Teitl Casgliad: Herald of Wales

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 9 o 16 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
ABERAVON AND PORT I TALBOT

ABERAVON AND PORT I TALBOT. QUESTION OF AMALGAMATION: OPINIONS OF PUBLIC MEN. The special article in last week's Heralci 11 ou the amalgamation ques- tion of Aberavon and Port Talbot created -widespread interest amongst all sections of the public. The efforts of j your special correspondent," writes our Aberavon and Port Talbot represen- tative, has certainly aroused excep- tional interest in the question, as may be judged from the following inter- yjews The Mayor of Aberavon. The Mayor of Aberavon (Ald. David Rees) said that the conclusions arrived at in the article in favour of amalga- mation were based on sound solid fact, and any supposed argument in opposition could be easily controverted by a serious con-sideration of what a well considered scheme for the fusion cj, the two districts would mean to the t^rieral weal of the two towns. Un- fortunately a good deal of unnecessary animus has existed between the two districts, which, however, has been gradually swept away. Once this is eradicated and the virtues of the scheme publicly undenstood, there will be a clear run for amalgamation. The Trades Unionists of the district have dearly recognised th-e great possibilities of a scheme of amalgamation, and in the future they will take a far more active part in its propagation than they have in the past. To this end the L.R.C. have included amalgamation as the chief plank in their local platform. Mr. Rees Llewetlyn (Chairman of Margam Council). Mr. Ilees Llewellyn, who has for many years taken a keen interest in the amalgamation scheme, said that although the article touched upon many of the salient points of the amalgama- tion scheme, it was impossible to deal with the numerous phases of such a big proposition in a short article or inter- view. Before any active steps could be taken in the matter a good deal of propaganda, work was necessary to educate the general public. Steps were being activeiv taken to this end. "My idea of amalgamation," he declared, "does not only include Aberavon and Margam, but the whole of the public authorities, seven in number, adjoining these two districts, such as Glyn- corrwg, I Cwmavon, BlaengwynS, Michaelstone Higher and Lower, Pont- rhydyfen, and Kenfig Hill, which would embrace a population of 60,000 people, and would so constitute the requisite basis of forming a county borough. The point is to create a demand for such a scheme within the areas mentioned, and then to apply to the Local Govern- ment Board for a Provisional Order. By this method a good deal of the parochial interests and p.?j?di

EXPRESS IN PERIL

EXPRESS IN PERIL. Horse Almost Wracks Train. I About six o clock on Wednesday evening the Fishguard express had a. providential escape from wreck near Court Sart. oblivious to the risk, and without noticing the on- rushing express, a youth named Geo. Fish, of Britonfarry, was leading a cafj-horse over the Court Sart crossing to the Marshes, when; hearing thtl shriek of the whistle, the lad just managed to rush out of the way &s the express dashed into the horse amd cut tile animal in two. So violent was the impact that the train absolutely rocked, but fortu- nately kept the rails. The accident was witnessed by several people from their houses, which overlook the rail- way, and they raced to the spot ex- pecting to find that the lad had been cut to pieces. The rails were covered with blood and horseflesh, and a few moments elapsed before a cry of joy was heard that too lad was safe. Unnerved by the shock, the distracted youth ran down the embankmaat, where he col- lapsed. .Recovering, he told the people around him that he was leading the horse over the crossing by the halter rope, and did not observe the express until it was nearly on him. "I threw down the rope," he said, brushing away the tears, and I just got out of the way in time," and the lad cried as if his heart would broak at the fate of the horse.

THE SPEAKERS DEATHI

THE "SPEAKER'S" DEATH, Well-known Bry nam ma nit a Passes Away. There passed peacefully away, in the presence of his family, at Llandilo- road, Brynamman, on Tuesday, one of Bry nam man's best known and re- spected characters, in the person of Mr. Thomas J. Hawells, of the Parlia- ment." Deceased was a boot and shoe maker, and successfully conducted business at Cwmgarw-road. His estab- lishment was the rendezvous of the leading poets, literary men, and politicians of the district, where the chief and current topics of the day were discussed: The meetings at times were most into resting, not to say in- structive, and the "Speaker," seated on his work-stool, jocularly termed "the woolsack," cut an imposing fl En I re. His genial personality and breezy conversations will be missed by a host of callers. He was one of the most original characters, unassuming and outspoken. He was a staunch Liberal, a member of the Quarter Bach Council for 15 years, and chairman of that body for a period. The late Mr. Abel Thomas, K.C., M.P., when he visited the district, invariably called at the "House." Deceased was well versed in Scripture. He was a pro- minent member of Gibea Church, and a useful member on many of its com- mittees. He was born 69 years ago at Pontarllcchau, near Llangadock, but had resided in Brynamman since he was two years of age. There are left to mourn their loss a widow, six sons, and two daughters.

I SWANSEA MANS DEATH

I SWANSEA MAN'S DEATH. A sad story of a distressing suicide was told \at the inquest held at Llany- byther, on Wednesday night, respect- ing the death of Richard Bartholomew Jenkins, a gentleman of indepcndenit means, residing at the Laurels, Llany- byther, who was fottnd snot in his bed- room on Tuesday, with a doub 1 e-bairrel gun lying between his legs. The deceased; who was 25 years of uge, was the son of the late Mr. Bartiholomew Jonkins, who at one time kept the Clarendon Hotel, Swansea, and of Mrs. Jenkins, Gwydr Villa, Up- lands, Swansea. He was educated at Llandovery College, and for some time studied in London with the intention of becoming a doctor. He was married to the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Rees, Plas Newydd, Henllan. At the inquest, Mr. T. Howell Davies, solicitor, Carmarthen, ap- peared on behalf .of the relatives of de- ceased. Locked in Her Room. The first witness called was Mrs. Margareita Jenkins, the widow, who stated that on Monday evening she went to church, and about 10.30 she and her husband returned home. De- ceased was under the influence of drink, and was very excited. She tried her best to get him to go to bod, but failed. About twelve o'clock ahe went upstairs to go to bed, but her hus- band called her and begged of her to oome down And keep him --P-Y, as he wa6 dopre,,z?? She caUM downstairs at once, and re- tnained with him until about four o'clock in the morning. She then went to bed, flo.wed by the deceased, and ?fteT talking for a long time he lert and 1 bedroom, locked the door from the out- side, and took the key with him. He promised to go to his own bedroom, and she thought he did so. Ftmd with a Coat-Hanger. F.S. Jones spoke to finding in the gun a spent oartridge and a live one. On the bed was a coat-hanger, with a piece of wire attached. It would P. I Sear that the trigged had been polled by means of this wir>. A verdict of "Suicide whilst tem- porarily iaeaao" was retained,

I COMPENSATION CASE 1

COMPENSATION CASE. POINTS OF LECAL INTEREST. A case of considordble interest was heard before his Honour Judge Lloyd Morgan, K.C., at Neath County Court on Thursday last. Mr. Ewim Gibon I solicitor, Poi-t Talbot, appeared on behalf of the applicant, Miss Mary Hannah Roers, Xiiuygroes--sar eet, Pert Talbot, and Mr. Yitiiers Meager (in- .111 i t-1-8 structed by Messrs. Lewis Morgan and Box, solicitors, Cardiff) appeared on be- half of the respondents, the. Tonhir Coi tiorn, Company, Ltd., Bryn, Port T'albot, and Mr. Trevor Hunter (instructed by Mr. Matthew Arnold, solicitor, Neath) appeared 011 befeaif of the other respon- dent, Mrs. Mary Hughes. In opening the case, Sir. Davies said the application was made by Miss Mary Hannah Rogerí1 the next friend and mother of William Hughes Rogers, the illegitimate son of a man named Wm. Hughes. "William Hughes was engaged by the Tonhir Colliery Co., Ltd., as a pumpsmati at their colliery, and was killed on the 22nd May, 1913, by being dragged into the machinery. Miss Rogers and deceased had known each other for many years, and had kept company from June, 1 ;09. until August, 1 colliery was three or four miles uwfeani from Port Talbot he could not have been waJkinjg out with the applicant at 13 o'clock or 10, the times alleged.—For the defence Mr. Villiers Meager sub- mitted that there wn6 no evidence and no corroboration to support the appli- cant's story.—His Hononr: Do you sug- gest that I reqtEnre corroboration of the paternity, and cannot accept the appli- cant's cfideiieeF-lklT. Meager: I sub- mit, sir, that you must have corrobora- tion in the same way as corroboration, is required in affiiiijtion proceedings. In reply, Mr. Davies submitted that the paternity had beE'n satisfactorily ptottkI by the applicant heraelf, as her testi- mony was prima facie evidence of the paternity, and that no corroboration was required if his Honour was satisfied with the truth of the applicant's sbate- ment. The position was quite different from tliat of affiliation prooaeddngs, and in the Workmen's Compensation Act there was no mention at all of the evi- dence or corroboration of evidence te- quired in compensation cases, wheresis the ocnoboratian required in affiliation cases v.-as a special creation of a gpL-cial Statute. In any case, even if corrobora- tion was required, Mr. Davies sub- mitted that in this case the corrobora- tion was ample. The letters written by the dooeased mail to the apspfaexmi aftes* he had become aware of her il lness be- fcnM more affectionate.—His Honour: Yes I notice that 000 of his lettfrs is add II Dearest Hamrah," whilst the others are addressed "Dear Han- liah ITpon the question of the appor- tionment of the compensation, Mr. Davies submitted that the child was entitled to the bulk, if not fjlie wbote, oi the £ 300.—-His Honour reserved judg- ment. v

I RUSSIAH OUTRAGE

RUSSIAH OUTRAGE. Berlin, Thursday.—A message from St. Petersburg states that, the mem- bei-a of the Russian Imperial family bad a narrow escape from death or serious injury early this BMfmng. The Imperial train from Roumania to St. Petersburg had passed the station at Tschudiow, preceded by a postal train, when the latter ran into a dynamite bomb which had been placed on the rails. Terrific Explosion. A terrific explosion occurred, and many of the coaches of the mail train were shattered and scsveral passengers injured. The Imperial train paiswed the spot a little latter, and continued its journey with little or joo dek-.

I RAILWAYMENS COM IFERENCE

RAILWAYMEN'S COM- FERENCE. IMPORTANT MEETINGS AT SWANSEA. The annual conference of the National Union of Railwaymen was held at Swansea this week, and a number of important resolutions were passed. The meetings commenced with a gathering at the Empire on Sunday afternoon.' Mr. Bellamy, in his opening address, said that when they tinst thought of uniting the railwayman's forces they were told 'that the influence of "grade- ism" made such a feat impossible, but he was glad to think that after twelise months' existence, the National Union of Railwaymen could hold such a fine meeting in Swansea, full of enthusiasm for the new cause and movement, and that in the interim the membership of the new union had increased by 100 per cent. The old d-esire for unity, he felt had been justified and exemplified in the N.U.R. (Applause). The world outside was wondering what this new umon was going to do when its teeth had been fairly cut. 4 projectod IFIG Amalgamation weicomea. Mr. it. rrcoei-t, chairman ci the Swansea Labour Association, and a. delegate to the conference, moved tho following resolution :-— That this meeting cf railway workers desires to place on record our appreciation of the increased growth and power of our organisation we Te. affirm our belief in the principle of one I union for railwaymen, and again ex- tend an invitation to our locomotive brothers to recognise the advantages of fusion. (Applause.) We congratulate the Executive Committee on the national programme, and trust the coming together of the transport workers, miners, and railwaymen will be the initial step to securing the emancipation of the workers. We again affirm our belief in the principle of direct Labour representation." MI. J. Phillips (Port Talbot), in sec- onding, referred covertly to Lord Claud Hamilton and the Great Eastern Rail- .1 way Bill, which was successfully blocked the other day by the Labour representatives. Mr. J. E. Williams, the general sec- retary of the union, who supported, said they waanted every section of rail- waymen to come into the union. They I did not care whether the Associa-ted Society had got accumulated capital or not. Comm on sense dictated that the unions should stop fighting each other, and fight the common enemy—capital- ism. So long as divisions existed, the capitalist would take advantage of the situation. When Mr. J. H. Thomas rose to sup- port the resolution the Llsunelly con- tingent—-who Jippeared toO be largely re- .sponsible for the subsequent disoider-- started to shout him down, members of the Amalgamated Socioty of Engineers and Firemen, who were present in some foroo, were also credited with a share in the interruptions. "I will put my friend Squaxutse at ease at once," said MT. Thomas, after waiting some moments to make his voice heard. "I am here this afternoon (more shouting and disorder in the gallery, and a Voice, "Turn him out.") The Chairman: I don't want any one turned out. A large number of people have oome here to hoaar the speaJrorn ad I vortis^d. (Voice: "We don't want to hear Mr. J. H. Thomas, Libeml.") Mr. Thomas: I am sure my frioncls who are interruptijw will at least admit this, that they u-pd me--(more disorder and shout of "Rotter.") I I Wo hav»3 n in too many tosses together for them. to tiling this wil; upset me," Tetorted Mr. Thomas Vodoe: "You sold us." Mr. Thomas: Yes, if I hadn't you wouldn't have had your job now. (Laughter, applause, and more dis order.) More interruption came from the same quarter later, and Mr. Thomas retorted; "Those interruptions are coming from men who assume they are a law unto themselves. When they get into a hopeless muddle they want us to get them cut of it. (Laughter and applause. ) The Chairman: I have heard a lot of Welshmen sing together, but when they talk together it makes an awful mess of it. (Laughter). Mr. Thomas: I appeal to this meet- in that we are not going to allow our- sejyes to be tracked by anybody. (Hear, hear and apktase). If you • are not pre- pared, he said, looking towards his in- terrupters, to exercise the common courtesy that is due from you as our guests, then we can only say we shall continue the meeting in spite of you. I more 13tweram Mr. Thomas, proceeding, sa.9- he did not take up the view that the Associated Society could ever hamper the National Union of Railwaymen for a moment. We met the railway companies and paid, We are not going to allow you to arbitrate between us and a small union.' (Applause.) And we said further, 'We are not even going in with you,' and we went in on our own. (Voices: "Shame," and "That is your Unionism.") He urged the locomotive men to reconsider the situation. (A Voice: "That is the old tale. ") "Yes," retorted Mr. Thomas. "It is because it is the old tale, which has proved to be true, that some of you don't like it this afternoon. No matter what difference ———— Voioe: You are the difference. Mr. Thomas: And if I am the differ- ence I am prepared to clear out if you people (the rest otf the sentence was drowned in applause). Voice: You have feathered your nest all right. Mr. Thomas: I feathered my nest all right by coming down to LlwtoUy, and helping some of you who had fouled your ne.3t, (Applause). Following this, there was some dis- order and a chorus of voices shouted "Chuck them out." Mr. Thomas: Let their own con- sciences be their judges. The speaker was proceeds when a man in the gallery shouted: "I should like to u6K Mr. Thomas a question." Mr. Thomas: You can ask me half-a- dozen after I have sat down. (Laugh- ter, applause and some booing). The resolution was carried with about, fifty dissentients. Heir Hermann Jocbade. (Berlin), sec- retary of the International Transport Workers' Federation., which represents mora tcbaa a million tran sport workers of the world, inotedrag more than (300,000 railwayman of all grades, ex- tor..dnd the good wishes of comrades on the Oontisoesit, who, he said, were waiehkug; the progress of the N.U.H. with much interest Two presentations x»ere then made. Mr. J. E. Williaans presented to the represeotativB of Air. Joe Thomibill, of Swansea, late encttto driver on the L. and N. W and a membeo- of the L. vn d W. Society for 27 ywa-s^ his disablement allowance, and Mr. J. H. Thomas pre- sented one of the Society's emblems to Mr. David Evans, secretary of the Swan- sea No. 2 Branch, in roaojgnition of his sexvaces as socretat- to the OrpJuaai Fun4.. Mr. Uelt Stmmted Deran. u ynegtat>rts w-ece tnen inviteo, and Mr. Neft (Llanefly) rose in the gallery and put. the following questions to Mr. Thomas :Do you recognise a man ail a Labour man when he ".ys in the House of that soldiers should I shoot strik?M in the name of disci- Lpiio?P? Caecrz and uproar). Mr. Thoma-s: My answer is this: that when the leader of the Opposition said that any officers would be justified, because cf a conscientious objection, in taking no part in maintaining order in iTlster, I said if that was to be the policy then Tommy Atkins would be justified in objecting to shoot in a trade dispute. (Applause.) I went further. 1 said that if the rich could by mob law defy the House of Commons and the law of the land, then the railwaymen would equally by mob law do the same thing. I wound up by saying that both such things would be disastrous to civilisation. In my opinion there must not be, and should not be, one law for the rich officer and another for the poo;- private. (Cheers.) Mr. N-eft rose to speak, but lie was shouted down.

ITHE CONFERENCE OPENS

THE CONFERENCE OPENS. The first annual conference of the N-,at"on.il Union of Railwaymen opened in the Albert Hall, Swansea, on Mon- day. After the usual formal pre- liminaries were dispensed with a civic reception was accorded the delegates, w ho number about 60. ■Mr. A. Bellamy, Stockport, presided, and was supported by tne officials of the Union. Similar standing orders to those of the old A.S.R.S. were adopted for the conference, an amendment by a Crewe delegate that speeches on public ques- tions be limited to five minutes be big defeated on a vote. The constitution of the conference included nine engine drivers, nine signalmen, eight good-, guards and brakesmen, four firemen, three loaders, two shunters, two carriage and wagon examiners, and one representative each of a. miscellany of other grades. "A most representative congress," commented the President. I Combination of Union not a Syndicalist Kg'&WKMdlti. The address of the President (Mr. Bellamy), was made at the first session during the afternoon. He contrasted the present member- ship of over 300,000 with the member- sflÍp of 5O,GOO on the occasion of the last conference in Swansea under the auspices of the A.S.R.S. in 1902. The effect of the new union has not been confined to membership," he said. It has improved the morale of the men employed on railways and increased the power of the union for useful work on behalf of its members. It has rendered the task of negotiating with the railway companies a much easier one, and the fact that we are at present engaged in hammering out a new scheme for the settlement of disputes and the adjust- ment of wage conditions with the repre- sentatives or the companies is conclusive proof of the wisdom of the step which has been taken in increasing the scope of organisation. I fully recognise that increased power brings additional responsibility on members and officers alike. It is necessary to guard against the disease of megalomania. Mere bigness does not justify tyranny. Might is not right, and title use of a large and powerful or- ganisation must be exercised with dis- crimination and with common sense. The rules of the N. U .R. are framed on democratic lines, and upon you at this Uieeting is placed the responsibility of deciding its future policy. A further step has recently been taken, towards the creation of a still gg,eater industrial combination. We have met the Miners and the Transport Workers in joint conference with a view of consolidating the industrial forces. An alliance has been entered into with these two bodies, which constitutes the largest and most formidable Labour combination the world has ever seen. It is neither revolutionary nor Syndi- calistic. It is a force which is not in- tended to be used indiscriminately or frivolously. It is not to be used like "a steam hammer to crack a nut," but is a solidifying movement for mutual co- operation in times of national emer- gency. The near approach of the end of most of the agreements with the railway com- panies has led to the launching of a new programme. That programme is the result of careful consideration by your Executive Committee. It is useless to attempt in a national movement a de- tailed programme for each grade.

ITUESDAYS PROCEEDINGS

I TUESDAY'S PROCEEDINGS. The congress was continued on Tues- day. Mr. A. Bellamy presided, and there was a goodly attendance. When the Congress was thrown open to the Press, the first business was in the form of a resolution regarding the working hours of railwaymen. The resolution was worded as follows: "That this Congress, representing 300,000 organised railwaymen, re-affirm our be- lief in the principle of an eight hours day, or 48 hours week, for all railway workers. We, therefore, urge our members to use all their power, indus- trially and politically, to secure the early realisation of the same. Other members expressed the desire that the congress should be unanimous in its demand for the shortening of hours for all grades of railwaymen. The resolution, on being put to the meeting, was carried unarnmdfeslv.

I WEDNESDAYS BUSINESS

I WEDNESDAY'S BUSINESS. State ownership of railways was dis- cussed at Wednesday's sitting. Mr. C. Watkins (Sheffield No. 1 branch) moved the following resolution: "That this congress, while re-affirm- ing previarass decisions in favour of the nationalisation of railways and approv- ing of the action of the Executive Com- mittee in arranging to obtain and give evidence before the Royal Commission, declares that no system of State owner- ship of the railways will be aoceptable to organised railwaymen which does not guarantee to them their full political and social rights, allow them a due measure of control and responsibility in the safe and efficient working of the railway system, and ensures to them a fair and equitable participation of the increased benefits likely to accrue from a more economical and scientific admin- istration. Mr. Appleton (Norwich), seconded. The tame had come and missed, he said, when the railways should be national- ised, but he did not hail state owner- ship too confidently, for when they looked to the Post Office and the tele- phone system they found that every- thing was not good for State employes. Mr. J. G. Wardle, M.P., while agree- ing they should be careful about safe- guards, thought if the railways were nationalised there would be undoubtedly a great improvement, not only from the general point of view, but from the standpoint of the workers on railways. It had been proved over and over again that waste and uneconomical management were of no advant- age to cnybody, and tho pre- sent system was undoubtedly waste- ful and uneconomical. He was quite confident that if they had centralised state management of railways at thy present time, even under existing Parliamentary institutions and con- trol, the resul twould be an immense improvement over their present system. It had been proved in other countries where railways were State owned that they were of much groajter advantage to the country as a whole than in those countries where they were privately owned. When Municipalities or the State had taken over any industry there had at onoe been an immense improve- ment in the conditions of the employes. The advantages State ownership, Mr. Wardle proceeded,, would far out- weigh the disadvantages that they would be very well advised to take j this step. "1 do not believe it would be possible to do in this country what was done in South Africa last year," he declared. "I believe the power of labour organisations is much stronger than in South Africa, that public I opinion in this country is a much InOT11 powerful factor than in South Africa, and that the traditions of our raco and our country would prevent us ever I ?Uowing to happen in this eOlntry I' what happened in South Africa." (Hear, hear). Support to the resolution was accorded by Mr. Manning (Battersea) and Mr. Stringer (Liverpool No. 1). The resolution was carried unani- mously.

THURSDAYS SITTING I

THURSDAY'S SITTING. I What has now become to be known as the Workers' Triple Alliance was the e,lict subject for debate during the public portion of Thursday's sitting of the annual conference of the National Union of Raiiwaymen, held at the Albert Hall, Swansea. Mr. A. Bellamy (president), occupied the chair. Mr. J. Gore (Kentish Town), moved a resolution welcoming the forma-tion of the triple alliance between the N.U.R., the Miners' Federation of Great Britain and the Transport, Works' Federation. Mr. £ rore, in moving the resolution, said it was the most important of the conference. In this reso- lution we have a reply to that 50 million fund inaugurated to fight, trades unionism." The resolution contained a departure from what he feared a few years ago was going to be inaugurated in the industrial wo.rhi— the organisation of the workers by in- dustry. Ho hoped Wore many veers were passed, all workers irrespective of in- dustry would have one groat umBn for all workms, to include female workei"s. The alliance, he thought, shmild not be used nierely as a weapon of defence; but to foroo from the emp?yine e.? that ?;

IENTERTAiNED BY THE MAYOR I

I ENTERTAiNED BY THE MAYOR. The Mayor of Swansea (Alderman T. T. Corker) entertained the delegates of the National Union of Railwaymen, to a dinner at the Hotel MetrQpole.1 Swansea, on Tuesday. The Mayor was supported by Lord Glantawe, the x- Aiayor (Councillor David Williams;, Mr. A. Bellamy (president,), Mr. J. E. Wil- liams (general secretary), Mr. J. LL Thomas, .M..P., Mr. U. J. Wardle, M.P., Air. Walter Hudson, M.P., the Town Clerk (Mr. Lang Coath), Alder- man Morgan 'iutton, Alderman W. H. Miles, Aiderman Dan Jones, Alderman Torn Merrells, Councillors D. Matthews, It. Buckland, E. Protheroe, W. Holmes, W. Morris, D. 1-ticdaards. Major G. S. Hams, Mr. J. Aeran Ihoanas, Mr. David James (Tramways Company), Mr. E. L. Jones (R. and S.B.R.), Hetr Jcckadoj Mr. G. Charles (G.W.R. Can- cilaition Board), Mr. T. Lowth (assist- ant secretary, National Union of RaiJ- spaytnn), Mr. S. Chorlton (assistant secretary, National Union of Railway- men), Air. A. J. Williams (organiser), Mr. W. H. Williams (local secretary), Mr. W. Broadman (local secretary), Mr. D. Bevan (chairman, Reoeptton Committee), Mr. E. A. "WatkÄ Mr. D. M. Glasbrook, Mr. D. Villiers Meager, Mr. W. G. Webster, and others, I The Mayor. I I After the loyal toasts had been I honoured, the Mayor proposed the I toast of the N.U.R., coupling with it the names of Mr. Bellamy and Mr. I Chorlton. He referred to the pleasure he had at being ax their conference the previous day to extend to them a wel- come to Swansea. All who had the welfare of the town and its commerce; at heart were entirely in accord with him 1 when lie said that visits of large organ- isations, controlling labour, to Swansea, to hold their conferences were bound to do much to create the best feeling: between ail concerned, as well as make for the advancement of conciliatory methods, which agpin r&-acted ior the good of the com-iii, ty and the in- crease of commerce. (Hear. hear). Swansea had visits within compara- tively few years from organisations covering every branch of labour, and also from associations covering most professions, and it spoke well for the town that it had been so honoured; and he as Mayor iT as proud to extend to them —the N. U .R.—an organisation of such stupendous proportions, the io> a hospitality. He trusted that when they had concluded their conference they would feel that the town had in some I' slight measure helped in the recreative or pleasant side of their visit. I The End of Division. Mr. Bellamy, in thanking the Mayor, sa?d that th<

ERRAND BO TO MANAGER

ERRAND BO* TO MANAGER. Career of the Late Mr. John Hugh«&. The deatn occurred on Tuesday, the death occurred on Tuesday morning at his residence, No. 3, Stoekwell Villas, Mount Pleasant, Swansea, of Mr. John Hug" es, maaraqgar to Mr. W. H. Ed. wards, oi tie Dufiryn Works, Morris- ton. After following his usual duties at the works on Moraiay, Mr. Hug^ies at nighi urove from Morriston to the Hospital an employe in whose hand a poi steal had lodged. It was late when he retired, apparently in the best of Health, but he soon became ill, and his death, a few hours later was caused by a eir, of blood on the brain. His life was a story of progress, from a humble position to one of grea-t re* sporisibility. An oll!ly child, the daatij of his father earty necessitated his main timing his mother, so he letft sohoot started at the DuflEryn Works as an err?ud boy, and by dilinoo rose to HM, position he occupied a.t has death. A? the time of the Mo&iniey TaTig th* deceased gentleman went out to America wliere be took over the management of the tiripla;be works in the States belonging to Messrs. W. Edwards, but some time later the workj were cl dDwn, and ne returned tc this country, w here be again took uj duties at the Duffryn. Composer of Hymn Tunes. Mr. Hughes was well-known in Souti Wales as the composer of hymn tunes, and his compositions were especially popular in this district. Hardly a sing- ing festival was held at Swansea but that at least one of his tunes was sung. At the festival held at Tabernacle, Mor- riiston, in 19G9, loou Axrwyl" waA sung, whilst a year later, at another festival at Tabernacle, Cara'r Jeeu" was rendered at the massed meeting held on the last night of the festivaL The following year his composition,. Dechreu'n Foreu was rendered at a large number of local festivals. But the hymn, "Calon lan," ttw strains of which were heard throughoul Wales durng the revival, is one of his best efforts, and this was included with the Caniadau'r Ysgol Sul," and is aM popular to-day as it was years ago. Mr. Hughes was a Welshman m't.h the spirit of patriotism deeply em- bedded in his nature, and identified himself actively, although not directly in the limelight, witii. divers Welsh movements. He was a member of Philadelphia Welsh Baptist Chapel, Hafod, and was an earnest Christian worker. His sad demise has come as a grearf shock to the inhabitants of Morris ton where he was personally known to aJ most everyone.

CARMARTHEN HERMITE SISTER

CARMARTHEN HERMIT'E SISTER Lady's Short Enjoyment of L75,000 Fortune. The death took place at Carmarthen, on Saturday, of Miss Allen Lloyd Davies, 57, Ii3inmajs-stroet, at the age of 72 years. The decea.sed lady came into prominence some sis weeks ago as the sister of Mr. ThomaJl Hughes Ford Hughes, the Carmarthen hor- mit, who died in the workhouse, leaving Misi Davies estate "of the gross value of £ 74.807. The aruiovnoemeBt of Mr. Fc a Hughes'e will combined a romance of wealth and loneliness. Although well connected, and the owner of a considerable estate in Wetrt Wales, he lived alone in Union-street, Car- marthen, for 25 Yee-.rs. and allowed hardly anyone to enter. For twenty years he very seldom left hia abede, and latterly be rigorously followed the life of a reolu&o, but one naorniBsj early in March last, a messenger delivering pro- visions received no response to his knocks and, fearing Mr. Hughes was dead, he in- formed the police. Upon .ezrtry being made into the residence. Mr. Hughes wRr fonnd h: a state of collapse. He was removed to the Workhouse, where he died a few days latrr. lie was the son of Mr. Cavies, Niiit, pwilyra, Cardiganshire, and was educated at the Cowbridse Grammar School, and later he became engag-ed as a. private tutor, and, prior to taking up a lite oi stciufiiou. travelled extenfiivetr. f