Teitl Casgliad: Herald of Wales

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 16 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
18 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
CANADIAN NEWS ITEMS I

CANADIAN NEWS ITEMS. I From, widely separated parts of West- ern Canada reports indicate that so far the season has been eminently satis- factory from the agricultural outlook. There is evidmwe that there will be 2,000.000 acres more under crop this year than at any previous time 111 the history of the country; and this, not- withstanding the fact that so many agriculturalists are transferring their activities from wheat growing to mixed farming. Aeroplane Invention, A devic efor alighting safely from an aeroplane has been invented by Mr. W. A. JriaoJvay, or iNortii »y

II IGARDENING NOTES I

I GARDENING NOTES. I (By F. DaSlman Page, F.R.H.S.) I THE FLOWER GARDEN. Water Lilies in Tubs. I Mo?t folk on hearing of water lilies think ihat they are a luxury of tb? w?H-to-d.o. So they are, bwt they will afford the poor person as mcl: pleasure in a tub, as the wealtiiy man in p. lake. Moreover, equal success is assured when the small-rowing sorts a.rc chosen. The lilies which shall be mentioned here are as hardy as the ordinary pea*cmvial. I'he first thing is to obt;aav a water-tight half-cask or tub. T.ica water iviill need changiwrr occasiionally, so a hole must be made near the bottom and kept phiggfd. with a curk. A warning as to refilling the butt: ESther use chilled water, or only half-empty the buit. Having the tub or tubs, ixt,iii-t thexn on the outside, and thell order your kirns and goldfish. Why goldfish? you may aBk. Ei-n a tub should have a couple of fish. They kill the. iuscete. However, unless in a pond the fish will require other food. that can be bought in packets -it a huge shores. With re- gard to soil, a mixture of light garden mould, leaf soil oa peat fibre, and road dust or sand will serve nicely. The com- post should be enriched with a little bone meal, or with a "complete" arti- ficial, or with, hep manure. The best timo for planting is the pre- sent, and the best. poMtio.n for a tub a surnv one. Whe,u the lilies arrive from the nurx'.rynian, wiap them in a wet cloth until planted. It is iiigjdy dangerous to let them get dry. Upon, tll:" bottom of the tub place a Layer cf broken crocks. Next, your compost. A foot,, or a little less, of water above the soil is ample for tub varieties. It your vossfel is a deep one, order the plant to be sent in a. basket. By means of these baskets, the lilies are kept high in the tubs, or pond for that matter. The basket gradually decays, but by that time thp plant is establislicd, and can do without the support. The after-car: of the water-lilies merely consists in keeping the water up I to the rim of the tub, in changing Ira,If or three-quarters of the liquid contents i every two or three weeks, and in feed- iiig every autumn with bono meal, or every spring with a complete fertiliser. The plants resent disturbance, and must not be replanted until a poor season's flower .show;* that the tub is becoming rvercTowded, or that the soil is ex- hausted. Here are nympheas (water lilies) for cultivation in tubs. The Lay- dekeri class the wild. American water- lily (Odorata) in its smaller varieties, and the Pigmy nyraphcas. ————— —————

THE FRUIT GARDENI

THE FRUIT GARDEN. I Disbudding the Trees. I Although good crops are often gathered without thinning the infarnt I fruits, and spurs are formed naturally all -1 without disbudding the shoots or summer pruning, no one disputes the desirability of these cultural details. It is & question of having the necassaa'v ? tune. The rasons for (?sbiiddmg—that is, removing nee,dlæs foMage shoots—are to admit a? much light And air as pO&- sihl to the rip?n'?g Jruit, to conserro ¡ the trees' strength and aHew the sap to be used in the development of tlnd fru, and to give weather an-op- portunity to get at and chock the dif- ferent pests. Before commencing to disbud the pip and stone treas, we would ask our- readers to not: the difference between fruit spurs and leal shoots. The former are thick, short and tufty growths, and the latter arc long and lean. Seldom ks much thinning-—that is, dishudding-üf spurs but usually the leaf shoots are far more numerous than is good for the trees' well-being. Now is the time for the wo-rk, At the cutset, the grower ■should carefully look over a tree notice where the now spurs are forming, and assist their growth through dasbudding any over- shadowing leaf shoots. Th eii, aJl the ion age growth upon the inner sides of the branches ought to be rubbed away. Badly placed spurs may be retained for a year or so when a certain tree is pootly, furnished with fruitful growths. but, otherwise, keep the centres of standards and bushes open. In proceeding, arrange for so many leading, and for a number of lateral, leaf shoots. The side shoots (the laterals) may be made into f.mi ting spurs. Several weeks hence they might be re- duced to a length of six inches, and the extensions pinchod later on. This is summar pruning The summer pruning causes the sap to concentrate towards the base of the shoots; and, when these shoots are further shortened in winter to the second or third joint, spurs be- gin to plump up, which, thou.gh they may not bear a.t once, will do so in time. Let the leaders crroiv on until the winter. gab —————- I

THE VEGETABLE GARDENI

THE VEGETABLE GARDEN. I Cauliflowers and Broccolis. I Broccoli flower heads, being the lii.irdiei, and more easy to grow, are fre- quently sold as caulittomM-s. Howbeit, the cauliflower is sufficiently robust during the summer months, and is cer- tainly superior i n texture and flavour to broccoiis. The kitchen gardener will ii-ad it best to have his cauliflower hauls maturing during the summer, and the broccoiis in the late autumn and through the winwr. The row's ought to be kept damp at all times, and the i;{)Ü open and pow- der v, to be asfiua-ed of the, plants not bolting. Lack of moisture and a caked t.urface are likely to ma-ke th. plants bolt "tihat is, run up into a tall Q

A SPLENDID CENTRE

A SPLENDID CENTRE. SIR SYDNEY OLIVIERS COMPLI- MENT TO SWANSEA. Not the least striking feature of the Bath and West of England Show this Ba tli ilici V?, e,, s t of year is the attractive stait belonging toi the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries. Pamphlets of all descriptions, are given at this stand, and the capable stair em- ployed are ready to explain things to any inquirer. Sir Sidney Olivier, K.C.M.G., the Secretary of the Board or Agriculture, has so far been in attendance doily, and our representative visited him at the Stand. The secretary proved extremely courteous, and when asked his opinion of this year's Rath 

I LOCAL FAIRS FOR JUNE I

I LOCAL FAIRS FOR JUNE. I S.—Lla-ndilo Bridge, Monmouth. n,-Cardigan, Haverfordwest, 10.—Nesath 31.—Caerphilly, Narb^rth (wool), Pembrey. 12.—Rhayader. 13.—Llandilo Town, Newcastle Emlyn, 15.-Caio, Letterston, Llandilo and District. 16.—Cairo, Llangenneeh, Maenclochog, Towvn, Whit land. IfOa;rdiga,n, Cilycwm, Llangeanech, Llatiddousant. 18.—Llanedy, Ross. 19. —171 an d every. 22.-LJndila, Llandilo Bridge, Mom- mouth (wool). 24.—Caste!! Ifo?!. Cowbridge. 2(5Llanwrtyd Wells.- 27.-Builth Wells, Dolgelly, LlandiW Town, Newport (Pern.). 29.—Llandilo and District. I 30.—Pontardulais,

HIS MAJESTY S PHYSICIANSI

HIS MAJESTY S PHYSICIANS. I The King has appointed Sir Bertr.iia Dawson to be physic^an-rn-ordinary to his Majesty and Mr. Frederick Stanley Ho wet t to b > surgeon apothecary to the King and epotliecary to his Majesty's House-hold, in saicceission to the late Sir Francis La ling, who held tlioise posi- tions. Sir Bartrand Dawson has been phvsi- eian-extraordinary to the. King since 1907 and physictian at London Hospital for nearly eight years. Mr. F. S. Hewett is the anaesthetist at the Vic- toria Hospital for C'hildreri, Chelsea.

No title

Mr. Asquith is staying with Lord I Sheffield at Penrhos, Anglesey. A man was found unconscious on the Grea.t Northern Railway line between Totteridge and Barnet Stations on Sat- urday afternoon, his left leg completely severed; he was removed to the Finch- ley Cottage Hospital. #IA

Advertising

I jELUMANS ELLSftlANfS ADDED TO THE BATH. EUiman's added to the hot or cold bath makes a silky and antiseptic bath. Experience will show the amount to be added to rnako the bath agreeable and comforting; from 1 to 3 ounces, according to the size of the bath, is recommend- ed. Added to the hot bath after severe exercise it prevents stillness. Elliman's added to the hot foot bath is useful to prevent chill from feet being damp. ,Elliman'¡i may also be used with advantage after heavy walking, for the purpose of dispersing that tired uncomfortable feeling which so often results, and in which case either hot water or cold water may bo used for the purpose of washing the foet. Bathing the kinds in hot water with Elliman's added is also beneficial when damp gloves have been on the hands some time, through driving. Illhem there is y.ezema or other tkin disease EUiman'a should not be ii&ad. nr&? ps?a !.o?

ITHE POULTRY YARD

I THE POULTRY YARD. I (By "CQCkOW.") OVERCROWDING. I am often suvprsied when visiting my amateur friends to find how many make the miishtke of crowding their birds. They seem to have the idea that not matter a# lcag as the birds are fed well, and I Ixdieve that no end of the failures we hear ct come from woukl-be jioultrv keepers making this mistake. If they could be per- suaded to give bettet clean easily. Iæt us "first con- sider the smallest æalc, say from fcur to eight fowls to be kept at the bottom of the gamen. If the aifair has u> be put up arrange it so as to have a liouise in one corner, a roofed shed cajriod out at its side, and as open run in front as can he awarded, or perhaps tho whole yard. The house will bo walled j II, but the shed should be open m front, though with a. closed end wall, unless it runs all across, in which latter caw it may perhaps compi-ise t-li,, run which can be afforded. In any case, in con- fined space the shed should be boarded 1IU a foot from the round, and netted above, that the few birds may be con- fined in specially had weather; and the roof over all should project a little in front and have a gutter. A house four foot square would reallv do for half a dozen; but this wrmld hardly give enough sh.elter-dcpth to the shed, which will be far better six feet to the back, hence a small house may part off four feet wide from such allied. A Nest in the Duck-house. The, illustration shows a simply con- structed nc?t ior the iltiel, F I n?sDng place is made with few hncks with a box of soil on which straw is laid as shown. If the ducks have a tree range they should be kept in till about ten o'clock. Buikiing to a Back Wall. If there is a Kick wall the mac.ter will le simplified, limber and planks are 12ft. long, so if the front of s'hed and house be a little less than 6ft., or the shed th.tt depth, the wood will cut up vvell. Quartering (2 + 3) should be uxext for frame and uprights, and not less than fin. for the boaixla. The back up- rights should be clinched to the wall by staymails or holdfasts, and a horizontal piece of same section similarly fastened to the wall to support the hack of the roof. The bottoms of all the uprights can be tarred and sunk in the ground; but- it is better to lay horizontal sills of quartering either on the ground, or" still better, upon a looting made by a row of bricks laid side by side, aud halve or moriiso all tho uprights into the sills. There nwisfc be uprights at the corner of the house, for a. doorpost, at the gate in the shed, at its corner, and wherever eJ«e needed for strength. A horizontal timber will run all along the top of the. front, and on to this and tho back piece on the wall the rafters will he spiked down. Tongued boards are best, and look neatest. The door must fit veclf, or rather, should be made so as to la.p over the timbers iit round. Putting on the Roof. For roofing there arc maLly materials. Loose tiles answer for the southern half of England, and provide ample ventila- tion but m high latitudes the house would be far too cold, as is aJso the case with galvanised iron when it is u-ed aioue, and which docs not venti- late. Boarded or ceiled under, either makes a good roof. Wood alone also makes a good roof. Feather-edge boards may be overlapped horizontally, and tarred periodically, or thicker hoards, tongued or plain, may be laid ¡' edge to edge from tho highest point to the eaves. This should be coated with hot gas tar in which a. pound of pitch to the gallon is dissolved. Or the wood may be tarred, then covered with thick brown paper down, and again tarred; or calico will be still better. Or the wood may be covered with roof- ing felt. The Importance of Strain. I AVIiioli are the best fowls for egg I production ?" This is an oft-repeated query, and is a.s ofttimes answered by There are no beet breeds, for al- though there are many bryeds of fowls that are noted for their prolific laying, it does not necessairly follow that each individual hen of such breeds will prove herself a good layer; in fact, uoh is not the case, for whereas cue hen of a par- ticular breed may yield 200 eggs in the course of ) singk' year, ?n?thf;?' hen of  the &am? hrd may rot produœ more than half t! is number of eggs in the same time; and the mfeon for this is that it is not only the breed of the fowl tha+ counts, but. what is of quite as much importance, the strain, and un- less a hen is bred from a of good layers sh«- herself cannot excel as iir. egg; producer. So writes Mr. F. Jay Amort ;u Feathered Lire." H^w to improve. Those poultry beepers whose ambition it is to own a, flock of 200 egg hens must pay strict attention to this very lm- portent matter of strain, as unless they do their ambition can never be realised. All .strains of fowls that are in existence at the present day have been acquired by many years of very careful selection and breeding, and their owners have exercs&ed as much thought and skill upon t?ni ?? fanci?i's do n?'u exhibition bird? The hens hav? hH carefully trap-nested, and fie bcst ).:y?rs on]' bred from, and ]t you wish to possess a good laying strain yon must pTweed in a rimiki,r way by carefully Doting t!? hens and their individual achievements as layers, mark- ing t!wm by ]]?nns of k?-bajids, and breeding only from the best, not over- looking the fact- that the cockerel to which they are mated must also have been bred from good layers, otherwise your efforts will Ix- in- vain. If you have a flock of hens that, although good layers, do not exactly claim the name of record breakers, you may improve en the progeny by purchasing a good cockerel from, sonic noted, flock of layers and mating linn with the lx st birds in your flock. You 1111Ft consider the strain as well as the breed before you can roach the top rung of the ladder of fame or success

Advertising

I IF you have never tried" Black Cats" I you don't know how good a Virginia Cigarette j can be obtained at 10 for 3d. It's an anti-trust Cigarette and is competing against monopoly by its distinctive merits. » m\ mmwrngm————■ HAY PITCHERS, OR ELEVATORS. The Original Patent One Man" Fork THE BEST IN THE WORLD. We were tho investors in 1S10, and the latest made In 1914 works itself. WHY is it that many hundreds of them were sold during that short time, and that there are hundreds in Stock for this Season alone. BECAUSE One Man can do better and more work with this Fork than three men possibly could with all the other makes combined. Supplied complete for SHEDS and complete for POLES. We apprpcia-te all Enquiries, and Orders can be tent direct to our Agents or Ironmongers in every Town. CAUTION—Avoid Imitations. PATENTEES & MANUFAICTUREriS- T. rORR IS & SON, Pontyglasier, Eglwyswrw, S.O. London Agents-Messrs. P. D. RASSPE & SONS, LTD.

CARMARTHEN SOLICITORS CRITI

CARMARTHEN SOLICITOR'S CRITI- CISM OF SWANSEA BENCH. I [ Criticism of the Swansea County Bench was made at Carmarthen on Thursday, when Ruth Ilees, Mill Cot- tage, Ponthenry, summoned Hugh Wil- liams, farmer's son, Furnacc Farm, Ponthenry, for non-compliance with an affiliation order of 3s. 6d. a week made at Swansea on December 31st last. De- fendant, who denied the paternity, had not paid anything under the order, and had previously served a period of im- prisonment for non-compliance. A Court of Appeal. Mr. A\ J. AVallis Jones, who ap- peared-lor the cie-ieikuan-t. e.xoiau: d that after the case was twice dismissed by the Carmarthen County Bench, it was taken to Swansea, where the county magistrates granted an order. "As your worships know," said Mr. Jones, "it has become quite a custom in this dis- trict for girls, whenever they fail to get an order here, they gQ. to Swansea, and invariably they get it there. I have made inquiries, and I do not know of a .single instance where Swansea has refused an order under these circumstances. The Swansea court practically constitutes itself as a Court of Appeal, and over-rules ycur decision here." "An Unfortunate Case." I The Bench intimated that they could '¡ not go into the paternity case. Mr. Jones: No, but if the Swansea ,court car. over-rule your judgment in that way, it is still in your power to ^ay what you think. Defendant refused to make any offer of payment under the oider, and the Bench, in. default of payment, stnt him to prison for a month. Mr. Wall's Jonas: I do not think he is likely to make any offer of payment. The Chairman (Mr. Evans, of Tanty- cendv) said it was rather an uufwtu- nate case.

MARK TAPLEYISM I

MARK TAPLEYISM. I Although they had been entombed for 20 hours in the South Hieodley pit., near HorasiR ortli, owing to a fire caused by a lamp explosion, the two miners, Harry Townley and Charles Brain, ap- pear none the worse for their ex- perience. Townley, in an interview, stated that j when he found escape was impossible he and Brain walked to a stream of water running through the workings. j Brain would have rushed out into the smoke md been lost had Townley not dissuaded him and cheered him by pointing out that there was plenty of water as well as a manger full of corn. In fact, Townley said, We shall be all right for a month."

A BRIEF SPEECH I

A BRIEF SPEECH. Reginald Harding, a six-year-old boy, 'I of Frome, Somerset, who has been re- garded as deaf and dumb from birth, I has just spoken the word "Early." It j was in school, where his teacher had finished calling the roll, and the word is .stated to have been clearly and de- liberately pronounced. Steps are being taken to try and de- velop his speech and hearing.

No title

John Roberts, a ninety-eight-year-old policeman, entertained a hundred friends at a banquet at Bellaire, Ohio, to celebrate the seventieth anniversary of his entry into the forep- Lord Strathcona's English seat, Deb- den Hall, on the borders of Hertford- shire and Essex, is announced for sale by Messrs. Hampton and Sons. The estate extends to 6,500 acres. The Little Lamb," produced at the Apollo Theatre Wednesday, wa& withdrawn on Saturday ntzhi*

Advertising

?J

AGRICULTURAL I AGUL9LlRALN0IESI

AGRICULTURAL I A G; U L-9 Ll R A L N 0 I'E S. I (By a. Farmer.) Improving Irish Live Stock. I Excellent prograss is evidently being Government schemes for imp roving .the breeds of Irish live tock. I he total* number sires allocated under tin* horse-breeding premimn Kcheme(was • of which 181 were llK'-rmighbreds, twelve Irish draught sta-H'ons/. lOt' ixr attempt to revivo-thc- old Irish type of draught Jiorpo appesys to meet with iair success, and the balf-breds and the Clydesdales both show continuous pro- grew, x.-hile the thoroughbred and the Sh-i re had a slight .set-back as coimxired i,tl L 3812. The number of mares passed si the 2Ç; local exhibitions as sound and suitable was 5,624, made un of the different breeds in about the ranie pro- portions' as the sires, and; the total amount expanded for nomination* in- cluding €4,810 from the Development Crarit. v?s i'1?.4C7. ?ei? \rerc 13,7G5 in arcs in.?ppded, of 'n huh 8,251 wrc ?)as??d Iv th? judges as? djgible for nominations, but ofi these 797 iv?ro rc- jltüd a* un?.und and 72 per cent, of the nominations were given to maizes six years of age and under. The total amount expended in pre- miums for bulls was £ 13,032, and funds v.ere set aside for the award of an aggregate of 959 premiums. I ocal ex- hihitions were held at JK) centres, and 57:! bulls that had held premiums in 1912 were passed as suitable for fur- ther service, but only 560 were actually retained. Only 3-10 new applicants were selected, .making total 900 instead of the maximum of 959 provided for. Of this total nearly two-thirds were v, 592-180 Abc-r- ixty-seven HerafortLs, and fifty-six other breeds, and with few ex- ceptions all the bulls were less than four veai-s old, and more than a third of the total were yearlings. In addition, 2(j,3 bulls were placed under sppcia t arrange- p'ent for congested counties, making the total number of sires distributed under the scheme 1,165. The number of premium boars, was whites*, twenty large blacks, a-ud 125 white Ulster. The eheep-breeding scheme is only on a limited scale, being confined mainly 'to the congested counties, in which 103 black-faee mountain rams were sold at reduced prices. Haw to Tahe Samples. With refbrersce to my recent remarks D'i the failure of the Fertilisers and Feeding Stuffs Act to aehaeve what it )vas intendof! to do, I am reminded that failure to comply with the sampling regulations is net infrequently the reason why successful proc-eedingis are not taken when thcr.s has clearly been contravention of the Act. It may be well, therefore, to mention the fcilcw- ing points in the official regulations: Thi" sattlplc must be taken within ten days of arrival of the manure or tecedpt of the invoice—whichever is later. The seller must receive three days' notice of intention to sample, with notice of tinie p.nd place for the operation. The ramp- ling must be performed in conformity with the instructions of the Beard of Agriculture Bags of manure must, of course, remain intact until after the operation. The buyer should always carefully compare the percentage of nitrogen, phosphate of lime, and potash inserted in the invoice with the quality ag' reed upon at time of purchase. A sample should then be &en.t, as per Board et Agricultural instructions, to the t>f £ dal analyst for tho county; but if the buyer should not desire the cer- tificate of analysis tr) be of suoh a for- ma! nature, he- ?An forward the sample to th? RnaiyKt o? his ?ca) agricultural society or to any well-known :mahsi. H? ?i4 ?av<'?th e ?an?-iuct'ion of know- ing that tb? samples have be?n dnw] in such a manner t.bat Ibs certificate oj: the analyst will be accepted without dp- i.iti and can be nswd as a basis lot. eOnl- J pensation should it show that the quality v. a inferior to the quality purchased. Loss in Weight of Cattle in Transit. An. important investigation lias been carried out for several years in order f to test the loss in weight of the different classes of cattle when conveyed by rail, a-nd to discover the various factors causing a greater or smaller loss in the course of the journey. Th« -loss in weight depends very nw- terially upon the, length of time tho cattle are kept without food and water before being loaded: the nature of tho feed which the ca.ttl-9 have before,ioati- mg-zoijd hay is recommended as being superior to pulp or silagej the weather conditions at the time of load- ing during transit, and at the market the c haracter of the journey—s low, rough journeys causing greater lass-- and the treatment tho cattle received at unloading stations the time of ar- rival at market—-if the cattle arrive juvt before- being sold they have no time to hare a good feed. It was found that c.tttic reaching the market early 0", the day cf sale or the afternoon of the pievious day fed better than those ;u riving "during the night. The tests fc-hwred that an exceedingly Jarge feed as jwarkct is not desirable, as it detracts from the selling price. T'iie >hlinkage in the ease of calves hokls abrmt the same proportion to their weight as is found, with sirown cattle. Steers usually shrirtk somewhat- less than cows of the same weight. The Jcs in .weight over a long journey is greatest pi op-ortionately during the first twenty-four hours. *Ih? shrinkage  present slipping or falling, which, of out ye, tires them unneces- sarily K mng Weeds and Maiming Crops. I Readers may be interested to have particulars of sqnie experiments carried t ut at fifty different centres last year, Lo tcq, the etncsicy of calcium cyaaani^de in the eradication d chariocii. and wild radish. T here was a wide. range of. soil and vreatbsr conditions at tbfcse centres. The crops wesv> spring-sown, and, in most eases, oats; the calcium cyana- lindc was applied at the rate of 1341b. ,1lJre on tho average. weea plants were at different, stages of development at the different, centres when the calcium cyanajiiide was applied.- The applications were always made. in the early morning alter a dewy night. In most cases the suc- ceeding weather was favourable—i.e., without rain, and in these cases the effects of the calcium cyaaiamide on the ciwiJ-lock and wild ra;dieh weae. ndsible on live two succeeding days, plants with from fonl to six leaves being completely burnt, and even stroiwer pkunte being I'.sually killed. Plants in. bloom were not completely burnt, but were weak- ened to such an extent that the oats overgrew them later. At whert: tltere was. i-aqxi tftar the applica- tion of the eaiciuni cyanamide the effect was not visible until a few days later, Sttc «as lea« marked than in the pre- caf* The experiments a kx> slio-wed thtsth^ to be i-c,ry sras?ceptible to calcium eyS-nainhJe. Aitheugh there :1 y^.ilowing of the nnt ph>ni"s a few d?y? ;1t,n,' T'hf a.p?pH?- tior.s. it Mas established a-t all nenti-^s that tT enfcinm cyaT?mid e ?Rd ?o h.nmfuJ c?< uu th? ?M.um oa.' At J elwen. centres clover was sown in the 1 oats. In-line cases, when the oat carop was taken, the clove- was seen to ho better than on untreated plots; in two -•cases it was woj>«, but attainted a better growtli by the autumn. In uio case dsd the calcium cyananiide percianeiit'y harm the clover. At all wntnos the manui ial dfod of the oalo*?u rn cr\ana- nvide was Very iTwiit'.o^ahle—equal, in fact, to that of either sulphate- of a-ii- moiMa or lutrate cf soda when these were tested. In the kas badly infested fields the gain from the treatment was about 5ewt. of grain per acre over the control plots.. But for treatment ill acme of the badly-infested fields these would have had to he ploughed up.

1WEEKLY REVIEW OF THE CRAINI i AND FLOUR TRADES

WEEKLY REVIEW OF THE CRAIN i AND FLOUR TRADES. Since pasting my last review the "'f'ath{'lf lias been mainly dry and hot, abnormally so for tho time ot y1. to 37s. English White, 34s. to 37s.; R? 33 s. to 36s Maize rather dearer. Russian, 24s. M. to ?5s. 9d.; Pta.tc, 2?. 9d. to 26s. 6d. American, nominal. );a.r]ev r?ry {irni. Ru?ian, 21s. Gd. tc 24s. Ud.. ludi?n, 23s. 6d. to 25s. (3d. Persian, K)?. 6d. to 22s. Gd. K?Jish Malting, 3is. to 40s. Oats firm. English, ISs. 6d. to 23s. 6d. Foreign, 15s Pod, to 23s. 9d. Feeding'Cakes steady, but demand I moderate. Flour. I With warmer weather, vegetables more plentiful, and fruit coming on the market, the consumption of bread eased off, and although the wheat mar- kets keep firm, the fiour trade is far from brisk, bakers being well bought at the low prices prevailing a few weeks since. Quotations as follow: Town Wnites, 30s. 2 Country Patents,, 26s. 6d. Whites, 24s. (id. Alinneape!is Spring Patents, 21s. to 28s. (id. Manitoba Patents, 26s. to 26s. (id. Kansas- Patents, 25s. to 26s. 6d. American Spring Bakers, i;4s. (id. to 25s. 3d. Hungarian Patents, 13s. to 44s. Weather Forecast. Whiter wheat in North An?'?ca. con- tmu?-s to progress most sa-tistadordy, and given normal weather until hai- I IF-l few weeks hence—it win be a prodigious and record crop. The out- I-kwk ill Europe is not qiMto so glowing, it teiii, moiv. variable, but in the main prospects may be deemed good. The planting of spring wheat in both continents ha