Teitl Casgliad: Herald of Wales

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 6 o 12 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
11 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

*-■ AUCTION SALES SUMMARY. (Full particulars will be found on Page 1.) oliine 29.—At the Swansea Market, at 12.30 p.m., sale of 10,000 Fleeces of good class Shropshire and Crossbred Wool, by Meere. James A James, F.A.I.

THE WAR DEMANDSI

THE WAR DEMANDS. I Since this time last week a lot has hap- pened in connection with the war, although there has been no really great outstanding event on the battlefields. What ought to attract most notice and re- oeive most consideration is the War Loan aaked for by the British Government. Thifl is onr:) a: the demands made by the war which :axinot be evaded, and the ample proposition arising out of it is that every man who has a £5 note or more, for which he has no immediate use, should consider it a duty to take his share in the loan to the extent that he can bear. The money is wanted, and will be wanted, In the first place the cost of the war must be met. It, through failure to get the money, the Government is rendered un- able to pay the bills, either an igno- minions peace or a defeat at the hands of the Germans will follow speedily. That fact must not be lost eight of, and those who are inclined to stand aside when the call is made ought to realise the respon- sibility resting upon their shoulders. But there is another- and equally important- aspect of the case. British credit in the face of so much of the world as is neutral raust be maintained. Once that credit be- comes affected, as it will be if the Government has to resort to artificial means of paying its debts, up will go the rates of discount and exchange, and the price of food will go up enormously, even upon present figures. The truest economy for the man in the street, therefore, is to do hie utmost to provide the Government with sufficient financial backing. There are indications that a large num her of people who can and ought to be in the ranks of the small investors do not realise the seriousness of the call that is made tj them. In a number of cases groups of men have had the question put to them, mainly for the purpoee of pointing out an obvious duty and of test- ing the feeling existing, and the replies have been far from encouraging. This is no time for silly excuses. Those who are inviTed to invest are not asked to confer favours upon anyone but themselves. Un- fortunately, some of those who have raised the question have been told that they are trying to enforce a form of coercion, whilst ether excuses are equally 7anfounded, and even silly. Before this war is over, every resource of the Empire in men. in money, and in moral strength, wiU be strained to the utmost, and the strain of calamity or failure will fall upon all &like-poor,as well as rich, healthy as well as weak. To meet the financial needs of the Government, therefore, is not to confer a favour upon the members of the Government, much as some people seem disposed to think; it is to fulfil an in- dividual and even selfish duty. There is this further possibility: if the money is not provided voluntarily Parliament may be asked to pass an Act transferring every shilling of the deposits in the banks to the War Loan account, and if such a course became necessary the rate of interest will be low. That was done in Germany long ago. It is quite true that the response made alreadv is large and encouraging, but there is still a large balance to be raised. The potential small investor must not excuse himself upon the assumption that his richer neighbour will bear all the burden for him. The man or woman who can go to the Post Office with his c)r. her t5 or £10 is wanted just as much as the man who goes to the Bank of England with his £ 500 or £ 1,000; and the I' responsibility resting upon each class is equal. THE WAR-GENERAL I CONSIDERATIONS. I ?aturaJly, the withdrawal of the Rue- man armies in Gadici? must be reco?ni$ed M a qet-bea. The German a.nd Austrian armies were massed against the invaders in sw* overwhelming numbers, equipped with such tremendous supplies of artil- lery and ammunition, that the only course open to the Russians was to get back as well as they could to a situation where they would be on safer ground. Russia bae to "play for time," and the high command will have to look for re- inforcements in men and munitions before the lost ground can be recovered. Much will depend now upon whethor that can be done in time to effect reprisals to tin extent sufficient to keep the Germans under the process of attrition before they can deal a really serious blow against the Tsar's forces The withdrawal from Lem, berg must net be taken as a decisive blow unless the Kuseiane are unable to set up another battle in tome to aave defeat larther north. The Musoovite Empire can afford to wait, and Mil last out at the game of alternately drawing on and ohaeiag the enemy up and down the try; So long as they can keep doing bhftt they will prevemt the Kaiser from swinging his millions across Europe to the western theatre of war. Meanwhile, the series of events in the west aft interesting, aad all the more so because they include nothing of the first order of events. Gradual gains and alow pushing forward make up the story, but through it all oomes the refrain that the British section of the forces is short of a certain class of amunition. The import- ance of this becomes apparent when we bring to mind the remarkable expen- diture of ammunition that the German artillery has been abYJ to expend upon certain battles, painting to the fact that they are well supplied and that their statement that they have large resources is no empty boast. In the Dardanelles the British and Vnmb troops are very much in the same position as they were a week ago. A few trenches have been won and a large number of Turks killed, but the main position necessary before any,, substantial advance is made are, still to be taken. There is no need for fear about the result. Certain supplies are required there as elsewhere, and more men will be landed, hat the have a good command over As situafirr. ,;iid, with an absence of ottekee of m*u luck, will have the enemy on the run in due course. Once GaUipoli is taken, the back of that part of the campaign will bp. broken. We shall re- ceive starring reports from that area be. fore long. Lt. will meaa hard fighting. Italy is now come to the first chapter of thp serious part of her campaign. We pointed out several weeks ago that the Austrian defenres wpre extremely for- midable, and that when the licum was reached hard fighting would be necessary if thp, advance was to be pushed on. That fftage is now reached, and the general trend of the reports to hand is that the Italians are proceeding: on a oareftd and well-considered scheme. They have to piaintftin the chain of defence works iin- metfcately in front of them, and then get pother over or around another set of mountains before they reach the plain reads towards Vienna nnd Buda Pesth. Consequently, several weeks must elapse before we shall hear news of a definite invasion of the Tital areas of Austrian terrttory. Tw,, points in connection wath the war may be noted bera. One is that a diA- pwitimi to c>io—« the Government about the supply of munitions has been ap- parent. It should be remembered that this war has brought into play new con- ditions of a character unthought of before, and the time i-ha-t has elapeed has not been too much for a proper examination of the cipeomstances. Here in England it has ?bom necessary to make Mid lay down new machinery, and when we realise I that the past ten months have passed very rapidly, so full of events has the time been, we shall also realise that all that could be done has been accomplished to the best of human ability. The other point is in connection with the food supplies. Several weeks ago we pointed out that the Board of Agriculture was not displaying the alertness required in dealing with the slaughter of immature animals—calves and lambs. It iq, there- fore, all the more gratifying to note that steps are now being taken to prevent a serious waste of the nation's food re- sources. The Bill now before Parliament will render people who sell lamb and veal open to severe penalties, a.nd we hope that when the Bill becomes law the authorities in all districts will see that its provisions are enforced.

LOCAL NOTESI

LOCAL NOTES. ABERAVON & PORT TALBOT. I Recruiting proceeds slowly, but tney are coming in gradually. There is some talk now of removing the recruiting office from the premises of the Aberavon Y-M.C.A. to tho premises in the main street of Port Talbot. Whether this will be an advantage or not is doubtful, as the present premises, with it-s private grounds and ample accommodation, is splendidly adapted for the purpose. A latter came addressed "To the Boys of Aberavon and Port Talbot this week, and it waa made care ot the office of this paper. It. emulated from the trenches in France, and on the reverse side was nicely drawn White Feather," a khaki clad figure with the words Some are and some are not," and Souvenir de la Guerre—PYom France." There is a rumour to the effect in the town that the IteserTo Battery of the Royal Horse Artillery, which has its headquarters at the Port Talbot Drill Hail, will shortly be transferred to one of the military concentration camps. Since their formation this baeory has oome on surprisingly both in horseman- ship and drill, and are at present a very useful body of well trained men. It is expected with their removal an effort will be made to form a third battery. The local Flag Day Ladies, who havS" accomplished such excellent work in sales and collections for the war fund, were given a complimentary outing to Llan- drindod Wells lant week, where they were entertained by the Mayor and Mayoress of Aberavon (Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Wil- liams) and their relatives at the Welsh Spa. The ladies were driven to and from the Wells in private motor-cars kindly lent by the owners. After this invigorating outing, the ladies will again be on the war path on Saturday, which has been selected as thp war Rose Day. There is an abundance of beautiful roses this year, and if the ladies exercise their customary energy and persuasive power?, a s-ubstantial sum should be realised. The proceeds will be devoted to tho local relief fund, which- has already done such a large amount of good to soldiers who have returned wounded from the Front. The committee of this fund has the advan-tago of judg- ing caw on the spot. and when found necessary to give immediate relief and assistance. Such a fund deserves the hearty a.ssriflfcanoe of the public, as it is expected that the future will entail greater dem-and-, on the fund than the past. Any lady wishing to assist in the sales or anyone desirous of presenting roses for the good cause will kindly com- munioate with Mr. E. Marchant. Jenkins, Pentylla, Aberavon. B:v the promotion of Sergeant John HalT, who for some years has ti 1D charge of the Aberavon Borough Police Station, honour has been done to one who rifely desertes it. Mr. Hale will, during 'the present month, take up the dutiea of inspector at Caerphilly, to which important station he has bega gazetted. During his many years' arduous duties in Aberavon, and also at Pontardawe, where he was stationed previously, Inspector Hale exhibited exceptional efficiency in the performance of his duties, and through a stern though kindly and humane insistence on public rectitude, commanded the admiration and respect of all sections of the public. On his shrewdness and scrupulous fairness In- spector Hale has received the encomiums -of judges of the High Court, county and borough Justices of the Peace, barristers, solicitors, and his own chief officials. His keen faculty of deduction in running criminals to earth has been on numerous occasions eloquently exemplified in Aber- avon and Port Talbot. Perhaps the most striking was his arreat in the public street of two desperate bllrglar, who were armed with loaded revolvers. These men were duly sentenced at the Assise*. and the judge congratulated the officer upon his heroic action. Inspector Hale also einglebanded arrested two armed bur?t?rs in. A- common lodging-house at Cardiff, Where he had traced them after they had perpetrated a series of bur- glaries between Pdrt Talbot and Cardiff, and held up with revolvera the officials of the Cowbridge Post Office. His v-iligance in the town generally, in spotting dan- gerous characters who have proved to be hardened criminals has received recogni- tion from the Mayor and Corporation. Whilst congratulating Inspector Hale, the inhabitants of the borough feel that they will have a distinct loss. The ap- pointmenfc has given immense satisfaction to his colleagues throughout tlie country, with whom he was extremely popular. Whilst making reference to the police, it is gratifying to and that there has recently been commendable activity amongst the local force in bringing to justice illicit liquor traders. Nearly every week cases of this class have been brought before the county and borough Bench, and convictions with heavy fines inflicted. In connection with these cases, Superintendent Ben Evans, Inspector W. E. Rees, and the sergeants of the division have played a keen and active part. After a few disappointments through the demands of the war, it has; now been definitely settled that the official opening of the fine new Municipal Buildings and Arcade shall take place on Thursdav next, July 1st. On this occasion, the Water-street main entrance will be offi- j cially opened by hhe Mayor (Mr. W. J. Williams, J.P.) and the Church-sfseot section main entranoe by Councillor" T. S. Goslin (chairman of the Markets CQm- mitJtee). Amongst the invited guests, numbering some 350. are expected to be Mr. T. Jeremiah Williams, M.P., Judge Lloyd Morgan, K.C., and numerous other dignitarim.- of the town and distriot. The Mavor, aldermen, councillors!, ar* officials in their civic r-galia, COlmty -a'td borough jtwaices. and leading inhabitants will march from the Old Town Hall a.t 4 p.m. ¡ to the new buildings, headed by the St. Mary's Military Band. After the cere- mony, the Mayor and Mayoress will en- tertain the company to tea on fihe flat roof of the btiiltKngs, where the bamd will discourse a programme of music. Should tie weather be un favourable,"the function will be held in the new Council Chamber. At'the last meeting of the Aheravon Town Council a tribnte was paid to the memory of the late Earl of Jersey, and a vote of sympathy and owoloines with the widow and relatives of the deceased Earl was passed. His Lordship was a sound friend to Aberavon, and fully de- served the eulogies expressed. His Lord- ship passed away, however, before the Corporation carried out its compact in connection with bia gift of eight acres of land for the purposes of a recreation ground. It will be learned with regret at Port Talbot. Aberavon, Margam, and Gower that Mr. R. Milner. the respected head gardener of the Margan Estate, has termi- nated his connection there, and also as hon. secretary of the Margam Flower Show. Previous to taking up his posi- tion at Margam. Mr. Milner for many years held a similar position under Miss Talbot at Penrice Castle. He was one of the most popular and respected men in the Peninsula. In Gower. as at Margam, Mr. Milner's popularity was no mean factor in establishing the annual flower and garden produce shows as the finest and most successful in the country. He has often had th« honour of being selected as judge at all the largest flower and vege- table shows throughout the country, includ- ing the great Shrewsbury Show. He has also delivered numerous lectures by special request throughout the country on the science of pardon cultivation, which have been tidily instructive and beneficial. Through the kindness of the National Council of the Y.M.C.A. And the instru- mentality cf Mr. F. S. Higman. the general secretary of the Welsh Y.M.C.A.'s, a mar- quee hat" been erected for the nse of the men of the 4th and 5th Supernumary Com- pany of the Welfih Reiment. now stationed at the Biich. The work will be under the care cf Mr Kenneth Groves and Mr. E. T. Rees. the joint secretaries of the Aberavon Y.M.C.A.. and Mr. R. Boon. secretary of the Sanrlfields Institution, and will be carried on under similar conditions to which the Y.M.C.A. marquees .are conducted in the various concentration camps in the country. It is the intention of the voluntary workers to provide a refreshment, bar, bagatelle table, draughts, and other games; also reading and writing sections. Everything possible will be done to brighten the livea of the men in religious and social matters. The usual Y.M.C.A. religions services will be held and a series of week-night concerts wiU be provided. The public will be allowed to visit tho camp with the permission of the Commanding Officer, Capt. Jenkins, or the orderly officer for the-day. In connection with the military boxing tourney at Neath, the A'bera.vort and Port Talbot tradesmen Mobist.ed materially in providing prices. Amongst the trophies which were presented for competition were thoee of our Italian, tradesmen and allies. Messrs. Berni Bros., Port Talbot and Neath, Messrs. John Franchi Broe., Port Talbot, and Mr. Louie Belli, Port Talbot. • The cups were supplied by Mr. E. M. Needham, jewellers, Station-road, Port Talbot. Pastor Bert Bailey, who has for many years successfully minietered at Wesley Hall, Port Talbot, will shortly be leaving the town to take up a, ministerial position in Gloucester, At the outbreak of the war Pastor Bailey showed deep interest in the Belgian refugee movement, and through his efforts and the co-operation of his con- gregafcion a home was provided at Wesley Hall for three refugee families, numbering about a dozen. Pastor Bailey has been a daily visitor to his guests, and has been most solicitous for their comfort and en- joyment. Mr. Charles Delefontaine, the senior member of the refugees, expresses the deepest gratitude of all the refugees to Pastor Bailey for his unfailing kindness. Mr. Jarfik Wood, of Aberavon, has joined the fioyai Naval Reserves, a-nd w" given a hearty send off on Tuesday. In bioi smart uniform Jack looked every inch saidor. Councillor T. S. Goslin, Aheravon, has again had the honour of being elected as a member of the council of the National Association of Master Bakers and Con- fectioners of Great Britain. Out of the whole of the United Kingdom he woe 6th on the poll. On Monday the piioe of bread in the dis- triot will be reduced to 8Jd. for a 4-Ib. loaf. i Lucifer. 1

AMMANFORD I

AMMANFORD. Considerable feeling has been aroused in Ammanford over a police court appli- cation which will be found reported in this week's Herald." and, without enter- ing into the merits or demerits of the case, it i-, pleasant to note that Carmar- then shire people do not regard Glamorgan- shire people svs aliens." Those who know Oheler-r-and site is very well- known and highly respected at Amman- ford—regard her as a Welshwoman, for although she hails from Neath, and was, I believe, prior to her marriage a Miss Griffiths, she has lived long epougii in Ammanford to have become a Cymraee f Sir Gaerfyrddin," which is generally re- garded as more Cymric even than being a native of Glamorganshire. The family at Neath is well known, and her late hus- band, Mr Oheler, although born in Ger- many, had lived a long number of years aDwng TIS and, in his day, made a large circle of friends in the town and the sur- rounding district. After his death, which took place some years ago, Mrs. Oheler carried on the jewellery business, and, with the exception of the name, there is nothing about her to associate her with anywhere except Glamorganshire and Carmarthenshire. The suggestion of re- garding her as an alien would be laugh- able, were it not that sympathy has been aroused with ber, and the most sym- oathetic are her immediate neighbours, who are all Welsh, like herself. Mention of Welsh characteristics re- minds me of the national instrument, and I fancy I can hear the music of the harp in my ears, and feel the thrill of its sweet tones vibrating Cymric ohords in my own heart, even now. At the Swansea Empire this week, in the course of a programme of all-round excellence, an outstanding feature, beyond question, is an instrumen- tal performance by ladies known as The Five Symphony Girls." In their turn they play beautiful selections on various popular musical instruments, and they are all brilli-aiit executionists, whose clever performance forms a particularly attractive item. But what appeals most directly to me, and which has led me into the strain with which I began this note, is the refillv clever production of the familiar Welsh a.ir. The Bells of Aber- dovey," upon the harp. Of course, the music—I beg"pardon, the 'hime--has foepn played almost threadbare in the Princi- pality, where few people know that, not- withstanding the charming tale of the un, dau, tri and the ding-dong," there are no bells at all in Aberdovey— but there is exceptional mu«ic in the ren- dering given. The "touch," the "lilt" so delicately kept up with remarkable effect in the "variatdona," and so alto- gether unique is the thrill of the turn that I could not help mentioning it ir. passing. Those of my friends who were recently inquiring as to when the next miners'con. ference wa;s to be held in London, bad better keep a sharp look out for a "short notice" which is likely to be issued by the Executive of the M.F.G.B. The "sands are running out," and the nearer the approach of the 30th June, the more urgent the need for watching the trend of events in the coal trad?. Xut only is Government intervention practically un- avoidable, because the coalowners still re-! fuse to Mgotiate for a new wage-regula- ting agreement, but that intervention is likely to lead to compulsory arbitration. Congratulations to Mr. J. D. Morgan and Mr. J James, upon the promptitude with which they succeeded in getting the Conciliation Board to deal with the Gellyceidrym Colliery dispute. Here, in Ammanford, as elsewhere, the "five shilling war loan" is the topic of the weelr, and I understand that quite a number of small investors will transfer from local banks and other societies to the war loan fund. A leading draper— shall I say the leading tradesman ? —told me hi-s libtle girl had voluntarily under- taken to take out her savings from the Post Oftee and buy vouchers. Another tradesman told me, yesterday, that if Cardiff took up a million, ae it ought to, and Swansea did its duty properly, Am- manford would follow suit, pro mta to population, just as it has done in the matter of recruiting for the Army. It is too soon to say anything about the great recruiting meeting announced to be addressed by "To,vn, NI.P. and others, as the Herald muct go to press somewhat early, and details must be left until next week. Awstin.

IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT

IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT House of Commons, Monday. Lord Robert Cecil, answering Mr. Fell, said it was not a fact that safe conducts had been given, generally speaking, tc German envoys or others who had been working in the United States and who desired to return to Germany. In one or two instances such safe conducts were granted because on a review of all the circumstances that course appeared to bv in the interests of the country. I Newbold and the Defence Act. Mr. R. McNeill asked the Home Secre- tary whether his attention had been called to the fact that Walter Newbold, said to be a graduate of an English uni- versity. had recently sent contributions from this country to an American pro- German newspaper, appealing to the American workers to put a stop to the manufacture of munitions of war for the Allies, and to compel the Government to place an embargo on the export of war materials, including raw cotton and copper, and whether it was proposed to take proceedings against him under the Defence of the Realm Act. Sir John Simon said he understood the matter was now under the consideration of the Public Prosecutor. (Hear, hear). Elections to be Postponed. Mr. Lough asked the Prime Minister whether the usual Courts for registration of electors would sit this year or new registers be prepared, and if not, what arrangements the Government proposed to make regarding the matter and the postponement of elections. Mr. Asquith said a great deal of the work of registration had already been done. and it was not desirable to suspend it. A Bill to postpone the elections for a year, and to provide future registration, would be introduced forthwith. Healthy Forces. Mr. Tennant, replying to a queeti-on. said as far as preventable diseases were concerned, the health of the Expedi- tionary Forces compared not only favour- ably with the health conditions of any previous campaign, but nothing approach- ing it had ever been known in the past. (Cheers). British Prisoners in Germany. Lord Robert Cecil, answering Mr. S. Roberta, said the Government had re- ceived, through the good offices of the United States Ambassador at Berlin, a further report regarding the British pri- soners at Rnhleben. The report was of a favourable character, and showed consid- erable improvement of British prisoners there. For this improvement we had to thank the untiring efforts of the Ameri- can Ambassador at Berlin and his staff, to whom the country and the Government were deeply- indebted. (Cheers). House of Commons, Tuesday. Mr. Tennant, answering Mr. Lynch, said no good purpose would be served by giving orders on a large scale for the production of aeroplanes at present. This was not a service that could be employed in a hurry. A steady development had been in progress since the beginning of the war, and this development would continue as rapidly as possible. The training of pilots required, time and care. As the hon. member was aware, the work of this arm of sfervice was a source of gratification to the whole country. An Unfounded Allegation. Mr. Tennant, replying to Mr. Ginnell, said no complaints had reached the War Office of youths who had been total ab- stainers having become confirmed drunk- ards since they enlisted. He was sorry that anyone in a responsible position should make a ?atemeut so devoid of foundation. (Hear, hear). It was a per- version of the facts to state that any British soldier was forced to take in-I toxicants through the absence of other drinks. Mr. Ginnell: Then we may take it that the complaints in the British Weekly are without foundation? (Laughter). Mr. Tennant: I have not seen the com- plaints to which the hon. member re- fers. If they are at- all in accordance with the statements made in the ques- tion, the hon. member may take it that it is 60. Youthful Soldiers. Mr. Kenyon asked the Under-Secretary for War whether he was aware that a number of lads, between the ages of fifteen and seventeen, had, for patriotic reasons, enlisted in the new armies, making a fal se declaration of their ages, and whether he would dismiss any re- cruiting officer who enlisted lads under the age laid down in the regulations. Mr. Tennant said that the lowest age at which a man might be accepted for the regular army was nineteen. If any doubt existed as to the age of a recruit, the examining medical officer was re- ferred to, and, if the latter was in doubt, the recruiting officer was required to make full inquiries before finally approv- ing the recruit. The regulatohs gave parents of any youth below the age of nineteen who had enlisted the right to claim his discharge. The Lord Chancellorship. Mr. Lynch asked the Prime Minister what sum the office of Lord Chancellor was now annually costing the country by reason of the salary of the present occupants, and the pensions paid to his predecessor; and whether, in the interests or economy he would consider the merg- ing of this office into some other less ex- pensive, lees political, but more judicial department of 1 he State. Mr. Asquith said the tq¡al sums paid in salary to the Lord Chancellor, and in pensions to his two predecessors in office amounted to M,000 a year. The country had the benefit of the judicial services of the latter, who sat regularly as Lords of Appeal and as members of the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council. He was not prepared at the present time to re- commend any change. Mr. Lynch: Is he aware the Lord Chan- cellorship is treated less as a great judicial office than as a «?ort of caravaa- serai for retiring politicians? (Laughter). Mr. Asquith: No, sir. House of Commons, Wednesday. Af now writ was ordered to be issued for the election of a member for the Keighley division of Yorkshire, in the room of Lord Buckmaster, the Lord Chancellor. War Office and Explosive Research. Mr. Tennant informed Mr. Edgar Jonas that there was a laboratory equipped for research in respect of explosives, and that a full staff was engaged upon re- search work bad been regularly em- ployed during the past six months seven- teen chemists were regularly employed. Enemy Aliens in India. Mr. Chamberlain informed Col. Yate that the number of enemy aliens mis- sionaries, consisting for the most part of Germans, who were interned under mili- tary control in India at the beginning of April was 115. The number compulsorily residing in specified places -under civil control was seven, and the number at liberty but on parole subject to general I civil supervision, was 442. 4 From the Front. I Mr. Wedgwood entered the Honse dur- ing question time, and as be walked to his usaul seat was greeted with warm welcoming cheers. The hon. member, who looked bronzed and had grown a beard, some weeks ago returned home in- valided from the Dardanelles. House of Commons, Thursday. Mr. Kellaway asked the Attorney- General whether he was aware that a group of newspapers controlled by Lord Northcliffe had endeavoured to pre- judice recruiting by refusing to publish Lord Kitchener's appeal for 300,000 more men, and that they had described this appeal as a disgraceful one which Lord Kitchener must withdraw, and whether it was proposed to take any proceedings against these papers? Sir F. E. Smith, Solicitor-General. re- plied to the question. The hon. member had, he said, sent to the Attorney-General a copy of an article which appeared in the Evening News" on May 20th which criticised the appeal made by Lord Kitchener for recruits, mainly on the ground that the military age was raised from 38 to 40, whilst numbers of younger men abstained from enlisting. It was not proposed to take any proceedings in reference to tho article. Mr. Kellaway: Does the right hon. gentleman not consider tho language quoted in the question must be preju- dicial to recruiting? Sir F. E. Smith: It must be assumed that my right hon. friend has considered that. Sir A. Markham: Is the right hon. gentleman aware there are many people in this country, including members of Parliament, who think it disgraceful to appeal to married men of -tO to enlist when there are lots of younger men available ? No answer was returned. I M.P.'s Humour. Dr. Addison was answering a question addressed to the Ministry of Munitions, when Mr. Watt, who sat some distance away on one of the back benches, called out, to the intense amusement of the House: "Will my hon. friend kindly ex- pand his diaphragm and speak a little louder?" The doctor duly obliged. I Jacks and Company. Mr. Ginnell asked the Prime Minister whether any member of His Majesty's Government holds or keld until recently a financial interest in tf11 firm of Jacks and Company, recently convicted of trad- ing with the enemy. Mr. Bonar Law: As this question refers to me, perhaps I may be permitted to answer it myself. (Hear, hear.) I was for many years a member of the firm re- ferred to in question, and I was still a partner in it when I entered the House of Commons in 1900. For some months afterwards I continued my connection with it. but I came to the conclusion that I had to choose between busi- ness and politics, and at the end of 1901 I gave up my business, and I gave it up absolutely. (Cheers.) Since then— that is for more than thirteen years—I have had no control over the business. I have ha.d no knowledge of the way it was conducted, and although I have from time to time put money on deposit with them at a fixed rate of interest, I have had no share, direct or indirect, in the profits or losses of the firm. (Cheers). Sir A. Markham: Will an enquiry be held into the state of mind of the hon. gentleman opposite who asks this kind of question ? (Laughter). No answer was returned. I Lieut. Warneford. Mr. Hohler asked the Prime Minister whether he would take steps to confer on the mother of the late Lieut. Warneford, R.N.V.C., a substantial annuity as a mark of nation's appreciation of his distinguished career and gallant conduct. Dr. Macnamara replied. He said in view of the wording and the intention of the regulations governing the award of pensions, he did not think any award could be made in this case. He took the opportunity on behalf of the Admiralty of expressing their sense of the great loss the Service had sustained through the death of this heroic ofifcer, and of tender- ing their deep sympathy with his rela- tives. (Cheers.)

I ABERAVON SHEBEEN

ABERAVON SHEBEEN. Sharp Penalty Imposed. At the Aberavon Borousrh Police Court on Thursday another instance of the activity of the local police in connection with illicit liquor traffic came on for hearing, when Gwendoline Simeonidie-, of Mabel-street, Sandfields, Abmaveii, wifo of Alexandra Simeonidie, a seaman, was charged on remand with selling beer without a license on May 30th. Defendant did not appear, neither was ehe represented Superintendent Ben Evans, who pro- secuted, said that the defendant's pre- misos were raided on May 30th, and de- fendant and several other persons were found on the premises drinking. Inspector W. E. Rees (Port: Talbot) said that in company with Injector John Iliile, Sergmnts McGovem. and P.C. Thomas, they watched defendant's pre- mises, and at 1 a.m. they saw defendant, a girl named Olive Griffiths, and four men, enter the house by the back door. Shortly afterwards, witness and Inspector Hale went to the front door. He knocked, and defendant opened the door. When shfl recognised who was there, she ran back in the middle room. shouting, "Look out! The police are here! Witness went into-the middle room, where he saw four men, Olive Griffiths, and defendant seated around a table, in the centre of which was a flagon of a,le and four glassee containing beer, and also a glass of water Asked what business they had there, a man named Francis Thomas said, "I came here for a glass of beer." E. Jones. D. James, and C. Jones replied, "We lost our train and came for a drink." Olive Griffiths said, I have been stay- ing here for three months. My father turned me out." Defendant said that she lived in the house, and her husband was at sea, adding, I took Olive Griffiths in about three months ago. I could not see her without a home. The men are friends of mine, and I asked them to have a drink A search of the premises revealed a number of cases containing empty and partly full beer flagons and bottles and whisky bottles. When told she would be charged, defendant replied, Don't do that My husband allows roe £3 10s. a month, and if he knows he will shoot me. In any case he would have a separation. He knows Olive Griffiths lives here." The Bench inflicted a fine of 1:2.5 or three months. Francis Thomas, labourer; E. Jones, collier; D. James, collier: and Charles Jones, engineer, were fined S2 each for aiding and abetting, and Olive Griffiths was sent to prison for a month.

ICHRISTIANITY DYING

CHRISTIANITY DYING? The Rev. Gwilym D'lvies. M.A., of Car- marthen, delivered a sensational address :t a Tondu public meeting on Wednesday in connection with the Annual Assembly of the West Glamorgan and Carmarthenshire Eng- lish Baptist Association. The title of the address was. "Je Chris- tianity Dying Out in W a.les?" He said ) e could give many instances of South Wales churches whichi were in a condition that could only be characterised as deplorable, and the situation needed to be faced with deep humility and holy boldness. Could it b; that the Welsh churr-hes wflre permeated with the spirit of Pharisaism, that their standard of values was the sttandatd of the street and of the World, and that in some cases (a.s alleged by the Rev. John Williams, Brynsiencyn) it was lower than the stan- dard of the followers of sport?

I MORE MUNITIONS I

I MORE MUNITIONS., I I MR. LLOYD GEORGE'S STIRRING I APPEAL. Mr. Lloyd George's speech on Wednes- day in the House of Commons on the problems which the Ministry of Muni- tions has been formed to solve and his announcement of the labour policy of the I Government led to a debate of the first Importance. Notwithstanding an appeal from the Prime Minister that the discus- sion should I),- ■confined to the proposals oittlined by MJ Lloyd George for increas- ing the output of war in»ierial, the Hou&e insisted on its right to review the national situation as a wiiole. Mr. Lloyd George discussed the situa- tion at the front and at home with great frankness, and his 90 minutes' speech was full of telling points and of pbrasess that will stick, ilia main proposals, however, for the mobolisati-on of munition labour were as follows: There shall be no strike or lock-out; any dispute must be referred to arbitra- tion. As many skilled men as possible are being brought back from the. ranks of the Army. Seven days were being given for the voluntary enrolment of skilled men in a mobile munition corps. Powers are taken to enforce the contract ¡ entered into by .,hese volunteers. There will be Government control of the work- i shops. and a Munitions Court, consisting of a president appointed by the Govern- ment and an employer and a trade unionist as assessors, will have power to I inflict penalties. No man can leave one yard and be taken on at another, without producing a satisfactory certificate from his old firm. Trade union regulations restricting out- put arc to be suspended. Employers' profits are to he limited. Country to be organised into ten muni- tion areas. I Victory Depends on Supplies. I In presenting his caso for the necessity of these exceptional measures, Mr. Lloyd George uttered a grave warning to the House and the country. He declared that ultimate victory or defeat depended upon the supply of munitions which the rival countries could produce. The Cehtral European Powers were turning out 250,000 shells a day; if we were in earnest we could surpass that enormous produc- tion. Mr. Lloyd George hinfced that the State may find it necessary to assume com- plete control of the metal market. There are indications in some quarters of a ten- dency to hold up supplies in order to obtain better prices. (Shame.) In the vital interests of the, nation these prac- tices must be brought to an end." (Loud cheers. ) I Labour Problems. I Coming to the organisation of his de- partment, Mr. Lloyd George explained how be had secured some of the best business brains in the country. He had decided to rely on a policy of decentrali- sation, and each of ten munition areas would do its share of the national task under a committee of management of local business men. The immediate pro- blem to be tackled was that of labour, and the Minister emphasised the difficul- ties caused by slackness, trade union re-, stnefions and competition between em^ ployers for labour, which made his new proposals imperative. The provision on which he laid special stress was the ap- peal for volunteers for munition work. The Trade Unions, he said, fully recog- nised that, if there was an inadequate supply of labour, compulsion would be inevitable. The Unions asked for seven days in which to recruit the necessary number of volunteers—Mr. Lloyd George could not give the figure. A beginning would be made on Thursday, and he be- lieved that the appeal would be succes&- ful and that the need for industrial com- pulsion would to that extent" have been removed. Warm commendation was passed on the trade union leaders for their willing- ness to suspend their rules during the war. He touched on the willingness of the miners to abandon their old opposi- tion to compulsory arbitration. If they prefer their old waJ", he will not greatly mind. He is full of admiration for the patriotism of the miners; there are 224,000 of them in our armies, and none of Our soldiers have exhibited more desperate valour in trying conditions than some of our mininsr regiments. The speech ended with an eloquent peioration, which stirred the House like the sound of a trumpet. Germany has tricked liar neighbours and fallen upon them unawares. Until she was ready to strike she was on the best of terms with -everybody. During the Balkan crisis she was friendly, modest, unpretentious; she walked arm-in-arm with England through the Chancellories of Europe." Yet at that moment she was forging her weapons and piling up her war stores. The whole basis of international good- will will crumble to the dust if Ger- many wins in this war. If. is essential for the peace of the world that she should fail, and it is up to us to ensure her failure. Mr. Hodge, for the Labour Party, pledged the trade unions to do every- thing in their power to maka the scheme a suocess, and freely admitted that the Bill was not only necessary, but ex- tremely urgent. Captain F. E. Guest. (L., Dorset, East), just back from ten months in France, said the fact that all this was going to be done at last would send up a sigh of relief in the trenches." As to the possibility of compulsory labour, if the seven on- listment scheme failed, he thought it would be much better to have compulsion straight away, and not tinker with the problem. Mr. Asquith, who had remained in the House, wa.r. brought to his feet for a few minutes by Captain 'Guest's reference to compulsory labour. The Prime Minister welcomed Captain Guest back in his place, but reminded the House that this was not the time to ventilate the compulsory labour question. It was not in the Bill. He asked the House to keep from raising questions controversial and not germane. He hoped the text of the Bill would be issued in print on Friday, and the second reading takei on Monday. -0.

I NO SLACKING WORKMEN I

I NO SLACKING WORKMEN. Sir Alfred Mond on Misdirected Labour. Sir Alfred Mond, Bart.. M.P.. said they had no idea as to the number of men it was proposed to enlist in rhe in- dustrial army or exactly of what class or workman it was to consist. Of course the idea that a large number of workjion! in this oountry were engaged in doing nothing, eimply slacking about, was per- fectly ludicrous. (Hear, hear)- There was a great shortage of labour ill all directions; in fact, the averag working man to-day was probably doing more work rather than less than in ordinary timct6. The difficulty that existed was that the labour was not always directed into those channels where it was most immediately wanted. The other day he was walking along Piccadilly and eaw a number of rivetters working on a new hotel there; those men ought to be em- ployed on the Clyde, in the Midlands, or elsewhere on Government work. (Hear. hear) Yet th(-.m, was no method of compelling those men, or their employers: to give up that job, and to engage in munitions work. He war, certain that a: great deal of talk in that debate had entirely missed the mark. It was per-, fect.ly ridiculous to think that they could drivo workmen into work with a whip. Th", Minister for Munitions had, cited a case in which, for the want of 70 j milwrights. extensive machinery could not be put np. He was perfectly certain' that those wrighte could be found within] fifty milts of the place where they were wanted. fi But there was no mechanism to enable the Government to "gai ti a private firm and tell them that they must release those millwrights for a month to put up the machinery. We were an extraordinarily conservative nation, and there was- nothing more difficult than to change our habits. Our labour was immobile. People did not like to leave their homes and families. All those peculiarities had to be rtaken ii-ito acooitut. If they could convince ivorkmen that it was their duty to do Government work. he was certain that they would be only too glad to do it. Not long ago a workman employed by his firm had applied for leave to take up muiutions work elsewhere, but had said that he would stay if convinced that he was doing equally good service to the counltry by remaining. They were atble to convince this man on the point, and he remained. He was informed the other day that skilled workmen were still being recruited in many towns for The Army. That should be put an end Ito, especially in view of the fact that skilled workmen who had already joined were beirg brought, back. Re tblo-ught a good deal would be done if the Government granted badges to men employed on munitions. The War Office conditions as to badge* were hedged round with such restrictions that most employers found it impossible to make use of such badges; these regu- lations laid it down that & badge could only be used by a man of recruitable age, aud so older men were not. allowed to wear them. He fait ceftam that it, would be a great. thing if men engaged in recognised munitions works could wear some.thing which would show that they were doing work for the State, aad he hoped that the right hon. gentleman would see that the mtatter was dealt with in a. much more broadininded. manner than hitherto. Another point he wished to mak* was in regard to, the question of compulsory arbitration. He congratu- lated the right hon. gentleman on having gone a long way toward s getting an agreement with large sections of em- ployers and employed in regard to com- pulsory arbitration. It was a matter which was extremely difficult, And he would suggest that. it Tniglvt,, meet ob- jootions if they adopted the Canadian Arbitmtion Aci, under which the men went so far as to say they would not strike until arbitration had taken place, though if they did not like the result of the arbitration they would still be at liberty to strike. That might remove the objecious of some of the organisations like the Miners' Federation, which did not like to have their hands tied by com- pulsory arbitration. He still hoped that the miners would come in. Judging from the' papers they were threatened in South Wales irith a very serious stoppage in -the: coal trade. He could not believe thtt such a stoppage would be allowed-to tal- 9 place at the present time. He saw only yesterday that a colliery with t,MO men wus out on strike, because there were 20 non-unionists working there, whom they wanted to get into the Union. That colliery produced a particular ebass of ooal, and made coke and by-products which ware wanted for high explosives. It wai absurd to choose a moment like the present to strike about a few non- union men, and to stop a. large coJliery of that character. He could Bofc under- stand why the responsible leaders of the miners in South Wales did not leave this trivial matter over until the end of the war. The Minister of Munitions had painted the general position in some- what gloomy colours, presumably to spur people on. As a matter of fact, during the last ten months a great deal of moat remarkable work had been done.The other day be had brought to his notice a Jarge explosive* factory put up in the Mid- lands in about three month..< ".which experts who had seen it looked upon almost, as a miracle, as it would ban taken two years to build in ordinary times. Mr. Lloyd George said that. this bad been specially signalled out. by Lord Moulton's Department as being a very fine achievement. Sir Alfred Mond, continuing, said that chemists, scientists, working men, and others had achieved some very remark- able results, not only in that but in other directions, and it was only right and just to give them credit for what, j.Àtm had done, although, of course, more might be done. He was glad the right hon. gentle- man had decided upon a scheme of decen- tralisation. He believed that people who bad engineering tools which they could not spare out of their works would be on!? too ready to employ them for munitions work for at least some time each week, if they were only given specimens to copy. There were a number of such works, which could not possiblv spare machine tools, but might very well arrange to use them, say, on Saturdays and Sandavf for this work. In that way a great facres?* in the output of munitions might be effected, and it would be willingly and gladly done by those who had the tools. In South Wales he understood that good progress had been made by local com- mittees in getting machines together. He was quite sure that there was no industry in which people, without any regard for their business interests or the financial results, would not at this time do every- thing possible to get on equal terms with our foe, and to make up for the long start which that foe had had. Olear hear,). The debate ended with a second speech from Mr. Lloyd George, in which he strovo to cool the passions that had. been raised.

JI MANSLAUGHTER

JI MANSLAUGHTER." Gretna Green Jury's Finding. The inquest was resumed at Carlisle on Thursday on the victims of the troop train disaster on t.he Caledonian Railway at Gretna Green. After retiring for 55 minutes, the jury returned a verdict of manslaughter against Meakin. Tinsley and Hutchinson. A juryman said, so far as thp fireman Hutchinson was concerned, the veTdiet had been agreed to by twelve of the nine- teen jurymen. He asked if that was suffi- cient. 'I Tbo Coroner replied in the aSrm&tiT?. Mr. Lightfoot. oU('itùr. vho r?pr?- sented the accused, protested again8t them bcin? committed for triaL on the ground that the aUeg<'d off?ccf was committed in Scotland outside the jurisdiction of th?t court. Tiuslev was already under arreat by the Scottish police, and he could Ml be arrr?tcd twic? on the f?me ch?!?. The Coroner replied that 

No title

Mr. H. 3. Clapham, solicitor, formerly of Llandrindod Wells, 1-aa been killed at the front. The Rev. T. E. Davies. -of Crug*glas, Swansea, who has laboured with much acceptance here for over five years, and has attained an influential position ae a Wekh writer and preacher, has been given an united and enthusiastic call to the pastorate of Bethlehem Chapel, Treorchy. -The death took place at the residence of her daughter. Mrs. Arthur M- James (Megan Glantawp), Brynpistyll. Tfebdeth, on Tuesday of Mrs. Mary Jones, 'affer a brief illness. The deceased, who'wms 14 years of age, was very popular in tjo dis- trict f