Teitl Casgliad: Herald of Wales

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 4 o 12 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
33 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
PRESENTATION TO KILLAY NURSE

===:=-==.=====-===:=-=::=. PRESENTATION TO KILLAY NURSE, Nurse Warren is leaving the Dunvan t and Killay district for London, and to show their appreciation of her faithful work, the villagers on Saturday, at the Parish Hall, presented her with a com- bined writing and dressing case and a- purse of gold. The Rev. J. H. Davies ,presided, and Mrs. M. B. Williams, tho founder of the Nursing Association, ma(IN the presentation. Other speakers wero the Rev. Glasnant Jones, Lieutenant Bransby Williams, and Mr. S. Roach. A musical programme followed, when tli,3 following took part:—Messrs. J. Thomas, G. Hoskins, T. Roderick, A. Jenkins, the Misses K. Hoskins, M. Austin, L. Br ay ley, and the Dunvant Male Voice Party. Thq accompanist was Mr. J. Owen Thomaa.

No title

Miss Violet Asquith is making satisfaOoi tory though slow progress, and is still con- fined to her bedroom. As soon as her! condition permits, she will leave town. Private Frederick Martin, of the Easfl Surrey Regiment, died in Willesden Ho, pital on Monday from the effects of in- juries received by being knocked downl by a motor-omnibus at Harlesden on Sun., day. Anglers will be interested to learn thatl the first V.C. awarded in the present wan was won by an angler—Corporal Charles A, Jarvis, who is a member of the Walthem. stow Brothers Angling Society and the Lon- don Anglers' Association. He blew up at bridge under heavy fire at Jenappes, A proposal is before the French Govern." ment for the creation of a. Minister of Suliw plies with the special object of preventing a monopoly in articles of food or an undue rise in prices. The appointment of such a Minister would be a flrat step towards th« pa-rliamentary control' of all war activities.

Advertising

For the Blood is the Life." DO YOU SUFFER from any SKIN or BLOOD DISEASE I Such as Eczema, Scrofula, Bad Legs, JJ r Absoeases, Ulcere, Glandular Swel- u lin?a, Boils, Pimples, Sores of &my mt,gl Mle<, 8100d Poison, Rheuma- tism, Gout, &c- ? If so don't waate your tinio and money on lotions and ointments which cannot get below the surface of the skin, What you want and what you must have is a medicine that will thoroughly free the blood of the poisonous matter which alone is the true cause of all your suffering. Clarke's Blood Mixture is just such a medicine. It is compoeed of ingredients which quickly expel from the blood all impurities from whatever cause wising, and by rendering it clean and pure can be relied upon to ellect a lasting cum Over M years, success. I Pleasant to ?' ?NL Pleatasakne. t to /Ctar?e's? —? Blood 1 Mixture# Sotd by ? .?Nf Chemists PW j??  .?B)?' R«fUM Substitutes* HAS CUBED THOUSANDS. WILL OUNK, Yogi.

LLANDOVERY BOARD OF I GUARDIANS

LLANDOVERY BOARD OF I GUARDIANS. THE COLLECTION OF LLANGADOCK RATES. I The fortnightly meeting of this body was held on Iriaay, when thero were present:- Mr. Dd. Davies (chairman), Ald. T. Watkins, Messrs. T. Williams, W. Evans, R. Lewis, J. l'rytherch, Rd. Thomas, Nicholas Nicholas, Evan Harries, Philip Davies, W. R. Lewis, and Geo. Morgan, together with the clerk D. T. M. Jones), the master (Mr. J. Ceredig Evans), and the relieving officer sMr. E. Williams). Outdoor Relief. The relieving officer reported that the number iri receipt of outdoor relief for the week ending July 29th waa 135. at a cost of £ 25 2s.; corresponding week last year, 122- cost, £ 21. For the week ending August 5th, 131; cost, X21 13s. 6d.; corresponding week last year, 122; cost, ;EZO, 15a. The House. I The master reported that Divine services had been conducted at the House by tho Revs. fl. Ivor James (B.) and Joseph Harry Cong.). Newspapers had been sent to the inmates by Ald. Watkins. An altered diet- ary, which met the approval of the medical officer, had been drawn out for Fridays. Plain cake had been substituted for bread and choose for lunch, so that the inmates would not be supplied twice with the same kind of food. The Board adopted) the change. Visits had been paid to the institu- tion by Ald. Watkins and Mr. J. Prytherch. They found everything satisfactory. Messrs. Evan Harris, Thomas Williams, and Nicho- las Nicholas had paid- visits at 5.30 p.m. on the 23rd of July. They found all the in- mates clean and happy, and he-ard no com- plaints. subsequent visit was also re- corded by Messrs. Watkins and Prytherch, when thay found everything in good order.. The door of the women's ward leading into the garden had been repaired in a highly satisfactory manner. The number of in- mates wae 25, against Z3 in the correspond- ing period, and the number of vagrants re- lieved for tho fortnight 44, against 55 in th# corresponding period la'st year. Precepts. I The clerk announced the receipt of pre- cepts including L264 4s. lid. in respect to the County School, and EI,591 general county mte.-Mr. R. Thomas asked if any reply had been received to the letter ad- dressed to the medical superintendent st the Mental Hospital, Carmarthen.—The Clerk replied in the negative—Mr. R. Thomas then moved that he be sent a re- minder asking him if he would supply them with a reply by the next meeting.—This was agreed to. Economy in Expenditure. I The Clerk read a circular from the Local Government Board issued to local authori- ties on The 4th of August drawing their at- tention to the need for the organisation of labour and the restriction of borrowing, and the postponement of all except abso- lutely necessary/ works.—The Clerk said it wma more applicable to the Rural District Council than the Board of Guardians. It applied to the latter in respect to the mak- ing of rates. He did not know where they oou'd economise more than they did. As to the Rural District Council they had only a few bridges where they might consider its application—The Chairman said they ap- proved of the contents of the circular.—The Clerk asked if they wished to fix a commit- tee to fix the rates for the next half-year.- The Chairman: Wo ,will act "UI a whole Board as usual. The Late Mr. Herbert Morgan. I Councillor Thomas, of Whitland, who in- troduced himself as the son-in-law of the late Mr. Herbert Morgan, assistant overseer "Uld collector of rates up to the time of his death, for Llangadock, applied on behalf of deceased's relatives, and especially tJte widow, that they might be allowed to col- lect the rates for this term. Mi". Thoma. said he hid, in conjunction with Mrs. Lewis, his sister-in-law, who assisted her father in the work for the last few years, consulted the overseers, and they were agreeable, sub- ject to the approval of the Board of Guar- dians. The deceased had, before he died, collected a goodly sum, and paid it into the bank. What they wanted was to be allowed to complete the collection of the rate. He believed that the deceased had even gone further than that; he had delivered, with the exception of a very few, the demand notes for the new rates. Mr. Thomas ex- plained that he had been appointed sole executor of the estate, and, as showing his suitability to undertake the responsibility, mentioned—although he had no desire to blow his own trumpet-thaf' he had been for years a member of the Narberth Board of Guardians and the District Council. He aaarcd tho Board that everything would be done as speedily as possible, -%nd he hoped, with the help of Mrs. Lewis, to do the work and bring in the books completed by that day month. He should, as well as the family, be very pleased if the Board would grant this request.—Aid. Watkins said that peraottally he considered the application a very reasonable one, but at the same time he should like to be clear whether they would be within their rights if they moved in the matter without conferring with the Parish Council. He was certainly in favour of recommending the course suggested to the body named, who could communicate with the overseers. He failed to see why anyone could have any objection to the ap- plication. They all knew the late collector very well. There was no better one in the. county.—Mr. Thomas said he should be pleased to deposit as security in the bank £;100 or £ 800.—Mr. L. Eoderick •. I move, if it is in accordance with the wish of the Parish Council, that we sanction the application.— Ald. Watkins said he had great pleasure in seconding, and he hoped there would be no obstacle in the way. He should like the relatives to finish the lot.—The Olerk: As far as I can gather, the Board of Guardians will have no objection whatever to accept security from the representatives of the late Mr. Herbert Morgan. As you are awara, you have no voice in the -%ppointment of an assistant overseer, but whoever is ap- pointed has to give security to this Board. The appointment is with the Parish Coun- cil, and the overseers are responsible for the rates. The Clerk added that it would be useless jrassing a resolution if it was not in order. If they stated that they would not raise any objeotion, that would meet the case.—Mr. Thomas: I have the approval of the overseers.-The Clerk said it would carry more weight if the Board recom- mended to the Parish Council th-at Mr. Thomas be appointed temporarily.—Aid. Watkins: That will simplify matters very much. I agree with that, and move that we strongly recommend to the Parish Council the representative of the late Mr. Morgan to collect.—Mr. Thomas said that the people were oontinually bringing money in, but be did not think it advisable to interfere with the books until the course suggested had been approved of.—The Clerk said that the fact that that gentleman was the executor under the will carried great weight, for the reprosentsaiv-e of the late Mr. Morgan was responsible for what was collected. Vote of Condolence. The Chairman: I am sure we are all very thankful t- you. Mr. Thomas, for your ser- vices. The late Mr. Morgan was very long connected with this Board,, although not actually our servant -is overseer, and did his work most satisfactorily- I propose that we pass a vote of condolence with the family.—Aid. Watkins, seconding, said they held the late Mr. Morgan in great respect. They looked upon him "LS a very good offi- cer, and he did his work thoroughly. With regard to tho new assessment or valuation in his parish, he had everything at his fin- ger ends. He felt that they had lost a most excellent officer.-The votu was"carried in the usiral way, the member^"standing the while. The Clerk explained having received a communication from the Lord Lieutenant of the County, Mr. J. W. Gwynne Huerhes, Tregyb, with reference to calling meetings of the Board of Guardians and R.D.C.. to vam a patriotic resolution as tiie it-oniver- i sary of the war. The communication was not, however, received in time to convene meetings.—Members generally expressed their approval of the resolution with its ex- pression of determination to continue the war to a victorious issue.

Advertising

GP.OCER- Going Messages! The Imps are busy going messages for Mother, and there will be a rare treat for the birthday party. Here they come with the !BIRDS Crystal Jelly fPowder which makes a "Jelly in a Jiffy." A clear gem-like jelly, laden with the delightful flavor of fresh ripe fruit. The clearness proves purity, aqd purity means health. BIRD'S Jelly is good for the children good for the grown ups. They have not forgotten the 33irds SpongiIL3 What a joy it is to use BIRD'S Spongie! With a 2Id packet the merry little imps can make, in a few minutes, a delicious, rich, moist Swiss Roll large enough for a big family. ?.????? -?_? If you have not tried BIRD'S  St tm.Sm?tt'? *

THE DOMESTIC ARTS

THE DOMESTIC ARTS. Swansea Committee and College Charges. At a meeting of Swansea Education Committee on Monday, Aid. J. Dovonald was voted to the chair. The Clerk (Mr. A. W. Halden) reported on a meeting of the Joint Management Committee of the Training School for Domestic Arts for South Wales and Mon- mouthshire, at Cardiff, and the Council of the University College of Cardiff with regard to the renewal of the lease to the Management Committee, which expired on July 31st last. The rent was previously 1:400 per annum, the college providing a portion of the clerical assistance, but charging £100 to the Management Com- mittee under this head. The college now wished to increase the rent by 1:50, and if they supplied clerical assistance required a total of £ 620 per annum. The com- mittee, however, agreed to pay the £ 4-50 rent, and provide clerical assistance at 4:126 per annum, bringing the total cost to the committee tfc £5ï5. Mr. T. J. Kees (Director of Education) wrote that a dozen Swansea girls were already in the school, with more to follow, and he strongly advised the sealing of the agreement with the new terms. In the coarse of discussion Mr. Ivor Gwynne said the University made a failure of the school. The Management Committee had changed this to a success, but the profit they had made was not sufficient to warrant this increase. He would not agree to a renewal of the agreement for five years, because at any moment they might make their own ar- rangements in Swansea. There was a possibility of all elementary school teachers having to take domestic subjects, and they might have to make local ar- rangements. But if they did not agree to jhe present proposals Swansea girls would be at a disadvantage. The University fakpd taken undue advantage of the educa- tional authorities of South Wales. The I agreement was agreed to for three years. I

LOCAL WEDDINGS I

LOCAL WEDDINGS. I On Saturday a very interesting wedding was polemnised at Hermon C.M. Chapel, Penrhiwcciber. The contracting parties were Mr. Willie Roberts, the well known violinist, of Morriston, and Miss Olive Morris, only 4aughter of the late Itev. James Morris, Llanstephan and Peny- graig. The Rev. David Jones, M.A., Pen- rhiwceiber, assisted by the Rev. David Williams, Treherbert, officiated, and Professor David Erasmus presided at the organ. The bridesmaid was Miss Annie Price, daughter of the late Rev. Thomas Price, Ammanford, while Mr. W. R. Davies, Maesyrhaf, Manselton (brother- ih-l'aw of the bridegroom) performed the duties of best man. The bride was prettily dressed in a grey silk poplin costume, with hat to match, and the bridesmaid wore a pretty ninon dress over taffeta, and a charming black hat. An interesting wedding took place a¡' St. Mary's Church, Swansea, on Monday morning, the contracting parties being Miss Betty Morris, 40, Terrace-road, Mount Pleasailt and Mr. H. Benson, of Eaton-grove. Miss Morris is well known in musical circles. A pretty wedding was celebrated at Capel Gomer on Saturday, the contract- ing parties being Mr. John Owen Jones, of Eiranfa," Ynystawe, and Miss Blod- wen Evans, of Chemical-road. Morriston. The bride was given away by her brother, Mr. Tom Evans, of Brecon House, Gors- einon. The duties of best man were carried out by Mr. Daniel Jones, father cf the bridegroom, while the bridesmaid was Miss C. B. Jones, sister of the bride- groom.

DUNVANT COLLfERS DEATHI

DUNVANT COLLfER'S DEATH. I Thricl Adjourned Coroner's Inquiry. The thrice-adjourned inquest upon David Long, of Eryncelyn, Waunarlwydd, a collier employed at Dunvant Colliery, was concluded by Mr. F. H. Glynn Price (county coroner) at Shepherds' Hall. Waunarlwydd. Long was found dead at the colliery on the 20th. July last. Mr. Rowlands appeared for the oom- j pany. Dr. David Arwyn Davies, M.R.C.S., j L.R.C.P., in his evidence at the first in- quest, said in his opinion deceased had slipped, struck his head against some hard 8U bstance, and fallen face downwards into the pool in wbich decea?wd w?? found, and death would be due to drowning. It was impossible, however, to say whether the burns on the hands were due to the electric current or some other cause; there were three burns. After further evidence, the jury re- turned a verdict of Death through asphyxiation, due to electrocution and drowning, accidentally caused."

I WELSH MP AT MUNITIONSI OFFICE

WELSH M.P. AT MUNITIONS OFFICE. On Monday Mr. W. Llewelyn Williams, K.O., M.P took up a position as a sort of law officer of the Crown, unpaid. There are, it appears, some 30 to 40 Acts of Par- liament, emergency and otherwise, which affect the Ministry of Munitions, and, of course, that Ministry being of such recent creation, many questions of a legal char- acter as yet unsolved have arisen and are likely to arise. Laet week, Mr. Williams offered his ser- vices to Mr. Lloyd George, and the latter gladly accepted them with a view to elucidating from the legal point* at view these points.

No title

Returns kept by Mr. Charles Crack, a rat catcher, who died at Bocking. Essex, aged 70, show that during the past 50 [years he caught Qxjw

I BOYS FOOLISH ACT

I BOYS' FOOLISH ACT. Six young Garnant boys namect Leslie Jones, Percy Jones, Gwynfor Jones, Gwynne Davies, Alf. Evans, and Michael Michael, were charged at the Juvenile Court at Ammanford on Monday with having damaged a Great Western Rail- way crossing at Garnant to the extent of < £ 3 on the 13ch of last May. Mr. T. R. Ludford. in prosecuting, said the charge was a serious one because, in addition to smashing the crossing gate, the consequences of the boys' mischievous acts might have proved very grave indeed. By means of a big bar, they uncoupled one of a number of empty wagons on the Prince Albert siding, and also released I the brakes The truck began to move, and gathered momentum till it crashed i through the Prince Albert crossing gates. Fortunately, a man named Mason hap- pened to be there at the time, and suc- ceeded in stopping the truck, which had been checked in its career by impact with the gates. Otherwise, there was nothing to stop it going along to Garnant Station, and by then it would no doubt have gone at a speed of 50 miles an honr. The serious part of it was that a passenger train was about due at Garnant Station at the time. The parents of the boys pleaded guilty on their behalf. A A ported named W. F. Mortimer gave evidence. Detective Inspector W. H. Morris said it would cost JQJxs repair the crossing gate. He mentioned that the 6.15 p.m. passenger train from Llanelly was due at Garnant almost at the time this occurred, and that there was nothing except one -Or of points to srop this uncoupled wagon running all the way down. The Chairman, Mr. Henry Herbert, addressing the parents, pointed out the serious consequences that would have ensued. A passenger train being due at the time, it was probable that a large number of lives would have been. lost as a result. Each of the parents would have to pay 30s. inclusive, with the exception of the father of the boys Leslie and Percy Jones, who would have to pay costs. The boys and parents were bound over.

BEAT HER SERVANT I

BEAT HER SERVANT. I Mistress Sent to Gaol. An amazing story of cruelty to a young domestic servant, who was beaten by her mistress with sticks and a rein, and whotie hair was cut off with a horse-clipping machine, was related at Banbridge (County Down) Sessions on Saturday, when Mrs. Margaret Bethel, of Ballievey House, County Down, was charged with having assaulted and beaten Bridget Murphy, aged 19, in an aggravtaed manner. She was convicted and sentenced to one month's hard labour. Robert Gray, one of defendant's servants, was fined 40s. and costs, or in default 14 days' imprisonment, for aiding and abetting Mrs. Bethel. Great local interest was taken in the prosecution owing to Mrs. Bethel's social position. Bridget Murphy stated that within a week of being engaged as a servant to Mrs. Bethel the latter beat her with a stick be- cause she was not working hard enough. The blows cut her head and legs and hands. She was beaten with a -stick al- most every day. On Sunday, July 18, Mrs. Bethel beat her with the handle of a pitch- fork. Some time before that defendant beat her so severely about the head that her ears bled. She also cut her hair with a horse-clipping machine in the stable. De- fendant attempted to beat her, and she ran to the fields, and the other defendant followed "her and brought her back for Mrs. Bethel to beat her. On another occasion defendant beat her with a pony rein and threw a bucket of water on her. Constable Hyland informed the magis- trates that he and Constable McNalty on July 19 found Murphy wandering along a country road. Her hair was so closely cropped that they didn't know whether she was a boy or girl. The only clothes she had on wero an old potato bag with a hole cut out for her head and arms, a jorsoy and undergarment, and a pair of boots. She had no stock- ings.

NATIONAL AWARDSI

NATIONAL AWARDS. I More Local Winners at Bangor. I At the National Eisteddfod at Bangor on Friday, the following awards were made:— Six sketches: Evan G. Owen, Henllan, Cardiganshire. Welsh Essay: H. Parry Williams, New- port, Mon. Photos: Osmond Charles, Swansea, (half prize). Crotchet cushion: Mrs. Roderick, Swan- sea Valley, (half prize). Princess petticoat: Miss Tomkin, Caldi- cot School, Newport. Essay: 0. P. Hopkins, Mountain Ash. Bass solo: Arthur Glyndwr Thomas, Yny6hir, Rhondda. On Thursday the Chairing of the Bard took place. The adjudicators severely criticised the prize ode, and characterised the competition as most disappointing. Dr. Parry Williams, Rhyd-ddu, was the successful author. The prize of E25 for a Welsh drama was awarded to Miss Eileen Hughes, Lon- don, who won a similar prize some years ago at Rhyl. Captain Cyril Jenkins was awarded the 910 prize for the be6t part song for mixed voices. Miss Burnett, Swansea, won the two- guinea prize in the merzo-sopra-no compe- tition. The solos were Al desio di chi t* adora (Mozart), and Y Bugail Da (Osborn Roberts).

No title

The camp of the Brrtonferry Boy Scouts was struck on Saturday. On the previous day Madame Patti and Baron Cederstrom invited the ys to a high tea" at Craig-y-Nos Castle. The prima donna entered heartily into the arrangements, and had talis with each scout.

LLANDOVERY SUNDAY I SCHOOLS

LLANDOVERY SUNDAY I SCHOOLS. INTERESTING SPORTS AT LLAN. I DINGAT. The sports held in connection with the Church Sunday Schools, which had to be postponed on Monday on account of the wet weather, was held on Thursday after- noon on a field kindly lent for the occasion by Mr. C. P. Lewis, J.P., Llandingat. Some valuable prizes were offered. There was a large attendance, and the difff-rent events were keenly contested. A good sum was realised, and after providing for the children's annual treat, the Mothers' Union Union, and the Mothers' Meetings, a substantial sum has been handed over to the Sunday School fund. Sports have not been held at Llandovery for a long time previously, and those of Thursday as a consequence proved a. welcome break in the monotony of local existence. Old, middle-aged ,and young folks thoroughly. enjoyed themselves ,and all are looking for- ward to a similar opportunity for whiling away some pleasant hours at eome future dxte. The initiative in organising the aports was taken by the Rev. W. D. Evans, Dolau (curate), and it was on his shoulders the greater part of the work which led to the afternoon's success fell. The president was the Rev D. Edmondee-Owen, B.A. (vicar), and the vice-presidents, Mr. Pryse-Rice (Mayor), Rev. W. W. Poole-Hughes, M.A. (warden of the college), and Messrs. 0. P. I Lewis, M.A., J.P., Llandingat; W. H. Jones, manager N.P. Bank; J. Powell, Woodlands; S. Smale, Ystrad; and D. T. M. Jones, Nanty- rhogfaen. SPORTS. 440 Yards Church Lads' Brigade race: 1, W. B. Williams, Cawdor House; 2, Cyril Ed- wards, Gae Cottage; 5, Ernest. Shoobridge. 220 Yards Training Corps race: 1, LLoyd Morgan, Medical Hall; 2, T. Wheeler, Spring- field-terrace. One mile bicycle race: 1, J. Griffiths, Groleugoed, Mothvey; 2, J. Evans, Verdre, Llandovery; 3, Harry Manning, Stone-street. One hundred yards (open) special". 1. Leonard, ma,nager Star Supply Stores, Llan- dovery; 2, I rank Williams, Cawdor House. Bucket and potato race: 1, im. Thomas, 26, High-street, Llandovery; 2, Van liacke Laen, Belgium. Pillow fight: 1, T. A. Lloyd, Cilgwyn Lodge; 2, D. Jones, of Mr. Nicholas's Central Drug Stores. 100 yards boys' race, under 16: 1, Cyril Edwards, Gas Cottage, Llandovery, 2, Edwin Lewis, Orchard-street, Llandovery; 3, E. Harries. 100 yards girls' race, under 16: 1, Cissie James, Victoria-street, Llandovery; 2, Lena Williams, Water-street, Llandovery. 100* varas sack race: 1, J. Griffiths, North Western, Llandovery; 2, Van Lacke Laen, Belgium; 3, Frank Williams, Cawdor House, Llandovery. 50 yards girls' race (under 7): 1, Carrie Evans, The Oak, Llandovery; 2, Gladys Sewelt, The Cottage, Llandovery; 3, Lizzie Griffiths, High-street. 50 yards boys' race (under 7): 1, Gilbert Edwards, Church Bank, Llandovery; 2, Shirley James, Victoria-street, Llandovery; 3, Albert Davies. 75 yards (girls under 7): 1, Oiesie James, Victoria-street, Llandovery; 2, Pegg Jones, White Swan, Llindovery; 3, Nancy Jones, Orchard-street, Llandovery. 75 yards boys' race (under 12): 1, Edwin Lewis, Orchard-street, Llandovery; 2, Lloyd Morgan, Medical Hall, Llandovery; 3, Ken- neth Deans, Granta, Llandovery. Special race for boys under 9: 1, Dunstan Jones, Orchard-etreet, Llandovery; 2, Ohas. King. 100 yards men's race (over 40): 1, William Davies, late Tycornel, Llanwrda; 2, Van Lacke Laen, Belgium. 100 yards ladies race (over 40): 1, Mrs. H. Thomas, 76, High-street, Llandovery; 2, Mrs. Nicholas, Garden-street, Llandovery; 3, Emma Baker. 100 yards three-legged race (open): 1, W. B. Williams and E. Shoobridge. 100 yards egge and spoon race: 1, F. Griffiths, College View, Llandovery; 2, H. R. Roos. 100 yards egg and spoon race (ladies): 1, Maudie Davies, Windesmere, Llan- dovery; 2, Lizzie Rees, Mile End, Llan- dovery. 4 The prizes were afterwards distributed by Mrs. C. P. Lewis at Llandingat House, after which votes of thanks were accorded Mrs. Lewis for distributing the prizes, Mr. Lewis for the loan of the field, to the vicar and Messrs. Tom Soar and Powis for the help they had given, and to the Rev. W. D. Evans for the great efforts he had ex- pended in making the sports a sucoers, as well as to those who had subscribed the prizes.

BOUND OVERI

BOUND OVER. The case agwnst Thomas Morris Wil- liams, the young shunter, who was charged with stealing and receiving S:4, the property of John Thomas Davies, at 46, Balaclava-street, St. Thomas, was re- sumed at the Swansea Police Court on Monday. Mr. Henry Thompson appeared for the defendant, and prosecutor in cross-exam- ination said that defendant was a decent and sober fellow who, however had got in with theatrical women, resulting in his spending more money than he earned. Detective Barry said that since the previous hearing he had made enquiries, and had found that defendant had been employed by the railway company for nine years. Up to the present he had borne a good character. Defendant pleaded guilty, and elected to be tried summarily. Mr. Thompson spoke at some length in mitigation, and several witnesses testified as to defendant's character. Defendant was bound over in the sum of S5 for twelve months, and "not fre- quent public houses or playhouses during that period." i 1 1

DEATH OF A WELL KNOWN WELSHj WRITER I i

DEATH OF A WELL KNOWN WELSH j WRITER. I i Mr. Howard Evans, an ex-Cfrairamn of the London Congregational Union and the author of "Our Old Nobility" and other political works, died on Sunday at his home in Brixton in his seventy-seventh year. For a long time ho was officially associated with the Liberation Society, and at the time of his death was chairman of the International Arbitration League, in whoso official organ this month there is an article by him in which he supports the causo of the Allies as the only hope of the world for a lasting peace Mr. Evans, who was educated at the City of London School, wae formerly editor of the English Labourer," ifterwarde of the Echo," and subsequently of the "Libera. tor." He was a well-known figure in Fleet. etrcet, and took a great interest in Welsh politics, One of his chief characteristics wae impatience at delay. If he wrote any- thing for the daily Press, he wanted to see it in next day.

FAMILYS DILEMMA

FAMILY'S DILEMMA. At Swansea Police Court on Monday a case of assault was preferred by William David Graddol against Martin Morris, it being alleged by the former that ha was kicked and struck by Morris. Defendant said his wife paid 8s. for furnished apartments at prosecutor's house on the Monday and on the Tues- day Graddol started to take away the furniture, saying they were moving. Graddel had taken 8s., but did not men- tion that he was about tf move. The result was he and his wife and child were left with not even a bed to lie on. Questioned by the clerk, Graddol admitted that he had given defendant no notice. The case was dismissed.

No title

A boy named Johnston was killed while handling the rifle "of a l sentry guarding a bridge at Balliuasloe.

COAL AND PRICES I

COAL AND PRICES. SCHEME OF REGULATIONS APPRCTVED. At a well-attended meeting of colliery proprietors of the Swansea (or Western) District at the Exchange, Swansea, on Friday, Mr C E. Cleeves presiding, an agreement between the various colliery owners in the district for dealing with the position brought about by the Price of Coal (Limitation) Ace, 1915, was passed, subject to confirmation by the general committee acting for South "Vftales, which meets at Cardiff on Tuesday. The agreement is a copy of the uniform one drafted by the General Committee for South Wales and Monmouthshire, it provides, inter alia, that every colliery owner shall make a return to the com- mittee of the quantities of different kinds of coal dispatched monthly from his colliery, and for what purposes, during each of the half years ending Dec. 3lst, 1913, June 30th, 1914, Dec. 31at, 1914, and June 30th, 1915. The more important clauses, which bear on the regulation of prices to be paid by the consumer, read as follows::— The committee may from time to time in respect of any town or other place within the districts enter into agreements with local authorities, coal merchants, or hauliers, fixing the prices at which var- ious descriptions of coal shall be de- livered to houses for domestic use; and in all cases the prices so agreed shall be ad- vertised or otherwise made public within such area. Before execution of any order a col- liery owner may require from the buyer payment of such a sum as may be sufficient to cover the value of the coal ordered, and of the transport and other charges on same. The committee shall endeavour, as far as practicable, to arrange that the respec- tive collieries shall supply coal for use in the United Kingdom in approximately the same quantities as they were supply- ing coal for similar purposes at the date of the Act. The cases of new collieries shall be dealt with by the committee on their respective merits. Any coal consumer or merchant requir- ing coal for use in the United Kingdom, and failing to secure supplies, or, any col- liery owner considering himself aggrieved, may apply to the committee, who will in- vestigate and deal with. his complaint. The collieries may at any time refuse to supply to any consumer or works more coal than in the opinion of the committee is necessary for the current carrying on of such works or the current require- ments of such consumer. The collieries may refuse to supply any applicant with coal intended for con- sumption outside Monmouthshire and South Wales, unless such applicant has prior to the war been obtaining supplies from collieries within the district of the committee.

FOR SORE TIRED FEET CORNS I AND ALL FOOT TROUBLESi

FOR SORE, TIRED FEET, CORNS AND ALL FOOT TROUBLES. WHAT SOLDIERS DO WHEN FEET ACHE, BURN, SMART, AND PERSPIRE Many readers of the Herald of Wales" may be interested to know how I permanently cured the extremely pain- ful foot troubles resulting from my first few days of route marching. After numerous powders and ointments had only increased the torture I consulted my medical man, and he explained that corns, callouses, bunions, and blisters are simply indications of injured tissues, but that there is really no need of enduring any form of foot misery a single moment. They can all be instantly relieved and permanently cured by simply resting the feet for about ten minutes in a warm foot bath containing a tablespoonful of ordinary Reudel Bath Saltrates. This softens even the worst corns so they come out root and all at the first touch, and all calloused places, soreness, and aching will quickly disappear. The feet being the farthest point from the heart to which blood must bo forced, foot troubles are often due to shoe 'pressure and de- fective circulation in those extremities. By treating the feet as 'above directed you will stimulate the blood circulation, clear out sebaceous matter from the clogged poros, render the skin active, healthy, and free from offensive odour or in- jurious effects of acid perspiration, and thus banish foot troubles for all time. All chemists keep Reudel Bath Saltrates ready put up in convenient packets, one of which will prove more than sufficient to permanently end all foot misery. A rriend to whom I mentioned these salt- rates even tried the treatment for chronic gout and rheumatism with astonishingly good results. Try it after coming in foot- sore from a long walk. You will soon feel like dancing with joy.—H.G.C.

DEATH OF AN OLD SWANSEA OFFICIAL

DEATH OF AN OLD SWANSEA OFFICIAL. Regret is felt amongst Corporation em- ployes at the news of the death of Mr. James VlTf36t, of 198, Kensington-terrace, Swansea. Mr. West, who was 70 years of age, had for 35 years been a timekeeper in the employ of the Swansea Corpora- tion, and in this capacity lie became well known and highly respected by many other than Corporation employes and officials. The funeral took place on Saturday afternoon, the cortege leaving the house at 3 o'clock. The mourners in- cluded Messrs. Jack West, William, Albert, Ted and Jim West (sons). The latter, who belongs to the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, was dressed in khaki. One of the deceased's sons was not present—Mr. Dan West-who left England on active service about a fortnight ago, so that he is still without the news of his father's death. Other mourners were: Messrs. John Wride, A. J. Maries, Cadbury Jones, Arthur Chapman, and Owen Williams; George Swarbricke, Assistant Borough Surveyor; Ivor Surridge, Oliver Thomas, and Dr. Lewis Jones. A number of other Corporation workmen and officials fol- lowed the hearse. A short service was held at the house by the Vicar of Christ Church, after which the procession left for Danygraig Ceme- tery, where the internment took place.

A WHALE ON GOWER SANDSI

A WHALE ON GOWER SANDS. Rhossili Sands, at Gower, has an added attraction at present, in-the shape of a large whale. The animal was washed up last week, and wea first seen to be floundering about in shallow water, eventually being left high and dry by the receding tide. Large numbers of visitors have visited the beach to view the remarkable creature, which, sad to say, suffered a great deal from the thirst of the eight-seers for mementos, in the shape of pieces of tail, fin, etc.

Advertising

I fHYARCHER&tH H GOLDEN RETURNSi I ftEsiarKHEP EffiK jjifl gwgj s < a a S Facsimile of One-Oume Packet., Archer's Golden Returns I The Perfection of Pipe ToDaCco. COOL, SWRAR AND FRAGRANT. ^r I

ILOST CON5CIO5NilbdI IN THE AIR

LOST CON5CIOÙ:5Nilbd I IN THE AIR. FIFTY-TIMES WOUNDED FLYINGI MAN'S ESCAPE FROM DEATH. General Headquarters, British Expedi- tionary Force, Saturday.-A very fine feat of endurance was recently achieved by an officer of the Royal Flying Corps. When effecting- a reconnaissance behind the Ger- man lines in Belgium he was very severely wounded by a shrapnel burst which almost severed hie leg He lost consciousness and his machine dived nose foremost. Fortunately it was flying very high, and after turning over once righted itself again. When he was wounded the pilot collapsed over the steering gear with his arms round the pillar, and this kept him in his seat when the machine turned turtle. Ilia observer was jammed hard between the machine gun and the struts by the shock of the sudden fall earthward, and he also was saved from falling out. When the machine righted itself the pilot, remaining consciousness, got control of it again and flew for thirty-five minutes to an aerodrome he knew of, where, wounded as he was, he made a perfect landing. Once on the ground he had ito wait until assist- ance could be brought to get him out of hie pilot's seat, for he was afraid that his leg would become detached altogether if he tried to struggle down by himself. He is now in hospital with some fifty wounds in his leg. Nevertheless, the doc. tors hope to eave the leg. Two officers of the Royal Flying Corps had a no less extraordinary escape the other day. When flying at a great height they got into a bank of cloud and speedily lost all .senl3e of direction. The adventure, ended by their machine diving at a dizzy angle straight through the clouds to earth. They were deep in the enemy's country, but though they were quite close to the ground when the machine righted itself, very fortunately they had nothing worse 'to face than a very irregular rifle fire from some German soldiers in a village and suc- ceeded in getting away unharmed.

FALSE PRETENCES I

FALSE PRETENCES. I Women Fined at Woolwich. I A grave warning to persons who commit separation allowance frauds was uttered on Saturday by Mr. J. G. Halkett, the Woolwich magistrate. Mr. Halkett heard a number of sum- monies against soldiers and their rela- tions for "attempting to obtain by false pretences from the regimental paymaster, Woolwich, a sum of money representing a soldier's separation allowance." Mr. E. F. Barker, for the Director of Public Prosecutions, said that all the ca" arose out of false statements made by soldiers' mothers, and sometimes by soldiers, regarding their earnings before they enListed and the amounts they al- lowed their mothers before the war. Scores of these cases will be brought before the Woolwich magistrate in the near future 'said Mr. Barker. "There are hundreds of cases in which money has actually been obtained in this way, and thousands more in which such attempts have been made all over the country. It is very necessary to stamp. it out, especially in such times as these, when the country is paying r,3,000,000 a day for the war." Mr. Hal Halkett said that separation allowances had been paid on a most lavish scale—far in excess of what had been in- tended—and in many case the money was not used as it should be. The duty of magistrates," he added, is to deal most severely with women who do this sort of thing when the re- sources of the country are so heavily taxed. I wiisli it to be made known that in future cases of this kind I shall inflict imprisonment." One woman was fined 93, another £ 2 10s., and a 'third El 10s. A fourteen-year-old soldier who helped his mother to commit a fraud was fined £ 1.

IKAISERS PIANIST EXPELLED FROMI ENGLAND

KAISER'S PIANIST EXPELLED FROM I ENGLAND. It was stated on Monday, on the authority of a news agency, that Maria Cecilia Natalie Janotha, the Kaiser's favourite pianist, was arrested in London on Sunday by two Scotland Yard officers. and has been expelled from the country. Mme. Janotha's address is given as Grosvenor-streot, W., but the police found her in a big house at Holland Park- avenue. She was given no time to pack up, but was taken away in a cab within two minutes of the arrival of the detectives. Mme. Janotha vias born at Czestochawa, near Warsaw. and after completing her, musical studies under Joachim, Brahms, and Mme. Schumann, was appointed Court pianist to the Emperor William. After his death she was a frequent visitor to this country. As a musician' she pro- bably holds more diplomas and decora- tions than any other living performer. At various times interesting stories have been current as to her black cat Prince White Heather, which was always accorded a place of honour when she was attending public functions.

I WALKING AWAY WITH HIS BAG I

WALKING AWAY WITH HIS BAG. You sent me for it, or else it was your double," was the excuse given by a young seaman when, as he was walking away with a dress case belonging to another man, he met the owner on the way. The man, George Albert Smith, was charged at Swansea on Monday with steal- ing the dress case and a quantity of food, valued in all 9s. 6d., the property of Wil- fred Clarke, on August 4th. Clarke said he was a cook on board the Truthseeker at the Prince of Wales' Dock. Defendant was a seaman on board that vessel. On the day in question witness met the defendant carrying his bag, and when asked what he was doing with it he replied, "You sent me for it, or it was your double." After consultation with the mate, wit- ness gave Smith into custody. Defendant pleaded guilty, and was bound over for twelve months in the sum of S5.

IWANTED MATTER CLEARED UP I

WANTED MATTER CLEARED UP. I A middle-aged man in a suit of corduroy entered the witness-box at Kingston-on- Thames Police Court and asked that he might be arrested, adding: I have been I accused of murder and I want the matter cleared up." The Clerk (to applicant): But no charge has been made against you, and the Bench cannot iaeue a warrant for your arrest. Applicant: I wiah to go for trial. The Clerk: But no charge has been pre- ferred against you, 60 I am afraid we cannot oblige you. Applicant, looking very disappointed, left the court, but a minute later he re- turned and remarked to the Bench: I wish to appeal against your decision. (Laughter). Applicant was politelv kd to the exit door, after again being informed that the Court could do nothing for him.

I FORTY YEARS OF MARRIED LIFE I

I FORTY YEARS OF MARRIED LIFE. I Hearty congratulations to Mr. P. G. Iles, High-street, Swansea, who celebrated the 40th anniversary of his wedding on Monday. During Mr. P. G. lies* business career in High-street he has seen about 150 grocers who have given up business there, while he has more than held his own. The Rev. Oscar Snelling has gone just one better than Mr. P. G. lies. He has been married 41 years.

No title

Lieutenant W. B. Hughes, Llangennech, ?o was ?evprr?y wounded at Ypres, i8 1 IUW bnc'k at his regimental headquarters I I doing light duty.

Advertising

A Sparkling, Cooling Drink. A N Contains the Properties of pogllsh and Foreigt Mineral Waters.  HIS preparation produces & tine Spa"klln I and Health giving Drink, Mdisespecia.Uy \?/ beneficial in Cleansing the system from accumulated impurities. ItPuriflestlhe Blood (the Life Fluid), and imposts a vigour to the Entire System. Be careful what you drink I This Salt acts by Natural Means; it has a disinfecting action on the Bowels, and removes toxic material, the cause of Headache, Biliousness, Sourness of tha Stomach, and Flatulence; it Strengthens the Digestive Organs, and aids the Vital elements of Nutrition in the formation at pure and more Vitalised Blood, thus stimulating the, very springs of life. Aa a simple drink a tea-spooaial in a tnmbler of water is very Exhllaratlnil. as a medicine, two tea-spoonfuls should be t&k £ n fasting. Its value will be known by the use of one Tin, rt not obtainable from your Chemttt, Grocer, at stor", five penny stamps will bring it. 4-oz. Tins, 4d.; 8-oz. This. 8d.

SAVINGS BANK FUNDS

SAVINGS BANK FUNDS. How War Loan Has Affected Swansea Investments. The half-yearly meeting of the trustees and managers of the Swansea Savings Bank was held on Monday afternoon at the bank; Sir J. T. D. Llewelyn presiding. The summary prepared by the actuary, Mr. C. Henry Corby, showed that invest- ments in the War Loan amounted to 113,940, In the Government Department, £ 38,424 had been received, as compared with L49,443 in the corresponding period of last year, whilst 141,420 had been paid, as compared with X45,158 in 1914. The total funds now amounted to £ 357,498; in 1914 they were £ 367,839. In the investment, department, 16,294 had been received, a decrease of .14,76t; whilst iE4,474 had been paid; a drop of £ 2,953. The total funds were somewha,t, in advance of last year's, being £ 83,868, aa compared with X81,736 in 1914. In moving the adoption of the report and accounts, the Chairman said that the figures did not require much comment. The decrease in the amount in the bank was very small compared with what might have been expected. Since last May there had, no doubt, been a considerable decrease ciaused by invetitments in the War Loan. Up to la-it month over 113,000 had been in- vested in War Loan, but that vtould only be about four per ceat. of their funds. In other baaks the percentage would be larger than that. Mr. Corby had recently visited Manchester to attend a meeting to disease the situation, and he had been able to gauge whaot the position should be in Swansea. He told him the result of his enquiries, and he (Sir John) had expected the bank to be affected to the extent of about £ 20,000. He was glad to think that the money taken out had been employed for perfectly, national transac- tions. Sir John went on to refer in terms of regret to the loss they had sustained through the death of Lord Glantavce, who had been connected with them for forty. four years. During that period "the banto had progre&sed in noteworthy fashion. Mr. Simpson proposed a vote of condolence with the family of the late baron and Dr. Stephell6 seconded. The vote Was carrie(L in silence. The accounts were adopted.