Teitl Casgliad: Herald of Wales

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 4 o 12 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
18 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
LLANDOVERY BOAaO OF GUARDiANS ii i

LLANDOVERY BOAaO OF GUARDiANS. A3YLUM COMMITTEES REPORT. The fortnightly meeting of this board fraf; held oil Friday, when there yore j present: Mr. David Davies, lihyluid1 (chairman), Ald. T. Watkins (vice-chair- j man), and Messrs. J. C. V. Pryse-Iliee, Harries, R-ees Lewis, T. Evans, J. Prytherch, W. fi. Lewis, Rd. Thomas, ip Davies, George Morgan, Da?ipl! jijwis, W. Thorns, the cl<-k (Mr. D. T. ft. Jon, the Talieving oSc taken out. It W"- very • good of a member of the Board to visit1 1-he asylum and take an interest in the! patients from this union, but the recora- mendation for their removal should j emanate from the authorities there, who t hemsel ves were very anxious to get them j from there when they were in a lit state, Mr. Rd. 1 homas mentioned the saving; they would be effecting by removing them to the Tloufce as compared with the sum they I)vd to pay to the Asylum authorities for their maintenance, be-i sides they could be of some assistance at xaoybryn. He mentioned one poor! woman who was much better than when! lie wa? down before, ami who spoke quite rational. She was very anxious to get: back io her husband and children. The c !t of ]ft-r maintenance was now borne 1.. this Board— Aid. Watkins said that; the person referr.-d to was very high Tempered, and if ahe was-removed to 'lanybryn she might get worse than she was.Letore going down.—Mi. R. Thomas said she wanted to go to her children. He suggested that if they took an in- terest ill saving the rates that they should communicate with the medical superin-' tendent to see if she could be removed.— ■ The Chairman asked if they thought they would bt> justified in going between the h ugband. a lid the relations c, ihis noor woman. He felt sure that if the hus- band and the relatives felt that s|ie was fit to be removed that they would be the first to apply.—Aid. Watkins said lie 1 knew the family well. They were nice people. He was afraid it was a case in which they (the board) should not inter- fere. The Chairman said he was of the same opinion. Ihe subject then dropped. RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL. A meeting cf the Rural District Council ??.h?d ??prw?'-ds. The Chairman <'M?. Thomas Evans,- J.P., Arnaim) presided. Rhandirmwyn Bridae. Mr. It. A. R?ia wrote t, say that he had given instructions to have the path over ,,n inqtnict-iori?'to bave tlae path o,.r I V,?am?firmwyn Bridge raised ae shown on pl?n 1 I Llangadock Drainage, The IJangs^dock drains were agsiin j under consideration, and there was a letter from Mr. Peel .on the subject. H suggested that. on behalf of this council an expert should be employed- to prepare to scale together with aft estimate of the probable cost. The County Council Main Road s Committee would contribute their share, and he would do his best in the matter.—Mr. Davies, Rhyblid, soid he did not understand Mr. Peel's remark as tc the County Council bearing their share. There was no share, but half ami hclf.: He was under the impression tin t the j County Council would pay half, but not tv-^rds a» expensive scheme.—Mr. E. that the District and the C -u u suryt-vor, rf?t Mr. Peel and hin.- x?r Dn Thure?la wT? h regard to the p)&rs ( It w?? then ?wt&t! that the Council were ] fp?ponsiM? for haTin? the plans drawn up f by a capa ble man.—The Clerk said it -wits Advisable to have those things in writing One said one thing and the other th, direct opposite. Mr. Gomer Harrier i his letter said no plans bad been agrcC" upon. Consequently nothing had gone the l/ocal Government Board. The sur- ge sti on was that the District Count *tK.ukl prepare a plan of what the wanted for submission to the Count; Council, showing the junctions they unjred for slops and so on. Were thej goiiii, to engai; as sngiaeer tc do ii.. cu I was it to be done by Jir. Tudor Lew t. The btter. he pointed. out, had not been engaged for such work.—M r. Davies, Ivhvblid, said thca when they eng-a,ged engineers to msake pIano and specifications j" this mtsnner they ran very expensive. They were paid so much per cent. on the outlay.—The Clerk said Mr. G. Henry wanted their plan from this council so that he could fix his own showing the junctions, etc. Why not open the pre- -?;? drain to see what w:? in it?—Mr. Davies, Rhyblid, proposed in view of the faot thai: they had four meetings alto- gether that day that the matter be ds terred for a month.—The Clerk said they had a committee who reported what was .required to he done, and there were people j who complained bitterly about the con- 1 di'tion o? the Lla')?ad:)ck drAinp. If tht matter was adj')?mp wm the owner in the Pump- saint district, but she would keep the j matter in mind.

I GIRLS DrtAW A MOISTI CLOTH THROUGH HASR i

GIRLS! DrtAW A MOISTI CLOTH THROUGH HASR. i Try this! Hair gets thick, glossy wavy' Try this! Hair gets thick, glossy wavy: and beautiful at once. I mined ia to--Yee,' Certain?—That's the joy of it. Your hair becomes light, wavy,! fluffy, abundant, and appears as soft, lustrous and beautiful as a young girl's j alter a Danderine hair cleanse. Just try this—moisten a cloth with a little Dan- derine and carefully draw it through your hair, taking one small strand at a time. This will civjanse the hair of dust, dirt or excessive oil, and in jU.5t a few minutes you have doubled the beauty of your hair. A delightful surprise awaits those whose hair has been neglected or is scraggy, faded, dry, brittle or thin. Besides j beautifying the hair, Danderine dissolves: every particlo of dandruff, cleanses, puri- j fies and invigorates the scalp, for ever stopping itching and falling hair; but what will please you most will be after a few wpeksJ use. when you see new hair— fine and downy at first--y"-but really new hair growing all over tho scalp. If you care for pretty, soft hair, and lots of it. surely get a l 'l!- bottle of Knowlton'g Danelerine from any chemist, and just try it.

ANOTHER REMAND j

ANOTHER REMAND. j Glanamman Wcimriirg Case Not Quite Ready for the Bench. At the Ammanford Police Court on I Monday afternoon, before Mr. B. R. Evens, Julm Thomas Davit's appeared on i remand in answer to a charge of alleged wounding, with intent to do grievous' bodily harm, his nephew, David Lewis, at Glanamman. It was explain: (I at a pre- vious silling of the magistrates that 1,h defendant, in reply to the charge at the police station, admitted having used his pocket knife in self-defence, and that the prosecutor was then unable to attend, but would he lit to appear in a few days. Inspector Davies now stated that the Deputy Chief Constable had telephoned from Llandilo, asking him to apply for a further remand for a week as the solicitorr. engaged in the case would not be able to be present that day, and the case was not quite ready. The Magistrates' Clerk asked the defen- dant whether he had auy abjection to the vei.iaud applied for. Defendant said he did not object. -The Presiding Magistrate: Very well, I assent to the remand asked for. The Clerk (to defendant) I suppose you apply for bail. j y Defendant: Yes. please. The Magistrate: The same bail as before —himself in £ 100, and a surety in £50. The necessary bail was prcimptly- obtained. Mr. Hugh Williams, solicitor, Llandilo, appeared for the prosecution last week; ) and it is now stated that Mr. T. C. Hurley, Llaudilo, has been engaged for the defence,

WE FOUGHT TO THE LASTI 1

"WE FOUGHT TO THE LASTI 1* Mrs. Lewis (widow of the late Detee- tive Inspector Lewis) of Wate.rloo-street,! Swansea, lirs received an interesting; letter from her son Clifford, who has been; Sighting at, the front, and is now a' prisouer in the hands of the Germans atj Gettirigen. Private Clifford Lewis be- longed to the 3 Ccmpany of tile Ist: Battalion Royal Wo .sL. Fusiliers, and on; the outbreak of vne war was I)rough,t •■ i a i ta, and was atj home from lam, v:.) ."iaita. and waa at. once sent to L: t'ro?u. He writes on I October 281b My dear inorfcuer,—I em a prisoner of war, and there is 110 di«g ace in it. We, fought to the very last, and had u«ed j all our ammunition, and they were shell- i ing our trenches. Our rifles got fur of I sand and earth, and so became useless.! So all we could do was to sit still and; wait for death, but we got cut off, sur-j prised and captured into the bargain. I am in the best of health, so you need not worry about me. Please do not send any cigarettes, as we are forbidden to to smoke. Our regiment got cut up very badly. My friend, Will Osborne (another Swansea boy) got wounded in the wrist, the bullet going right through it. I marvel I am alive at all. For three (Jays it was like hell itself, shrapnel mowing us down til heaps. I was in the thick of it, and right by our officer was shot in the head and killed. After the firing had ceased for a while I would look around me and see, chuuis, ho full of life a few minutes before either dead or scr&aming for help. It was terrible at night time. You could hear the wounded in their delirium i shouting for help and praying to God for forgiveness. As soon as the war is over I will be released with tho rest of the prisoners. I am constantly thinking of you at home, and am longing for the time to come when everything is settled and I am at home once more. Please j write back a? soon as you can, because it is very nice to hear from home when ] one is a way in a place like this. We aro; treated peifectly well. My love to all, your loving son Cliff."

Advertising

FOR COLDS AND CATARRH No matter bow bad you lfcay be with Cold in the Head and Catarrh you will get imine- die l)eltfit by using 'Noatroline" It clears your h,-nd instantly. It relieves the distress- it!* irritation 1:'1 the nostrils. It stops the running discharge. -It frets rid of the thick ?rerro-l?d«n mneufi in your nose and throat. It enables you to breathe freely. It quickly banish M catarrh and Pooth w your cold away! Yon know that Nbstroline is doing you good the minute you try it. Begin to-day. ?.b.. H? and 2'9. most chemists, or post .free from makers. Harold E. Matthews arnd Co., Chemists. Clifton. Brtetol.

UNLAWFUL GAMING

UNLAWFUL GAMING. REMARKABLE STORY TOLD BY SWANSEA DETECTIVE. At Swansea on Monday, Isaac Silver. described as a machinist, was charged with keeping and using No. 5, Dyuevor- place, Swansea, for the purpose of unlaw- ful gaming on October 31st, and other tiat". His wife, Sarah Silver (SJ), wasi charged with uuiawfuiiy assisting the conducting of l'o. 5, Dynevor-place, kept and used for the purpose of gaming; whilst iive meu were charged with that they unlawfully resort and play at the house. They were: Harris Hyman (44), a tailor's presser; Francis James Coakely (25), fish salesman: John Clarke (36), iiiaciiinis t; Sidney Williams (29), book- maker, and Maurice Jacobs (27), tailor. Mr. Laurence Richards prosecuted, and Mr. Trevor Hunter, instructed by Mr. Verley Price, defended. The Silvers elected to be tried by a jury. A remarkable stcry was told by Detective-Sergeant Johnson, who said that he with other officers kept observa- tion on the house on October 31st. He saw a lot of men enter the house, the first going in at 8.28, and the last at 10.10. At 11.10 in company with Detective Barry, he went to the door, leaving other officers in reserve. He knocked at the door and heard a person walking in the passage from the direction of the front parlour door on first floor, tow a ids the back of the house. Shortly afterwiu ds he heard a noise in the bouse of persons seemingly hurrying down the s tairs at the back of tho house. Then he heard footsteps, in the passage. He received no answer to his knock, but heard the footsteps going up- stairs. An attempt was then made to burst open the door, but it was a failure. While attempting the same, three men rushed from the front door of No. 6. j Witness ran after them and stopped I thmu. They were Sidney Williams. John Clarke, and Maurice Jacobs. Detective Juhnson spoke to them, and took them back to No. 6. The landlord of the house came to the front door, and spoke to him. Witness left the three men with Detective Barry, and went i: rough No. Ii, over tho garden wall to No. 5. In the back yard 7/sre two men, Harris Hyman and Francis Coakely. The offirerwent into the house, taking the two men with him. He produced th* search warrant, upon which he searched the ground floor. Whilst he was doing so Isaac Silver put his head over the ban- nisters and shouted out, "lIe.v! What's all the noise about?" He called Silvet and told him that he held a warrant. Silver replied, "Commnn gaming house? There is no one here. I have been in bed j i-his hour." He also said that the oiffcer hnd not seen any men enter the house. Witness was reading tb", warrant when Mrs. Silver came in from the street. She said "What's the meaning of this?" and Isaac Silver replied something in Yid- dish Witness took fr. and Mrs. Silver and th" two men to the basement where they were later faced by the men Wil- liams, Clarke, and Jacobs, and the other detectives. He found various sums of money in the po-wewion of all the defend- ant* He searched the basement, and be- 1; hind the couch found two plafing cards, Ortside the basement street door he found two other cards. In a drawer he found a pack of cards. On the stti rway leading to the bedrooms he fOUlHJ one card. On the basement floor were pieces of wrappers from a pack of eards. A br-rdle of mixed card* were found in a dieter cupboard in the bf.-aement. In the bftök bedroom another lot of eards; were found, some in the fire-place, some; under the bed. and some in a rarffboard box. In a wardrobe in the front bedroom was a glass which contained £5111 mixed money. Behind the kitchen door was found an overcoat with an unopened pack of cards with the name Cdrifeins 'theredh. i Sidney Williams claimed the pack. il- ver then said "It's hard lines that a per- son can't play a game of solo whist in his! own house." On a sofa in the basement another, overcoat was found. Mr. Trevor Hunter voiced an objection to the effect that the cross-examination of the defendants by the police after they had been informed that they were under. arrest was not evidence. The Bench dei cided to admit the evidence- Posuming, Sergt. Johnson said that Mrs. Silver said that the (tont belonged to one of the lodgers In the pocket was! a hook which showed an entry of the same day. In the front room was found a coat, in the pockets of which were three packs of cards. Mrs. Silver said the case belonged to one of her lodgers. A revolver loaded in six chambers was handed to; witness by Detective O'Brien. The i revolver was shown to all the defendants, j who denied any knowledge of it. Witness went upstairs, and found two children in the back bedroom, and in the front i room was a bed, unmade, which showed appearances of being well shaken. Wit- ness next examined the back yards, and found that step ladders had been placed j against the walls between No. 5 and No. j 4. and No. 4 and Xo. 8. There were marks of the whitewash on the walls, and Williams, Clarke and Jacobs had white marks on their clothes. Mr. and Mrs. Silver were taken to the Central Polie Station, where there were cautioned and chrtfged. Isaac Silver replied, "All I got to say, I never used it as a common gaming house in my life." Following his evidence with regard to October 31st, Sergt. Johnson told how he! had kept observation on the house on other nights, and had seen a large num- ber of men enter and leave the house at, very late hours—In answer to Mr. i Trevor Hunter, Sergl. Johnson said that! he kept observation front the old Y.M.C.A. buildings on October 17th. On! the 24tli he watched from a yard between the Inland Revenue and Mount Pleasant j ChapM. He watched from 8.30 p.m. to 5.0 a.m. on a ladder, looking over the!! wall. Evidence was also given by DetRntive- Constable Tucker and Detective-Constable Barry, Detective-Sergeant Hayes, tive-Constable O'Brien. P.C. Tovey. and Mrs. Myers, wife of the occupier of No 7. Dynevor-placa. The Clerk asked Mr. Lawrence Richards what. charge he was going to proceed with. It was decided to proceed with tho charge /of using the house as the occu- pier. There were no marked tables for gaming. The only evidence of card play- j ing was that cards were found about the hoaso Silver had told to Sergt. John- i son that he would find cards about the! house, all the children played with them.! He had also said that it was hard lines that they could not have a game of solo That was not one of the unlawful games There was no evidence to show that this was a game of chance or that it had been played for money. The case against Mrs. Silver was dis- missed. Isaac Silver pleaded not guilty to the! charge He was committed for trial 1ù the next Quarter Sessions. Bail was ai- lowed. The other cases were adjourned for three months. j

DUTIES AND SALARIES

DUTIES AND SALARIES. The Swansea Board of Guardians | Duties and Salaries Committee met at he Union Offices, Alexandra-road, on hursday aften-oon, to consider the ap- J )Vication of Mr. E. S. Morgan, the Master's Clerk, to live out.U, W. hven moved that the application be; ranted. The resolution was carried. Discussion arose as to terms.. In the ,d it was resolved that payment should so I i, .)iii &a U £9Q., by a yearlv increase "f £ 2 10* 1

BURRYPORT BURGLARY

BURRYPORT BURGLARY BLACKSMITH'S HOUSE RANSACKED: 1149 STOLEN. David Thomas Anthony, Cwmbach Wm. Morris, 2, Bryn-terraee; Win. John Morris, 30, Sandfield-row, and Thomas Samuel Davies, Derwydd, all of Burry j Port, were charged at the Llanelly Police Court on Monday with breaking and entering New Road Cottage, Ash- burnham-road, Burryport, and stealing £14,9 1(" the money of Frank King. Mr. Martin R. Richards appeared for the proseeution, and Mr. T. R." Ludford defended Win. John Morris, Anthony and Davies. j Frank ICing, blacksmith, New-road Cottage, Ashburnham-road, Burryport, said he slept alone at the house and worked at Llanelly. On November 2nd he left the house at 5.1.1 to catch the 5.30 train, and before leaving he saw that the house was locked up- At the time there was a ladder across a gap in the hedge of the garden. At about 11.30 he received a telephone message from P.S. Mitchelmore, m consequence of which he returned to Burryport by the 11.40 train. He went with P.S. Mitch el-1 more to the house and found the ladder leaning against his back bedroom win- dow. On entering the house, he noticed that the drawers in his bedroom had been forced opc;it, and found that all the money was missing. Mr. Richards: How much money did you misc, Witness: There was Slt9 10s. missing, .£143 being in gold, £ 2 in notes and the rest in silver. Mr. Richards: What was the condition of the bedroom window at this time?—It was open and the ladder was against it, the upper portion being down to the bot- tom. How did you leave it in the morning?— It was closed, but I cannot ?we?r that the catch was on. i Proceeding, witness said that at 10-30 p.m. that night a woman camo to his house, and after he had spoken to her for a few minutes she brought William Morris in. After they came into the kitchen he did not know exactly who he had there, but he ascertained that the ifemale, was William Morris' wife. Wit- ness told them; I am in a fine prl-dica- men." The Clerk: Was predicament the actual word you used? Witness: Yes. The Clerk: Was tho conversation in j English or Welsh ?—Welsh. | Mr. Ludford He didn't say predica- I ment in Welsh, I know. (Laughter). Continuing, witness said that Mrs. Morris said. "Dotit you worry; your money will soon all come back." She also said that after hearing what had occurred she persuaded her husband to come and tell him all that he knew about the affair. She then told her husband, Speak up, Will. Tell the man what you know about this." Wm. Morris then said, I met GoddyJ tjie previous week- Mr. Richards I Did you ask who "Goddy" was?— Yes. and he told me that Goddy was D. T. Anthony. What did he say then?—He said that I Gaddy" told me that Franky King's house would have to be entered, and that Monday morning would be the time. I told him not to do that for shame, but to go and look for work. What else was said ?-I asked him who was the company, and he said, Davies, tho Close, who is a son of the Close lodg- ing at Burryport; Morris Baer "that lives by the Police Station; and Tom Davies, the son of the butcher. Did you know then who the men were by that description?—No, I had to make inquiries. What else was said?—They both said that the sooner the better I gave the in- formation to the police, but that I was not to mention any names. Thomas Phillips, haulier, Carway- street, Burryport, said he was passing King's house at 5.30 a.m. on November 1 2nd., and noticed a ladder against the bed- room window, but he saw nobody. Bessie Hughes, Stepney-road, Burry- port, stated that King was her uncle, and she went to his house daily to do housework. On the 2nd inst., she went to the house about 9 a.m., and found a ladder against a bedroom window. She found that, drawers in the bedroom had been forced open. the locks having been broken. There were five shilling pieces on the floor, and she went to inform the nolice. She knew all the defendants, and Tom Davies was in the habit of coming to King's house. Winiam John, Brynheulog, Stepney- road, Burryport, said he was on the plat- form of the G.W.R. station on Noveiiiberi 2nd, between 5,15 and 5.20 a.m., when Anthony came to ask him whether ho had < seen William Jones. The man happened to be passing at the time, so witness pointed to him, but Anthony said, Never mind," and walked away. P.S. Mitchelmore stated that on November 2nd he received information. about the burglary, and on proceeding to I New-road Cottage noticed a ladder against the back bedroom window, which, was open to the half. He entered the house, and found that two drawers in the bedroom had been forced open by an instrument. A drawer in another bed-; room had been forced open in the same way. Witness then 'phoned to King, and went over the house with him after he arrived. On November 3rd he saw Dd. Thomas Anthony on the tramline leading to Aehddu Colliery, and told him he would like to speak to him. Witness asked him to go to the Police Station. He went. and witness followed him. At the Police Station witness told him he was making inquiries concerning a robbery, and n,ku-,cl him to give an ac- count of his whereabouts on the morning of November 2nd. After having been cautioned, defendant said he would let him know everything. A lengthy statement made by Anthony I was then read. P.C. Joint Williams said that between i the 2nd and 3rd November he concealed himself in the front garden of Maesyr- haf, Stepney-road, Burryport. Anthony; and Wm. John Morris came from the direction of the statiou. and stood talk- ing for about 25 minutes. They then came close to the garden wall. and wit- ness distinctly heard Anthony say in Welsh: "I'll get out of it all right." Morris said: We will have to stick to- gether." Anthony then said: The only thing we've got to do is to keep Will's mouth closed. If he don't I'll split about the other things." He saw the faces of the men as it was a moonlight night. The men were not more than 3ft. away from him. When the colliers came along Anthony said- "The colliers are coming so we'll go." Cross-examined by Mr. Ludford: He had been in the police force for eight years. On the morning of Nov. 3rd he years. or? the uior,.i. was in the Police Station when Anthony was there. The man was there about an hour. Mr. Ludford: Was P.S. Mitchelmore questioning Anthony?—He asked him to give an account as to his whereabouts. Did Ygu tell him then that you over- heard his conversation the night before? — yes. What! Isn't it strange that P.S. Mitchelmore never said a word about it? —I have nothing to do with his evidence. Did you tell your solicitor about it r- I sent in my statement. You want to tell the truth, I suppose? —Yes. P.C. Rees Connick, said that on Wed- nesday last he had to take Wm. Jdorris: from the Town Hall to the Dock I-Iolice j Station after he had been remanded. On I the way Morris said, I am locked up i for nothing. If they will give me a chance I ".m Ml them a!) about it, and I'll gi?e Anthony awV. He asked me to l come with him to break into the house. I I ?old him I was working the next day. | My wife told me that he called at my house the next day and inquired for me. On the way home from work I heard that the house had been broken into. j My wife and I went down the road. I there saw Anthony, and asked him for half of the money. Anthony said, I hope you will not give us away." I j afterwards went to the house which had been broken into and told the man about it because Anthony mentioned my name, and it was through him I was arrested." 11 Wm. Morris: I did not tell you thut I asked Anthony for half the money? Witness: Yes, you did. Wm. Morris: T told you that the wife asked for half the money r-lhat is not so. j William Morris: You did not write the notes from which you are reading on the | way to the Police Station?—No, I wroto them immediately after I arrived there. Inspector Nicholas said that William Morris was brought to the Dock Police Station about one p.m. on November 9th, } and expressed a desire to make a state- ment, but at the moment witness had no time to take it- On the 12th inst., after his (Wm. Morris) wife had visited him in the cell, he again expressed a desire to make a statement. He said to witness: "The week before this happened I was [engaged on the tug 'Falcon.' When I re- turned about the middle of the week I was informed that David Thomas had called to see me. On the following Sat- urday, when I returned I was informed that David Thomas had called to see me again. The next Sunday about 11 a.m. I was lying on the sofa when he called. We had a conversation during which he asked me: 'Do you think that Franky King has money'? I said: 'No, I don't I' think he has.' He said: 'I'm sure he has, because he has a house of his .,)wn: I I said: .y r:.u will play with your health if iyou arc going to steal there/ He said: '1 think I'll have a smack at it on Wednesday morning. I will tell the old man, my father, that I'm going to look for a job in the Gwendraetb Valley. Then Fit go and watch Frank King leaving the house to go to Llanelly. Then I'll go into the house to see what is there, but I shall 'see you again.' Ho then left. On the following day, about 6 p.m., I went out accompanied by my wife. We went to my father's house. where we were told that Mr. King's house had been broken into and that 1-150 had been stolen. We then went down tho (street, "and near the ironmonger's shop we met Dd. Thomas Anthony. My wife finid to him, Give us a share of that money." lie said, D 1 can't get hold of tho boy?. Tom Davies, tho butcher, is going to hammer us all." We then went to Mr. King's house and I told him all I knew about the affair." Mr. Richards: Did you ask him whom he meant by David Thomas? Witness: Yes, and be said David Thos. Anthony. The defendants were remanded until Monday, bail being allowed in sureties of 2:3,10 in each case.

RUB WEAK ACHING BACK STOPS LUMBAGOI

RUB WEAK, ACHING BACK, STOPS LUMBAGO I Rub Backache Away with Small Bottle of Old Honest" St. Jacob's Oil." j Does your back burtp Can you not straighten yourself up without feeling sudden pains, sharp aches and twinges? Now listen! That's lumbago, sciatica, or perhaps a strain; but whichever it is, instant relief is obtained the moment you rub your hack with soothing, penetrating "St. Jacob's Oil." Nothing else takes out that aching pain and stiffness so quickly. You simply rub it on your back and out comes t'-e pain. It is perfectly harmless and doe-i not burn the skin. -Do not suffer! Get a small bottle from any chemist, and after using it ju?t once you will forget that you ever had ba.ek-i ache, hhubago or sciatica, because your back will cease to hurt or cause any moro, misery. "St. Jacob's Oil" never disap-i points, and has been recommended for 60 I years.

MUMBLES WOMANS DEATH FROMI AMMONIA POISONING

MUMBLES WOMAN'S DEATH FROMI AMMONIA POISONING. Mr. C. J. C. Witeon, deputy county ocxrdm&r, conducted an inquest on Monday at the Mumbtes PoUoe Station touching the death of Mrs. Susannah Morley (60), of 7, Devon- fcerraco, Mumbles, who died em Sunday from t,he effectri of taking ammonia, in mistake for another medicine. Florence Bevai) Morley, daughter of the deceased,, stated tha.t her mot-beo* had a. slight, cold on Thursday leqt. She mired up a preparation of Epsom salts and lemon and kept it in a bottle which formerly contained a preparation of ammonia. There was another bottle of ammonia- which came with the groceries on Friday. Botih bottles were on a shelf next to one another. Her mother did Dot distinguish one bottle from another, bwth being similar. Wrtneas, proceeding, started that she was having bs*«kfast about 8,10 a.m. on Saturday whem her mother took down tie bottle which she thought con- tained the medicine. After taking a wine- glassful Abe said, in a choking voioe, that she had taken the ammonia, in mistake. She (witness) nan a.t once for Dr. OnirtMs; ber sister in the meantime gave toer an emetic of salt a.nd water. I Dr. John Cyril Chrrtie said that he knew the deoeaaed very well. lie 6ow her about a week ago. Sl-io was df a "bright and cheer- ful oeij;i'>ri. He was oaJJed in on Satur- day. The deceased was V""Y distressed, and complained of much pain in the mouth end etomach. She explained that she had taken ammonia in mistake for ealts. Her mouth and tor.gue weqe sore a,n.J. inflamed. fThe lived until Sunday morning. He explained that the taking of a glass of anunfcvia would cause the ini ulries and, pain described, as the preparation was a deadly poaaon. The jury returned Q. verdict of death through misadventure, adding a rider to the effect tha/t they wished to bring to the notice of the propffifotore of tho ammonia that the dangerous quaiitiee of the preparation should be printed more prominently on the front of the bottles, and that the word Po;ioou chouJd be printed in large letters.

Advertising

g Good Living for All 5 and Cheap! I j The delicious British Made ? BIRD'S Custard does the '?j ï children good. C It is full of nutriment '? j and contains the body- 'j n buildmg material they need. ig y Costs only a trifle per head i. n with sugar and milk at their l\ present prices. jjf No Increase 1 | in Price of | Birds. Remember — It's FOOD p y H mCC/Sr??D?br/n/ 3 n 1? pMs.! 4? A 7? Bojm? |JttR l and large 8? Tina. K Cuft cf OFFICE: I LLOYDS BANK LIMITEDr HEAD OFFICE: Current Accounts are opened upon the I ?????v??? fjj terms usually adopted, by Bankers. Deposits j ill received at interest, subject to notice of with- ¡j .????"??? ? N drawal, or by special agreement. Purchases !j ????????? and Slos of Stocks effected through members !i j????!?!??? :J? of the Stock Exchange, Securities received for _'??'??? {T????? safe custody, Coupons, Dividends, Pay Warrants, t? ?? ? T &c., coUected, Foreign Moneys exchanged, ???';??????S?? periodical payments made, and every ,| |g description of Banking business conducted. | | jl |H$jjj| THIS BANK HAS OVER 850 OFFICES IN EN;ND & -;L- i-_1L- g J   PAMS AUXtUARY: LLOYDS BANK (FRANCE) LIMITED. "??- ;;de¡ ? 

DISTRICT RECRUITING

DISTRICT RECRUITING. Gratifying Effect of Appeals rt Carmarthen and Pontyberem. Taking advanago of the large crowd visit- ing the town for the annual November fair, a successful open-air recruiting mat- ing wais held in (iuiidhall-equare, Carmar- then. on Saturday, the Mayor (Mr. John Lewis) presiding. The elevated entrance to the Guildhall was utilised &8 a platform, and the march past at the commencement of the meeting of the large number of recruits now billeted in the town provided an imposing spectacle. Speaking in Welsh, Mr. John Hinds, M.P" urged the people of Oarmarthencihire to do their &hare in the present national crLiis. It was not. he said, a war to save the land- lords cf the country, but a war to Baye the British people 1:1.6 a whole. Conscription, was in the a4r. and unlese the eUgiole youns men of the country came forward voluntarily to enliet they must be mule to join the Army. It would be by far more to their credit to come forward of their own free wilL (Applauee.) Mr. Dudley Williams Drummond (Hafo,i- neddyn) said it was the young men of the country districts they wanted at the present time. The towns and industrial districts had done well; it was the country man woo was behind. If all the youths of Walep, fully realised the tragedy and enffering of Belgium, they would all come forward to enlist at once. The sooner they got nre men the sooner the terrors of the wir would cease, and he hoped, for the honour of the Principality, that the people of Wmt Wales would respond at once to thair country's call. (Applaiiee.) Col. Gwynll Huxhes (Glancothi) said three Welsh regiments had already earned for themselves imperishable fame, and had acted up to their motto. "Better death than dishonour." Mr. Alfred Stephen (prospective Unionist candidate for West Carmarthen), iu an elo- quent appeal for recruits, referred to the wave of patriotism passing over the whole Empire He almost believes that the Colo- nies were coming forward better than they themselves. They must not let the Colonies be firat. The old country must be at thw head. Conscription would come unless young men came forward. Let it not be said of them that they were forced to join the Army, but th it they came forward willingly to defend their country. One man now would be a. good as ten in twelve months' time. (Applauee.i Mr. Lleufer Thomas (Stipendiary Magis- trate of Pontypriitl) having referred to the noble response made hy the miners of the Rhoudda Valley, saiu a movement was on foot to raise a Carmarthenshire battalion of the Welsh Army Corps, to compose a thousand Carmarthenshire yonths, so that they juight be amonimt their own pals and able to speak their own language. As a Carmarthenshire bo,), himself he hoped they would rally to the catl of their country and maintain the noble traditions of the old country. Tho several monuments standing in Carmarthen to commemorate the bravo men of the past appealed far more elo- quently than wo'-do. Let them remember the lesson of General Picton and others. (Cheers.) Lieut.-General SUr James Rills-Johnes. V.C., G.C.B., said surely the young men of the country had pride enough to say that they would not allow the Colonies and th" native troops to dj what they onght to do themselves. Sir James made a fervent ap- peal for recruits. The Bev. James John (Ilanotephan) also spoke, and on -the motion of the Rev. A Fuller Mills, seconded by the Rev. B. Parry Griffiths (vicar of St. Peter s), a vote of thanks was accorded the speakers. At the close about fifteen came forward to enlist.

CORPORATION COMMITTEESI

CORPORATION COMMITTEES* I At the Swansea Council meeting Friday I Aid. David Davies moved that the com- I mittees remain as they were at present, I but that each of the three parties be al- lowed to make any alterations in their: own representatives that they desired- Mr. Matthews seconded, and the Oouu- cil agreed. Mr. David William-, pointed out there were IS vacancies created by the resigna- tion of Mr. Morgan Hopkin, and some of the vacancies created by the death of Mr. Clancy had not been filled up. How did the Council propose to allocate the vacant positions ? Aid. Davies said they could follow out the same principle. We are in a, bit c: difficulty with regard to Mr. Hopkin's seat." lie said, because he has left no successor of his part." (Laughter.) Mr. Parker: As the only representative left of Mr. Hopkin's party-(laughtor)- I should be glad to serve on the Parks Committee. Mr. Parker's wish was acceded to. Aid. Corker was elected on the Educa- ti,.i Committee in place of Mr. Hopkin, and Mr. Wilson on the Health Commit- On behalf of his party, Aid. Davies; moved that Mr. Holmes replaee Mr. Molynenx on the Parliamentary Com- mittee; Mr. Hemininge replace Mr. Mac Donnell on the Insurance Committee, and that Mr. Barclay Owen take the place of Mr. Lee on the Watch Commit- tee. Aid. Corker seconded, and the oouncil agreed. Vacancies caused by the death of Mr. Clancy were then tilled. Mr. Sheehan, his successor, was elected to the Education, Water and Sewers, Stores, Housing, Pen- sions, and Markets Committees, Mr. Lloyd to the Librar- Committee, Mr. Hill to the Arts and Crafta Committee, and Mr. Grif- fiths to the Committee to Visit Lunatics. Aldorman Miles relinquished his seat on the Pensions Committee in favour of Mr. Richards, and on the Library Commit-tee in favour of Mr. T. J. Wi'don, and Mr. Richards's name was substituted for that of Mr. Ivor Gwynne on the Visiting Asylum Committee. Mr. David Williams pointed ont that Mr. Miller, who M serving with the Terti- torials, would not be able to attend com mittee,4 for some time, and suggested that the positions occupied by him should be filled by other members of hia party in the meantime.

ONCE A SWANSEA VALLEY CURATEI

ONCE A SWANSEA VALLEY CURATE. I The death occurred on Friday, after a protracted illness, of the Rev. Rees Lewis, vicar of Llanaaintfraed-in-Elvel "and Betitwg, Radnorshire. The deceased gentle- man camo to Llansaintfraed a few years ago, succeeding the Rev. H. J. Lerio, M.A. on the latter's preferment to the living of Glasewm. The deceased vicar was a son-iu4»w of M nI. John Jordan, of Glais House, Glaia, Swan wet Valloy. He was a curate in Glais tor some jrean*-

1 STREET TRADING

1 STREET TRADING. I Summonses Against Swansea Newsboys. I A batch of summonses against parent* and guardians of newsboys for various breaches of the bye-laws, were heard at the Swansea Police Court on Tuesdav., Phiiip Jones (36), rollerman, was sum- moned for allowing his son Philip to street trade without wearing his badge. Shnilar summonses were heard against George Pert (42), haulier, in respect of his son George; David Morgan (30), labourer, in respect of his son John; Mrs. Agnes ("arter (42), ill respect of her ward, James Thomas; Thomas Stacey (40). dock labourer, in respect of his son Thomas, Mary Ann Williams, in respect of her I ward, William Walters; and David Owens (:>b). in respect of his son. Philip Jones, George Dent, Agnes Carter, Thoma.s Stacey. and David Owens were each fined Is. Mary Ann William* was cautioned, and the case against Dd. Morgan was withdrawn. Timothy Dineen was summoned for al- lowing his son Thomas, aged nine 10 street trade without a license.—Fined 2a 6d. Owen BtlYMn was summoned for allow- ing his son Stephen to enter lieeased pre- mises for the purpose of trading.—Fined 2s (ki. Summoned for similar offences we Dd. Thomas, in respect of his son Price; Thos Morgan (Hi, dock labourer, in respect of his son George: and Albert Robert God. an in respect of his son Ethelbert. Each was fined 2s. 6d. Summoned for allowing his ward. Wm. Haddon, to street trade after nine p.m., James MeKsan was fined 2s. 6d. SimilarLv summoned, Mrs. Elizabeth Leswell, was fined 5s. in respect of her child Thomas. Following these cases several sum- monses were heard against boys. Reginald John Bennnett (14), summoned for selling newspapers by outcry in Car- marthen-roo-ft, said that his father was in the Army, and at present in 7-Ixeter Hos- pital. Sergeant Balsden said that thr I lad had to look after himself. He was cautioned. Isaac Morgan .summoned for street trad- 1 ing and not wearing his badge, said thak he was not the boy whom the policieniao caught. He was fined .s. 6d. Summoned for a similar otfence Thos. Morrisev was fined h. Brinley Neliemiah was summoned for street trading on Sunday, being under tho ago of 16 years.—Fined 2s. fid. Similarly summoned, David Roberts and Thomas I.oberts.-F-ine-cl j. < h.

GENERAL BOOTH j

GENERAL BOOTH Unsuccessfully Sued by Morrision Salvationist. In the City of London Court yesterday before Judge Rentoul, K.C., Dr George L. I Jones, of Morri?ton, Swansea, made a I claim against General Bramwell Booth, J of the Salvation Armv, Queen Victoria- '} street, for £ 72 in respect of the passage of himself and his wife from India to England. Mr. Merlin appeared for plain- tiff and Mr. Harney for defendant. Mr. Merlin stated that the claim aroso under an agreement made in 190; Plaintiff, who had an assured position as a doctor in this country, was desirous of entering the medical mission field in India, and he approached the Salvation Army on the matter. Eventually he was employed to go to India for three yours at 10 guineas a month and the second- class passage for himself and his wifti, was to be paid. Plaintiff devoted all his7 time to the work of the Salvation Army in India. Under the agreement, if plain- tiff left before the three years had ex- pired, he was to refund the outgoing passage money, which had been paid, but that did not arise, as lie had worked ouL his thre evears. i'lainfiff was to be paid his return passage at cb., end of years, but it so happened he did locum tenens work for some months for other people, and when hu asked for his return passages defendant said that plaintiff häd. waived his right to them because he did. not return at the end of the three yean. That was not plaintiff's view, and he now demanded his return passage money. Plaintiff said his wife's health made it necessary for him to return to England, and the National Insurance Act was then just coming into force. There were big openings in England, and lie knew ho. could get plenty of workjn Wales if he. could get back. Mr. Harney said defendants were. ad- ministering public funds, and they, there- fore, could not take only a philantropic view. If plaintiff could recover hit passage money 12 months after he left; the service of the Salvation Army he could recover it 12 years afterwards, and, of course, that was ridiculous. Judge Rcntoul said he must find. for defendants, without a doubt, and with costs, but he hoped they would not, b*J? enforced. Mr. Harney agreed.

THE UNEMPLOYED DOMESTIC 1 SERVANTS OF SWANSEA

THE UNEMPLOYED DOMESTIC 1 SERVANTS OF SWANSEA. A Sub-committee of the Swansea Eda- cation Committee met ou Monday for the purpose of considering the question of opening classes for, young girls who had left school and were unable to hod em- 1 ploymont owing to the war. Mr, IVHI." 1 Gwynne presided. It was stated that a large number o-e girls, chiefly domestic servants, were oti^ uf employment, and the Sub-committea considered the question of giving them instruction in domestic economy, house- wifery and cooking. Mr. T. J. Rees (the Superiatendexxt I)f Education), said in reply to Aldarxoar Corker, that the classes would not cost the Education Authority anything exra provided the girls attended. They would get a grant. It was "decided to make the necessary arrangements for establishing classes in St. Thomas. Danygraig, the Hafod, sad Morriston, if necessary. It was stated that 151t domestic servant* 67 charwomen, 26 clerks, 16 barmaids, 12 waitresses and 83 female shop assistants were out of employment.

Advertising

B 0 RW I C u"uir3AU Wit nU Ct8ill, "?rUWUt-Bi The Best BAKING POWDER in the Wtrtf, J