Teitl Casgliad: Herald of Wales

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 4 o 12 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
21 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
THE RIGHT TO SUE

THE RIGHT TO SUE. AMMANFORU MAGISTRATES AND A GERMAN LADY'S ACTION. An application was made at the Ammanford Police Court on Monday by Mrs. Oehler, The Square, against Thos. Da vies, the tenant of a house owned by her in Pantyifynon. Mr. T. M. Evans al)- peared for applicant. The presiding magistrate (Mr. David Richards) observed that Mrs. Oehler was a German, and therefore the position was a very queer one. Mr. Evans pointed out that the plain- tiff's right to apply in the court had not been interfered with at all. There had been no new enactment made dealing with Germans. Mr. Richards said they vera living in very abnormal times and, that being 60, he thought they had a right to ask Mr. Evans to have the application adjourned until the war is over. Mr. Evans: May I point out the serious hardship which that does to my client? Mr. Richards: You know, Mr. Evans, bow these Germans are treating this! country. We know that Mrs. Oehler mar- ried a German, and she has made herself German in that way. II Curtailed Liberties. Mr. Evans contended that he did not see why, while there wa.- no enactment on the Statute Book, hr should be deprived of her rig1'' Witli all respects to i lie Bon ,('1 t that he must How- ever abnormal ti,, times might be they were uot justified in overlooking the provisions of the law as they stood. The Chairman replied that the liberty of Germa.no in this country had been limited in many ways already, tnd *if was done in one direction it could be done in another. Mr. Evans: It may, but it is not. The Chairman said t.his was the first case he had heard (,f, Lnd he would be very glad if Mr. Evans a to an adjournment for a week, so that they might be able to look into t.he position. Mr. Evans: Ob. yes. I will agree to an adjournment, for a week, but not until thtt und of the war. The Chairman: It may He until the end of the war afterwards. (Laughter.) The case was accordingly adjourntd for a week.

MOBILISING OUR SCIENTISTS I

MOBILISING OUR SCIENTISTS. I Very welcome, if belated, news was fciven 

SEQUEL TO A SWANSEA GROCERS FAILURE

SEQUEL TO A SWANSEA GROCER'S FAILURE. William Morris, grocer, of Thomas- &tr«et, St. Thomas, Swansea, the I judgment debcor in au interpleader; ic.tion at the Swansea COJoty'('ourt oj Monday. Mr. Da.'il Jones, financier, Swansea, for whom Mr. E. J. Hinds ap- peared, claimed on a bill of sale against en execution levied on defend- ant's stock-in-tradel by Messrs. Peak, Ftean and Co., biscuit manufacturers, in satisfaction of a judgment debt. Defendant 6aid he borrowed t.30 from daima"ht in April, and gave him a bill at sale on his stock-in-trade. The bill [ov?cpd all the goods whi?h wer? ?narked "D.J. claimant'3 initials. I Quectiou?d by Mr. Trevor Hunter (instructed by Mr. J. D. Rawiin,), whol &pp?red for the execution creditors, de- fendant admitted he gave Messrs. Peek, Frean a cheque which was dishonoured at the bank, and he arranged for the hill of we on the same day that he re- ceived a letter from them stating that the "usual steps will be taken/* His ob- ject in executing the bill of fiale was to get ready money, and not to defeat his' creditors. His weekly turnover was £, He put "DJ." on the goocia before the bill of sale was executed. The reoeipt for the bill of sale was not produced, and bis. Honou f insisted on this being done, remarking "Every docu- ment must ba produced. Receipts are given so that they may be produced in a court of law N Mr. Trevor Hunter here raised an ob- jection to the validity of the bill of sale, on the ground that the description of the chattels was not specific enough. His Honour eventually upheld the ob- jection, and gave judgment for the execu- tion creditors with costs

CARMARTHENSHIRE FUNERALI

..CARMARTHENSHIRE FUNERAL. I The funeral of Alderman &. W. Stephens, I.P., Coedybrain, Llandyfeilog, a well-known agriculturist. and public man, took place on Saturday. The Key. R. R. Thontfte, pastor of Salem Baptist Church, Ferry aide, conducted a service at the house, and the Vicar (Rev. Thomas Jonee) and the Rev. Irtris Roberts (curate) officiated at Llandyfeilog Parish Church. The chief mourners were:—Mr. Evan Stephens, Llan- stephan (brother); Mias NeUie Stephmm, LJanstephan; Mre. Davies, the Miesea Davies, and Mr. D. Daviee, London House, Kidwelly; Messrs T. B. Stephens, London Gravel, Pontyberem; John Williams, T. E. WUliauka. Gletwyn: John Williams, Trmawr; John Jones, Pas. Ferryside; Wm. JOneB. Rotten Pill; Thomas Thomas, Cwm, Ferryside; Richard Edwards, Cardiff; Mrs. Moeee. Coed, ami Mrs. Thomas, Coedybrain. Among the general mourners were Messrs. Barratr. Evans, J.P., Llnnstophan; J. Lloyd Thomas. J.P Tanlan Harris, Glyn, Lla.n- stephan; Gomer Henry (Conaty Council sur- veyor); J. G. Anthony, Kidwelly; Rev. D. Ed- wards, LIandyfeilog; Mr. Eees, TNantilain; and the deacons of Coedybrain Baptist Chyrch.

THE WELSHMAN WINS

THE WELSHMAN WINS. There was an inter-regimental athle ie sports meetingvpn an extensive scale at Caterham on SaNirdav with the com- bined efforts of the Grenadiers, Cold- streams, Scots, Irish, and Welsh'Guards, and the 17th (S) Battalion Royal Fusi- liers and the 16th (S") Battalion Middle- sex Regiments. Sergeant T. L Henton I added to the he has scored since his attachment to the Welsh Guards by capturing the sprint. In this event he beat Private W. Efleson (16th Middlesex- Regiment), an old Highgate Harrier, 1 y ) J

j HAIL AUSTRALIA 1

j HAIL, AUSTRALIA 1 ——— « .——— HIGH PRAISE FOR CORNSTALKS. (Passed by Censor). Bow nearly seven hundred mfacd death, mute and firong, how in the horrible presence of the mojt awful calamity they grimly and resolutely pirrsned their duties. and when the time came to leap into the water ?. t>und them. they leapt bravely, without a cry. from the shin that few minutes previous had been floating in majestic splendour on the ocean waves; that was the story told to a Daily Leader" reporter by Gunner Page, of the Majestic, who wis on board the ill-frited battleship, when. at the break of dawn on May 27th, she went down to the bottom of the toea six minutes after having been &truck by a German torpedo. Gunner Page had been expected home daily for the last le,, day?, and on Wednes- day night, when be did eventually a five, a right royal welcome was extended to bim. The houses in the vicinity of his 57. Carmarthen-road, w.e-j gaily deco-i.:ed with flags and buntinar, and some jarmlee^ humorist had seen fit to place a h.fe-fize figure of the famous Charles Chaplin in a point of vantage. Gunner Page, at the out- sec of the interview he was good enobgh to grant us, expressed his gratitude to the neighbours for the reception aooorJod him, j while he was not lie mindful of the kindness of Mr. Wm. Law, of the Swansea Ilnrbour Trust, who had interested himself HI tl c brave man's family. How Britons Face Death. Gunner Page did not see that there was anything worthy of especial note in t:e sinking of the Majestic. All of ns." i e said. knew the minute the ship was struck that she was doomed. She heeled over -it cnee in an alarm it; fashion till she li4d, a lift of about 45 degrees to port." "Was there no parie:" queried the press- man, Gunner Page smiled grimly, a half-con- temptuous smile. Don't forget." he said, the boat wis manned by British sailors, every lad of them a Briton. What need wa.s tberc of a panic? We knew siie was doomed, and we all knew th it we had nothing to do but jump for it and swim for our livea as besl we could." But there mnst have been some excite- ment?" suggested th'j writer. I "Well, if you were there, you would nc-i-er fox-get it. The infernal instant when submarines, aeroplanes, oinnon, and quick- firing gans vrere dealing death right a.nd left, everywhere was a bit exciting, but when you are practioally f.Cc to face with death you can't think of those things. Nearly all of U8 had lifebelts on. and those who did net should have and them." How long were you in the watarl" "About t qna,rter of an hour. The French trawlers that were lying' near were quickiy on the scene, and with various other, boats were pretty smart in rescuing us." Gunner Pace went on to describe the bombardmeat cf the Dardanellee, but opuid not say that there wae anything in .A ..Io warrant it being called oxciting. He -sail! the Majestic arrived there in February, and until April they were busy shelling the forts. Brilliant Seamanship. I You may have heard a great deal," he said, about the markmanship of. the enemy. I can't 8nk with any amount of decision on the point, but 1 can say this, that to the brilliant manoeuvring of our officers can be attributed the low casualties we suffered. The Turks were never allowed to and the target, and on our boat onl^ tfco men were killed and nine injured during the bombardment. It W.1.a the crew of the Majestic that landed the first party of soldiers on the ooast, and in this connection Gunner Page enthusiastic in his appreciation of the gal- lantry of the Australian soldiers, who formed the first landing party. I can't find a word to explain it," he said. 'mustard' isn't half hot enough; t" ey were aheotuteiy it.' Of course, the m

THE TWO SIDES I

THE TWO SIDES. I At Swansea Police Court on Monday, Rose Beatrice Sharp summoned Karl Btotasle, a Belgian spelterman, for as- sault. Mr. W. 1'. Thomas defended. Complainant s story was that she went to defendant's house, and he beat her afid draned her from one room bo another by her hair. There was so much traffic outside that no one heard her cries. Defendant told her that he would treat her as the Germans were doing. 'I Mr. Thomas, (,r the defendant, said the complainaat knocked at his door for fully half-an-hour. Complainant de- manded a shilling from Mrs. Brotle, who, being afraid, gave it to lier. Com- plainant then snatched Mrs. Brotasle's pLrse. Defendant came in and led her out through the back door. gin ro. tuined twice, and defendant had to put her out through ?he front door.  Defendant's wife entered the box to give evidence, but as no interpreter was present the case had to be adjourned for a week.

WELSH VICAR AND SLACKERS 1

WELSH VICAR AND "SLACKERS." 1 An extraordinary passage appears in I Pontlottyn Church Magazine for this month from the pen of the Vicar (the Ilev. G. A. Williams). It is as follows:-— "During the concert held at St. Mary s Church, Fochriw, the performers did their parts right well, wheh the be- haviour of not a few is taken into con- sideration. They were not aided by the patriotic enthusiasm which characterised the Pontlottyn concerts. This is not to be wondered at, for, if report be true, there are more 'slacksrs' in Fochriw than in any other village in the parish of Pontlottyn, yea, the civil parish of Gelligaer. Methinks that twelve months in khaki would tend to civilise not a few who are over-endowed with animal spirits." Remarks were also passed at a recent Gelligaer Council meeting by the Rev. Canon T J. Jones and Mr. W. Ham- monds. Tirpliil, about the "duckera" at

THE QHAIRED SARD t

• THE QHAIRED SARD. t PQNTARDAWE EISTEDDFOD I WINNERS. Thousands of keen ciat4z6ddfodwyr from all over the Swansea district at- I tended the fourth .é\ n h:b.al clíair eistedd- fod held at Pontardawc on Saturday. There was a lirge numt)i--r of-' entries, and the competitions were of aft exceed- ingly keen character. The conductor and literary adjudica- tor war,, the Rev. Dyfhallt Owen, Car- marthen; adjudicators of music, Messrs. T. IIopKin Evans, Neath, and W. J. EvanF, Aberdare; recitations, Mr. J. J. WilliamSj Trebanos. The aecompanists wetfe Messrs. Aneurin lims, F.K.C.O., and Isaac Hopkin, Trebanos. The chief officials were: Chai rman of; Eistedfod Committee, Mr. F. IV., J.P.; viee-chairmau, Air. John Edwards; treasurer, Mr. W. II, Thomas, Gelly- i mudd; general secretaries, Messrs. Mor- gan Jones and W. Thompson Davies. Mrs. Gough, of Yniscedwyn, presided at the afternoon session, and delivered a short address. Mr, John Ildwards pre- (tided at the evening session' in the ab- seuce^f Mr John Williams, M.V. .Vtaiioforte solol, uudet 12: 1, EHzabetJi Ann. l)a vies, Lan dore; -C.Areline James, I Yn"&Dludw. Girl's solo, tindor 12: 1, Edna How el Is, Birchgrove; 2, Irene Owen, Llansamlet. I Pianoforte solo, under 15: 1, Dilys I Davies, Plasmarl; 2, divided IxStwecn Irene Ashford and Elsie Thomas, Bryn- I hyfryd. Boy's solo: J, David Thomas Jones, Ynystawe; 2, Ivor Jones, Colbren. Recitation for boys: 1, Morgan Rees Roberts, Glanamman; 2, Hy. Clement, Trebanos. Girl's reei4«»tibtt: 1, Cwdelia Roberta, Glntuvmnian. • Violin solo. open: Vivian Graham, Ystradgynlais. Contmlfo solo: )f-is5 M. L. Williams. Sit. Thomas, Swansea. Soprano solo: Miss M. H. Thomas, Pl-asmarl, Swansea. Englyn: En'xdi Richards (Ap Per- llanog, Clydach). Poem: Ellis Evaftu, Trawsfynydd, North Wales. The Rev. Roland Evans, of Ynismeudwv, was chaired in the absence of the winner. Juvenile choir competition; l, Britoft- ferry; 2, (larnant. Essay; Divided between-the Rev. E. T. Evrans. North Wales, and G. E. Williams. Llanelly. Baritone solo: Gwilym Jones, Ystrad- gyillais. 0 Tenor solo: W. H, Rees, Gowerton. Recitation (open): Miss M. J. Francis, Godrc'rgraig. Duet: Messrs., H, Thomas and D. H. Evans, Fforestfach. I Double quartet: Ystradgynlais. Mixed choirs: Gowerton. v Male vdicp Divided between Graigcefn- ^r

TABERNACLE CYMANFA I I I

TABERNACLE CYMANFA. ? I Annual Coaference at Morriston. The Ol4, ^S^rrfhfte' Htm- T he 0 1 day 11)d itjs Slirt annual cymanfa ganu en Sunday. Thepe were three meet- ings, at each of which the new- paatpr (the Rev. J. J. Williams) presided. r. John Davies. Peqtrepoeth. conducted, and Miss T. J. Davies, Mojrfydd House, played the organ. lu the mooni-lig the choir sarig "Y Drig- fan Deg and "Cawn Fyn'd Adref Fory," and the pastor addressed the children on -"Yf Yagol Sul." '^he programme of-J the-aTteirnoOli ser- vice was provided yolinger scholars, tie MIotfiBg "iaking i>art:— Miss Mary Davies, Miss Casteie Row- lands, Mias Blodwen Jones. Miss Myria Davies, Misses Lilian Rees and Katie Lewis, Masters John Joseph Morgan, J. E. Davies, Bertie Jones, Harold Evans, and Harold Charles. The evening service was opened with prayer by Mr. Morgan J. Phillips. Enthused by the crowded congregation in the large building, the choir was at its best in Awn i Bethania," Mi-,ddylisu anr y. Nefoedds" and- "Awn yn Mlaen." Male Vtsioes $ing 0 her yn y man. Solos and recitations were 'given by Misses Gwladys Morgan, Iris Thomas. A. Morgan, Daisy Herbert. Louise Savage, Sarah Davies, and Morfydd Rowlands, Masters Trevor John, Willie Evans, Rd. Davies, and Sidney R. Davies. Each of the three services was well at- tended, that of the evening specially so.

PRACTICAL SUBJECTS IN SCHOOLSI

PRACTICAL SUBJECTS IN SCHOOLS. I A conference of head teachers of the county and members of the Carmarthen- shire Education. Comnprittee ,wa

WAS IT HIS BROTHERt J

WAS IT HIS BROTHERt > J A remarkable, story was told at the Old Bailey on Saturday, when a man de-! scribed as Percy George Frederick Peters (28), labourer, was indicted for bigamy. I It was stated prisoner in 1912 married Ella Clements, and in April this year he I married Lucy McKellow. His real name was Percv ,but he had endeavoured to pass himself oft as hiS brother" IlarWI-RA now dedlared it was his stap-brother who joiarriod Ella Clemeata*

IN THE WAR ZONE I

IN THE WAR ZONE. MR. BEN TILLETT'S IMPRESSIONS OF THE STRUGGLE. A graphic description of war, as it ig I being fought to-day just beyond sight and] sound of these islands in Northern France and Belgium, was contributed to Sun- day's issue of the Sunday Times" by Mr. Tillett, the well-known labour leader, who has had special opportunities of watching the titanic struggle at close quarters during a three weeks' visit to the war zone. All wars are barbarities. This war is a Hell thrpw'n in, adding to the barbari- ties of war a crescendo of horror. What- ever sympathies or preconceptions one may have had regarding the maintenance of war from the purely national stand- point, the realities of this* war bring an qntirely new view-point independent of previous imaginings. One feature Ulat almost oppress one in realising war in its actualities is the sumenA," and the ugliness, the sheer monotony of trench fighting. Trench fight- ing is relentless war. Nothing but ten- sion and streruousness, keeping men on their nerves all the time, compelling a vigilance and watchfulness day and night. Another characteristic of this war Is the absence of panic. Children play in fieldf; ploughed by the shells of the enemy, the women work, men walk and ride an d drive I through positive hails of shell. The then sit grimly and sternly in the trenches or in places w here they can observe the enemy, sometimes seeing, bnt always knowing, that a shell may burst at any moment in the trench or dug-ont, bringing in its train death and destructiveness to any one of them. What a Trench is Like. I Can my readers imagine what a trench is like Will they think of the grave that perhaps covers one of their dear ones fallen in the war. Extend this grave for miles and the elongated grave will give a conception of what the trenchc-4 are like. There arc dug-outs, little niches for rest- ing, little platforms for the observation of the enemy and the direction of fire, but all the time the elongated grave yawns near, offering shelter, shelter that can- not always offer any other shelter than the end of all. A huge shell may blow the trench Und its iiihabilaiits into the air. making of it a sheer chitem lined with tangled flesh and blood, the sacrifice to the Moloch of Militarism Modern warfare is determined by artil- lery efficiency or deficiency. Shells, shells, and again shells, to protect our trenches, to save worthy lives, to give men contend- ing with bullet and bayonet shelter when charging against the serried masses of the enemy, an enemy protected by efficient artillery, with a trenmendotw supply of ammunition. The fighting is just Hell and, if the Germans can raise a bigger Hell than we can, not even the greater courage of our men can avail I have heard no single whine or grumble so far as the actualities of battle, its risks and sacrifice*, its tragedies and suffering are concerned. I have travelled some 2,000 miles, struggled and elbowed my way through some twenty miles of trenches, been to within 400 yards of a most formidable German position; have even witnessed two fights in the air. I have seen terfifio bombardments by artillery, and have, seen llong traiiifi pi wpunded en route This is not a spectacular war, it is a war of doggedness, pluck, and resource, a war of energy maintained through all the nerve-breaking monotony of daily watchfulness against death. And through its horror shines the silent courage, the stoic calm of the wounded, going back with their poor battered and lacerated bodies, smiling at the thought of ,duty done. What can-1 say hut tbat proud of but tha.t of the officers d men who are fighting for the very'M?tenc?'of bii nAff6w and our country? These men are doing OUT work cheerfully and willingly, realising that they risk their lives every day, seeing the tragedy of it all, and yet facing it with courage. What can we say, what can we feel, what can we do but bow our beads in gratitude, for our mouths but mumble futile wo-dq to these Titans of a great destiny. We must feel within ourselves a, Spiritual, feeling oftrra.tihel a. spiritual awafojung la theactJhatcountry aw,a] L-e-u 't. o  t' h e ve4 ?, that can,brooct sveh, men as these must hallow its destiny, express it in a sar-i-ifice of equal-magnitude, express it by equal loyalty and an equal determination to dare and to do. This war depends to a great extent on transport. Transport is second only to artillery. The internal combustion engine, rapid locomotion by rail and ship, the motor-car, the motor cycle, the aeroplane, all the means of transporting men, guns, and munitions, play their part, and com- pare "with the ••achievements ^of other countries. The raen, rajfk and file, officers, staff, in their nubility, their chivalry and devotion, bring a spirit of reverence to T hw-- i r one' who sees it at first 'hand. camaraderie in the face of. death is the expression of a great human brotherhood, and from general to private there is no regret except that the war is.

OLD LLANELLY DISPUTE SETTLED1

OLD LLANELLY DISPUTE SETTLED? 1 The longstanding dispute between the Llaaelly Harbour Trust and Messrs. Waddell and Sox*wkith t'involves some thousands of j^onnds, has; judging by the printed minutes of a private meeting of the Harbour Trust, an amicable settle- ment in sight. The terms which have not yet been disclosed to the public are to be submitted to the next meeting of the Cor- poration, after which they will have to be approved by the ratepayers. The printed minute relating to the terms of the proposed settlement reads:- "The Vice-Chairman placed before the Trust the present position and read the correspondence which had taken place without, prej udice between him and Mr. Waddell. It was proposed by the Chair- man (Mr. Dan Williams), seconded by Mr J. John, and resolved that the Har- bour Trust approve the provisional terms of settlement arranged between the Vice- Chairman and Messrs. Waddel, the same to cover all outstanding matters and also all accounts between the Trust on the one side and Messrs. Waddell arid the Usn- elly and Mynydd Mawr Railway Co. on the other, up to the 30th June, 1914, in- cluding the purchase of the stages, the cancelling of the lease of 1882 and the future position of Messrs. Waddell and the Mynydd Mawr Co., as regards the use of the North Dock."

THE INDIAN WHEAT COMMITTEEI

THE INDIAN WHEAT COMMITTEE. I The President of the Board of Agriculture I and Fisheries has re-appointed as follows the Indian Wheat Committee, appointed by I his predecessor, to supervise the arrange- ments in this country connected with the so heme introduced by a notification of the Government of India, dated 25th March, 1915, for the shipment cf v;lv.6at from India to the United United Kingdom on Government aocou.it: The Rigrht Hon. F.' D. Acland, M.P. (Parlia- mentary Secretary to tho Board of Agri- culture and Fisheries), chairman; Mr. B. H. Rew, C.B. (Board of Agriculture and Fisheries), deputy chairman; Mr. J. M. Keynes (H.M. Treasury), Sir George Sa't- mareh (The Baltic), Sir Lionel Abrahams, K.C.B. (India Office), Mr. T. H. Middleton, I C.B. (Board of Agriculture and Fisherios), Mr. J. A. Hubback (Indiai Office), and Mr. H. D. Vigor (Board of Agriculture and Fisheries), secretary.

No title

It is reported tftom Fl6¥ehce that ten I lads have run away from a Florenco r- plianage to go to the Irvnts

I MEAT PRICESi

MEAT PRICES. I. WHAT THE" RïNG" MEANS. The editor Of the" Herald of Wales aske me whetiier there is a meat ring," whether this affects the prices people have to pay for meat, and whether prices may be expected to go higher. I will answer the last question first, Prioes will go up, and up—unless a littll.: common sense is shown and unless the food supplies of the civil population is made a matter of organisation. They have been organised so far as military and naval requirements are concerned. in fact they have been so perfectly or- ganised that there is nothing to complain about, But civil needs have been rele- gated to the remotest background. In ordinary times laws of suppty and demand govern, and direct, the channels through which life necessaries flow to the mar- kets. The first and paramount demanu now is for the men under arms. They have to lie served first. Quite, rightly. But the wants of the civil population need not have been utterly lost sight of, as they have been, and as they would not have been had the powers that be but thought of orgainsation at the onset. This leads to an answer to the first ques- tion. By the meat ring," of which there is 130 much talk, is probably meant the American Beef Trust which controls the meat supplies from South America. Be it borne in mind that in this article I do not propose to deal with home' supplies, the imported article being the great fac- tor in the matter of prices. It is obvious quotations for home produce would have to come down if, say, chilled beef, from the Argentine, or frozen from Australasia, fell 30 per cent, in value. I! But the operations of any Meat Trust have been crippled, if not rendered alto- gether inoperative, by the action of the ¡ Board of Trade in commandeering all the refrigerating shipping—except that of one line tied up by contracts—a fact that goes to- prove that We really can do ) something when we are kicked into doing it. Only by that one line of steamers referred to could a Meat Trust send its meat to these shores unless they offered reasonable terms to our Govern- ment. The practical outstanding fact now is that the Government is the only real meat importer, at the present time, in this country. It is assisted by a com- mittee of gentlemen who know the im- ported meat trade from top to bottom. This committee, fully acquainted with the supplies available, and with the needs of our Allies, for we supply them largely too, determines what quantity of meat, after military requirements are met, can be released for ordinary market requirements. Here comes the trouble. Fighting men want beef. And beef they will have. Before the war the British soldier was so averse to eating mutton that the authori- ties had dropped calling for tenders for it, at any rate as far as the frozen article is concerned. So much beef being needed, up goes its price. Other meats follow suit. And the lifting process is aided by the comparatively small quan- tities set free for public use. Release larger quantities, and prices will go down. Are these bigger supplies available? That they are, and that the 6uffting, at present being under- gone is to an appreciable extent avoidable I propose to show. At the present moment we are faced with the fact that no lees than 3,000 cheap butchers have had to shut up shops because they have had no cheap meat to sell. This means that the poorer classes have suffered more than words can tell. It is all very well to ad- vise people to eat less meat. That is not going to cure the evil. If, instead of giving such advice, the Government sought a little of it in the right quarter, they might come to the, conclusion, that the present state of ings might, be materially alte'rM "for' lltfJ 'ben.(>r,' If people are to eat less meat, the figure of 3,000 closed butchers' shops is going to lie added to. And the Board of Tr4de Bankruptcy Department is going to be busier than ever. Two needs stand out. Supplic-s.for the civil population must be organised, as they are for military and naval purposes. And methods of distribution must be de- centralised. To take the last proposition first. Again I point out that I am re- ferring to overseas supplies, which are practically controlled, as far as the Argentine is concerned, bv our Govern- ment, and, as far as Australasia goes, bv the Australasian Governments, who hold all meat stocks at the disposal of our Government. The initial problem is- (1), sea transport; and (2), rail trans- port. Now we have had for months ships locked up in certain ports; for instance, London and Liverpool, congesting those ports, with refrigerating machinery kept running for weeks longer than would have been the case had the cargoes been -discharged with ordinary celerity, the ships themselves being kept for weeks waiting for discharge when they could have been on their way to get fur- ther supplies. All these delays meaning the worthless waste of the silver bullets which Mr. IJoyd George says are neces- sary to winning the war ana also adding to the cost of the goods to the consumer. The total of muddle, selfishness, and loss due to this is really appalling. In Lon- don, vessels, by the dozen, have been kept waiting for weeks, while in Liver- pool last Friday 44 vessels were waiting for berths. Those who gave out this in- formation added with glee that there was a decrease of 14 on the week as if it were (something to be proud of. As to London I open my note book and take the first entry I come across. It refers to a steamer from Australia, loaded with food products. She lay in London over a month before she broke bulk in respect of the consignment to which the entry refers. It was rabbits. The entry shows that a considerable part of the shipment was discharged putrid, and that 70 per cent, of another was damaged by mould to such an extent that an allow- ance of 408. per case had to be made— that 4s. would mean 2d. per rabbit. What about silver bullets? I quite, admit there might have been damage had there not been this delay. But the strong pre- sumption is that it was caused by the delay. In any case the goods were not improved. The question I ask is whY" theJlle things should occur through vessels being hung up at Liverpool and London when they could have got berths and speedy dis- charge at Swansea, Cardiff, Avonmouth, or a dor/en other places? Dock people from the provinces tell me London and Liverpool won't let the vessels go else- where because of the fear of losing trade permanently. Then compel them. We have had a lot of talk of compulsion lately as applied to labour. Let's apply it to dock authorities and merchants a bit. And apply it also to your local authorities. What has the Swansea Corporation or the Swansea Harbour Trust done to break down this state of things, and bring food that is deteriorating in ships* bottoms at London and Liverpool to Swansea? Are your two public bodies I have mentioned incapable of movement in the matter? Organise locally, and take into consulta- tion the people who know the business -A transport and food supply; and then get the Government and the military authori- ties to insist on decentralising, at any rate as far as surplus food supplies are t'oneerned. Things would then soon bet- ter themselves. In fact, something will iave to be done. Look at the idiocy of it! The purchas- ing power of a sovereign has sunk to 14s. We call tho worker unpatriotic when-lie strikes for another 3s. a week, which, if he got it, would give his 32s. a purchasing A power of say 15s. But we never think of raising the purchasing power of the original sovereign. Truly we are a pack of fools. Let me give an instance to show how in- complete are even the arrangements that have been made to cope with the question of meat prices. In the early days of the war the Board of Trade set up a com- mittee to advise on meat prices. That committee has done good work as far as it goes. It is composed of gentlemen thoroughly conversant with the meat trade. But that is all. They have ad- vised on the prices of beef, mutton, lamb, veal and pork. But it apparently never entered into the minds of thfv e gentlemen that theie are flesh foods that enter into competition with the meats named. As I have mentioned rabbits we will take that. They are an excellent flesh f,,(.,d. They are being, and havfc be"H. landsd ia enormous quantities (172,119; cwt. from January to May). Yet at the present moment they are being withheld from tbe pub c. The question of rabbit* not Ing in season cannot enter into the matter. f.)r the rabWits referred to are, i. a considerable extent, Australasian, caught and killed in the proper season. Yet to iny personal knowledge an ofiicial report went out. by last week's mail to an Australian Government to tho effect that 1 lie lener il trade in rabbivs -Is ex- ceedingly small Mer-.bants are holding their supplies in view of /espectA.; short- a.ge in the autumn through the difficulty of obtaining freight." Stocks now due are being bought at 17s. to 18s. to go into store. Now this is top price for large rabbits of 2jllbs. and over, and the price given is 1-ter case of 2i in their fur In otuez words they are 9d. to lOd. each for the very largest size and best quality. At what price are such as find their way on to the market being sold? In London it lias long been the practice in the. lower class districts to sell rabbit, cut up into joints, at per Ih, Since liigh í1ritXoS of meat have ruled, this practice has been adopted in tho lower middle class dis- tricts. Seeing some Colonial rabbits in a shop for sale in the way described, I had one weighed. It scaled loz. over 21bs.. and would therefore have cost the dealer quite Id. less than the largest grade. IT i price was lOd. per lb, He was thus eell ing for about Is. lOd. (he had the skin), that for which he had given not more than 8d. or !)d. And the Advisory Conimtftee of the Board of Trade, has never once, since its inception, given the public, or the trade, any idea of what would be a reasonable price to charge. Who can blame the pub- lic for giving that retailer such an exor. bitant profit? Surely, if rabbits were available at a reasonable rate now it would have a tendency to bring down other meat food3. And the principle would apply to other things besides. The fact is our Government knows nothing of food supplies from overseas or their distribution. There are people who say they.know nothing of home supplies either. That I won't discuss. When the Government is in a fix, as at present, it calls in. in an advisory character, gen- tlemen of experience connected with the particular industry in question. These gentlemen may, or may not, be person- ally interested. But because a man knows a lot about meat it does not follow that he knows much about rabbits, to stick to the humble bunny. On the other hand, there is not a single Colonial Government who has not attached to its IJOndon office a repre- sentative who, though ho has not so spe- cialised that he can go into Smithiield and compete with salesmen there, or to Tooley-street, and sell butter and cheeee with success, is yet so familiar with the entire range of .produce that he is hi ghl y competent to advise his Government upon all produce business that affects them. With the British Government, it is nobody's business. We muddle through commercial matters just as we muddle through wars. Lt. is a conio-day-O-day- God-send-Suriday way. But it is our way. Only when we see a little organisation, as in the case of the Germans, how we gape with open-mouthed astonishment. With some flourish of trumpets we were informed on Saturday that a com- mittee bad been appointed to deal with the congestion ait Liverpool docks. What is the good of that? After they have got berths for the 44 vessels awaiting dis- charge the cargoes in there vessels have got to be distributed all over the country if they are to be of any use. And the railways are in as* congested a state as the docks or more so. Dozens upon dozens of times within the last few moniths have I been in offices when trunk calls have come through asking when purchasers can have delivery of good (foods) bought In no -case could a definite answer be given. If congestions at London and Liver- pool docks are removed, and the goods still go there, the congestion on the rail, ways must become worse. Far better leave the food in refrigerated holds than have it lying about in uneven tem- peratures for goodness only knows how long. What is the position at the momentp It is said that owing to the difficulty of obtaining transport, the Australian, New Zealand, and Argentine cold eitftres are full up with meat food awaiting freight, and that the works have liad to stop killing because there is no cold storage for the caroa-ses. Then, as I have shown, such supplies as come here are being hung up almost interminably, when if there were proper organisation, the vessels could be discharged and back again in the southern hemisphere taking in fresh e.are, Why isn't it done:, It ooutd easily be. One would hardly like to proffer advice to the British Government. But if I were asked to advise, say, a Colonial Gov- ernment (as I have been on somewhat similar matters) I should feel inclined to suggest something on the following lines. (J) Get from the sources of supply an. estimate of the quantities of meat thai can be regularly shipped with a speeded- up transport service. (2) Got from port and dock authorities and other public bodies at good distribut- ing centres the amount of berthing. ac. eommodation, and cold storage avuilahle, with prolnable consumption in the markets served by the respective ports. (3) Apply compulsion to dock authorities and merchants as well as everybody else. (4) After taking, a.t various centres,the supplies required for usual and military purposes, send your surpluses, by sea. to the distributing parts, and in this way relieve congestion of the docks, prevent; congestion on your railways, and let your vessels get away as speedy as possible Î01 freah supplies. (5) And last, but not least, put the fear of God into any merchant who puta goods into store for the purpose of getting better prices later on.

Advertising

To Mothers! 1 You rea M healthy children ott food substitules. But you can rear healthy children on a dietary in which j wholesome BIPD'S  — ^J JJf r £4 ? Custard supplies its ?——-  ? ir  t rich store of body- (?    j????? r t building nutr iment. J I I Remember— children must have sweet dishes, i I and the best an d most suitable of all is B Birds" the Nutritious Custard. Made in a moment r No tax on your time! No tax on your pocket! |j Always insist on BIRD'S Custard. No substitute can be so pure or- Mt so wholesome, and since BIRD'S is so cheap, it is not worth the risk. gh Sold in id Pkts 4d 4c 71d Boxes, and large Tins. pjj I llisilill 10-11 Jill »

COLLIERS FOITLY I

COLLIER'S FOITLY. I. Statements that would Discourage a Recruiting. J A charge of making statements likely to prejudice recruiting was: brought against Gwilym Jones, collier, Brynam- man, at the Pontardawe Police Court OIL Friday. The proceedings were taken under the Defence of the Realm Act. Supt. Letheren prosecuted, and Mr. Mor- gan Davies defended. Private W. F. Rowe, 12th Welsh Regi- ment, said that on May 15th he was en-6 gaged in recruiting work in the Brynam- man district. In the morning be was in the bar of the Brvnamman Hotel talking to defendant. The hotel WSus the recruit- ing headquarters. During the conversa- tion Lieut. Ll. Williams, of the 12th Welsh, came in with a recruit named Thomas, and upon seeing him defendant said, You are a fool to join the Army with the job you have got, earning Z3 to £3 10s. a week." Witness immediately told defendant that he should not make use of those words as it would do harm to recruiting and to himself. tnir.revply defendant saiicl it would be time enough to join the Army when the Germans would be knocking at their doors. Mr. Davies: Didn-L, defendant say to the recruit that there were plenty of slackers and corner men about, and who should go before him ? Witness: Perhaps he did. Was he sober that dave-He was not sober and he was not drunk. Corroborative evidence was given by Wm. John Hunns, Lieut. Williams, and Private Tom Thomas. The defence was that defendant did!not make use of the statements alleged* -and that he had endeavoured to get" boys to enlist from time to time.. Defendant said he had a brother with the colours and a brother in South Africa, who went through the Boer War. After retirement Mr. Miers (Chairman) said the Bench thought there was too much of this thing going on. It did not matter what personal feelings people may have, but it was an infringement of the law to make use of the words rtrierrcd to. It was a great pity that the. wo«ls w«re uttered in a populous district lika Brynamman where so many young oaea had been holding back. In his opinion it was a tmrst • owgrflly thing to dü, especially when so many were suffering and fighting for their homes, and when there were 75 per cent-, of married men with the. colours. He hoped the present case would put a stop to people trying to discourage recruiting. Defendant would be fined M.

SWANSEA FAREWELL TEA THAT WAS NO JOY FEAST

SWANSEA FAREWELL TEA THAT WAS NO JOY FEAST. A pathetic little scene took, plaef the other day at the old Y.M.C.A. buildings, Dynevor-place, wrmsa, on th V oec^ton of tho closing of the workrooms i-i efin- nection with the Queen's Work for Women Fund. Of the 22 women employed there until the end, 15 were widows, alt had lost their occupations as seam- stresses or lodging-house keepers through the war, and for none of them is there any likelihood of regular employment. Is it any wonder that the excellent farewell tea provided by Mrs. II. D. Williams was not a feast of joy? Miss Davies, Mumbles, and Miss Wil- liams, Danygraig, paid high tribute to the self-sacrificing spirit in Which Mrs. Williams, as hon. secretary to tlie fund, had devoted herself daily, siacfi the com- mencement of tfie war, to the interests of the women and girls in the workrooni. Some of the women present had been em- ployed there since the beginning, when thfe fund existed under the name of the Mikyore& War Garment Fund, and these women spoke a few words of gratitudo and regret. Mrs. Williams responded io a touching little farewell speech, efidinjj on a note of cheerfulness and hope. There is no doubt tlmt; many good friendships have been fohiied in the workroom, and that there exists a'Ve.r^ real feeling of affection between !tha workers and those who have given time, thought, and sympathy to them in their hour of need.

No title

Mr. Standish, the gymnastic, instructor at the Swansea Y.M.C-A.. has joined the Mumbles detachment of the Red Crois Society. He has been giving the Mumble* members instruction in Swedish drills.