Teitl Casgliad: Herald of Wales

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 12 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
21 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
MAYORS SUNDAY

MAYOR'S SUNDAY. IMPOSING MARTIAL PROCESSION. Although there were frequent heavy showers, doubtless depleting the attend- ance, Mayor's Sunday at Swansea was success. and St. Mary's Church, to which the very representative procession ji.vxt'eded, was crowded. The marshalling ..I' tii" procession in the vicinity of the (imidhail was ably done by the police, directed by the Chief Constable (Capt. A. H. Thomas and Supt. Roberts), and the Police Hand played hymns and selections iii titc- Guildhall yard, wh-ere the official portion oi the procession was formed. Among those who gathered here with the new Mayor (Aid. Dan Jones), the ex-Mayor (Aid. T. T. Corker) and the Town Clerk Mr. H. Lang Coath) (with mace-bearers aud javelin men) were Aldermen Morgan Tutton, B. Jones, W. 11. Miles, T. Merrells and J. Devonald, Councillors D. Williams, D. Matthews, D. J. Davies, H. Buckland, W. H. Holmes, A. Sinclair, H. Mac-donnel, Mil- bourne B. Williams, J. Barclay Owen, F. J. Parker, J. H. Lee, D. J. Bassett, E. G. Protheroe, J. Lewis, J, Miller, G. Hill, W. G. Lloyd, D. Kichards, D. Griffiths, 1. Gwynnc, W. H. Morris, T. W. Howells, T. Shcehan; representing the Harbour Trust, Lord Glantawe. Mr. David Glas- brook, Mr. Aeron Thomas, Messrs. W. Law, T. Strick, A. O. Schenk, D. J. Davies, Ca;pt. Griffiths and Mr. 1. H. Itobiuson; Mr. T. P. Cook, J.P., Mr. G wilvm Moz-gai). J.P., and ir. J. W. Jones, J.1 I., with Mr. Thorpe, deputy magistrates" clerk, and Mr. Laurence, Richards, prosecuting solicitor; Messrs. J). Levis, inspector of mines and J. Hilditch, inspector of factories; repre- senting the Board of ,Guardians, Messrs. G. S. Mitchell, W. A. Thomas, A. Ereed- man, J. Meredith; Capt. Colquhoun; re- presentatives of the Corporation depart- ments, with Borough Police and Fire Brigade and Harbour Police. In adjacent streets were waiting the litli Welsh Territorial Reserve (Major Thomas in command), about half Swan- Rca Battalion (Major O'Hara command- ing), the 1st Welsh Howitzers (Captain Edwards in command), the newly-iormed reserve of the 3rd Welsh Held Ambu- lance (Capt. Bryce), Salisbury Rifle Club, Tramwav employes and Band, Harbour J'mploves and pilots, representatives of Friendly Societies, Telegraph Messengers' Band, Postmen, Telegraphists and Tele-j graph Messengers, United Service Brigade, iiov and Sea Scouts, Church Lads' and Boys' Life Brigades, Licensed Vic- mallei*' Association. The lengthy and imposing procession j was headed by mounted police, the Cwm- feiin Bund, the Howitzers, Kth Welsh and the Swansea Battalion, the Mayor being at the rear, and when the church was reacherl after passing through the. crowded Wind. Castle Bailey. Temple, Oxford. Waterloo and Chureli-streets, the Mayor passed through, and the mili- tary section returned. in the church the Mayor was joined by the Mayoress, and their daughters and son. The impressive service opened with the! National Anthem, in which and in two of the hymns the police band assisted. The Mayor's Chaplain (the Rev. Maurice H. L. Williams. Vicar of St. Gabriel's) preached, the Revs. J. M. Perry and G. Tippings intoned the service and the Rev. i G. Gibbs (seamen's chaplain) read the lessons. Mr. A. Hay. Mus. Bac., Vas at the magnificent organ, and played the Saul Dead March with great effect at the close in connection with Lord Roberts' death. The hymns were: "O worship the King (portions sung by the choir as a pretty chant),- Fight the good Fight," and O God, our Help. Preaching from the words: Your con-' fusion (or. more litprally, citizenship) is jn heaven." and "Render unto C«sar the things which are unto (rod the tilings which are God's," the Rev. Maurice Williams pleaded witli all the earnestness of which he was capable that the service should be nothing short of a consecration or re-consecration of citizens. The Mayor was entering upon his duties under circumstances the like of which had not been in existence when any previous Mayor of the tovii entered the office. 1 pon him as the chief citizen, ard representing the town, a great and solemn responsibility rested, as much having been committed to him. much would be demanded. His responsibilities at the time were more than municipal; "they were imperial. Every man and woman in the country was called upon at this time to pay his tribute to (.fezar. Tliev paid it gladly, indeed proudly, +ha'nkful for their membership of a king- dom that was unique in its world-empire. Our young men were rising in their hundred s of thousands to defend their motherland—from every corner of the; earth they came. and would come so long as their King and country called them, as long as there was a man left to this tribute to (-'azat--not a forced- tribute, hlft the willing sacrifice of truø I patriotism.

SWANSEA SAWYER KILLED BY FLYING TIMBER

SWANSEA SAWYER KILLED BY FLYING TIMBER. A story of how a man died under very peculiar circumstances was told at the inquest on a sawyer named Edward Steele (26), of 61, Danygraig-road, who died oil Thursday as the result oi a ac- cident while following his employment at Messrs. Hughes and Morgan's timber yard. Port Tennani, on November 12th. The inquiry was conducted at the Church Hall. St. Thomas, by Mr. Glyn Morris, the Deputy Borough Coroner, on Friday afternoon. There were present: Mr. Edwards (Inspector of Factories), and Mr. Grieve (Solicitor). Edward Steele, 12, South Luton-place, Adam&down, Cardiff, identified the body as that of his son. Deceased's assistant, Reginald Organ, of 67, Port Tennant-road, said hel was! working with the deceased. He was be- hind the saw about two minutes before the acidont pulling the pieces of timber out and stacking them. Deceased was feeding the saw in the front. Witness was stacking one piece of wood, and whilst doing so another piece was coming through the saw. Witness turned to the tiaW but failed to pee the half-inch strip that should have been sawn off the piece of wood. It had got caught in the guard. Witness held the large piece'of wood and heard a crack in the wood. and saw Steele fall down. He did not llee where Steele was hit. Steele asked witness to tell the boss, and witneas did so. Do- t' ceased was taken home. Dr. Keyes said that he ealled to see j the deceased at the saw mill a few } minutes after t?a o'clock, soon after the V accident, i?ce?ted w as lying on his a(-cit t eR t- baak. He was very p?le, and was mut- tering incoherently. Witness found an infusion between the ribs, where it was said he had been struck. Witness felt deceased's heart, which was gradually l»eatiiig less and less. Witness saw that thef man was dying, and so made no fur- their examination. Deceased was not con- scious. Be attributed death to shock to the nervous system, paralysing the action of-tlie heart. It would require a sharp blow, altbough the same blow would not hurt everybody. Mr. Thomas Morgan* Danybryn, Pwll- fffreet, Landore, said he saw the deceased » just after the accident, and the latter told him that a piece of wood had flown back from the saw and struck him on the right side of the chest. The saw was guarded veil. The jury returned a verdict of death from shock due to an accident. The Coroner expressed his sympathy with the relatives, as did also Mr. Morgan an be- half of the firm.

No title

The Chancellor of the Exchequer acknow- IML&M &.b8 QOeipt.M £MIa- J.e¡.

I THE OPN SAFE

| THE OPN SAFE. n IOTYKimor-A HOTEL BOOTS WHO HELPED HIMSELF. How an hotel boots had a trip in a taxi cab to Cardiff and bought a new outfit for himself out of money stolen from his employers, was a tale told at the Swansea Police Court on Thursday, when Albert Victor lamg (34), was j charged on remand with feloniously stealing certain money amounting to the sum of JS75, the monies of Messrs. R. E. Jones, Ltd.. on November 2nd. He was also charged with stealing and rt. -Hving a pair of gent.'s Dalf shoes, value 18s. 3d., from the Maekworth Hotel, the property of T. W. Nicholls. Mr. Chapman did not sit in this case. I Miss Kate Henton, the manageress of the Maekworth Hotel, said that the prisoner was employed there as a night boots up to the morning of November J 2nd. when he left without notice. On the night of November 1st she placed the sum of .£f)3 19s. 3id. in a brown canvas bag in the safe. It was made up of coin, a cheque, and notes. She also placed in separate glasses in the safe the sum of J211 i9fl. Id. She locked the safe and the office door, and gave the keys to Miss Gale, the book-keeper, who hikes charge throughout the night. Her duty would be to hand them over to Miss Bromfield, who would take charge during the Sun- day. Between 7 and 8 p.m. on Sunday, November 2nd. she went to the safe, and saw the money in the bag quite safe. On Monday morning, at about 8 o'clock, she was told something, and, going to the safe. found the bag of money mijug. She made inquiries. and later on her attention was called to the canvas bag bv Mary Phillips. It was on a chair in the commercial room. containing .£1 3s. On being asked if he had any questions to ask, prisoner said. I only want to say that the safe was not locke.d." A barmaid at the hotel, Ethel Brom- field, said that she received the keys from the last witness. Part of her duty would be to take some money from the safe for the tills, and she took from the glasses the sum of C9 !ls. She locked the safe afterwards, and kept the keys in her possession during the day. At 10.5 that night, she replaced the X9 9s. in the safe, together with < lis. Id., which had been taken during the day. The canvas bag was safe then. She closed the safe, and was quite sure that it was locked, having tried it twice. She locked the office door, and went to her bedroom, leaving the kevs'on the dressing table whilst she retired for the night. She locked her bedroom door on the inside, leaving the key in the lock. Next morning, the keys were still there. and at about seven o'clock she handed them over to Miss Edmond. whose duties were to give them to Miss Gale. In consequence of some- thing she was told latet- in the day, she went to the office and found that the money in the sa f e was gone. Miss Mary Gale said that she received the keys at 7.25 in the morning. She went into the office. and went to the safe. Se had no difficulty in opening the office door or the door of the safe. She found all the money missing, and so in- formed the manageress. A witness, Mary Phillips, told how she found the bag on a chair in the com- mercial room between eight and nine that morning. She inquired of the travellers in the hotel if it belonged to any of them but finding it did not. told the manageress. George Wilson, a chanffeur of the Monico Motor Company, said that at six o'clock on the morning of November 2nd he received a telephone message to take a car to a certain a ddress. He was on the way when he was stopped by prisoner near the Palace. He said that he had I telephoned, and wanted to go to Cardiff. Witness said that he would have to go back to the garage, as he was not pre- nared for such a long distance. Prisoner -went back to the garage with him. Wit- ness did not know the road, but prisoner said he would put him all right, as he ikiiew the road to Cardiff, and wanted to get there as soon as possible. They went to Cardiff, witness leaving the prisoner at the Cardiff Ilotel. He paid the fare in notes. Witness noticed that when he paid he took from his inside pocket a number of tl and 108. notes. He wanted witness to take him to Oxford,, but witness re- fused. Det.-Sergt. fHaYN; stated that he made inquiries, and took out a warrant. On November 10th he saw the prisoner in the custody of the Oxford City police. Wit- ness read the warrant, and prisoner said, "That is right. I don't know what made me do it." In his presence the police handed over to witness the sum of J238 4s. 8d. which had been found on the pris- oner, who said "That is what is left of it." The police a)-o handed over some new articles of apparel and a leather bag which prisoner said lie had bought. He then went on to say: I had a good job; but I have had a great deal of trouble. The safe was left open, and it was a great temptation to me. I must have been out of my mind to do it." Witness brought prisoner to Swansea. Prisoner pleaded guilty and repeated that he really must have been out of his mind. He saw the safe open and the temptation was too much. Afterwards he realised what he luul done. He was very sorry. Superintendent Roberts stated that he believed prisoner had had some domestic troubles. A gentleman on behalf of Messrs. R. H. Jones stated that the firm did not wish to press the charge. The Bench decided to deal with the pri- soner under the Probation Act. and bound Lim over in the sum of 950 for 12 months.

ISUSPECTED PERSONS

I SUSPECTED PERSONS. Two further arrests, on suspicion have been made in connection with the bur- glary which took place at Burryport, on November 2nd, when £ 149 10s. was stolen from New Road Cottage, Aslibum- ham-road, belonging to Frank King. This brought the number of suspected persons in custody up to four. Their names are David Thomas Anthony, Cwmcapel; Wm. Morris, 2, Bryn-terrace, Win. John Morris. Sundfiftd-row, and Thomas Samii(, i t: i v.y (1(1, all of Burry- port. The la.l two miuilioucii \vt re brought before the Llanelly Police Court on Thursday, when P.S. Mitchelmore stated that he arrested Wm. John Morris on suspicion the previous day at the Police Court after the application had been made for a remand against Anthony and Wm. Morris, while Davies was arrested at his home on Thursday morning. When told that he was arrested on suspicion of having jointly stolen the money, Wm. J. Morris said, "I am quite free," while Davias said, "I know nothing at all about the affair." Supt. Jones, in applying for a remand in custody until Monday, explained that two other young men were already in custody. Davies, in appealing to be allowed out on bail said he had his business to fat- tend to. Supt. Jones: I object to bail on very strong grounds. If they fire innocent it will be all the better for them that they are in. The Bench refused the application for bail and granted the request for a re- mand.

No title

German soldiers are being provided with small tin whistles, so that when wounded they may use them during the noise of lthe ae a ffitmal ikr &u*gical aid.

J TRAG8C STOVI 1 TRAGIC 0 STARV1

J TRAG8C STO?V. I 1 TRAGIC .0 STARV. 1 PISTON KILLS WORKER AT SHIP- BREAKING YARD. The awry of tlbo terrible end (,f a worker on the King's Dock was unfolded at the mquest conducted by Mr. J. C. Morris, the borough coroner, 3it the A leKSMidnvroad Chapel. Swansea, on Thursday. The ee- ceaaed man, Edward Gm-vel, aged 49 years, of 42, Bacian-otr-eot., Port Tennaait, a.s killed at four o'clock on Tuesday afternoon while on board a vessel at Hessre. Cohen's shipbreakingr yard, King's Dock, where he viae employed. Evidence of identification was piven by L>ev £ iti Gravel, a brctheu*. of Morthyi- Tydfil. | The story of the accident was given by a. fellow-worker, Enoch Bndgeman, of J'J, Ysifol-street, Port Tennant, who said that j they 'Wfj-? working in a. cylinder. They had been working amce early in tbe doming. hut not on the same job. They returned to this particular job at 2.30, and worked in | spells. Witness had inst ructions to get the nuts off the top of the pititon. Just before the time of the accident witness had been working for twenty minutes at c-ut-ting a nut. during which time he did not see the deceased. Having cut away one side of the nut, he wa-A tapping lightly on the other side when the piston fell down with him on top. He scrambled out cf the cylinder, and the first, .thing he saw was tihn) dec-eased with his head in a. hole MI the cylinder, just where the pM.ton had (iroppe

I I ON BOARD THE GLASGOW

I I ON BOARD THE GLASGOW.  Abl Seaman A. M. Palmer (E(?o).} who joined JLM.S. Glasgow at Ports- mouth a little over two ypms a?o. when -1 she was commissioned for service in the ) South Pacific, is believed to be the only native of Swansea aboard. His parents Ii resi de at Harry-street, Sketty.

I WELSH PRISONERS TRIBUTE I I

I WELSH PRISONER'S TRIBUTE. I l.ieuteiuw\t W. Thomas, son of Mr. j Thomas, auctioneer, Llandissilio. who was reported missing and attcrwardte was taken jrisoner by the enemy, has written home as follow? :— "On Monday, October 12. we ha.d a scrap with the Germans, and had to stay in our trenches on Monday night. There was a. village in front of us which was supposed to have been evacuated during the night, and 70 of us were sent up at dawn on Tues- day to occupy it. Unfortunately, there were about 1,000 Germans there, and they did give it us. Our captain was wounded at five a.m., another lieutenant (Oxford ¡ man) killed about seven a.m., and about 18.20 a.m. 1 was wounded by a bullet .'hrough my sbmùder. We wero now in a farmhou. which wa* surrounded by Germans, and we were waiting for supports. The farm w-As I put on fire, and we had a terrible time, and eurreudyed at eight p.m. Of the 70 three in the morning there were sixteen left, of v.boin four were wounded. All the other 54 were killed. The Germans were surprised at t4be way we held out. They then took us away, and I have been in hospital ever since. The Germans have been vory kind to me, and have looked after me well. I will, however, have to stay with them now till the war is over. but do not worry about me. for I am safe as nuts. I shall ask for a week-end off to come and see you Ha! Ha! Ha t" laet-dna.nt Thomas, who bad a very suc- cessful college course at Aberystwyth, was appointed ucieavce master at Ammanford Intermediate School shortly before t.e joined the 3cd Cheshire Regiment Special Reserve. His present address is "Leo Con- Yikt, Paderborn, Westphalen. Germany.' ï

No title

The funeral took place at Sheem on Saturday of William Thomas Pover, aged 82. of Gillingham, who saw active service in the Baltic and in the Crimea, and nearly 30 years later took part in the bombardment of Alexandria. He was also one of the few survivor* of the ship's company who ac- companied Dr. Livinestone. the African traveller, in his expedition for the British Government for exploring the Zambesi and its tributaries.

Advertising

j I ;;loÚŠ' I ? -?? ?M) STEREO :-?- ? &jp h. Facsimile of One-Oance Packet. Archer's N Golden Return5 Tho Parlecf,ion of FOipc TobaCrOo i- r-vw SwtBT AND FBtOAMT. 11 i ] — V I

WELSH ARMY CORPSI

WELSH ARMY CORPS. COLONEL SCOBI E TO COMMAND I CARMARTHENSHIRE BATTALION. A meeting of the Carmarthenshire Recruiting Committee, formed in c7.11(l tion with the Wblsh Army Corps, wa? held at the County Ofhces. Carmarthen, on Thursday, Sir Stafford Howard, K.C.B., presiding, to consider tho position follow- ing the resolution passed at lite last meet- I ing, in which the committee pledged itself to raise a Carmarthenshire battalion pro- vided the War Office sanctioned the estab- lishment of' a camp of llUG. at Pcuibrcy to train the men. The Chairman said when the depu tatiol1 appointed by the committee waited upon General Sir Henry Mackinnoi) the COlli- manding olticcr in chief) at Chester with regard to getting a camp at Pembrey, they found that matters had advanced beyond 1 their anticipations, and tlw (t uestion of getting a camp in that county was no longer a practical one. Colonel Uuun (Wrexham), commanding; officer of the South Wales Biigade, ex- plained the situation and pointed out that the committee agreed when asked to raise a Carmarthenshire battalion. The ques- tion of housing and training the battalion in a local camp was laid before General Sir Henry Mackinnon, who pointed out that it was against the wishes of the War Office, who wished all battalions of the office who ,iis!ie d Welsh Army Corps that were to be raised to be formed into brigades and to be con- centrated in one place, 80 that brigade- training should be under the supervision of the officer commanding the brigade, and also that the brigades should be eonccn- j trated as ljltich as possible, so that they should be under the supervision of who- ever should bo appointed to command the division as soon as that was formed. The first brigade of the Welsh Army Corps was to have its headquarters at Llandudno 1 under the command of Col. Owen Thomas, j the second brigad" to be recruited fromi South Wales to have its headquarters at Rhyl, and he was to have the honour to command it, and the t hird brigade was to have its headquarters at Colwyn Bay to be raised from Central Wales. The first brigade would be affiliated tDi the Royal Weigh FustlÜm,. whose depot w:? at Wrexham? the Heeond brigade j atnH<.ted to the Welsh Regiment whose de?'t wa- at Cardiff; and the third bri- gade amiiated to the South Wales Bor- derer? with the depot at Brecon. The deputation bnving accepted the conditions and had undertaken to raise a Carmar- thenshire battalion. Aa 'was pointed out the responsibility would rest upon them *? to nnd a commanding officer, and onicers. and non-comm?ioned omcers as &aS. In, response to the deputation. General Mackinnon submitted a list of names of suitable commanding officers for the de- putation to select, and he recommended one or two. '1 he Executive Committee at &bre?bt);y on Wednesday decided that commanding o?.ers o.f county batta- lions '-bo?hi he ('kd,'d hy 1he Lord Lieutenant of th? County in conjunction with tb oCiee)- ??mmanding the brigade of which that .county teg-iment formed a part. The name of the selected command- ing officer was to be submitted to General MacKirinou for- approval, and to the War Office to lie gazetted. The commanding officer appointed would then select his other ofifcers, in conjunction with the Lord Lieu+cnnn-t of the County. The Chairman said the question of a local camp therefore fell to the ground. 1 and it remained for that committee to far in with the arrangements made. It would relieve tho committee of gratf eJifiJ- culiy and responsibility- The committee's] doh: now WÔ\. "imply to find the officers j and recruit the men. He asked General M;;ckinnon if he could recommend any- one as commanding officer of the Carmar- thenshire 'Battalion, and the first he men- tioned wac Colonel Scobie, C.B., of Here- ford. who had 90 distinguished himself in working up Territorial reuimerits and in other duties that he wa-s given the title of C.H. Colonel Scobie had worked under Colonel Dunn, who would bo very glad to h iv? him. He (Sir s.tatford) wrote to Col. Scobie, who had replied that if the com- mittee did him the honour of appointing him for the command of the Carmarthen- shire Battalion, it would be his endeavour to iustifv the selection. On the motion of the Chairman, seconded by Mr. J. W. Gwynne-Hughes (lord-lieutenant of the county), it WHf; unanimously decided to submit the name of Colonel Scobie. C.B., as the appointed I commanding ofifcer of the Carmarthen- shire Battalion. Colonel Scobie then entered the meet- ing and, returning ^ltanks, said be felt the responsibility a great deal. and if the o-eneral officer commanding-in-chief and ¡' the general of the brigade thought he was worthy of the great honour paid him, he would be very pleased to do all he could. With regard to the appointment of I quarter-master of the Carmarthenshire Battalion, the Chairman stated that General Mackinnon recommended Capt. H. Gardener, of Brookwood, Surrey, who had had a great: deal of experience as a soldier. He joined the Scots Guards in 187?. and retired from the Royal Fusi- liers in 1895 as sergeant-major. The meeting decided to a&k Captain  Gardener to allow his name to be u!> mitted as the appointed quarter-master. Mr. John Lewis (Meiros Hail): Are all Welshmen engaged at the front? (an- no! we possibly get Welshmen for those appointments? The Chairman: We cannot find one. All those we asked for have already gone to the front. It is no use waiting any longer. Mr, W. X..Tones (Ammanford): Welsh- men are always at the front. (Laughter). Rev. R. If. Jone" (Llangendeirne): And they will secure promotion there. The Chairman said the other officers necessary would he selected by Col. Scobio and the Lord Lieutenant, who would sub- mit the names to the general vommand- ing. Col. Dunne said they would want 28. The difficulty was to find majors and cap- tains. They would require 8 captains and 16 sergeants. Great difficulty was ex- pressed in getting an adjutant. Referring to non-commissioned officers, j the Chairman said tliey had a list of 23, wh o were ready to give instruction in their own localities. They must be ap- proached to see if they would go to pl-iyll at once. It was decided to request the local com- mittees to ask the various non-com mis-1 sioned officers in their respective districts I if they would act as instructors at Rhyl, j Mr. Dudley Drummond said seemed to him an extraordinary anomaly that a? South Wales Brigade should be trained at Rhyl. and he would like to know if alII efforts to obtain a drilling centre in South Wales had been definitely abandoned. He thought they would have great difficul- ties in rawing the battalion if the men I had to go to North Wales. It seemed ex- traordinary that the three training centres should be at Llandudno, Rhyl, and Col- wyn Bay. How wei? they going to in- duce the miners, other workers and agri- culturists of South Wales to enlist under such circumstanced They should put it I strongly to the War Office that appar- ently they in South Wales had been oIl_I tirelv governed by the views of ?orth Wales and Shrewsbury. South Wales had not been considered to the extent that its position justified. They would do their I best to make the Welsh Army Corps a! success, but lie thought results would be I disappointing by reason of that. Mr. II. E. Philipps (Tregevb) said he was very surprised to find that South Wales, which had done far superior to North Wales in recruiting, had been ig- nored altogether in regard to getting a raining centre. It seemed hard that the miners of the iihondda, who had done so magnificently iu recruiting should be seat up to North Wales. It was unnecessary expense and trouble. Mr. Blagdon Richards (Carmarthen), said severe strictures had been passed on the manner in which North Wales had responded to the call for men, and it had come to him as a great surprise that the three drilling centre:; should be located in .North Wales. Col. Dunn said when the deputation broached the matter before General Ma'?- kinnon at Chester, the reply was that the North Wales centres were the finest places they could find. So far as he understood, the men would not be very long there be- fore being drafted to Aldershot and other big centres to complete their training. Rev. R. H. Jones (Llangendeirne) did not think the fact of the training centres beuig in North Wales would hinder re- cruiting in South Wales. Mr. Drummond: It is a very strong point, because Welsh people down here have no sympathy with North Wales. Lord Dynevor said General Mackinnon told the deputation mOfSt emphatically that the whole matter had been thrashed out. In such a national crisis they must accept the facts as they were. The great thing- at the moment was to get men as quickly a.; possible. It was stated that the question of eetab-1 lishing training camps in South Walos had been fully considered and found in- advisable. The great difficulty at Pem- brey was that they had no huts, and the men could be trained at North Wales be- fore the camp there was ready. The Chairman said if J10 had to enlist he would prefer going to Rhyl than camp on the sands at Pembrey. Col. Scobie said he considered that Wales, as united Wales, was very lucky to get training c^ntreg at all, because it was different in England. The question of getting training centres in South Wales was then dropped. It was decided to proceed with the recruit- ing of the Carmarthenshire Battalion at once.

Advertising

AFTER THE WAR IS OVER!! History will be repeated! We venture to predict an immense increase of trade in all directions after the conclusion of the present War! An inevitable result of this will be a substantial increase in the prices of most commodities, and especially will this be the case with regard to Furniture! As a result of keeping men employed during the present strenuous times our various Establishments are now crammed with Goods. These vast Stocks we are offering at unprecedently low prices. The foregoing are genuine reasons why, in order to economise, you should place your Furnishing Orders NOW. Delay positively means extra cost! Prompt purchasing it is equallv certain, means considerable Saving! BEVAN g COMPANY, LTD. Wales' Largest Furnishers and Pianoforte Merchants, 280 OXFORD nT' R,ET SWANSEA, Z AT %j I" 1l l-:iJ.' ;lt.) Cwmbach Buildings, Llanelly; and throughout South Wales.

uNEW SWANSEA SURVEYORI

_u NEW SWANSEA SURVEYOR. Photo by Bentley Humphriss.] Mr. Richard Heath, Who hae Ijeen appointed Surveyor to the Swansea Corporation. lie waki formerly engaged in the Borough Surveyor's de- partment, Stoke-on-Trent, and possesses very high qualifications. i

TELEPHONE FACILITIES IN SWANSEA VALLEY

TELEPHONE FACILITIES IN SWANSEA VALLEY. At the Pontardawe Council mating' on Thursday, Mr. Morgan Davids presÚling', I a It'thr from Mr. Morton, of the C.P.U., London, which had been, sent to Mr. John Williams, M.P., regarding improved tele- phone facilities for the district was read. The letter was to the died that in: view of the nearness of the existing telegraph | office and the smallness of the estimated traffic, the G.P.O. regretted that an ex- tension of the telegraph system to Cwm- gorse was not warranted at present. The expense of providing and maintaining a public, telephone call office would not he justified by the prospective receipts, but I they were prepared to provide the facility under a guarantee of tlO por year. The letter went on that the G.P.O. was prepared to authorise the provision of a telephone circuit from Cwaun-cae-Gur- w?n to Pontardawe, which would con- nect up Y'stalyfera on the way, and the necessary work was in hand. By means of that circuit direct telephonic com-1 munication would be afforded between Gwaun-cae-Gurwen, Upper and Lower, Brynamman on the one side, and P(3utar-I dawe on the other. On its completion the circuit would be available for local telegrams. The traffic between Upper Brynamman, Lower Brynamman, and Gwaun-cae-Gurwen to Pontardawe was not enough to warrant the provision of a direct telegraph service. In regard to conveying the mails to and from the Gwaun-cae-Gurwen district by the motor 'buses, the writer of the letter did not think it would be so advant- ageous to the public as the present ar- rangements. The Glamorgan Local Pension Com- mittee wrote enclosing a circular from the Local Government Board in regard to the dependents of soldiers and sailors, other than wives and children, who were at the time the men were enlisted or called, being supported in whole, or in part, by those men. The committee asked the sub-committee to be good enough to undertake the work of investigating the claims of such dependents. The Clerk (Mr. Wyndham Lewis) said the scheme was a very good one, and would be placed before the local pension coinmittee fit an early date. I Tho Rev. Evan Davies said he had a petition from the farmers and tradesmen in the Cwmgorse district appealing for a siding or halt near the Pwll Watkin bridge. The Chairman and Clerk were asked to endorse the petition.

No title

Mr. E. J. Sigby has been elected Master of the Gunmakers" Company The new wardens are Mr. F. W. Jones and Mr. H. T. Baniett. Of the Ncbdlenvtkcrs' Company Mr. John Morpaii has beer .ippointci Master aud Air. E. A. Fisher and Mr. A. 6 Temple Wardens.

Advertising

I | "SAFE AND SURE" I "SAFE AND SURE" ? ? Is ?? old ? fam'Har sayig, which, wIJn it cm b? honestly and tr?hfuH" used ,? ?i? )n connection with a medicinal prepar.?ion, must give great satisfaction! To '? know that the medicine you take is safe, is good; to know that it ;5 also sure, is ;<*§> better still. fhne is not the s'ightest doubt that t he phrase in qnestimi can jjS I ¡;.>S.£¡ be applied unreservedly, to Beecham's PiUs -[he most popt.?r medicinc of the ?'?  'time. Becham' s Pi!)$ are safe, because they are whole]y curative and free from 71J I any drastic or delcterious princip!c. Bcc?-am's Pills arc sure, because the\- ?<  restore the hea1thy anion of the stomach, liver and bowels, gently assisting Nature I  to conect what is wrong with the digesu?c system. For the re!!ef and cure of ?! ?? the many ailments to which those organs are liable, you should always seck the ?.1 £ 55 aid of that "safe and sure" remedy-  p ECHAIVIS p L Lso Sofl! everywhere ta boxes, price I! lid. (5 6pi Ik) & 219 (168 pillsh  ?PROF.W. A. WilLIAMS ig|g>k Fellow of the National (Fowler) Institute of Phrenology). May be consulted daily at his plf^ y Mbb Rooms in the ??? ?JS? Victoria Arcade, Near the Market, Swansea. For Advice upon SELF-CULTURE, Choice of TRADE or PROFESSION, HEALTH, How to Secure and retrain it. OUR HYGIENIC METHODS will he?pyou ht tb? deve,???)ment of HEALTH and the ERADICATION 01 DISEASE wheDdrt?&au OPERATION f? you. If yot hiv? been declared INOURABLE" of any form of disease, we shall be pleased to consider your case and advise a NATURAL and RATIONAL mode of treating it. If your ca&« is a very eerious one, call any day bnt Saturday—our busy day-and please note thai our rooms are in the VICTORIA AKCALE Jstar the Market) Prof. Williams holds the highest credentials as a Phrenologist, and is m-R ONLY person in Walos who has been personally trained to the work by L. N. and J. A. FOWLER. We would heartily recommend our readers to consult, him. A? a Phreu- ologist and Hygienist he is as much above Lhe ordinary lecturer and examiner of beads as is the skilled medical practitioner above the quack. "—Vide Press. OUR NEW BOOK, REGENERATE E FOOD AND COOKERY," IS SOLD AT Is. BUY A COPY. IT WILL HELP YOU.

ELECTION WRITS

ELECTION WRITS. Carmarthen to continue to receive them. In the King's Beiieii Diviaibn Frida.>, Justices Darling, Lawrence, and Sartkey, sitting as a Divisional Court, heard legal argument in two rules nisi which lwd betyi obtained by the Mayor of Llanelly i calling the revising barristers for Car- j mat-then and Llanelly to show cause why a mandalll us should not issue directing them to deliver revised lists of parlia-. roentary voters for the constituency of I Carmarthen Boroughs to the Town Clerk | of Llanelly. | | Mr. MacnaorraJi, K.C., and Mr. Baily appeared for the revising barristers, and II Mr. Foote, K.C., and Mr. Montgomery, I K,< represented appellants. Mr. Macmorran, in showing cause against the rule, said that the rules were obtained on the ground that there were two borough* and two Mayors within the boundaries of the Parliamentary con- stitue.ney known a* Carmarthen Boroughs, and that as Llanelly Borough had the largest population, the Mayor of Llan- i elly was the proper returning officer for the constituency, and the Town Clerk of Llanelly was the town clerk who had to receive the revised lists of voters from I the revising barristers. The short point, was this: Llanelly got its charter as a borough in 1913, and as it had the larger population, it was suggested that the writs for elections | ought to go to the mayor of that borough j and, therefore, tLc revised lists ought to go to the Llanelly Town Clerk. The point depended on various" statutes which he: proposed to quote, The writ of elect-ion had hitherto been directed to the Sheriff of Ctrinartboxi,. hat the fact did not justify the writs be- ing now delivered to the Mayor of Lian- elly because Llanelly was the larger t-own. Mr. Justice Darling asked who was the I first member for Carmarthen, but no one in court could supply the information. Mr. Justice Darling observed that Mr. Lloyd George was at the courts yesterday for the nomination of sber?t's. and he would have beeD very indignant to l&aru I that rher? was no one in court who c?uid say who was the first nteiuber tor euch a I constituency. (Laughter.) Mr. Palmer, tor the Sheriffs of Carmar- then, produced an affidavit that for 34 j years election writs had been directed to the Sheriff. Mr. Montgomery, K.C., in support of the rules, contended that it was clear on the Acts that where a Parliamentary borough consisted or two boroi.^iis, 1 in write must be delivered to U.«- vlayor ot j the larger boroiigii. No doubt it would deprive the Sheriff of the privileges that he had enjoyed for many years Mr. Justice Darling in giving judg- ment, said that ever since the time of James 1.. who granted Carmarthen a Charter, that town had been a county borough, and had sheriffs of its own, and it was (I ,,i,- certain that whenever a writ was sent o Carmarthen ordering them to return a member of Parliament it was always directed to tho sheriif there, who made a return. lie thought the Act of 18S2 did not ( ap- ply to Carmarthen, nor did the redistri- bution. of Seats Act of 1884 apply, a8 had been contended. He wa? of opinion that the rules must be discharged. Mr. Justice Laurence and Mi*. Justice Sankoy concurred, and the rules were' discharged accordingly with costs. j

No title

Germany is now faced with a famine in matches, as the supplies of Russian wood from which they are iniade are exhiusted, and no more material is.availaMe. A correspondent at Gorseinon writes to! I say that the other day thirty young re- ruits from that town left in a body to join the training camp at Ta.unton. At Llondilo Police Court on Saturday, the liconsc of t It, Nag's Head was trans- ferred to Mrs. E. A. Roberts, and tuat of tlv George and Dragon to Miss ivowis. Lord Kopebery, who is president- of the Royal Scottish Generation, will take the chair at the 250th ai rdversary festival ou !»t. ^'ldrcv. "s Day (N-cvember 60) at the Hol- boru .'te«taurant.

Advertising

Important to Mothers. Every Mother who values the Health and Cleanliness of her Child should use .Harrtsen's "Reliable" Nursery Pomade. Oe Applicatiou Kills all Nits and Vermin. Beautifies and etreugtbens the hair. In Tins 4Vi. an,1 9d.; postage Id. Geo. W. Harrison, Chemist, Readiug. Sold by ail Chemists. Insist on having Harrison's Pomade. Agents:—For Neath, llibbprt a wi Son; Aberavon, G. D. Love luck; Swansea, M, J) vies, High-street; Bridgend. E. H. Griffith, Imnraven-place; Britonrerry, W. W Trick, 9, Villiers-etreet; Maes-teg, R. D. Morgan; Cwmavoa, Ii. S. Arnold; Aber- gwynfi. ldwal Jamets, 127. Jersey-roa-d; Porthcawl. F. E. Duck, 24, John-street; Neat-h. J. GriftO c; Port Talbot. T. B, Baoujord. A RELIABLE REMEDY) TO LADIES. 1 Irregularities, fee., removed by an entirety Kn PI and nbso'.ateiy certain method witnool Medicine. '9/ No mixtures oc nanseoos dnigs to take. The 4 greatest discovery of Modern Medical Science, j Guaranteed Inrmiess. It is positive, safe, eertain. and r-r>ee

No title

The anniversary services were held at Paraclci" Congregational Churcl^ New- lon. >*i»mbW. on Sunday, when Professor Thomas Lewi- M.A., Brecon Theologic-al College, preached powerful sermons. Anthems were rendered by the choir, undo1- Mr. John Bowça. I