Teitl Casgliad: Herald of Wales

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 12 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
26 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
SPLENDID DEATH

SPLENDID DEATH. DISHONOURED OFFI-CER WHO I FOUGHT IN THE RANKS. The Runaway. The Hero. After the war In the early part broke out Captain of this year, Thomas 11. S. Smart, of the Hardy enlisted as a 53rd Sikhs, attached private into the 2nd to the Khyber Itifies, Batt. Queen's Royal got leave of absence West Surrey Regi- and failed to return ment. On May 17 he to duty. This was in was killed in action December last. After at Festubert, but all inquiries had not before he had failed to trace him, fought so gallantly he was removed that he would have from the service, received the D.C.M. p n d this was had he survived. gazetted on June 4. At- first there seems no further connec- tion between the above two true storyettes I (of the war than so far as they furnish a contrast in attitudes to the Empire call- I to-arms. But the fact, just revealed, is that- Captain H. S. Smart, of the 53rd Sikhs, and Private Thomas Hardy, of the 2nd Queen's Royal West Surreys, were One and the same per-on; end the story of Captain H. S. Smart. which at first sight looked like an extract from the roll of dishonour, becomes an added blazon on the roll of honour. A Romantic Career. I In cold official terms this splendid nucleus for the plot of a war novel is told in an official communique as follows. In the "London Gazette of August 6 a notice appears cancelling the removal Srom the service of Captain H. S. Smart, ndian Army, which was notified in the t. Gazette of June 4 last. The circumstances of the case are as follows:— Captain H. S. Smart, 53rd Sikhs, at- tached Khyber Rifles, was granted short leave in December last and did not rejoin on its expiration. All inquiries failed to trace hm, and he was therefore removed from the service. It has since been ascertained that his action was due to his strong desire to join the Force in France. It appears that he came to this country and enlisted, in the name of Thomas Hardy, into the 2nd Battalion Queen's Royal West; Surrey Regiment. While serving with this battalion as a private he was killed in action at Festubert on May 17th, 1915, where be displayed such gallantry that he would have been granted the medal for Distinguished Conduct in the Field had iin survi ved. In view of the special circumstances of the case, the Secretary of State for India, with the concurrence of the Army Coun- cil. decided to submit to his Majesty that the removal from service of Captain mart should be cancelled, and his Majesty has been gra,ciouslv pleased to approve thi" proposal. Captain H. S. Smart was born on February 3rd. 1895. He received a com- iiiission a, second lieutenant in the British Army on August 16tli. 1905. On October 31st. 1907, he was trans- ferred to the Indian Army, being attached to the 53rd Sikhs. In that capacity he took part in the operations on the NortV West Frontier of India in the Mohmand country. He was present at the engagement at Kurgha on May 21th, 1908, after which Le received the medal and clasp. Ho- was made a captain on August 16th, and was afterwards attached to the Khyber Rifles, a body of irregulars whose duty it was to police the frontier. In an interview. Captain Smart's brother, who is an official in the Consular Service, said:— We did not know of my brother's action nntil after he had joined as Thomas Hardy.' Then he wrote to me, telling me what he had done. and giving bis new name and regimental number. So I asked the regiment to keep me informed at anything happened to Private Thomas Ilard.v,' though, of course, I did not (Iisc!or,e that he was my brother. A year ago he was seconded from his regiment, the 53rd Sikhs, and sent to the Afghan frontier with-the Khyber Rifles. His old regiment was then sent to one of the scats of war, and he was very anxious io go with them. He made three separate applications to rpjoin thf 53rd Sikhs, but each time was refused. His services and special knowledge were considered valuable by the local Political Officer on the Indian frontier, and because of that he had to remain. I understand his actions as Thomas Hardy won him the notice of his superior officers, and General Gouirh made some reference to what he did in a dispatcli to the War Office." Captain Smart was an old boy of Clif- ton College, that famous school which lias given so many gallant fighters to both cervices. He was unmnarried. When he enlisted in January last he described himself as a farmer, aged 28. and gave an address in Victoria-street. where inquiries reveal that he -is un- known. Private Hardy" went out with a draft of his regiment on March 24th, and .was killed on May 17th while performing an action as gallant and brave as any which have been recorded in the war. In a description of the battle which appeared in the Times," Mr. John Buchan wrote: No less gallant was Private Hardy, of the Queen's (West Surrey Regiment), who was badly wounded in the left arm (he was a left-handed man), but continued throwing bombs with his right till he was shOot dead." Indeed, his behaviour was such that a second lieutenant of the South Stafford- Bhires—by a strange coincidence, the regi- ment. in which he originally obtained a tommissioi in 1905-wrote to the colonel commandant of the 2nd Queen's West Surreys, recommending Private Thomae Hardy" for the Victoria Cross, and stating that he had demoralised the Germans and saved the forces about Lim from heavy casualties." By the time this recommendation reached the War Office it is probable that the authorities were informed of the facts concerning the real personality of Pri- vate Hardy. The full circumstances of liis disappearance were known to a few intimate friends pledged to secrecy, and as soon as his death was notified the War Office was placed in possession of th« whole story. When he was reported killed, confusion arose owing to an error in his regimental number, and as there were other Hardys in the 2nd We6t Surreys this led to four different women regarding themselves as widows. They all wrote to that effect to the authorities, only to learn that the Private Hardy referred to was not re- lated to them. The identity of Private Hardy be- j came known to one or two of his com- rades in the regiment shortly before his death. During an evening rest, a day or so be- fore the fighting in which he received his fatal wound, he told his story to a non- commissioned officer with whom he served at Festubert.

YSTALYFERA MANS COMMISSION

YSTALYFERA MAN'S COMMISSION. His many friends in the Swansea Valley will be pleased to learn that Mr. W. H. Woodliffe, of Ystalyfera, has been gazet- ted as a lieutenant in the National Re- serve. Lieut. Woodliffe thoroughly de serves the honour conferred upon him Since the commencement of the war he has identified himself with the recruiting movement, and has secured hundreds for the colours. His brother, Capt. Woodliffe, is in Aden withthe Brecknock*.

GRAVITY OF STRIKES I

GRAVITY OF STRIKES. I Mil. ROGER BECK ON DISLOYALTY TO THEIR FELLOWS. At the monthly meeting of the Swansea Harbour Trust on Monday, Sir Griffith Thomas (Chairman) presiding, Mx. Roger Beck reported a further falling off in trade, and made an important reference to the effect disputes ane having en the trade of the port and the prosecution of the war. Mr. Roger Beck, in moving the adop- tion of the Finance Committee's report, said he had had occasion previously to refer to the effect of strikes on the trade of the port. The strike of miners in the South Wales Coalfield between July 15th and 21st was largely responsible for the diminished trade of the port last month. The total decrease amounted to 189,000 tons. The imports showed a falling off of 20,01V) tons, as follows:—Pitch, 3,500 tons1; pig iron, 3,700 tons; steel bars and billets, 3,000 tons; wood goods, 8,000 tons; ce.ment, 1,500 tons; pyrites, 3,000 tons, grain, 9,500 tons; sugar, 1,200 tons. There was an in- crease, however, in copper ore of 1,800 tons, calamine 7,000 tons, and iron ore 8,000 tons. In the exports coke and patent fuel de- clined 162,000 tons, tinplates 4,800 tons, and galvanised sheets 2,700 tons. T h-e financial result for the month of June was a loss of £ 1,922. It was a matter of very deep regret, Mr. Beck continued that there should be differences between capital and labour leading to stoppages at this critical time. In this connection he referred to the dispute actually exist- ing at the Swansea Docks to-day, and said there was no question that could arise between capital and labour that at a time like this should lead to a cessation of labour, and especially in the shipping of coal, because, as the Minister of Munitions had pointed out, coal was the fundamental strength of the country at the present time, and a large portion of the coal which was being sent from here to Franca was necessary for the produc- tion of munitions of war, in which hitherto our a dversaries had held an enormous advantage. Anything which checked the export of coal to France at the present time was practically playing into the hands of the enemy. If they were to fight together and to act as a loyal nation, all classes should combine together and make every sacrifice rather than there should be any falling off in the supplies necessary for the carrying on of the war to a successful issue. lie hoped and trusted that all who had to do with the leadership of the men would bring the men to think for one moment what they were doing. They were not only destroying the income of the Trust, but they were depriving those who had been their fellow workmen of the necessaries for the protection of their lives, the production of at least sufficient munitions to balance the enormous power of munitions brought against us by our adversaries; and they were, moreover, not loyal to those who had left good employ- ment and sacrificed their interests for their country. That Trust was not a great body with enormous funds upon which to draw. He pointed out that a great number of the supporters were in circumstances that were comparatively poor, and looked for their maintenance to the interest they got on the bonds. He wanted to point out to thcm-it was. he felt, his duty to point out to them—that it was absolutely essen- tial that, under no circumstances what- ever, should difficulties lead to a stoppage, and he wanted to protest against anything that would tend to prevent our being any- thing but an entirely united people. AM. Merrells .aid the reference of Mr. Roger Beck were evidently to the tippers, and he would like to say a word or two in defence of those men. In the first place, he pointed out that his union was not itself directly concernpd in the dispute. From what he had personally known of the facts of the matter, lie, however, chal- lenged Mr. Beck's charge that the men stopped work. lie had understood that the men had duly presented themselves for work every day and, as the railways were now under the control of the port, they were responsible. The men were ready and willing to work, but the railway com- panies were not prepared to let them work under the conditions the men asked for- Mr. Roger Beck: Quite so; that is tho point. Mr. Merrells asserted that the men wanted to share the work between them in the best manner possible, U and," he added, you gentlemen concerned in the shipment of coal must agree that it is the best method that the men should co- operate-together in the way they propose.v The fault, went on Mr. Merrells, did not lie at the door of the men. As a ma-tter of fact, they were quite ready and prepared to work. If the method they proposed was not the best way, why did they not come forward and prove it was not the best: and if it was the best, it should be adopted? Mr. Roger Beck: That does not detract at all from what I say; that it is no ex- CUoSe for discontinuing work, that their way. which they think best, but which the employers cannot possibly think best, is not adopted Alderman Merrells: The same question should be addressed to both labour and capital. The Chairman moved the adoption of t.he report, and gave it as his opihion that the prevalence of a dispute should not mean a stoppage of work, especially at this time. The resolution was carried.

SIXTH WELSH DRIVER KILLED IN FRANCE

SIXTH WELSH DRIVER KILLED IN FRANCE. News wr.s received on Friday morning that Driver John H. Jones, of the transport section of the 6th Welsh, has died in ho&- pital as a result cf injuries sustained after being severely kicked by a horse. He "lWS buried in a British soldiers' graveyard in France, and a cross will le placed, t3 mark the spot. The burial ervice wa3 condiiet-d by the Rev. A J. T. Eacott, chaplain to the forces, who sent letters of condo- lence to the rela- tives. Driver Jones, who was in his twentieth year, was a son of Mr. J. H. onJes, Short- street. Swansea. He was formerly cm- ployed at the Mond Nickel Works, enlisting in the 6th Welsh on the outbreak of war. He has three other brothers with the colours—Sergeant D. Jones, of the 6th. Welsh, cnd Corporals Dan and Sam Jones, in the 7th Welsh, whilst a brother-in-law, Coy. Sergt.-Mijor T. Thomas, of the Rifle Brigade, is serving in France. Another bro- ther, Mr. Tom Jones, is a member of the "Cambria Daily Leader" and "Herald" com- posing staff. Mr. J. H. Jones, No. 8, Short-street, Swan- sea, the father of Driver J. H..Tones, ha3 received a message of sympathy and con- dolence from the Right Hon. Sir Alfred Mond, BM-t., M.P.

No title

Some of, the finest of the Nottingham lace machines have in recent years been sent to Warsaw to local firms with branch establishments there. One of the leading Nottingham houses estimates the value of its plant at considerably abowt £ 250,000.

Advertising

c J'BAtfE MARK BEG. GREAT BRITAIN. -cheap clean cool gg ? ? bright g The housewife who has to POl make 1/ go the length of 2/- will find in Crex Carpets the lw|30f best all-round satisfaction —in wear, comfort, appear- ance, and cleanliness. They BS0I are seamless and reversible a? fl -cleaned by merely taking j f]|| up and shaking. No tacks B I needed. I jjl Unrivalled for Hospitals, Tents, and Huts. laP^ I Come and see r— them at hen. Evans & Co., Ltd., Swansea.

GOWERTON CONSTABLE AS GUARDSMANI

GOWERTON CONSTABLE AS GUARDSMAN. Three more members of the County Police Force 8tationed in the Gowerton I area have joined the forces, thus swelling the proud and big list of those already gone. The latest recruits are P.C. Thomas Norgate, Gowerton; P.C. Sidney Phelps, Gorseinon, and P.C. 535 Thomas, of the Mumbles. The two former left the district on Mon- day morning to take their places in the ranks of the Welsh Guards. P.C. Thomas left at the same time to join the Hoyal Garrison Artillery. All three officers are well-known and very nopular. P.C. Norgate has bsen stationed at Gowerton for about four years, and for some time P.C. Phelps has also been at the head station, but he was better known at Gorseinon, where he had been stationed until a short time ago. P.C. Thomas has been stationed at Mumbles, to which place he was trans- ferred a few months ago from Cwmgorse.

I WOUNDED LIEUTENANTI

I WOUNDED LIEUTENANT. I In the Gazette." the name of Second Lieutenant G. H. Mills, 6th Welsh Regiment 

ISWANSEA MILLERS PROFITS I

SWANSEA MILLERS' PROFITS. I The directors of Messrs. Thomas, Evans and John Dyer, Ltd., at a meeting on Friday, decided to declare a dividend at six per cent. per annum on the preference shares, and of seven per cent. per annum on the ordinary shares, less income tax, with a bonus of three per cent. on the ordinary shares. The dividend is declared for the year ending June 30th, 1915. Last year the dividend on the ordinary shares was five per cent.

ISXTH WELSH SOLDIER WOUNDED

I S:XTH WELSH SOLDIER WOUNDED. Pte. Bright, of the (ith Welsh, who was on Friday officially reported having been wounded in action in France, is a native of Tumble, near Llanelly. He came to Swansea shortly after the outbreak of war, and enlisted in the 6th Welsh. No de- I tails of his injuries are available.

NEW DEPUTY LIEUTENANTS

NEW DEPUTY LIEUTENANTS. The London Gazette of Friday states that the following commissions as deputy-lieutenants are signed by the lord- lieutenant of the county of Glamorgan, under date uly 31st:— Lieutenant-colonel William Forrest, D.S.O. Colonel Alfred Sidney Gardner, V.D. Colonel Herbert Richard Momfray. Colonel John Arthur Hughes, C.B., V.D. Colonel Arthur Perkins James, V.D. Lieutenant-colonel Henrv Edzell Mor- gan Lindsay, C.B. Captain Rhys Williams. Lieut.-Col. Forrest, D.S.O., St. Fagans, is a leading member of the Glamorgan Territorial Force Association. Colonel Homfrav, of Penllyn, is in command of one of the Bantam batta- lions of the Welsh Regiment. Colonel James, V.D., of Taffswell, is the veteran Territorial, so long associated with the 5th Welsh. Colonel Morgan Lindsay, C.B., of, Yetradmynach, had a distinguished career in the R.E. He has two sons at the front. Captain Rhys Williams. K.C., of Miskin Manor, is in the Welsh Regiment of Guards. Colonel Gardner, of Swansea, was formerly commanding officer of the 1st Welsh Howitzer Brigade. R.F.A., and is now iu command of the Divisional Am- munition Column of the' 43rd (Welsh) Division. Colonel Hughes, of Barry T)ocl;. has rendered yeoman service to the T««fitorial movement ia Glamorgan,

I WARSAW AS IT IS TODAY

I WARSAW AS IT IS TO-DAY. GIGANTIC TASK OF DISMANTLING I TOWN SUCCEEDS. I A vivid description of the evacuation of Warsaw is given by Mr. Bassett Digby in the Chicago Daily News," from which we extract the following:— I left Warsaw for Moscow with the British, French, Belgian and Serbian Consuls, together with the contents of the Consular archives. On our train also was the British chaplain, the last member of the British colony in the Polish capi- tal. With us was treasure amounting to nearly 31 millions sterling. The evacuation began on July 15. Free transport "was provided by the Govern- ment. During many weeks freight cars had been accumulating in thousands on the sidings, and every day train loads of refugees were dispatched east as fast as the tieeing men, women, and children could be packed into the trains. A third of a million citizens, including nearly half the Warsaw ghetto, thus de- parted eastwards, while another third of a million of the peasantry came trooping into the Polish metropolis from the sur- rounding districts. It is reckoned that in the city itself tens* of thousands of homes were in- stantly broken up. I know four cases of men worth more than a million roubles last month who are now nearly penni- less. Simultaneously with the evacuation, all property likely to be useful to the enemy, especial metal machinery, was removed or destroyed. Factories were feverishly stripped of their plant, and the owners granted free transport for it to the east. Day and night one heard the muffled roar of dynamited factory plant that was embedded in concrete or too cumbersome to dismantle by other means. Every fragment of this dynamited metal was transported eastwards. The newspapers made their last ap- pearance with the announcements of the evacuation, after which the lynotypes were uprooted and the floors carted away. Police and soldiers visited every printing works and newspaper omce. taking away founts of type and dismantling printing Dresses. Ii Hardly a ton of copper fittins was left in the city. All stock of copper- piping in factories, plumbers shops, iron- mongery establishments, as well as house- hold and hospital utensils and fittings, were taken away. Warsaw knew no sleep. The huge post office, banks, telegraph office, Law Courts. and various municipal departments were scenes of universal dismantlement, pack- ing every kind of portable equipment for immediate transport to the interior. Throngh the streets passed endless columns of carts and lorries, heavily laden, converging upon the Praga and Alexandrovsky bridges across the Vist-ula, only soldiers, with their legs swinging over the distinguishing a waggon laden with millions of roubles in paper" money and irreplaceable records, from those containing peasants and their sacks of potatoes. Day and night gangs of soldiers were busily employed stripping league after league of copper telegraph wires from their poles. Church doors flung open revealed the interiors filled with weeping, praying Poles and Russians, amongst whom passed ministering priests in their gorgeous vestments. — Aloft in the towers the TOge bronze bells had been unglung, lest they should become food later for Krupp's furnaces. Not only the bells, but all the church plate, precious vestments, and Ikons, were transferred into the interior. In the Church of the Holy Cross, Krakovski-street, reposed in a vault Chopin's heart. The vault was opened and the precious relic removed to Mos- cow. The telephone exchange was dismantled, and dynamos supplying power for street cars removed, together with all wheels and detachable fittings connected with the tram service. Wherever possible troops were sent out to gather the crops in the surrounding country. Where this was impossible the harvest was destroyed, villages being razed to the ground. Food cost ten times as much in War- saw as it did a month ago, and during the last few days there was no public water supply, the pumps for operating the machinery having been dispatched east- wards. Every wheeled vehicle was trans- ported across the Vistula, and nearly all the horses. Two thousand hackney car- riages were driven by their owners out of the city to find refuge somewhere on the Moscow-road. • Thousands of the poor were ferried across the Vistula and stream eastwards on foot unable to afford bread. Jewellers have buried their stocks, any necessary trade being done by barter. On the Belgian Frontier, Sunday.—The German army in Flanders celebrated the German entry into Warsaw by reviews of troops in the various towns, a display or flags and other festivities. In most places the commandant fol- lowed the example of Count Schulenburg at Liege, who addressed the garrison, which was drawn up in the Place Lam- bert, after a triumphal march through the city. Schulenburg referred to the valour of Germany's unconquerable armies, and distributed a number of Iron Crosses. I There were similar scenes in Brussels, Ghent and Bruges. The cafes were crowded with German officers, and at Bruges banners were displayed with the inscription, Warsaw to-day, Calais to- morrow." The German heavy howitzers near Vlasloe and Eessen have been indulging in an unusually lavish bombardment of the Belgian trenches. On the west bank of the Yser, below Dixmude, the enemy clai into have rendered a portion of the first line untenable in the neighbourhood of Heernisse.

IDRINK AND POISON A SWANSEA I TALE

I DRINK AND POISON: A SWANSEA I TALE. At Swansea Police Court, on Friday, George Beard, labourer, was charged on remand with attempting to commit suicide by taking poison in the Ivorites Hotel, Swansea, on July 24th. Evidence showed that defendant entered the bar of the hotel with a woman com- panion. After writing a note, he drank the contents of a glass he had. The woman endeavoured to snatch the glass away from him, and shouted, It's poison!" A glass of salt and water was administered, and subsequently P.C. (48) Williams was called, and defendant handed to him a bottle of spirits of salt. Beard was re- moved to the Swansea Hospital where he remained for five days. Defendant, when charged, said he had been drinking very heavily for the last three months. For days before he com- mitted the act he had done nothing but drink. He had never had any intention of taking his life, and, as a matter of fact, he did not remember having taken the poison. He expressed regret, and said his downfall was due to drink. He was deter- mined not to drink any more, or ever to enter a public-house again. Defendant was committed to the next Q-carter Sessions, bail being allowed in a personal surety of £20, and one other of £20.

No title

Official intimation has been received that Lance-Corporal Harry Dempster, of the King's Royal Rifles, a brother of Mr. T. D. Dempster, secretary of the Aber- gwili show, has died in hospital in France from shot wounds. Lance-corporal Dempster, who was highly popular, was well known at Llanelly and Llandilo, MBJaere he worked for some time.

Advertising

STARTLING NEWS I FURNISHING WILL SOON BE A CREAT LUXURY 11 Any House Furnisher will confirm the fact that not only has everything required for Furnishing gone up very considerably, but that through the great shortage of labour caused by the War, the great difficulty of getting supplies is increasing every week, certain goods in fact being unobtainable at any cost! Foreseeing several months ago this probability BEVAN & COMPANY, LTD. WALES' LARGEST FURNISHERS, 280, Oxford Street and Arcade, Swansea; Llanelly, Cardiff, &c., placed at old prices, for delivery to them as required during the War, the heaviest orders by far ever given by them during their long career of sixty-five years. This well-known Firm are therefore in a position to offer goods at old prices, and far and away below those of their competitors!! SAVE YOUR MONEY! PURCHASE FORTHWITH FROM BEVAN & 00. They continue to pay Return Fares on Cash Orders! Free Delivery up to 200 miles from all Branches! Illustrated Catalogues Gratis,-and Post Free!

PONTARDAWE FUNERALS 1

PONTARDAWE FUNERALS., 1 Mr. Thomas Thomas. The funeral of Mr. Thomas Thomas, Quarr-road, Pontardawe, took place on Friday at Rhydyfro Churchyard, and was largely attended. Deceased, who was 73 years of age, had not been able to follow his work for a number of years. He was highly respected in the locality, being known as "Thomas v Crvdd." The Revs. J. R. Price (Rhydyfro), and J. Seirio! Williams (Tabernacle), took part in the funeral service. The chief mourners were: Mrs. Thomas (widow), Thomas, Llewelyn, William and David (sons), Mr. and Mrs. Bowen Bevan. Ynismeudw; Mr. and Mrs. Gwilym Wil- liams, Pontardawe; Mr. and Mrs. Edward Thomas, Pontardawe; Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Awstin, Dunvant; Mr. and Mrs. William Harries, Alltwen (daughters and sons-in-law); Mr. and Mrs. Evan Evans (deceased's only sister), Mr. and Mrs. James Hinkin. Alltwen; Mr. and Mrs. John Davies, Pontardulais; Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Jones. Alltwen; Mr. and Mrs. John Daniel, Alltwen (sister ,of the widow); Mrs. Morgans, Graigcefnpar:; Mrs. Hopkin Jones. Swansea; Mr. John Hopkin, Alltwen; Mr. Thomas Clement, Llansamlet; Mr. and Mrs. John Austin. Three Crosses; Mr. Evan J. Long. Three Crosses; Mrs. Rees. and son, Pontypool; Mrs. Lloyd, and Mrs. Jenkins, Morriston. Mr. John Williams. I There was a large and representative gathering at the funeral which took place at St. Peter's Churchyard, Pontardawe, of Mr. John D. Williams, a retired metal merchant, of Weighbridge House, Herbert street, Pontardawe. The deceased, who was a well known figure in the Swansea Valley, had reached the ripe old age of 86 years. He was a native of Trebanos, and was the originator of the local public weighbridge. The Rev. Joel Davies, M.A. (Vicar), and Rev. Jenkins (All Saints) officiated at the funeral service. The chief mourners were: Mr. and Mrs. D. Charles Williams. Morriston (son and daughter- in-law); Miss E. J. Williams, Trebanos (daughter); Miss M. G. Williams, Pontar- da.we (daughter); Mr. Eaton (son-in-law); Misses Olive, Doris, and Beryl Eaton (grandchildren); Mrs. John Williams, Pontardawe, and Mr. Tom Williams: Mr. and Mrs. Davies, Morriston; Mr. Nute, Swansea; Mrs. C. Powell, Tylorstown; Mr. G. Griffiths, Glyn-Neath; Mr. Owen, Neath; Mrs. William Johns, Neath; Mr. D. E. James, The Larches, YRtradgyn- lais; Mrs. Spencer Jones, Ystalyfera; Mrs. T. Phillips, Ystradgynlais; Mrs. Gibbs, Ystradgynlais Mrs. George Davies, Clydach; Mr. and Mrs. Morgan, Brvn- amman; Mrs. Havard, Graigcefnparc; Mrs. Daniel Bevan, Clydach; Mrs. Jones, Alltwen Hill; Mr. David Howells, Allt- wen; Mr. David Hy. Jones, Clydach; Mrs. Jones, Ystalyfera; Mr. William Davies and Miss Davies, Seven Sisters; Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Jones. Morriston; Mrs. Jenkins, Morriston; Mrs. Davies, Morriston, etc. Mr. J. R. Williams was the undertaker.

SWANSEAS YOUNGEST ACTORI

SWANSEA'S YOUNGEST ACTOR. I Undoubtedly the youngest actor on the British stage at present is little Ronald Vautier, who is a member of Mr. Mate- son Lang-s company playing "Pete" at the Aldwych Theatre, London. Ronald was born in Swansea, and his mother, before her marriage, was Miss Nellie Dean, of 17, Langdon-place, Swan- sea, a young lady well-known in Swansea and district. Ronald's father is Mr. Sidney Albert Vautier, of Shepperton, and he is also a member of the company. The youngster was born at his grand- mother's house, Langdon-place, Swansea, and lived in the town with his mother for six weeks. When Mr. Matheson Lang was looking out for a baby to ifill a role in his new production, Ronald was declared the very one for the position—and he got it. He is described by a Swansea l'riend of his mother as a "bright, bonny boy," and naturally he is extremely popular with his colleagues at the Aldwych Theatre. It will be recalled that his excellent be- having at the first performance delighted the audience.

SWANSEA USB WAR RELICI

SWANSEA U.S.B. WAR RELIC. I It will be remembered that some time ago Commandant Maggs of the United Service Brigade, Swansea, presented a French cavalry sword to be put up for auction for the benefit of the French Red Cross. The highest bidder was Mr. Charles E. Cleeves, and he has now kindly handed the interesting military relic back to the Brigade.

REMARKABLE ESCAPES I

REMARKABLE ESCAPES. A fierce looking fighter, according to a photograph of him, but actually an* extraordinarily cheery and conten- ted individual, is Pte. Richard Often, 1st South Wales Borderers. who has come for a week's furlough to his home at 26, Well- street, Swansea, t e r after having been in France from August 12 to July 31st, and away from home 12 months on Thursday.

DRUNKEN SOLDIERS FEAT j

DRUNKEN SOLDIER'S "FEAT." At Swansea Police Court on Monday, Thomas Williams, a soldier of the 6th Welsh Begt., admitted being drunk ami disorderly in Mansel-street. P.C. (84) Porter said Williams was very dn)nk nnd using mo.t obscene lan- ?uaerp..H? lumped aboard a tram-car and practically cleared the car,'? .mdtt was with great diSic?]ty that he w?g removed. He was remanded until T v ea c.1 to [&wait an escort.

Advertising

A 600D INVESTMENT y is a box of that famous stomach and liver medicine- Beecham's Pills. It can certainly be claimed that every box of this excellent preparation yields a £ large interest to the purchaser in the shape of increased energy and the profit C X resulting. If you feel that better health would improve your powers, { ggg Beecham's Pills are, in every way, likely to help you. They strengthen the JL Mt stomaclif restore the appetite, stimulate the liver, cleanse the bowels, purify M H the blood and consequently exercise a beneficial influence upon the whole B ? system. They maintain the health by regulating the most important B El £unctios of digestion. You will be sure to find a good investment in B BEECHAIVTS PILLS fl Prepared only by THOMAS BEECHAM, St Helens, Lane. B H Sold everywhere In boxes, price Illi (66 pllls) & 2{9 (168 pills.) B

LOCAL MILK VENDORS FINED f I

LOCAL MILK VENDORS FINED. f Several milk cases came before the Swansea Bench ou Monday. John Davies and his wife, Hannah Davies, Bishopston. were summoned for selling milk alleged to be deficient in butter fa.t on June 24th. Mr. Hield, deputy town clerk, who prosecuted, said that the analyst's certifi- cate showed a deficiency of butter fat of 20 per cent. Mr. £ va.n Rowlands defended, and aid his client had been a farmer for over 27 years, and had kept cows all that time, selling their milk without a com- plaint. The magistrates inflicted a fine of 40s. against John Davies. the case against the wife being withdrawn. Anotonio Silver and Joserpha Larnas, j assistant, of 1, Waterloo-street, were sum- moned for a similar offence. There was a deficiency of 11 per cent. The Bench inflicted a fine of 10s. against Silver. Messrs. Jones were summoned for ppll- ing milk allegpd to be not of the quality demanded on July 24th. Mr. Hikld, deputy town clerk, prosecuted, and Mr. Trevor Hunter defended. Mr. Hielei said the analyst's certificate showed a deficiency of 30 per cent. of butter fat. For the defence, Mr. Trevor Hunter said he did not dispute the facts, but. as a matter of fact. defendants only sold milk for consumption on the premises. It was bought from a farmer in Carmarthen- shire, whose milk had hitherto been f6und exceptionally good. The Bench imposed a fine of C5.

SHACKLETONS SHIP DISCOVERYI AT SWANSEA

SHACKLETON'S SHIP "DISCOVERY" I AT SWANSEA. The auviliary barque "Discovery," the vessel on which Sir Ernest Shackleton made his famous expedition to the South Pole in 1907-1909, reaching a point within 97 miles of his goal, is now lying outsde the entrance to the Prnce of Wales Dry Dock, Swansea. As she made her way up channel, she attracted a good deal of at- tention from people who were tak- ing a stroll around. tho bays at the Mumbles, the unique and solid looking structure of the barque making her out from other vessels. Prior to April of this year the Discovery was laid up at London Docks for four years after her long voyage. She has since been to New York and France, and I has come into Swansea in ballast from Falmouth. Owned by the Hudson Bay Co., her skipper is Captain G. F. Bush, who has just been promoted to that rank. He was out in Xcw Zealand when the Discovery coaled there. The Discovery's net register is 421, and she can carry a cargo ot 750 tons. Her sails are supplemented by steam power, and she can do fix knots under steam.

LAND SALE AT CARMARTHENI

LAND SALE AT CARMARTHEN. Messrs. Bpn Evans and Sons, Pen-I eader, offered for sale at the Bcfar's Head I Hotel. Carmarthen, on Saturday, freehold farm property situate in the parish of Abernant. The bidding did not reach the reserve, and the lots were withdrawn. The farm of Pwllryfarch, comprising dwelling-house and outbuildings and K5 3-5 acres meadow, pasture and arable land,, in the occupation of Mr. Thomas Pugh. as yearly tenant, was withdrawn at 91.950. The other lots were: Parcyrychain fields, 6 3-5 acres pasture land, in the occupation of the Rev. Owen Jones and Mr. John Davies, as yearly tenants; three nelds of 1" 1-5 acres, part of Parcyrychain fields, in the occupation of S. Davies and John Davies: small holding, part, of the farm of Pwlldyfarch, comprising 35J acres pasture meadow and arable land, in the occupation of Mr. Thomas Pugh, as yearly tenant; field of 13 9-10 acres, part of Pwlldyfarch, in the occupation of Mr. Thomas Pugh. j Solicitors: Mr. C. F. Davies. Llanwrtvd Wells, and Mr. D. E. Stephens-Davies, Carmarthen.

SWANSEA MANS DEATH IN SOUTH i AFRICA I

SWANSEA MAN'S DEATH IN SOUTH i AFRICA. Mr. A. H. Widenbarr, a .native cf Swansea, died Ht Pretoria llosr"t?ll., Africa, last mouth, from pneumonia. Mr. Andrew Harrington Widenbarr was born at Swansea in 1873, and went out to South Africa, at the call of nation a service, with the Gloucestershire Yeo- manry in January, 1900. Towards the end of the war, Mr. \Vi,lu.- barr va* for a time in the office of t, Governor of Pretoria, and then acted paymaster of the National Scouts. He was afterwards appointed assistant dila tor of Burgher Land Settlement*, and this office he held till the closing of that ele- partment in July. 1S15. For SOllle ti m. Mr. Widenbarr was in business in Pre- 'I toria as an accountant and went, and latterly he had been in the service of tire Dcletvo Department, and wa« in that • itrce days before his dcatli

Advertising

r: CREY HAIR } restored to its original coloor by nsing j j HARSISON's^RESTORER j It is not a dye, but actS naturally. is quiteharaaless PRICE 118, PoutsHgo 3d. j G. W. Harrison, M.P.S. Spgf*tst, BeAg. SpectgdK Ru la g Agent for Gowerton: S. R. Morris, Chemist, Sterry Road. Brynairunan: E. M. Morris, Chemist. Port Talbot: T. B. Bamford. Swansea: M. Davies. 1/11 We claim that 2/9 DFL. TYE'S DROPSY, LlVEa. AND WIND PILLS Cure Constipation, Backache, Indigestion, Heart Weakness, Headache and Nervous Complaints. M-. John Parkin, 5. Eden Oeeosat, West Auckland, writes, dated March 21, 1912:- I must say they are all that ycm represent them to be; they are splendid; indeed I wish I had known about them sooner. I shall make their worth known to all who suffer from Dropsy." Sole Maker: S. J. COLEY, LTD., 57, HIGH STREET, STROUD. GIX53. KERNICK'S VEGETABLE PILLS. When you feel out of sortft^fe are taxwibiBd with Indigestion, AcidiJsj Wind, yea. cannot do better than try a coarse of tlae a.bove remedy. Appetrte will be regaiwd and you will again fed vigorous. Of dt Chemists at 7id. aaid 134d. per box. ELLIS'S HERBAL PILLS. Made from prescription of celebrated rse for Aisemia, Bloodleseness, &c- Send stamp foe free sample and paxfica- lars; also testimonials. Prices Is. 3d. and 4s. 6d. post paid, under cover. Advice Free. MRS. ELLIS, 12, V ALLAN CE ROAD, HOVE, SCSBEX. fnHPORTAMT TO IWTHEBSII P 0' RTW 109 M9, l?, -gafu.l"-a of her obild øbo1dd.. A ??JPR???? i POMADEJ ODe mpliootioa MMB aU Nib -a -M" IA beauttoes &Dd xkvugthens the Llh.. n "a' ti& & gapo"o",d* K A 1D'cJ4. h Zoe" (a h"big TYA R ltii()Tn am IL onsomm CSBR, KO| ( Agents for Neath: Hibbert & Son. Abet. avon: G. D. Loveluck. Gwmavoo.: H. S. Arnold. Neath: J. G. Isaac. Port Talbot: T. B. Bamford. Swansea: T. Davies. Brynamman: E. M. Morris. Garaairt: J. W. Evans. Glanansman: J. W. Evans. Landore: T. Dryden. Pontardawsc E. Griffith. Clydach: Davies Bsoe. M