Teitl Casgliad: Herald of Wales

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 12 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
25 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
TRUSTING THE PREMIER

TRUSTING THE PREMIER. At the quarterly meeting of the Executive Comifcittee of the South Glamorgan Liberal Association, held on Saturday, at Cardiff. reference was made to the formation of the new Ministry, and a resolution was pasf-ed j e.*i vcgsing- complete confidence in the judg- nient of the Prime Minister and satisfaction with his promise (contained in a letter from tht Chief Wliip's office to the prASirtent I that the pursuit of iho "special aims cf the LiberaJ party in the sphere of domestic politics was not abandoned, but only sus- pended, sn(I that wher- the national hal been vindicate.! against the cnernr. tho Libaral leaders wou d take up again the un- finished task to which the party bad set its hand. Mr. S. Thomas addressed the meeting: both on this point and al-c on the question of extending the lif- of the present Parlia- I ment, and his remarks were endorsed by s. venil other speakers, with the result that the resolution was gassed unanimously.

Advertising

E YOU ARE STRONGLY ADVISED never to disregard or treat lightly any apparently small ailment of the digestive jj g ,K?tem. The discomfort may only be slight, and you may think that it vMl ? < C soon pass away; but it must be remembered that the disorder, however 3 insignificant it may seem, is one of Nature's 'Warnings, and probably A Call. S g M for timely assistance. Many people make it a rule S | TO TAKE 3 ? Beecham's Pills immedUtdy &nv utegulatity Appears in conntcdcm wt?ttte 4 £ organs of digestion. Remarkable success in the treatment of stomach and j j* liver troubles has attended this excellent preparation for the lengthy period of 3 c seventy years. People of all ages, and in every walk of life, have bccA kept in perfect health by talcing BEECHAM'S PILLS. J Sold everywhere ia boxes, price llli f56 pills) & 2}9 (168 pills). IIXIIXIIXIIZXIZZIIIIIIIrIIIIxIrxxxxxxrIxxxIXXIIXX1.

THE WCLSH GUARDS

THE WCLSH GUARDS. Lord Harlech to Take Command. irfwd Harlech has been chosen to com- mand the Welsh Guards, the new regi- ment just created as a recognition of the splendid, valour at the front of the men of the Principality. The appointment waa gasetted as fol- lows :— Welsh Guards.-Ron. Colonel Georpe R. C. Lord Harlech, retired list, to com- mand the Regiment and Regimental Dis- trict, anct to be temporarily colonel whilst so employed. Dated June 16, 1915. I/ord Harlech, who is 60 years of ago, is descen led on the maternal side from the Welsh family of Owen of Brogyntyn and Glyn Talsarnau. The family title is taken from Harlech Castle, which was defended by a. member of his family in the Wars of the Roses for Henry VI., and for Charles; I. by another member (Colonel Owen). The new commander was educated at Eton and Sandhurst, and hie first mili- tary service was with the' Coldstream Guards. Afterwards he joined the Shrop- shire Yeomanry, of which he became colonel, retiring in 1309. He married in IRSl Lady Margaret Ethel Gordon, daugh- ter of the Marquess of Huntlv. His only son, Lieutenant the Hon. W. Ormsby Gore. M.P., Shropshire Yeomanry, who has been doing duty since the outbreak of war as A.D.C. to his kinsman, Brigadier-General Herbert, C.B., com- manding the Welsh Border Mounted Bri- gade, was last week appointed staff cap- tain in place of Captain Donaldson- Hudson. The- greater porfcien of the town of CriccietJi, which the Minister of Muni- tions has made famous, was included in the Harlech Welsh estates, which were sold about four yeaTs ago.

DEFIED THE SENTRYI

DEFIED THE SENTRY. I Swansea Man Who Ran the Risk of I Being Shot. At Swansea Police Court on Saturday, William Preecod (29), engineer, was brought up in custody charged with ob- structing the sentry on duty at the South Dock, on June 18th. He was also charged with assaulting Corporal Fitrmaurice, of the King's Own Liverpool Kegiment. Private Boardman said at 3.15 on Fri- day afternoon lie was on duty near the South Dock bridge. Prisoner came up slightly under the influence of drink. Wtitnes asked him for his pass, and pri- soner produced one which had no name on it. Witness then told him he could not pass, but Preecod threatened to take off his coat and vest and defied him to stick the bavoné" in him. Witness called to Corporal Fitzmaurioe and the latter had him removed to the guard- room. Corporal Fitzmaurice gave corrobora- tive evidence and said that prisoner used most obscene language. An effort was mado to get prisoner removed without force, but he became very abusive. Wit- ness tried to catch hold of his hands, but Preseod sprang at him and struck him a severe blow on the back oi the head. The Clerk: Was the man drunk ? Corporal Fitzmaurice: No, Eir; he was sensible enough. Mr. S. L. Gregor fa magistrate) I sup- pose he would probably have been shot if it were in the night? Corporal Fitzmaurice: Well. sir. h*» would have bek-n placed in an exceedingly dangerous position. Defendant totally denied the assault. and said the sentries had a grudge against him. In imposing a or 1 t .da;r in each case, the terms of imprisonment to run concurrently, th" Chairman (Mr. A. H. Thomas) impressed upon Prescod the difficulty sentries experienced at this period. He hoped this case would be a warning to defendant and others.

AN INNS GERMAN NAME

AN INN'S GERMAN NAME. A novel application was marie to Carinar then county magistiate, on Saturday by Mr. W, J. Harriee. licensee ef the Prince of ,aa ke- fo permission toO subr-titutc the nam^ of PnJ1e of Wales for thp inn instead of th^ I prcMnt na,m?. Pr;n,,e Soxe Cobur- which, bein,- G, r:,io.T,. obnoxious The Chairman ?:r r'nd!?- Drummed' loi ha-vp had a. gool deal of trouble over it. have rou? .Supt. J. F..Toni».t: Peeplr arc otkin'- ex- ception to it. It was stated there was no other- inn bearing the name of Priuoe of Wales in the d.vihioii. and Bench authorised chango. the chairman remarkins: to appli- | cart: J hope ycu wiii eliminate that rier- m.in prince's name a* toon as

No title

"Before the war, ¡ "Udöl'? th war, r<)t(' a -Y<:lrk"lire tndent in an ?say on the ?r?t )I,ii? "En?lapd?asalandoi'?cas!)? r.?it! is a l?d? prayer. TIH' Kílir i to; blame for this." > A ease containing diamonds to the" value of if is stated' of one of tht' ?f I he Lusitallia, has been recovered in the Xortk Sea hy some -Xorw^tiau fiikermea. i

TAXI COLLISION

TAXI COLLISION. A collision heiwoen a taxi-cab and a motor car took place at a corner cf Prince of Wales-road, Swansea, shortly after 11 o'clock on Saturday night. The taxi-cab was going in the direction of Landore and the other vehicle was coming into Swansea. The motor car was being driven .by D. J. Stock, of Morriston. and the occupants of the taxi-cab were Meeers. D. Charles, D. Jones and A. Phillips, of Llansamlet. Both vehicles were badly damaged, and all the occupants, more or less injured, were taken to the hospital, fl. J. Stock was badly shaken and received an injury to his head. D. Jones was also injured about the head, and D. Charles reoeived an injury to his rib". These three were detained at the hospi- tal, and thW are now progressing satis- .factorily. A. Phillips received a slight ÜI- jury to his leg, and was able to proc td homo,

Advertising

BETTER THAN SPA WATERS As a Curative Agent in case,6 of Dvspep«ia, Disordered Liver and consequent poisoned etate of the system, many English and Continental sufferers consider KERNICK'S VEGETABLE PILLS (combined with rest) are unsurpassed. Sold by any Chemist at 7Jd. aud per box. l/1i We claim that 2j9 DR. TYE'S DROPSY, LIVER, AND WIND PILLS Cure Constipation, Backache, Indigestion, Heart Weakness, Headache and Nervous Complaints. Mr. John Parkin, 5, Eden Crescent, West Auckland, writes, dated March 21, 1912 :_n I must say they are all that you Tppreosent them to be; they are splendid; indeed I wish I had known about them sooner. I shall make their worth known to all who Buffer from Dropsy." Sole Maker: S. J. COLEY, LTD., 57, HIGH STREET, STROUD. GLOS* ELLIS'S HERBAL PILLS. Made from prescription of celebrated Nurse for Anaemia, Bloodlesmess, &c. Send stamp for free sample amd particu- lars; also 'testimonials. Prices in. 3d. and 4s. 6d. post paid, under cover. Advice Free. MRS. ELLIS, 12. VALLANCE ROAD, HOVE, SUSSEX. IDEAKINSl lUNCHEAkERl I immediately arrest the course of the < ■ disease and guard against all ill effects, It ■ ■ possesses marvellous healing and tonic prop- ■ I erties. aDd glves instant relief to Coughs, B I 01d5, Hoarseness, 8ronch D'iftl. II culty of Breathing, etc. It is very t beneficial. and has proved for many years a t boon aftd blessittig to thousa,ids of oufi,(crers. t REMEMBER I Neglected Coughs and ■ Colds frequently turn to Bronchitis, Asthma. R etc., and are often the forerunner of that B dreadful disease-Consumption, ????'?"- of ?' Chemists acd Stores.' t 12or2 ron, the sole poprletorsan<1iD\ntOrs G. DEAKIN & HUGHE& B THE INFLAMMATION REMEDIES CO., t  -dmft SLAENAVOOO. f4ON. S C o ^aenavoh. WOW,  S deakin s "o° E;Er;^ INFLAMMATION REMEDIED AND PILLS 1fti a.nd 2:3, of a,l) Cbemiste and St/Orcs. tHE GREAT PAIN A DISEASE KILLERS 1/3 AND 2/6 DIRECT FROM:— a DEAKIN & HUGHES, rho Inflammation Remedies Co., BLAENAVCJ f IMPORTANT- 10 MOTHERS I Y Bvery mother who v&lceb the BeaJt;a aad Cleanliness of her child should use m ? M?M??r? 4 "Rellb/e" .EiQ D a D ir' A tSu-smry r- II. t:r;, ■ Oos licatioli kills all Xit3 8Dd Yermio, A ? OnkII.11-p-ptif3es aod strengthens the Hau.  In Tins, 4Jd. Postage Id. y A SOLD BY ALT. CBEMIISTS. r < K Insist cm r^amr.j HARP.ISGS S FOMADS. i V uo. W. HAUISOn. CS^JBSST, &Len AguutS to*" .Neuiii: ;jx;l.H'lt A >011. avon: ti. D. l./vveluuk. Cwiuavon: ti. ArnoJd. Xeath J. G. Isaac, I'nrt Talbot: T. B. Bittniord. Swansea: T. ])avj»?s. Brynamtnan: E. M. Morris. Garnynfr: V* bvans. Glauamman: J. W. Evans. Landore: T. I)ryden.. Pontardaws.- Gh. Cljdacli: Davies Brofc i

A FALSE POSITION

A FALSE POSITION. GLAMORGAN COUNCIL'S CONFERENCE. The opposition of the authority to tho Swansea Extension Bill was debated at a meeting of the Glamorgan County Coun- til, Mr. J. Bland y Jenkins presiding. Alderman J. Jordan, referring to the minuses of the Parliamentary Comniit- tee, afked whether. in. connection with the Council's opposition to the extension of Swansea boundary, the Swansea Cor- poration had asked for a conference with the County Council, and whether such a conference had been refused. He hau been told that the only conditions on which the County Council would hold fi < onterence with, the Swansea authority were most humiliating. The minutes showed that at a meeting cif the Parliamentary Committee it was stated, th;:¡,t tb local Government Board had refused to sanction the loan for the Swansea sewerage scheme during the war, atid that probably the Bill for confirming the Board's Draft Provisional Order would nof be introduced. this Session. The Committee recommended that should "this afiord opportunity for a conference between the Swansea Corporation and the County Council, and if the Tonii Government Board would be disposed to alter their Draft, Order to conform with the results of !"u('hconft!rpnüo, the Board be informed of the suggestion for a joint conference. It was stated, however, that the difficulties which bad resulted from the Corporation having agreed with cer- tain District Councils as to special terms had hitherto precluded the hope of any useful result from such a c?nfcrence.? County's Conditions. The Chairman, replying to Alderman Jordan, said that, the County Council had not refused a conference, but. the Corpora-tion would not. accept the condi. tions laid down by' the county. Alderman Jordan: The conditions were too onerous. The Chairman: I do not think they were too onerous. Alderman Jordan: There should have been -no. conditions at all in regard to the conference. j, .The Chairman: That was for us to con- adder. • .Alderman Jordan ;il,-4) asked whether there had been petitions from local authorities urging the Council not to proceed with its opposition. The Chair- man replied in .the affirmative, but said there had also been resolutions from other parts exactly to the contrary. In further reply to Alderman Jordan, who again said that th A conditions were humiliating, the Chainnan said, You suppose we were going to confer ,>wztfi our hands tied?" An Open Mind. I .Alderman Jordan: But you were tying vthe hands of others. • Tbff Chairman: We did not tie them i at., ail. They should have asked the m;;nty • for conference at the start before they dealt with the programme. rha was :h", right way, and the Council would. Irave m?;. them with an (!.len mjnd AU«emoan. Jordan moved that the opposition oi U)c Council be withdrawn. acl(i:;ig that the County Council were iVc -lg up a false position. Mr. Ilu^rh ifr:unwll asked if it was not raft that Swansea Council had entered „at:rangeihents with adjoining Dis- trict 'rVxincik which the Local Govern-I "lent Heard refused to acknowledge, and the Chairman said such was the case. Mr. A. T. Williams urged that the con- ference should not break down.on some point of rod tape. The Chairman said he thought, there be r. conference, and on his stating that he woul l endeavour to secure the ■ ronsent of the Local Government Board a.-conic,-evice, AMerman. Jordan with- 4 minutes were v- A Nrath Suggestion.. path. ,lIo;pibl Com .hiit'tee suggested that n'nng to the increased cost of material the .building, of the proposed hospital r-honld -be deferred.' but the Health t'^mniiftee took the view that hos- pital accommodation^ was now more needed than e\ c.\ and had informed the local Government Jtoard of this view. The nunulf) wa. adopted. The only Co-.BOfils which had not iiie Notifit,ittioil of" Biiths Ar-t were; it was stated. Go.wer. and Ovster- ^m'oliVi'C' and the .meeting af-eppted the re- commendation of the ifealth Committee that these Counts-he informed that, fail- ing their adoption of the. Aft, the. Local Gov'ernment Board be asked to enforce it,or the County Council carry out the Ar-t. charging the costs to the Councils concerned. -in eonne;-tien with the suggestion that children h(tn!rI be allovM to do agrieul- lufal y.^rk owing labour, the Elementary ik!v cation Committer re- port eii th^it the master harl been left: to th? chief e.lreation official, who would exorci*'?' his discretion in npplicntions tor pa^if.! exemption. Ail exemptions would Ho subject to the conditions' laid down by the Board of Education ii cl th,, Warwick- shire Education 'Committee. This course was :vf;?pte'i by the meeting without com- The Mining Committee reported that consideration had been given to sug- gestions for greater < o-operation between owners and managers of mines and the ■Education Committee /,ifh regard to min- ing education, and pointed out that it was highly desirable that facilities be afforded to promising inine students to attend the flay and evening classes. Man- and owners might, it was suggested, take a personal interest in the class re-ords of students in their employ, and miirht treat as apprentices students pro- paring for the Home Office examination. I The recommendation was adopted.

CARMARTHEN AND ITS POOR I I

CARMARTHEN AND ITS POOR. I Mr. Hugh R, Williams, Local Govern- ment Board Poor Law Inspector, who attended Carmarthen Board of Guar- iiin.s, meeting Cn Saturday, expressed patisfaotnon with the administration ol .fhp in!gtituti..)nt; under their charge. He was iriai the Guardians wero in a posi- tion to deal so generously with the poor, as shown in the amount of relief granted, in spite, of the war. lie was glad to find that when dealing with relief cases they ha TEard for those people who had been thrn?.r aU their liv. bv giving t.hm larN a?ou?ts. which showed that thrift rhowetl tb-at thrift- anti ge,4d character were recogni-?e d by He referred to the great decrease in vagrancy in that and other unions throughout Wales from an average of 800 ■o 200 nightly in a. year, and he firmly believed that. vagrancy. had come down to its irreducible minimum, and fheir d?ty now was to investigate more closely as t& who were the remaining vagrants. Th1e w" aIM, he said, a great decease in pa:u. gin, The Chairman (Mr. Llewelyn Morrg.r m?vin? a Tote of thanb to the inspector, described the tramps as merely the para- ttes of the nation, living on the hacks of honest people.

WELSH HOME RULE

WELSH HOME RULE. Scotch members of the National Liberal I Cl-ub hare fotmed themselves into a Scotch Home Rule group with the intent I of forwarding Home Rule for Scotland in every possible way, and educating the Liberal party up to it. The group has been fully organised and a secretary to the gfoup appointed. The Welsh mem- bers of the Club are also organising them- j selves into a similar group with a like ob- Ant in regard to W&leo. 1

I THE OLD MASTER

I THE OLD MASTER. UNVEILING OF MEMORIAL TABLET TO "EVANS, GELLIONEN." At Gellionen Chapel a tablet was un- veiled to the memorv of the Rev. John Evans, headmaster" of the Trebanos Grammar School for 26 years. Mr. Evans died in 1888, but it was in the early part of 1914 that Mr. Josiah Griffiths, of Allt- wen, who had returned home from tne States, threw out a suggestion that some- thing should be done, by the old scholars. The latter he'd a meeting, and the sug- gestion was taken up in a most enthu- siastic- manner. The most notable figure in the gather- ing was the veteran Rev, John Danes, of sAlltvplaca. Now 80 years of age, he was an old college chum of the Rev. John Evans. It was onlv. fit.ting that the honour of unveiling the tablet should fall 11;0 his lot, and he performed the ceremony las gracefully as could be.. I I College Chums. 1 n. the course of a short address he said he had been in close touch with the deceased since they met as boys in Car- marthen College, and they had grown up to love each other. In tho time of Mr. Evans the schoolboys were quite different to what they were at present. He referred to the sacrifice made in order to keep the children in school and to the conditions under which they had to work. Such conditions would not be tolerated to-day. Mr. Lewis Hopkin, who presided, and Mr. Henry Morgan, Trebanos, alluded to I tb. splendid work achieved by the de- ceased. Dr. William Morgan. Swansea, one of the oldest pupils, referred to the deceased as a man who was loved by everybody. He was always so kind and considerate, and the number present that day testified to the esteem and respect in which he was | held. I Reminiscences. I Mr. Morgan E. David, Glais, another old pupil, said he rejoiced that Mr. Josiah Griffiths was at the bottom of Hip movement which had brought them together that day. Reverting to the old school days, he aid he did not think any- body had more clouts than he did with the old master—(laughter)—and he had received many through the previous speaker. Dr. Morgan. (More, laughter.) Whenever there was any mischief hollt Dr. Morgan always had something to do with the engineering of the plot. (Laugh- ter) At this stage letters of apology were read from Aid. David Matthews. Morris ton: Rev. Samuel Thomas, Newmarket; Daniel Williams, Kenfig; and the Rev W. J. Rees. Alltwen. Other scholars who dwelt upon the good qualities of the deceased were Mrs. Pitt (Trebanos), David Davies (rate collector). John Hopkin (Trebanos), W. H. Thomas (Gellyjiudd), Lewis Thomas (Morrisfon). John Hopkin (Ynistawe), Rd. Morgan (Alltwen). J. G. Harries, and the Rev- H.hn Lndro (Gniigcefnparc). Others who spoke w?re the Rev. Cr?ys Williams (?vansca) and Mr Dd. l?.cdric (Clydach). I Verpes composed for the occasion had come across trio Atlantic from Dr. Dan Richards, M.B., of Scranton. Pa.. U.S.A., and thc^c were read by the chairman. Other verses were bf Mr. i fo wells, head- master Bryncoch Schools, and by the chairman.

SWANSEA FAMILYS LOSS

SWANSEA FAMILY'S LOSS. corporal Fred. U, Slater, Dragoon I Guards, a nel M rs. Jennings Slater, of 6, Town llill Villas, Swansea, have no I fewer than eightoc n relatives with the colours. Of th-ese. lour have killed, viz.: Stoker R Beddoes (brother) Privates Tho*. Oak- ley and Hudson (brothers in law), a .) (I one of the., sons, Corpl. John .Te'nnings Slater, ot the South Waifs .Borderers. Another son, Lance-Corporal I*. W. Jennings Slater has been wounded. Both were tig!ting in the Dardanelles. Carpi. Slat e r, writing home tho rl.riv hf- fore he was killed, Stoker R. Beddoes (killed). Cpl. John Jennings Slater (killed). Lance-Cpl., P. W. Jennings Slater (wounded).

LOUGHOR COLLIERS NOTICES

LOUGHOR COLLIERS' NOTICES. Notices expired on Saturday at Cae Duko Colliery. Loughor, a.nd a meeting was held regarding the dispute. Mr. W. Morgan said he could report no progress. but he mentioned the notices were not in order, and he advised the men to tender new notices of fourteen day! Mr. John Williams. M.P., endorsed wlilt Mr. Morgan had said, and if they wanted, his help they must obey the rules. It was agreed unanimously that notices he tendered again.

DOGGED BRAVERY

DOGGED BRAVERY. I SIR JOHN FRENCH'S TRIBUTE. The Press Association special corre- spondent at the British. Headquarters in trance sends the following dispatch dated June ] 8th Sir John French to-day visited the 3rd Cavalry Division a-nd personally thanked t,be mn for their gallant conduct in recent fighting. He inspected each brigade in succession, and aiter. walking down the ranks expressed his- high appreciation and thanks. for the magnifi- cent work they had done during the past three weeks in most trying circumstances. He wanted to congratulate them all moat heartily on their splendid conduct and personal gallantry. It; wa.s always a great pleasure for him to come to the oavalrv, especially when he was able to come and talk to regiments with whom he' had formerly been so closely associ- ated. They rominded him, moreover, of some of the happiest days he had spent in his life, when he was himself in thedr ranks. I Cavalry in the Trenches. He was glad to have the opportunity that day of congratulating officers, non- commissioned officers and men upon their wonderful performance in the trenches at Ypres, when they showed that cavalry could fight well in the trenches as on horseback. Trench warfare was not the work of cavalry soldiers, nor were they trained for it, yet they had shown that they were as capable in one branch of the service as in another. No gallant deeds se. r v i ee as in ano t lie r. of theirs would ever surprise him. for he knew what they* were capable of. The conditions in which they held on to trenches assigned to them were of the most arduous and trying nature, and yet not one ftian wavered, but all did their I duty without lfinching. It required far more steadfast pluck, real grit, and dogged bravery to sit still in a trench, exposed to fcicessanfc and heavy shell fire, than to jump upon a horse and charge an enemy. Yet this was what the cavalry had done. I "A Very Hot Corner." on were." continued the Field. Mar- shal, placed in a very hot corner, where, owing to continuous shelling by thenemy. it was impossible to secure adequate cover. By your steadfast-bearing in that terrible position, yoii vav, all, every regiment. added fresh lustre and still greater honour to the magnificent; records you already possess. This is what want you to remember when you think of the losses you suffered. You had some terrible experiences there, but'every regiment has covered its banner with distinction and glory. This-record I am sure you will maintain throughout the, campaign in whatever sphere of action you may be engaged." Sir John then referred to what he could only dPscribe as the "dastardly" gas attacks by the Germans at Ypres. The gas came as a bolt, from the blue I to tlHltroops in this region, and many dropped dead on the spot. It was im- I possible to see anything owing to the darkness, which was rendered still more opaque by the asphyxiating fumes. In these circumstances' a certain amount of confusion was unavoidable, but the manner in which the men behaved and the quickness with which they re- covered were superb. It was impossible to speak too highly of their conduct. The magnificent stand they made and the work they did in filling the gaps, also accomplished in the face of a wall of gas miles long and yards high, could not be too highly praised. In referring to losses the units had suffered in the fighting, the Commander- in-Chief expressed his deep sympathy with all concerned, and especially con- doled with his old regiment, which had had the misfortune to lose a very gallant and distinguished officer in Colonel Shear- man, a very old and valued friend of his IOWJI. He also sympathised with the Essex comaTi ry on the loss of Colonel Deacon, and with all other regiments whose losses were, however, only proofs of the wonder- ful example they had given of steadfast- ness under galling fire. Sir John referred to arduous work ac- complished during the capture of certain buiktings at the chateau of Hooge early in this month, and especially compli- mented the 3rd Dragoons on their work in those operations. FinaJly, Sir John congratulated the men upon the soldier-like appearance they presented on parade, which was mosit striking after all they had gone through. He said that every man looked hard and fit, and that great credit was reflected upon all ranks. He concluded by offering everyone there, officers and men, his heartiest personal thanks and admira- Lion. Before leaving the parade gronnd, the Field Marshal was greeted with three enthusiastic cheers, the men brieaking their ranks and waving thedr caps in the air. Amid the enthusiasm Sir John stood in the middle of his men. his hand raised stiffly f-o the salute and the sun glinting upon the treble line of decorations upon hi" tunic. It was an impressive picture and an apt demonstration of the perfect amity and loyalty to command that per- vades the whole Uritish Army, and which) is perhaps more'than anything else res-I ponsible for the innumerable deeds of heroism by which our men have dis- tinguished themselves, during this greatest of all

GENERAL PHILIPPS NEW DUTIESI

GENERAL PHILIPPS' NEW DUTIES.I It is understood that Major-General Ivor Philipps, D.S.O.. M.P., has been ap- pointed Joint Parliamentary Secretary ior military purposes to the Ministry of Munitions Under ordinary circumstances, General Philipps would give up his command of the Welsh Army Corps, but it is under- stood arrangements have been made for him h retain it. and that Brigadier- General Evans, now in command of the hrigadt1 at Colwyn Bay. will act for him I during bis absence.

BROTHERS liM UNIFORM

BROTHERS liM UNIFORM. Mr. and Mrs. B. A. Lewis, of Morfa House, Carmarthen, have reason to be proud of thfir-familt. The above group show6 nine of their boys wearing uni- form, some that of his Majesty's forces, and the others that of the Boy Scouts. Their names are as follow:Top row (leading from left to right): First-Lieu- tenant H. C. Lewis, 15th Service Bat- talion Welsh 1{;nJ.. J. A. Lewis, Welsh Field Co. Royal Engineero; B. D. Lewis, Scoutmaster, Launceston; .Rex Lewis, just joined the Royal Naval Division; Second-Lieutenant Alec Lewis, 15th Service Battali?D W?Ish Regiment. ?,??',Pcond row: Tudor J??'i?, Scout patrol leader; Gwynne L^wis, ordinary seaman Royal Naval Division; Eric lewis, Scout patrol leader. Seated, ui ifcnt; Teddy Leivis, Boy Scouta.

WEDDING DAY MESSAGE I

| WEDDING DAY MESSAGE I I BREACH OF PROMISE ACTION AT SWANSEA. ) The Swansea Under-Sheriff (MajoT Geo. Isaacs, who was in uniform) and a jnry were asked at the Civil Court. Swansea, to assess tho damages in an action in which Miss Jennet Loveluck, 01 Pentilla Farm. Ken- fig Hill, sued Mr. John Lewis Jcnes, farmer, of Baiden Farm, Cefn Cribbwr, fo, breach of promise of marriage. xio was claimed as special damages. 1 or. the plaintiff Mr. A. T. James (in- structed by Mr. E. E. Davies, Maesteg) appeared, and for the defence Mr. S. 11. Stockwood (Stock wood and Williams, Bridgend). Mr. James, opening, said the facts were rather pathetic. The plaintiff was 27 years of age and lived at home with her father, who was about 80 years of age. Her mother was dead. Lewis, 33 or 34 years of' age, was also a farmer, he and his brother controlling three farms. The parties had known each other from child- hood, and from WTJiitsun, 1909, had been recognised as sweethearts. In January, 1912, defendant promised marriage, and relying on that there were relations, as the result of which twins were born in September. They died. The marriage was arranged for the 21st November, the banns were put in, she purchased clothes, aftd on the day, when she and her sister were leaving for Bridgend, registry office for the marriage, there was a message from the defendant that he was not going to turn up. 5 Plaintiff became Terr seriously ill, and had never been the saine since. The dis- appointment and the shady trick of the defendant, rather played on her mind, and her physical-'health bad been affected. Shortly after he promised to put in tne bancs again, but he did not. They con- tinued t'o meet. She gave birth to another child in February; 19U, and this was still alive. When1 she issued a summons at Aberavdn Police Court, defendant made an agreement to pay 4s. weekly in respect of it. Plaintiff gave evidence in which she said brothers had 210 acres of land and much stock. Mr. Stockwood, in cross-examination, put in the will of defendant's father to show that, by it his mother being etill alive, he would, if he married in November, 1912, get only CIO. Have you suffered anything by his not marrying you in N--o. vember. 1914; no great catch was he: asked Mr. Stock- wood.. No answer -,m as returned. NQ witnesses were called for tjse d&- Stockwood argued that it was strange that the action was in re- spect ot a promise made nearly three years ago. In 1912 defendant was QnlyPa farm labourer; henoe plaintiff had lost a young man whose only qualifications were for farm labouring, and whose sole capital was then lit). From the fact that defendant had not had the pluck to-face any of the proceedings, he asked the jury to say that, both on the ground of meat Li and of personality the plainitff had lost nothing. Mr. James contended that Mr. Stock- wood had misled the jury and read por- tions of the will to show that the receiv- ing of the S10 under j1; by defendant on marriage would not debar him from his share in the estate when his mother died. The jury awarded plaintiff 970 damages and judgment was entered accordingly.

SWANSEA SOLDIERS SURPRISEI VISIT HOME

SWANSEA SOLDIER'S SURPRISE I VISIT HOME. Everybody in Bathurst street possessing flags dis- played them on Friday morning as a welcome to a young soldier-pte, Lewis Thomas (1st Devons), son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas, do without warn- ing, walked into his home at No. 5, on Thursday even- ing, convalescent from woundis re- ceived in Flanders. Thomas" was one of a large number of Young, fellows, all under 19, who enlisted on Sept. 2. He had been a. locomotive driver with Messrs. Powlfesland and Mason, and has two bro- thers in the Arrny--Oliver.in the Sixth Welsh, home for some weeks with dam aged leg muscles, and John, in trainidg with the 3rd Devons. Lewis had abo.it four months at the front, for he left England on 22nd Dec. and was wound ed bv shrapnel in both legs on April 19th: Since then he has been in hospital at Poole, Dorset, and is now on seven days' leave. i i

A SWANSEA HEROI

A SWANSEA HERO. I Private David Lewis. 1st Batt Welsh Fusiliers, who has been killed in action in France. He joined the Army in August, and was wounded just before Christmas. Deceased lived at 48, Pentre Estyll. Swan sea, and for- merly worked at Dillwyn's Spelter Works, Morriston.

CARMARTHENSHIRE FARMER I FtNEDJEM

CARMARTHENSHIRE FARMER FtNEDJEM. A heavy penalty was inflicted by the Cardiff stipendiary (Mr. T. W. Lewis) in a case in which Howell Evans, Cwmdwyfran farm, Banyfelin. Carmarthenshire, was summoned for sending under contract to a customer at Cardiff- milk which upon analysis was found,to be deficient in butter fa,t to the extenVof 12 per cent. Mr. Howell Davies defended. The wife of defendant., who declared that the milk was placed in a churn in exactly the saml" state as it came from the cows, stated, in cross-examination by Mr. F. W. Ensor, that she could not account for the deficiency except in-this way—that when the cows were ijrst turned out the milk became poorer. The Stipendiary Knowing that it would bcomf": poorer, did you give them any extra fèeding-stuffs: Witness: -No. because: we hadn't got any. Previous convictions at Swansea were j admitted, and 'the magistrate imposed a fine of 9.50, or three months, nil.-

FRUIT CROPS IN SOUTH BRITTANYI

FRUIT CROPS IN SOUTH BRITTANY. The Board of Agriculture and Fisheries i have received from his Majesty's Con- sular Agent at. Ijorient a report on the fruit crops in the Morbihan Department. I An abundant, crop of cider apples is ex- pected, and in view of the stocks of old cider it is not probable that prices will exceed 50s. per ton. William pears will be more or less abundant, according to locality, and a certain amount may be available for expnrt. Tible apples promse well. It is too early to give quotations, but they are expected to be a bout „ £ 5 to £ 6 5s. per ton. according to quality. Chestnuts promise an abundant yield. The cultivation of. strawberries has considerably developed around Vannes. and some hundred- weights will be shipped daily to Eng- land 'front .hmp till September. Cherriee are a fairly big crop. It should be pos- sible to export some quantity of the early jjk^nds of plunak and greengages*

Advertising

   Save Your Money By placing your Orders /aVi in the hands of ?M ?< ? t    ?e???? f??     ??"??? well-known and 0/?-M??/?? .?  Cl?? ? ?0?"?? of every I ?Y??M   ? ^^requlsiteforFurDish' ?' .?«h \??? ??"?m this part of the  ?'    ?°'"°—— Everything at Rock Bottom Pr i ces. I ???? 4??' ?4 y -??? Catalogues Gratis. Free Delivery up to ?00 ? ????? ? ????'? miles from aU of the Firm's numer'ot,,s Braiiches. ?????? Term? Cash, or generous arrangements for Credit. jJ ??? Train .Fares Paid.

GENERAL PICTON

GENERAL PICTON. Carmarthen Honours the Memory of i.ts Hero. Born at Poyetob, in Pembrokeshire, General Sir Thomas Picton, who "died gloriously" at. Waterloo, the centenary of which historical event is celebrated throughout the country Saturday spent great deal of his time at lscoed, the family scat at Ferryside, and was closely associated with the Borough of Carmar- then. To mark the hundredth anniver- sary of Waterloo, a. very interesting pro- gramme was gone through at the county town to-day. The chief actor in the day's proceedings was Lieut.-Generai Sir James Hills-Johoes, V.C., G.C.B., who | deposited wreaths on monuments and various other places in the town and neighbourhood associated with the memory of Waterloo. At noon, Sir James deposited a wreath in Abergwili cm. the tomb of Capt. Gri&- mond Philipps, Royal Welsh Fusilierh. from his daughter. Mrs. -Fred Edwards. The gallant general then motored to St. Peter's Church, Carmarthen, where under the colours of the Royal Wlsh Fusiliers hanging in this sacred fane, he placed a wreath presented by the children of Priory-street School. The next. place visited was St. David's Churchyard, where the equire of Dolau- cothi deposited a wreath on the grave of Private John Samuel, an old Waterloo veteran. This wreath was given by the children of Model School. A wreath presented by the pupils of Pentrepoeth School was then placed by Sir Jamee'under Sir Martin SheaWf; por- trait. of General Picton in the Guild- hall. Here the Mayor and Corpora- of Carmarthen attended to receive the distinguished freeman of the borough. Later. Sir James attended Llantlwch Church, and on tbe grave of Capt. D. J. Edwardes, Royal Horse Artillery, who fought at Waterloo, de- posited wrAaths-one sent by the regi- ment and the other sent by Lady Rille- Johnes, who is a relative of the late Captain Edwardee. On his way to Llanllwch Church, the gallant general put a wreath on Picton's monument in the town. The Boy Scouts and the school chil- dren took part in the proceedings, and a number of soldiere stationed in the towns attended. The various ceremonies were witnessed by crowds of people. Almost the only actual happening in connection with tiie Waterloo centenary will be the Duke of Wellington's anni- versary visit to the King. According to the strict legal theory, if the Duke does I not pay rent, in the shape of a small flag, by twelve o'clock on Waterloo Day, he will lose his eetate of, Strathfieldsaye, which he holds from the Crown in con- sideration of this annual payment. The flag is a Napoleonic tricolour, and it is placed over the bust of the Iron Duke in the State. guard-Toom at Windsor Castle. This time next year the centenary flag will become the perquisite of some member of the- Boyal Household. The whole ceremony is really a senti- mental formality, for Strathifeld-saye was purchased by the Iron Duke out of the vast sums that were given to him by a grateful nation. It is a very old Hamp- shire property, chiefly remarkable for its Wellington and Waterloo relics and asso- ciation's. The bed on which the Iron Duke slept is there, also the grave of Copenhagen, the charger ridden by Well- ington through the entire day of Water- loo. There, too, are the keys of Madrid, surrendered to the great soldier by the citizens. The baggage captured from Prince Joseph Bonaparte is in the house, as well as a lovely Sevres dinner service specially ordered by Napoleon to cele- brate his Egyptian campaign, and given to Wellington Louis XYIlI.

PONTAROULAIS DOCTORSI FUNERAL

PONTAROULAIS DOCTOR'S FUNERAL. The remains of the late Mr. David Griffiths. J.P., The Hollies, Pontar- dulais, were on Thursday conveyed to Llangranog. Cardiganshire, for inter- ment. A short service was conducted at the house by the Pvr. W. C. Morgan, B.A.. vicar of Pontardulais, who was as- sisted by the Kev. George Williams (B.), and other ministers were the Revs. Iiemuel Jones (C.M.), Goppa: Jonathan Richards (curate). and J. Jore&, St. David's Church. Hendy. The chief mourners were: rii W. C, Griffiths (brother); Messrs. Evan Wil- liams, J.P.. Glyndwr; Henry Williams, Llwyn Gwarn; Llewelyn John. Dafen. Amongst the general public were: Aid. Rees Harries. J.F., Messrs. Samuel Wil- liams, J.P.. John Williams, J.P., H. C" Bo ugh ton Lloyd. Henry Jones. George White (Lliw Fotge), Supt. Letheren (Gowerton), Messrs. D. P. Griffiths (Teilo). Arthur E. Williams, John Griffiths and. David Rees ^Clayton). D. Griffiths (headmaster), D. J. Morgan anti i W. 1. Griffiths (Glynhir). Parry Rey- nolds, Wra. Jones (Trade Hall), Daniel Morgan, W. D. James (postmaster) G. Digby Bayliss, David Bonnell. Rhydwin Davies, etc. The bearers were Messrs. Evan Morgan. Thomas Griffiths, D. John Griffiths, An<=urin White. Peter Downing, and Edward Mathias. The funeral ar- rangements were carried out hy Messrs. D. C. Jofies and Co.. Swansea, and Mr. John Gregory, Pentrebach.