her bedroom and took away the child, who slept with her. He returned and told ber to keep quiet. She threatened to jump out of the window, but Mr. Jones caught be-rj arm. He W8S in tb> room for mer R-711 hour, and promised to marry her. On the following Sunday evening a similar act took place. She afterwards kept the child with her in the evening, and they went to bed together. She was hi formed that defendant had married another girL and he offer?i her £ 40, Mtd then £ 100. li,, box defendant Raid that the story oi' the girl as to wh?c took place in the )x}dro

RUINED BY DIVORCE PROCEEDINGS

RUINED BY DIVORCE PRO- CEEDINGS. At the Swansea Bank.TllpU:y Court, before the Registrar (Mr. D. Wal- ter Rocs), Davie.s, colliery ma.-«on, of ''CW!yorgans, Gorseinon, late of Pon lUrgaer, appeared for his public exami nation. The gross liabilities were scheduled at .£ 1 u 7s. 3d., due to eleven urewxsired I creditors and the assets iven-,e efrtamatwi to produce £ 23 IFs., leaving a deficiency of R t 25 9s. 3d. Debtor attributed his failure partly to his failure as petitioner in divorce proceedings in 1911, when he wws ordered to pay f67 c-opts. He had only paid £ 40. He was entitled to a share in a small house at Pontajduiais after las father's deuth, and had received £ 93 under letters of administration of his father's estate. The examination was ctese d Mi-. J. B. JOQQG (Garseincn) repre- sented debtor I

WIFE CROPPED ON TOP OF HIM I

"WIFE CROPPED ON TOP OF HIM." r am illnt of bM?bing h? }.eg'1 t hit him one blow and he fell down, and his wife dropped on top of him." This was the r?p!y of Benjamin Wm. Lewis, colliery repairer. Ciyne-terraee. Clyne, to a charge of doing grievous bod?y harm 10 Arthur Ru rt Da,i, eng?o? driver, tpitb whoni r,? 10 ag C',d P.C. Hurley ?''? eriden.ee of arrest, I I J" I, arid ''??d DaiW brox.-n -kg.  Lewis WM fem?nded on BAIL lor aI OtMM?

DAINTY FASHIONS

DAINTY FASHIONS. THE PRESENT STYLES. The visit or the King and Queen of Denmark to London is bound to have some influence on the coming season's fashions. It was undoubtedly the intro- duction of the llus-sian ballet that was responsible for the complete changing of hair oraameijts ior evening wear. Let. us hope that from the present royal visit we shall, be richer the coming of some of the various very picturesque etceteras for w-hieh Danish native costumes aro so distinguished. The Queen of Denmark's strikingiv modish hat, almost entirely covered with beautiful ospreyg, must have come upon, many of our society dress re- formers with a great shock. Both Queen Mary and Queen Alexandra have so set their faces against the vorrtw of the ospre.y that fashion has .substituted flowers and other trimmings for this most cruel and exceedingly expensive ornament. Possibly the Danish Qnoczi's example may he toiSnved on the stage, exain-) 1 4-, in, where, in musical oociedy at least, the cult of the osprey has never died quite out. But with the entAluraze nf the court it is safe to predict it will not experience any rivival. Sketch No. 338.—Neat Serviceable French Bleu sc. Paper Pattern, SId. (post free). Sketoh No. 389.—Housewife's Useful Shirt Blouse, Paper Pattern, 6-ld. (po.-»t free). Sketch No. 390.-Aiv Icteal Blouse for Summer Weather. Paper Pattern, 6d. (post free). Ail applications for Paper Patterns and Correspondence should be addressed "Patterns Department," 59, Fleet Street, London, E.C. It is strange from what trivial matters new fashions are evolved and Lhis is not only the case in regard to frocks and articles of clothing generally. The Tanguette Curl. The Tango is responsible for the sty!e of hairdressing which is dominated bv the tangiiette curl. Given the proper type of face,-with the rest of the head suitably dressed, the tanguette curl is eminently becoming, but on the other hand it is extremely trying when at- tached to the wrong styte of face and head. Th's was exemplified in a verv convincing w:\y the other evening at His Majesty's Theatre. In the third and fourth act.sof Pygmalion, Mrs. Patrick Campbell wears her hair in this fashion, and it is most becoming to her Spanish type of f&(x, surmounted by her beautiful bitte-black haix. ci-i conrsc, it wa.s dreswed just to the last hair," and Inoking at her, one could scarcely imagine any ether style oi coiffure could jwssibly be so appro- priate. As if to demonstrate that what may he beautiful on one woman is abominable on another, there wa, a ladv in the stalls that night alfo desirous of being fashionabh' coiffed. She certainly did not hesitate or seem to care whether it was ?nirt?.3>le for her .?ty? or colouring, or she would have ,-tyte or --rlcur*ii:, tartli ng sty!?. Her dingy brown-cum-mcuce was dressed in this fa&hion, but 9œin both heads, the cnormom 

I HINTS TO HOUSEWIVES

I HINTS TO HOUSEWIVES. SOME TASTY DtSHES. The touches of colour are very welcome on black, and subdue the "motlnllng" atmosphere which surrounds it when entirely unrelieved. Children's Dresses. Both boys and gi-ris were surely never prettier or af simple as they are now. Indeod, everything in juvenile fashions, from hair dressing to foot wear, has maio ranid strides in the right direc- tiod-thtt of beauty and health a* well as economy. Some years back children's clothes over-trimmed and elaborated to look like miniatures of their elders were frantically expensive. They were impossible from the point of view of the home worker, a.nd they were much beyond the means of ordinary parents witn more than one chikl. ow all is changed aid simplicity is the key-note. Simple nd very dainty are the blouses to be vror nduring the summer. Iiideed. the majority of ai-c, so easy to make up at home with the aid of a well-cut- pattern that there is not the slightest mtson for e^_en tlie woman with a rerv* nuall drew; allowance and with not much time at her cfriapoeal for sewirug ivy. to be always atti-actively arpd suitably dressed. Tlie three cha.rni- iug blouses wliich appeqr in our sketoh this week are very stilish and French looking, yet they have been selected with an eve to usefidnieess, and to meet J the various needs af the houserwafe, and are quite a.ppropria.tG for any occasion according to the materials in which they are made up Ii The F?rst S Iouse. I The blouse OIl tlie left of our sketch | is one of the latest type featuring the new shoulder pieces, giving the model j the fashionable yoke appearance, It is as easy to make as you eould posisibJv | wis h, and I would roocrmmend it to j those of my readers who like siimple and n Kit styles. It is suitable for tashion- inb in anvtliing fiom satin, or taffeta to |»rau&in or cotton crone. The novel shaped, ai-tiistic collar is iraost txCDmt-lllg antl the snvai 1 bow of black velvet rib- bon gives the df^ired finii=}iiing touch, Sruall round pearl buttons ATOuld look nice on,a blouse of tohis style. The Shirt Blouse. The centre moffo! is a most ideal !>kuse for the hou.sowife or l^i-sine?-:s woman. What eouid bo more neat and generally becoming than this useful de- sign. The orthodox shirt h!ouse is st-ill the chic Pansienne as ever, and for wearing in tlVe houscv while attending to tho ipany little tasks it cannot bo equalled. It is exceedingly simplo to make up, and has the advantiiige of lookinig < tremeuy well in almost any material, For p»re:^ettt wear, dolatiKO, print;, coitton, pophn, linen, cjx^pes, etc., arov m(ist suitable. Jap silk, tuse^oare or sat-i-il. oeukl ho used for making a. rather mnre elalx>rate n.odel, suitable for weairiiiig witSi the best tailor-made. The føw tucks and "he pretrtily alisipod collar and cufl's add to the htoaseY, charming ap- pe^ranoe, ami the neat little time com- pletes the smart effect. I Pretty Summer Blouse. The third blouse in our sketch is an exceptionally pleasing design. It is smtable for coloured or plain white materials. I have seen tlhis style liiiade up in figured sttiffs, and it looks vcvry pretty. As can be seen, it needs ve>ry little aewing. Tlv- colbrr and ouffs in contrasting; -.rna-tonit would giv<>. the rc.ary bright touch. Tlie original model wafi in a very dainty silfiide of pinlc crepe do chine, with black satin oolkir juid cuffs lined with I kick ninon. It would p«rove vciy servicifsible, ho»w- ever, if it is dmired for (-,rclinarv wear, made up in one of tlie modish sponge ctefhs or crepes, a.nd ouffs of the same materiaJ, hut in a con- trasting sluade. A biowwe wfkidh took: my faiBcy was in wli'ite crope with collar and cutis in old rose crepe, and little glass buttons in the same sl>ade down th*- centre. A oteven- little girl friend of mine ha.s lift upon a good idea in con- nection with her aiunmeri- wardrobe. She has made a simple white crepe skirt and blouse, anl witii t.hi. she wiU weax a varricity of collar and cuffs in different colours. Ffach time she wears a different collar cuff set her appearance will he quite different, and in this way she ("UT trivet to make oie dress go much longer than would otiiervnse be the case, and this wifeltout any ferjr of being clitcxl The paper patterns of a,ny of the ahiove blouses cost Old. poet free, ami with each one a printed slip is ISfven sliowing a diagram and giving the qeantaty of material neoessajy. Appetising Supper Dish. Most people are fond of ^.usages, and, tlierefore, the following way of cookine them may be useful. Firat prick the su-usages and put. therm in a saucepan of cola water until they come to a boil, let them iziow for five mmaxtefi, take off Arc, strain off the watcvr in-I add alxHit half a. t-ia < £ iwcraAoes. i-o which add a small onion (vVliole) finish cooking t!>e sa'isa«e^ in tiie tomatoes, arid '?tt'n dnu. rn-rn-- the onion, and s?nd th<' r??t *.o mJ?? This m?t?.? a v?rY h.y. fixwp sup '

Advertising

 t T? HAPPIEST  my OF YOUR LIFE should be crowned by the thought that the symbol of your wedding joy is the most perfect f r ?y that money can buy. H. Samuel's Lucky Wedding Rings are perfect—perfect in beauty, !????t t perfect in their golden purity, perfect for sterling value, perfect for a lifetime's wear. t /nJtt ) I Finished in all the newest Court styles, in 22ct. solid gold. Sold by weight, 10/5 to 70/ J If A HANDSOME WEDDING GIFT FREE! W 1^1 V An enormous selection of Diamond and Gem-set Dressand Engagement Rings, Buckle and ? ? ?' tt???S?? An enormous selection of Diamond and Gem-set Dress and Engagement Rings, BucHe ???\? ???s????????M? A M E Lg AI.C, 265' OXFORD STREET, SWANSEA. By | ( (UNDER THE BIG CLOCK), WE^HT Ia A i li JHASBBI lU a ALSO AT C&RDSFF, NEWPORT, ME RTHYR, etc. 18/6, 15/- 21'- tmwrrd& I I f,

THE MAYORS GUESTS

THE MAYOR'S GUESTS. BRILLIANT SCENE AT THE I ALBERT HALLS. The reception by the Mayor and Mayoress of Swansea, in connection with the liath and West and Southern was a very brilliant function. The decorations were delightful. After the recption of the guests by the Mayor (Alderman T. T. Corker), and the Mayoress, a musical programme was rendered by the Royal Marine Ar-: tillerv String Band, under the årt{)Tl of Bandmaster Lieut. B. S. Green, M'.V.O. the GA-cnt Gleo Singers; and Miss Gertrude Reynolds, of the Queen's fclall and Albert Hall, Tiondon. The programme consisted of the fol- lowing items :-Marcb, "La Ritirata" (Dreschen), the band; incidental music to "Monsieur Beaucaire." the band; Chanson Napolitaine, "Quanto St. bella," the band; glee, "A Musical Jest." the GwenWUlee Singers; songs (a) "My heart will <-aU you home," (b) "Wake Lip, Miss Gertrude Reynotds; "Wake, Lp," Gerinidt? Welsh air, "Y D(lyn Aur," the Gwent Glee Singere; soiag, "Thy dear voice call s me," Miss Gertrude Reynolds; Barcarolle from the "Tales of Hoff- mann," the band. The accompanist was Mrs. Fred Har- rison. L.R.A.M., Mr. J. \V. Jones con- ducting the Gwent Glee Singers, who were accompanied by Mr. Elwyn Diuiiel. About 10.:30 a.m., dancing was started, Mr. T. X. Talfourd Stirck act- ing as Master of Ceremonies, aided by the foliowirg Messrs. I) I.kswelyn Yorath, G. C. Chalk, E. A. Chalk, Reggie Morgan, A. Dermis John- son and H. V. Uavios. A progratumK1 of twelve dana-s was given. The furnishing decorations were carried out by Messrs. Ber; Fvans and Co. the flcfral dceonttions by ).11". Bliss, Superintcntk^nt of the Swansea Parks f THE GOWNS. I The Mayoress (Mrs. Corker).—A draped gown of powder blue charmeuse satin; it had a double tunic of the same shada ninon. The corsage of ninon. veiled a band of lovely lace; a collar of the same lace trimming the neck. The waist had a swathing of the satin, hav- ilig a tSlblier end in the front of sulphur satin. Lady Mond.—A beautiful gown of cloth of gold, brocaded in silver, pink and blue. It was draped and had a long pointed train. The corsage of blue grey ninon had transparent sleeves, with cm- broideries of silver and blue. Some lovely diamonds were worn upon her coiffure. Miss Eva Mond.—A dainty gown of ivory Oriental satin, slightlv draped and cutaway in the front. It had a rather I full tunic of floral crepe-de-chine, with tiny posies of pink barskia roses. The corsage was also composed of the crepe- de-chine. Around her head was worn a pretty wreath of tiny pink roses. Mrs. Ct- JEJt. Bevan.—Draped gown of black satin. The corsage was fashioned of black and white ninon and had a vest of fine black lace, finished with a hand of pink and blue beaded Oriental insert ion. Mrs. Fred Bradford.—A gown. of Tango chiffon moire, it was nartially veiled in black ninon, which came up as long points upon the skirt. The sleeves of black ninon were transparent, the veiled corsage cf the moire being sewn with crystals. Mrs. Lang Coath.A lovely gown of F flamingo pink velvet hrochc. The skirt had a pointed train, and was draped up over a tunic of ivory lace. The corsage of ninon to tone had points of the velvet from the waist, which was swathed with blue moire ribbon, finished. as long ends. M ss Corker.—A chic gown of "Ciel BIen" satin, with a tunic of blue aecordeon pleated chiffon. The corsage of chiffon and satin had trimmings of white soft fur. Mrs. Morton Peel.—A lovely gown of sulphur brocade, the draped skirt having a pointed train. The tunic and corsage were of sulphur ninon, sewn with tiny jewels, the waist being defined with panne velvet in a darker tone. Mrs. Cosmo John, Sliefrield. -Gown. of blrck satin, with a tunic of black embroidered lco over white ninon, the corsage having touches of old rose velvet. Miss Crystal Griffiths.—A pretty frock of pink aecordeon pleated chiffon, the skirt edged with a, band of skunk. The full corsage was composed of shell I pink satin and chiffon. Mrs. Rowland Bevan (Cower).—A lovely draped gown of old gold brocaded satin, which was draped up over a very sm.3rt tu.nic. I Mrs. Henry.—Gown of white sa.tin, the .short tunic bein? of real ivory }?x', the corsage of satin was veiled with tha same lace, the sleeves being trans- parent. Mrs. Forneaux.—Gown of ivory satin broche, with tt pointed tunic of the same satin. The cor.in.ge c/f ivory crepe ninon had shoulder cfrnbroideriett of tiny crys- tal and j"i heads. The waist swatfiing of satin was partially veiled in black tulle, finished off with a ohoux of tulle. Mrs. Jvor Evans.-Lovely draped gown of pink satin, over an underdrew of blue ninon. The tunic of blue ninon, had a band of s kunk. tho same pelt being introduced upon the corsage. Around the waist was a swathing of black velvet. Mrs. C. C. Vivian.—Trained gown of ivory Oriental isatiu; the long tunic had a broad bajtd of cry-stal insertion, crystal embroideries trimming the corsage. Mrs. Jenkins Jones.—A handsome gown of black charmeuse satin, with black trimmings Miss Jenkins Jones.—Purple crepe ninon gown, inserted with crystal enlc broideries and lace motifs. Mrs. David J a.mes.-Bla.ck satin chartneus? gown, having a veiling _1 ivory lace upon the skirt in t hree tiera The oorsage was aLso veiled in lace and had touches of rose pink satin, a swath' ing of the same defining the waiet. Mrs. Talfour Strick (junior).—Gown of blak silk satin armure, the skirt having a long pointed train, and draped with bbck chifTon..The corsage of jet l embroidered net. had transparent sleeves. Mrs. Aearon Thomas. Gown of pastcJ I gr?v brocaded satin, having a square traia. T he skirt was beautifully draped, the cnrsaKe of ?rey ninon, being crn" hrnider? in crystal I Mr?. D. R. Jones (Morriston).—Gown of black satin, veiled in black sequin^"i embroidered n*d. j k uu on Uüt. vgluznn but OJMU

Advertising

':GENUINE SAJLE OWING to being overstocked we are I selling 10,000 PAIRS OF LADIES' HIGH- 8 CLASS GLACE GlaSON SHOES. Latest g style, with Cuban heels and patent | toecaDS and large eyelets. I 3/- ■ We re clearing them out at 3a. ver pair, S or three pairs for 8s., -and persons send- S i ng for Shoes will receive a, Pair of Real | Good Stockings FREE, as per offer we a send. Size-j 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. State size re- 1 quired and send P.O. or etainpe to 8 JOHN LYON & CO. (Dept. 57). 153, Port- | land-road. Indon, R.E. I ——a—win immiM it— j OCUUSTS' & HOSPITAL I 1 Prescriptions receive our' ? careful attention, accurate M ? grinding of Lenses being g| ? guaranteed. Our prices are H ? moderate, consistent with G ? accuracy and Best Work- B manship. ——— H ? We have our own plant, and can M U supply the majority of Specud Lenses If ? within a few hoars. Kg C. F. W ALTERS, 1 OXFORD STREET, SWANSEA I g (Nearly opposite National Schools) H | Two Qualified Opticians are in attend- H H anoe, and their skilled services are at ffl gB your disposal. 9 J Defend the Castle i) of Your Health J by taking Towle's PiUs. They a are the recognised remedy, by a women the world over, for all m irregularities of the system. They quickly relieve all suffering, and bring t ease and better health wherever used. 5 TOWLE I I PENNYROYAL AND STEEL I PILLS [ Write for booklet, containing' trust valttaMU I I information for Alarried Wotmn, Post free. j ) Sold by all chemists throughout the world in ) Boxes I/Ld. and :!I9d,; or post free on receipt t ci P.O. t/3?. or 2/iOd., from &. T. TOWLE & CD. Ltd. 29, L,ong Bow, Netti?ham llllllUHIIIHWIHIII'l'"1"1"11 llT"nn BROUQHTON.: F{ GO TO A [ BROUGHTON'S )} V. Noted Wedding Ring Shop JJ V. T SS09 Hynod am Podirwyau Priod»sol. y aU HIGH STBEET, yf SWANSEA. IBROUGHTON.  ::i ¡ Every taothor wl?o values ti;o Hoaltii ood ff > Oeanluio38 of her chiM should UW ? HARRISON'S 4  POiWADE.0 4 fØflt08e"J/ r-VIIJ1., S Qao application kUtc &n Nib and Vermin, ? be&D.eB and etzengtbeus the HWe ?' In Tlus, 4d. & M. Postage 13* fgrj< ? SOLD B? AM. CHRXIB". Lt' 1 rMiei o? !MrpI¡;. -e by Y,, want is. 1nd.id!1(: Ihl -n, ?, c:eali and pure. ,ill thorou^Jy :ree tha fia 4t ntlr Toils elfect a blood of th,? impure mJtltt ,omplote aud L."Uv cute, v hichis tue t-, C2.U f Thousands of testimonials, aU 70W suffetm¡;. Clarke's fjj O?., S. y-,r success Hlood :l4infe is jutt P".e&aJOt '° cue. j "CURES! 1 EcnM. I SLMBUt-M &LOGO PO". I ? SCP.OfUL, $W[LUGS. PtHS, ■ j I BAO Lies, 204LS, RKWMnmn:. B j I i ABSCrSSES. PSM?ttS. GGUT ? | j Q Ull;, !OR£. &c. to. | « t 

No title

-+- I Mrs. David Glasbrook.—Draped gown of old gold brocaded satin, with a very smart tunic 01 tsmon. wiiist had a swathing of Kuiorsild green ¡ satdn, finislning as long tabber ends. MJTS. Krkrby.—^Crown of white satin, the tunic of silk oniLirc^d^ixxl lace be- ing edgtxi "ith fringe. A toiich of colour was given by the "La Fra.m»" rose won, upon the corsage. Mrs. Fabei-Whi.-tA-, &-i-tin olisnrKMise gown^ with an overdress of ivory chiffon, lia;vil)g a floi-tll 'rhoami was also a short, tunic of lace. Tlie waist swath ing wac of ro.se pink satt n. Mrs. ilichanfl Ijowin (Sk-2ttv) Draped gown of rose pin,k braoadt?. worn over an nmkrrdxess of crm-ni laoe I The tunic aand c-or,age was of cioaan lace, black tulle dciiuin-g th«J waist., Mrs. Wright.—lively gown of primrose hroehe satin, with a tunic of gold metallic boo. -Nitr-s. W. J-aanee.—Brown charmeuao gown, it had trimmings of kilted ribhons to tone, the corsage having a revct- of I Honitori laco -Alr, T.cwl. (Ba.tih).-Drap3d gown of sjlvoi' grey silk, the tunic be- ing hømmød with a narrow band of sable The corsage of satin h.ad slPeves of groy net Mrs. chiffon ta^etas fashioned her gown, which had a train of moire. The double tunic was of black net, the corsage having bretteleG of ivory lace. Mrs. Bertie Perkins.-Gown of pink ta?'ta?, the skirt was draped and caught up upon the tunic of ivory lace. with a pink posy. Miss Watkins.-Draped gown of ivory broche crepe de soi, with a tunic of shadow laoe. Around the waist was a .swathing of ciH bleu ribbon, with long ends falling at the baok. Miss Helen WtHLMtts- a smart gown of black satin, which had a full tunic and corsage of black Brussels net. Oriental ribbon swathed the 'waist, finished with a red rose in front. Miss Towers. -A chic gown of pink satin, with two tier veiling of silk- embroidered shadow lace. The corsage was also veiled with lace, and had vasts of crystal em broidered net. Mrs. H. D. Williams. Gown of black satin, which had a slightly draped skirt, and a tunic of black guipure lace. The oorsage had a vest of "Tango" embroidered velvet, the same swathing the waist. Miss Honorine Williams..—A pretty gown of ivory ninon, the skirt was fasliioned in flowers, which were headed with point lace. similar lace trimming | the corsage. Miss Davies (Bryngolly).—Gown of black ninon draped over ndiite satin, which had a tunic of silver lace. The corsage had trimmings of jot, a relief being given by the swathing of floral rihhon at the waist. Mrs. Ti-olnie,C;,own fashioned of white satin, and a. double tunic of floral, crepe-de-chi3ie, edged with tiny bohs. The fitll coraage of the floral crepe-de- chino had a Medici collar of fine whito: lace, i Mi ss Holmes.—A sweet dress of poach satin, with a ninon turlic. Of a darker tone. Miss Delia Abraham. White satin gown, with a tiny tunic and oorsage of white lace outlined with pearls. There were touches of pale blue at the waist. Mrs. P. Molyneux.—Draper gown of black satin, the tunic of black lace, being banded with skunk. The oirsago had trimmings of black ninon and jet J embroideries. i Mrs. Muriel Evans.—Gown of whit? &attn eharmuose, tb?? skirt having a I pointed back tablidr of satin, finished with a crystal tassel. The corsage of mauve ninon was veiled with, shadow laoo. « Mrs. Chapman.—A gown of black I chiffon velvet, the corsage having trim- mings of lovely Honiton kme. Miss ( hapntan.— W ore a pretty gown of ciel bleu crepe de chine, with touches j of shell pink and pearl embroideries. | Miss D. Ofcapma.n.—Gown of sapphire j blue paiktte, having a waist swathing of geranium red sotin, ami papiiTgs of the .same satin upon the <»Ts:ige. Mrs. Geen.—A gown of b)a<'k satin, the oorsage having ruffles of floral -net. Mrs. Ciairy.—J)ra-jxxi gown lof bla^-k satin charmeuse, with a. tunic of ninon trimmed with jet. The corsage had wang sleeves of the net M Lss Betty IN-illi-a.ins.-A gown of shell pink satin, draped over a laoe petticoat, the skirt was "Peg Top." while the corsage had trimmings of sil- ver find crystal. Mrs. Swarbrick.—A pretty gown of white satin, having a long tunic of black net embroidered with black se- quins. Mrs. Coonan.—A gown of blue satin, the skirt draped to form a "Peg Top." The corsage of blue ninon was sleeve- less, but had chairs of turquoise beads f upon one arm and a trellis work of pink I ribbons upon the other. Miss Coonan.—A very smart gown of white chiffon taffetas. The skirt was fashioned on "Peg Top'' principle. Tba top of the corsage was of folded ninon. the waist having a high swathing of the taffetas. i Miss Clothide Hopkins.—A pretty I gown of "Ciel Bleu," satin charmeuse, j having a tunic of carise ribbon. Misis Doris Matthews.—White char- mouse gown, the tunic and cor were I of rose pink ninon. The transparent sleeves were of ivory needlerun lace. I -cpO Cwyneth.

I RADNORSHIRE TRAGEDY I

I RADNORSHIRE TRAGEDY. I A tragic occurrence is reported irom Gladestry, Radnorshire. A young woman who, up to October, had been housekeeper to a farmer, and had since been in* domestic service at an adjoining farm, last Sunday heard that the banns of her former employer s approaching marriage had been pub- lished. This seems to have consider- ably agitated her. She left her present abode some time iiig the night and entered the house of her former employer. When the latter came downstairs early on Thursday he saw the bar- rel of a gun pointing at him from be- hind the door. He sieved the barrel, and the gun was discharged, but he was unhurt.. He then found his former house- keeper behind the door with the gun. She took a bottle from her pK),itet, I drank its contents and died from pokoning shortly afterwards. _u,

No title

An inquest at Barrow on Saturdav showed that John Turner, a laf)oij (lioo from a bult wound in the hoad. received while lie wa*. in a field, and thp coroner, while adjo'i^iiing till Jure 10. RUgg?.ste>d tha.t a eertain voung man and. '.voman sVicmid then come forwot-d and give their statement.

Advertising

GHSLOBIN TEETHING are greatly relieved by taking DOCTOR STEDMAN'S TEETHING POWDERS, These powders are guaranteed by the Pro. prietor to contain no harmful ingredient, and are therefore a safe and effective medicine for Infants. AsJt for them by the full title of DOCTOR STEDMAN'S TEETHING POWDERS, and see the Trade Mark, a, Gum Lancet, on the label of every packet, and powder, without which they cannot be genuine. Of Chemists and Stores, 1,11, 1 and 2/9. 125. New North Road. London, N. THE BUDGET AND NEW TAXES Have worried many, but Indigestion, Biliousness, Headaches. or Liver troubles are much worse. Happily, these can be relieved or cured by a prompt dose of KERNICK'S VEGETABLE PILLS at a very all cost. Thousand s take 'tt a -v e r- ,m PILLS no other n??dicine. S