Teitl Casgliad: Herald of Wales

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 6 o 12 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
12 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

AUCTION SALES SUMMARY. (Fun particulars will be found on Page 1.) August 23.—Sale of Leasehold Business Premises, known as Paris House, Aber- avosi, at the Walnut Tree Hotel, Aber- avon, at 3.30 in the afternoon, by Mr. Riebard T. C. Bevan. liept ember, 8, 9 and IO.-Sale of Well-Pre- mi-red Antique and Modern Furniture, Rare Old China, Oil-Paintings, Water- Colcars, &c., at Llanfair Grange, Llan- «kw«3ry, at 12 noon each day, by Messrs. Wm. and Walter James, F.A.I.

CURRENT COMMENTS I

CURRENT COMMENTS. A bird's-eye view of the war news gives, a fairly encouraging picture. The chief centra of interest is tlie Russian frontier, where the Germans are, it is quite evident, making a desperate effort to get to Petrograd. They know full well that if thart task is to be accomplished, there is very little time at their disposal. A* it is, the ground the troops have to cover is full of dangers for an invading force, especially in the autumn when extreme heat combines with a humid atmosphere to make men not used to the climate tuffer severely. By the middle of October the winter will be setting in, and then fresh troubles will beset them. How- ever, the Russians are setting up a gallant defence to a perfect whirlwind of attack, in whiel-b the Kaiser is using all his heavy artillery. It is quite possible that the Grand Duk" will decide on another retire- mwitj and :<>r a. time make the best use he can of districts in which Lakes Peipue and IlInen are the outstanding fea- ttures. As to other features of the East and West compaigns, there are indications that further developments may be ex- pected shortly. Judging from indications available, it is probable that in rather less than a month the Kaiser will have his hands full of trouble. In the Gallipoli Peninsula further sub- stantial progress has been effected. Sir Ian Hamilton sends another very en- couraging report, showing that the men from the Antipodes are still acting with magnificent bravery and energy. They have got a hard job in front cf them still, but they are curling the Turk up into a very small parcel, and the fate of the Dardanelles will not be in doubt very much longer. -Considerable patience must be exercised for a few days by those who want to know the very latest news from the Dardanelles area of the war. That some big move is either happening or about to happen is quite evident, but the exact nature of it is not to be made known at once. One thing fairly certain is that Turkey is in, an extremely critical position. Supplies have not come through from Germany to the extent required, whilst the hign- handed actions of the German com- manders sent to Turkey has led to a lot of discontent amongst the officers of ▼hat is (to be quite fair in our criticisme) a brave and ambitious people. In spite of his many faults, the Turk is a good soldier, and in the past the command8 of the army have been in good hands, so that we can well understand a lot of what comes through from Constanti- nople in the course of private letters about the resentment of Turkish officers against their German superiors. What helps to the formation of expec- torgi-on that the new move in that area is of a more than usually important char- i aeter is the harmony of opinion amongst the best military correspondents. For one thing, it is urged that the change in the French command has a isignificadeel all its own. Commenting upon the selection of General Sarrail to command t'he French Expeditionary Force in the Near East, one correspondent urges that! such an eminent leader, who has com- manded one of the largest French armies at a most vital spot in the western front, would hardly have been spared purely in order to direct the French corps which has been assisting Sir Ian Hamilton in the Gallipoli Peninsula. More likely is it that he is to take command of an addi- tional French or Franco-British Army, one of whose landing stages is at Kar- atchali. This army will be ready to join that of Sir Ian Hamilton in a concerted advance on the Tchataldia lines and the Adrianople railway after the Dardanelles have been forced. Amid all the hurley-burley of news from the Western, Eastern, and near Eastern areas of the war, there is a danger that one interesting and important part of the general campaign may be overlooked. That is the Caucasus, where the Russian Army is putting up a fine fight at great disadvantage against a foe who is in a rather good position. The campaign there has been carried out with persistence and skill, and although the task of beating the Turks out of their hold upon the district is almost as difficult in its way as that facing the Franco-British in Gallipoli, the Russians are making good progress towards final victory in a district where the limelight is not so strong, although the importance of the campaign is great. It is hard to tell which set of accounts is true with regard to the state of affairs in Germany. Some writers tell us that it is a case of "Business as usual" over there, whilst others say that the state of affairs is bad. One of the latest contribu- tions i3 a letter from an American who has just returned from a visit to Ger- many, and who says:—"From all I have seen and heard I think Germany is very near the end of her tether. Every woman in Berlin is a widow, and every child an orphan. Whole families have been wiped out and hundreds of unhappy women have committed suicide. The plight of the working-classes is most pitiable. The cost of food is exorbitant, and necessaries have become luxuries, there being a shocking shortage—not to be denied—of the most ordinary eatables. I have witnessed frantic scenes in the market plaees and food stores. These places are crowded by hungry women, whose despair has driven them mad. They come into collision with the police, and free fights are an every- day occurrence. The contrast between London and Berlin has never been more striking. Time is telling its tale upon Germany; London on the other hand seems as imperturbable as ever, neither elated nor depressed, but muddling along serenely as if the people knew nothing of war." Another indication of Germany's con- dition is to be found in the attempts made for the purpose of getting supplies Iof various commodities. For instance, during the last few days German adver- tisements in Dutch newspapers asking for quotations for rubber and various kinds of food have been more numerous than ever. In this connection, it may be as well to mention that there is more than a suspicion that agents are buying up such things as old motor-car tyres, which are sent out of the country. One or two prosecutions have taken place already. The name of the youngest son of the Bishop of Winchester, Lieutenant Gilbert Walter Lvttelton Talbot, of the 7th Bat- talion the Rifle Brigade, appears among officers ldlt-ed in the casualty list just published. Dr. Talbot's two other sons are Army chaplains, and the younger, the Rev. Neville Stuart Talbot, Chaplain of Balliol College, who once served in the Rifle Brigade, was wounded some time ago. Other members of the Episcopal B& who Lwm loat a son in th< war are^ the Bishop of St. Asa-ph and the Bishop of Hereford. A lot of difference of opinion has been expressed on the question whether minis- ters should join the ranks of the Army. To those who are opposed to such a course it will be of interest to note that Lieut. J. Naismith, who was honourably men- tioned in General Sir John French's de- spatches recently and complimented by H Eye-witness for a remarkably clever piece of work, is a United Free Church minister in the south of Scotland, and was formerly assistant in Bridge-of-Allan. One day he noticed a company of Ger- mans advancing stealthily to make a sur- prise attack on the British lines. Tele- graphing for one or two machine-guns and a few snipers, he concealed his forces in a wood, allowed the Germans to pass; then, when they had gone some distance, opened fire upon them. They retreated to their trenches; but, as they passed the wood they were brought down one by one by the nine snipers, ninety-five being killed and forty wounded. Of the deeds of heroism in various parts of the battlefield we shall not be able to tell the full story for a long time to come. Every day we read of some act that would thrill everyone but for the fact that it is only one amongst a very large number. Here is a silhouette from a long letter by one of the special corres- pondents (Mr. H. M. TomlinBOn):- 'There was a boy with us, a short, ruddy, smiling officer lad with merry grey eyes. He seemed quite out of place there. He was altogether too cherubic, innocent, and happy. He glanced up smiling at the passing shells exactly as if he had never heard them before, and did not know what they were. Even his tunic was not exactly the regulation pattern, as though he were unaware even of the necessity to be dressed' like other officers. I thought he was a new arrival who would learn much more presently. Later I was told, I as a joke, that that boy was once lighting his cigarette when a bullet swept the match out of his fingers. His cap had been blown off five times by explosions. His tunic was what it was because it was a makeshift. His old one had been torn off his back by machine gnn and rifle fire. He had dragged a heavy box of bombs over the corpses in a trepch, a target for every explosive abomination the Germans could shower round him and his men. His men were all killed, but he got through with the bombs and saved the situation. In fact, he was Lieutenant Smythe, and he had just got his V.C. I see they have been recording his features in the illustrated papers since I met him, but the pictures are all wrong; they have left out his luminous and innocent merriment." A meeting was held in London on Tues- day for the purpose of protesting against the supposed inaction of the Government with regard to cotton importations into Germany. It is a pity that those respon- sible for the meeting are so persistent in lettingwtheir zeal outrun their discretion. No subject has received more earnest and close attention from the Government. If the various methods of dealing with the difficulty which are advocated fith such heat have not been adopted it is not be- cause they have not been considered, but because they have disadvantages more serious than the present arrangement. The reasons which are guiding the Government are not, and cannot be, made public, but we may take it as certain that, from the information which is not available to the outsider, the Government knows that the remedies urged with such glibness and lack of responsibility pre- sent no single advantage over what has already been done. It is time that ran- dom talk about a very delicate situation should cease, and the worst service that could be done at the present moment is to endeavour to hurry the Government by I clamour into action which it believes would increase rather than diminish the difficulties which it has to face. This is one of the points in which it is not only wise to trust the people who can alone be fully informed about the situation, but in which it is unpatriotic and dangerous to our best interests to keep up reckless agitation. Sir William Ramsay is a very famous scientist-, but he seems utterly un- able to realise the remarkably dangerous set of international complications that surround the present situation. If he (and those acting w,ith him) wants to see another nation or two ranged in battle against the Allies it would be best to say so in order that we may all know what he (and they) are driving at. Advices from Nova Scotia state that the crop outlook in the province is very j favourable. It is estimated that-from 15 per cent. to 20 per cent, more land has been brought under cultivation than last year, and proportionately larger returns are looked for. The hay harvest promises well and will be at least 25 per cent, above the yield of last season, vhile clover is abundant. Grains are looking well and with propitious weather good re- turns are anticipated. All live stock, especially sheep and cattle, are flourish- ing, and there is plenty of pasturage. Apples have now set, and it is possible to form an estimate of the yield, which, ac- cording to experts, will be 20 per oent. in excess of last year's crop. While prima facie, the clauses of the scheme adopted by Swansea district coal- owners under the Limitation of Prices Act may seem to aim only at safe- guarding the interests of coalowners, wholesale buyers, and large consumers, the regulation of the prices and preven- tion of unfair "cornering" of coal sup- plies must obviously benefit the house- holder who is only interested in his domestic arrangements and the other small consumers. The clause setting forth the right of fixing the prices to be charged by hauliers who carry and deliver from the collieries to buyers of one ton and upwards will fix the market price- approximately at any rate-to the pur- chaser of a hundredweight of coal, and, aa w predicted last week, the inevitable result will be a decrease in the prioe during the coming winter, rather than an increase. The Act itself fixes the pit- top selling price at not more than 4s per ton over and above what it was in the corresponding months before the war broke out. As the scheme—which will apply to Swansea-is intended to further the objects of the Act, the small buyer must benefit to some extent. We pointed out that, if retail dealers should insist on reaping a big profit they must be dealt with by the force of public opinion, as the Act does not apply to them; but the scheme, by giving the colliery people the right of fixing the celling price to the haulier and the small retail vendor, ought to materially help in putting that doubtful point at rest. Famine prices for householders' coal during the winter may be regarded as entirely out of the ques- tion, and the point to watch will be how will September and October prices com- pare with those of September and Octo- ber, 1913-be&re the outbreak of war. Once more the South Wales miners' leaders and coalowners' representatives are appealing to Mr. Runciman, the Pre- sident of the Board of Trade, to decide the points of difference between them, and, seeing that the interpretation of terms laid down by himself is involved in the settlement, it is as well that ihe should give, if possible, his personal at- tention to all the points at issu e^between the parties. At Tuesday's meeting of the Conciliation Board, the report of the sub- committee on the draft wage agreement was brought up, and, as might have been expected, the coalowners' side supported the view of their own representatives on the sub-committee, and the workmen's ?4do took a. similar coijme. of w4hasising the demands put forward on their behalf by their own representatives on that sub- committee. But both sides agreed to refer the points in dispute to Mr. Runci- man, and it is understood that that gentleman Will be given full power to de- cide for both sides on all matters sub- mitted to him. Therefore, there is no likelihood of any further friction such as can lead up to a strike or a lock-out. In- tricate and contentious as the points at issue are, they areooCapable of adjustment. Still, as the increased wage payable to certain classes of miners are "held up" pending the sigring of a definite agree- ment, the delay is causing irritation and dissatisfaction among the workmen, and the sooner Mr. Ejaeiciman's fiat goes forth the better for all concerned. It is clearly understood that the extra sums accruing will be paid retrospectively when the settlement comes, but people like to handle the money rather than have it dangled before them as a prospective "lump sum," the exact amount of which, they often regard as a question which I would puzzle a Philadelphia lawyer. Obviously, the main point a-t issue be- tween the parties now is whether the workmen's representatives have a right to put forward any new proposals beyond those definitely decided by Mr. Lloyd George and Mr. Runciman, and called "the Government Agreement." The employers say "No," and say they also have claims to make if the workmen insist. The workmen's representatives say Yes, a new agreement must be pre- pared, so let us settle the points now." "Tack the Government award on to the old agreement," say the colliery owners, in effect; and the men's representatives contend that the alterations necessary are numerous and render a new agreement essential. Besides—and this is important --they want, among other things, machinery to put an end to the scandal of the delays in settling local disputes, and, incidentally, means of preventing the occurrence and recurrence of such disputes. In this matter the general public may be said to be as deeply in- terested as the disputants, for minor stoppages affect all trades in the vicinity of collieries at which local troubles arise; and, therefore, it is to be hoped that such stoppages will, in the immediate future. be reduced to a minimum, and the power to avert them may be increased to a maximum-to apply a phrase frequently applied by the leaders to the fluctuations of the wage-rate. Mr. Runciman is "now expected to de- cide, first of all, the right of the men to demand a new agreement embodying the award. If he agrees with the coalowners, the new demands, no matter how useful they may be, must go overboard. If he admits the validity of the workmen's con- tention, he will then arbitrate upon the points still remaining unsettled, and the Conciliation Board will then be able to proceed with the consideration of the technical matters which are left for them and Lord St. Aldwyn to deal with. The question of the workmen's tentative ap- plication for an advance in wages was made "without prejudice" at an "in- formal" meeting of tBe Board on Tuesr day, and, being rejected, was withdrawn, so that the whole procedure may be gone through in a proper and formal manner after Mr. Runciman's final settlement of the agreement. On that demand, again, there need be no fear of a rupture in the coal trade because the decision of Lord St. Aldwyn, when made, will be final.

LOCAL NOTESI

LOCAL NOTES. ABERAVON & PORT TALBOT. Simultaneous with the publication of this issue, everyone will be engaged studying their Registration papers pre- paratory to filling them up on Sunday. The papers have already been delivered and, as opposed to preconccived ideas, the filling up pcrocess is .simplicity itself. In connection with the provisions of the Act, it should be carefully borne in mind that there are heavy penalties for any false de- claration. Collectors, too, are under a penalty of S,50 should they divulge the contents of any declaration going through their hands. During the fine days large numbers of adults and children, chiefly females, visit the Aberavon beach to frolic on the silvery sands, and lave in the refreshing briny. On Tuesday the sands were lined for a mile with hundreds of young children en- joying themselves. It was, however, noticeable that there was an entire lack of supervision over the general control of the beach and of the bathing. People were allowed to dress and undress without any restriction, although a bye-law decrees that above a certain point no one is allowed to bathe without using a bathing machine. Means of rescue in cases of emergency should also be available. Last year the police officer stationed on the beach was a powerful swimmer, and was always on the alert. Although late in the season, could not something be done in this direction? On Sunday last Pastor Bert Bailey, of Wesley Hall, preached his farewell ser- mons both at Wesley Hail and Taibach Wesley. He is leaving the district for another field of spiritual labour, after several years of vigorous usefulness. Through his spirited propaganda in re- ligious methods, social and temperance reform, Pastor Bert Bailey became a household name in Aberavon and Port Talbot. His methods of getting at the populace were most unique and interest- ing. He was the first minister to intro- duce the cinema into his religious work, and by it. commanded large congrega- tions after the usual Sunday services of other churches were concluded. During his pastorate at Wesley Hall, Mr. Bailey established brotherhoods and sisterhoods which did an immense amount of charit- able and good work, notably at Christmas time. lie inaugurated an old people's treat, which gave delight to a few hun- dred old people, irrespective of credd, in the district. He established successful football and cricket clubs in connection with Wesley Hall. At the commencement of the war, Pastor Bailey took a keen in- terest in the Belgian refugees, and with the co-operation of the members of his congregation bec.amethe host of some twelve refugees at Wesley Hall, where .they were comfortably housed and eared for under his kindly supervision. An able and impressive speaker, Pastor Bailey, with his exhaustless energy and determined methods will certainly be found a potent factor for quickening the religious and social life in his new sphere of labour. When Captain Tom Hughes of the Margam Fire Brigade, gave his services to the Red Cross work, everyone who knew him and his splendid enthusiasm for the cause were conscious that he would prove a great and welcome asset to the work. Excellent reports have been re- ceived from France, and the latest tribute was read at Monday's Margam Council meeting, when a letter from Orderly J. R. T. Bradbury, of No. 2 Red Cross Hos- pital, Rouen, informed the "Council that Captain Tom, through his knowledge of t fire fighting,' had been instrumental in saving the hospital from possible des- truction through his prompt and suc- cessful action in a fire which 'broke out in the sleeping room of the hospital. The orderly declared that he owed his life to the prompt action of Mr. Hughes. The members of the Council received this in- timation with exclamations of Hear, hear! and decided to send a letter of congratulation to their Fire Brigade cap- taia. At the last Margam Council meeting, Mr. Charles Cook, the accountant, was congratulated upon having successfully negotiated a gas ivorks loan for £ 1,500. Will it ever be brought into force ?" is the question asked by those interested ia the Shops Act in the district. After a lot of red tapism" the County Coun- cil at last has condescended to allow the local Council to administer the Act and to work it jointly with other public bodies in the district under the supervision of one inspector. It is to be hoped there will be no further delay in the matter. Lieut. H. E. Daniel, officer command- ing, No. 1 Supernumerary Company 4th Battalion Welsh Regiment, writing from the Vivian Camp, Aberavon, wishes, on behalf of himself, the non-commissioned officers and men, to publicly express their thanks to Mrs. Arthur Watkiss, 22, High- street, Aberavon, for her kind present of the Welsh Regiment flag (Prince of Wales' feathers) and Ich Dieu in white on green ground, with the motto Gwell Angau na chywelydd in red letters. The I gift is very much .admired and appreci- ated by the eompanv. Mr. T. O. David, of Port Talbot, his daughter an some friends, recently paid a visit to the R.H.A. camp at Marsham. Mr. David speaks in eloquent terms of the splendid condition of the camp both from comfort and sanitary points of view, He says the men, are happy. During a visit to Weymouth Miss Olive Kate David performed an act of great bravery. A motor 'bus knocked down a child, and Miss David rushed forward and pushed the child's head back just in time to save it being crushed by the second wheel. The little one had a miraculous escape, and Miss David came in for hearty congratu- lations by a large number of people who witnessed her prompt act. Aberavon has done, and is still doing, its share in sending her sons to fight her oountry's battles. A few weeks ago two young fellows, Rowland Harrison, son of Mrs. Harrison, of 18, Pentyle, and Reggie Baker, second son of Mr. F. E. Baker, the Borough Accountant, gave up comfort- able positions in the town to join H.M. Navy. They are at present in Devon port undergoing a course of training prepara- tory to join one of H.M. ships for foreign service. They are engaged in the pay- master's department. Both Mr. Baker and Mrs. Harrison each have their elder. sons in the Army. Mr. Wally Baker is in the Dardanelles, where he has once been wounded, while Mr. John HarrisQn is a signalling sergeant. The wide-spread interest taken in the Aberavon-Port Talbot and District Cottage and Accident Hospital is indicated by the fact th.it natives living thousands of miles away are contributing to the fund. A cheque of Y,2 has been forwarded to the fund by Mrs. Mary Gravell Cammaek, Atlanta, U.S., who is a native of Port Talbot. She is a sister of Mrs. Meyrick, Beverley-street, Port Talbot. It is a very welcome and kindly remembrance of her native town. The death of ex-Police Inspector A. Mac- donald caused a wa,ve of profound sorrow in the district. His popularity and general usefulness was universal. As inspector he performed his duty with marked ability. After his retirement he devoted himself to the assistance of all good objects, and was a prominent figure in all local undertak- ings. He was for some years a sid-esmau in St. Theodore's Parish Church, where his ser- vices will be greatly, mioSSM. In sport he was an enthusiast, being a keen devotee üf Rugby football, cricket, bowls, etc. In the early history of the Glamorgan Police Lie played as forward, and was for years a prominent member of the Aberavon Foot- ball Committee and a regular, follower of the team. His beau ideal of the Rugby world was "Bobby" Bryce, whom he trained with a diligence which undoubtedly placed him on the top rung of the football ladder. Matters are shaping splendidly in connec- tion with the Boy Scouts sports, which will be held on Saturday, August 28th, on the Port Talbot Central Athletic Grounds. All who are interested-in the sports are spe- cially desired to attend a meeting this (Saturday) night at 6.30 at the Aberavon Y.M.C.A., when judges, officials, ect., will be elected Inspector Bdward Williams (Weights and Measures), Port Talbot, has been much in evidence in Hearts of Oak circles. He suc- cessfully introduced a motion for a re-ad- justment of the administrative work of the order, which he calculates will main a saving of £ 2,000 per annum to the society. In the appointment of a committee of in- quiry into the provisions of the motion tiTuwttnr Williams headed the poll. L-j,JW Lucifer.

I AMMANFORDI I

AMMANFORD* I I In view of the new laurels won oy Amman Valley competitors at the National Eisteddfod, it is no matter for wonder to find that the bardic fraternity, from Y Gwter Fawr to Penygroes, are concocting "englynion" galore to cele- brate the return of conquering heroes and heroines. Chairs and challenge cups are the out- ward tokens of local successes in this dis- trict, and it is eaid some of the bards have won quite a suite of oak chairs, while singers have glass cases shining with silver trophies, and even elocutionists and little boy reciters are seated at home on stately carved oak thrones, which indicate that, to use the music-hall phrase of the prosaic "Saxon invader," each is "following in the footsteps of the dear old dad." But, chaff apart, there is genuine re- joicing in the district at the euocees of South Walians as well as local winners at the National," and the bardic Gol"sedd- always strongly represented here—is linked up with various other districts by old associations of birth or residence. I have no doubt, therefore, that ,the following englynion by the Rev. Volander Jones, to the Minister for munitions of war, will be read with peculiar interest by all, but especially by the friends and admirers of both the bard and his hero-- Ein glandeg Sior yw'n Glyndwr—i'n har- Wrth herio'r gormesw r; [wain Rhyw filain o rvfelwr Yn y gad yw'r enwog wr. Ei gleddyf mawr a gladda—yn y eawl Roddo sen i Walia; A hen gampwyr a gwympa • Yn ed ddig dros Gymru dda. Mawr yw ei glod Gymro glan—a'i synwyr Gwna'r Senedd yn benwan; A'i eirias dafod arian Yrr y Ty yn fernv tan. It is difficult to give the monoglot English reader an idea of the beauty and symmetry of the terse, trite, tribute paid in .the foregoing to Mr. Lloyd George. Only the monoglot Welshman, or his brethren, the duoglot Cymro, can enjoy it to the full. The production is a positive proof of the inadequacy of t'no late Prin- cipal Rowlands' definition of an englyn- It is a pecuHar metre, known only to the Welsh bards, and its principal dis- tinguishing feature is the jingling of the consonants." That was how Professor Rowlands (Dewi Mon) defined the Welsh englyn for the benefit of Carmen Sylva, Queen of Roumania. By way of emphasising my contention that such a definition is at least inadequate, let me quote Volander's" address to the Eisteddfod:— lawn yw son fod ein senedd-lenydd.01 Yn nawdd i wirionedd; Dysga'n der mai ofered-d Yw mynu clod a min cledd. Heddyw'r gan a'I' gynghanedd-yn eu hing Sydd heb eu rhwysgfawredd; Arswyd geir ar ei orsedd A deua-r clod drwy y cledd. Mwg a niwl y magnelan-au hytif r Sy'n ddiluw o fflamiau; to Yma e geir yn yingau i Ar rengoedd randir angau! Yn y dalaeth mae y delyn—ond lleddf Ydyw llais ei hemyn; Ac wyla tra oeisia'r gelyn Fwydo a gwaed gin. hen lyd gwyui I fyny boed y Faner—yn aros Ar dyrau'r uchelder; A'r Brython tra'r son am ser A yso bob rhyw Kaiser And having invited the reader to follow me thus far into the realms of poesy and alliterative congratulation, perhaps I may be permitted to give a final magic touch to the story of the Eisteddfod week's doings by citing the same eloquent bard's englymon to the crowned bard and the chaired bard—in this year's contests, both the same man:- The Crown Bard. Odditani mae'r bardd tyner-a'i ben Dan bwys o ysblander; Aed a'r goron dirion der Er caso clopa'r Kaiser. The Chair Bard. Torodd ben dri awenydd—o wych liw A chledd ei ymenydd; r, gannolls" font ar gynydd, Yna o faint Lloyd George fydd! Lest somo may imagine that my sig- nature is attached to the poetry, rather than to the Ammanford Notes, let me once more subscribe niyself, Awstin. I

WELSH MEMBERS STIRRINGI VERSES

WELSH MEMBERS' STIRRING I VERSES. Mr. W. Llewelyn Williams. M.P., and Sir Francis Edwards, M.P.. are con- tributors to the current number of "Y Beirniad." In three stirring patriotic verses, entitled Llewelyn's address to his men," the bard "Llwydfryn," who, in more prosaic though eminent circles is known as the hon. member for Carmar- then Boroughs, descants upon the old feuds of the past 'twixt North and South, and the little poem forms a fitting plead- ing article (not the first time for the hon. member to write one), opening up to the reader a collection of contributions which render this quarter's production an exceptionally interesting one:— Mae'r estron yn erlyn," yn brndd medd Llywelyn, « 'Does balas na bwthyn na theimlodd ei drais! Mae Gwalia yn gwywo ar 01 yr erch frwydro, « Cyn hir ni bydd Cymro ond caethwas i Sais. Mae Deheu a Gogledd, y taeog a'r bonedd, "0 Ddyfed i Wynedd yn plygu o'i flacn; 0 Dduw, rho amddiffyn i'th bobl y sy'n achwyn! "Rho luoedd y gelyn fel sofl yn y tan! H A'u cestyll uchelfri, pa raid in eu hofni Tra'r erys Eryri yn noddfa i ni? u Er amled y Saeson nid ynt ond caeth- weision I'r Norddmyn beilch. trawsion ddi- 'styrant eu cri! U Er lleied yw Cymru, cad-ernid roed iddi, Nid ellir ei llethu gan ddieithr- ddyn,— Gwyllt Walia ni chollir, ei hiaith nis anghofir, "Ei rhyddid a gedwir tra'r erys yn un!" Condensation" of poetry is so much like Boydlerising novels that we feel loth to have to omit the second verse of the foregoing, but we l do so in order to give examples of the beautiful and force- ful translation of the same verses con- tributed by Sir Francis Edwards, whose accomplishments are as varied as they are effective in all that pertains to the Cymric tongue, Cymric lore, Cymric aspirations and to poetry, the universal language of the world. And Mr. Llewelyn Williams is fortunate in having his vigorous version of the Welsh chieftain's appeal and his own exquisite cadences translated into lines, of living fire by Sir Francis Edwards: The Saxon oppresseth," sad Llewelyn confesseth, No palace or cottage but rapine doth know; Our Gwalia doth languish, through battles and anguish, And Welshmen ere long will be slaves of the foe. The North and South wh-olly, both noble and lowly, From. Dyfed to Gwynedd before him do bend; Oh God, do Thou Cherish Thy people who perish, Like stubble to fire the hostile hosts send.. a The castles they rear them, we need not to fear them While Snowdon our fortress re- maineth on high; The Saxon resources are vast, yet their forces Serve proud perverse Normen who heed not their cry. "Though Welshmen be few men, might cometh to true men, No stranger can ever o'ermaster their land; Wales standeth for ever, her tongue will die never, Her freedom, she'll keep if united she stand."

I THE EISTEDDFOD

I THE EISTEDDFOD. Good -fortune seems to have benignly smiled upon the promoters of the Bangor National Eisteddfod, for, notwithstanding the utter impossibility of securing big choral contests, the attractions which were provided and the natural and national interest of the people of Carnar. vonshire and. the surroiindin- counties of North Wales in the old institution drew together immense audiences. The spec- tacular display of the bardic Gorsedd always proves a charm to the crowds who foregather at these great national festivals of song, poesy, poetry, music, arts and literature, and the novelty of a historic and traditional ceremony shorn of one of its most popular features evi- dently attracted the curious and, at the same time appealed to the man in the street" as a sign of sound common-sense on the part of the Gorsedd authorities. Ceiriog," whose lilting poetry has per- meated the soul of the Welsh nation, once declared, in a jocular verse, that the bards of the world live in a magic land of their own, on hope, honour, and praise. The fiats of the present Archdruid, Dyfed, however, clearly show that he possesses not only the poetic gifts of the muse, but a stern sense of the importance of the fitness of things in accordance with the dictates of modern usages as well. Hence the decree by which the Gorsedd cere- mony of this year was shorn of the appeal to the multitude as to the prevalence of peace. A oes Heddwch?" was not put as a challenge, on the ground that it was no use crying peace, peace, when there is no peace" among the warring nations of Europe. Why, even the bards and the harpists are with the colours." They not only sing of feats of arms, as they did in days of yore, but they perform them, and all honour to them for putting into practical form the Cymric aspirations for liberty, and for translating into action the in- spiration of Ceridwen. Yet. the apprecia- tions Eind judgments of crowds and audiences are so notoriously uncertain upon matters of signs and ceremonies that the Bangor Eisteddfod authorities might well have hesitated over the inno- vation when it was first suggested. There is a financial side to these great events, and some of us have had to undertake the duties connected with paying the pipes" after an eisteddfod; and it is the fact that the reports show that large numbers attended the eisteddfod at Ban- gor that gives zest to the well-deserved congratulations showered upon the officials and committee on the remarkable success of the competitions. We, in South Wales, most heartily join in those con- gratulations, and our tendered felicita- tions are none the less sincere, because while quite a large number of important prizes were awarded to gifted southern competitors, the presence of so many people from our half of the Principality helped, to some extent, in making the national of 1915—unique as it was in many oenses-a success beyond cavil or question.

THE MENS CASEI

THE MEN'S CASE. ANTHRACITE MINERS AND THEIR CLAIM FOR LOST 5 PER CENT. (By Our Mining Correspondent). CARDIFF, Thursday. Important meetings connected with the settlement If the outstanding points re- garding the drafting of the new wage regulating agreement for the South Wales Coalfield were held to-day at Cardiff. It had been intended that there should be a meeting of the South Wales and Mon- mouthshire Coal Conciliation Board, but that was dispensed with. Separate meetings of the representatives of coal owners and the workmen were held at the respective offices of the two sections. The coalowners' sub-committee on the wage question met at the Engineers' In- stitute to make their own preparations for meeting Mr. Runciman, President of the Board of Trade, on Tuesday next. No official report was furnished of the proceedings. The Executive Committee of the South Wales Miners' Federation met at the Central Office in St. Andrew's-crescent to consider the reply from Mr. Runciman to the request made to him that he should meet the members of the Conciliation Board in London to settle the outstanding points of difference and deal with the interpretation of some of the matters con- tained in what is known as the Govern- ment settlement. Mr. Runciman Ready- The reply received expressed Mr. Runci- man's willingness to meet the Board on Tuesday next, and it is probtiole that the meeting will take place in one of the rooms of the Home Office, as it is doubt- ful whether sufficient accommodation can be found at the Board of Trade Offices, the number expected to be present being over 60. Consideration of the letter and the necessary preparation for the visit to London occupied the whole day. • A meeting of the Enginemen and Stokers' and Surface Craftsmen's Associa- tion for South Wales and Monmouth- shire was also held to-day at the Y.M.C.A. Buildings, Cardiff, Mr. Illtyd Hopkins (secretary) being present, amongst others. The principal business was the discussion of the demands to be formulated to the Coalowners in order to afjiust the wages of the members of this Association in accordance with the varia- tions made to the miners in the recent new agreement. The Craftsmen's Demands. The chief point under consideration to- day was the demand made for raising the wage of those who are now paid 3s. 4d. per day and upwards by adding to the sum now payable 4d. per day, to form a base wage, and then adding to that 50 per cent. of the existing percentages to form a standard wage, upon which 10 per cent. should be added to make the minimum wage. Another point was that of the bonus turn to be paid to men employed on after- noon and night shift. It will be remem- bered that Mr. Runciman's award gave ,the miners six turns for five when work- ing nights. The circumstances connected with the enginemen and stokers' work are somewhat different, and the question now at issue is as to what should be the exact payment made in respect of the men who are employed on Saturday and Sunday shifts. Lock-out Pay. In the course of the afternoon it was reported that arrangements had been made for the payment of lock-out pay to those of the members of the Association who were prevented from working owing to the stoppage of the collieries during the recent strike.of the South Wales miners. CASE FOR MR. RUNCIMAN. An official report given by Mr. A. Onions at the close of the meeting of the Miners' Executive to-day, 'staled that in the absencb oi Mr. J. Winstone, Mr. Enoch Morel presided, and Mr. Onions himself acted as secretary in the absence of Mr. T Richards, M.P. Mr. W. P. Nicholas, solicitor to the Federation, was present, and submitted draft of a letter which he and the secre- tary had prepared, setting forth the points at issue which they desired Mr. Runciman to determine. After careful consideration the letter was agreed, and instructions given to the secretary to forward it to Mr. Runciman. Anthracite Miners' Lost 5 Per Cent. A letter was read from Judge Lloyd Morgan regretting he could not see his way clear to accept the invitation to be- come chairman and umpire to conduct an inquiry into the demands of Anthracite miners for the restitution of their lost 5 per cent. Steps were taken to invite another gentleman to undertake the duties. A number of colieries made application for permission to tender notices to termi- nate contracts on the non-Unionist ques- tion. These were deferred untile the new agreement is lodged. Pontardulais Lodge requested tho ex- ecutive to receive a deputation with re- gard to Enginemen and Stokers Federa- tion. It was decided to receive the depu- tation at the next meeting of the execu- tive. Miros Lodge applied to be transferred from the Pontypridd and Rhondda Dis- trict to the Garw District. Mr. Noah Rees was appointed to in- vestigate and report. Gomplaints Against Workers. A letter was read from the Tynydedw Lodge, Pentre, complaining that the col- liery officials had induced some of tho workmen to work on Sunday, August 1st, and on Bank Holiday, contrary to ar- rangement entered into by the Concilia- tion Board.—It was resolved to place the matter on the agenda for the next meeting. Consideration of matters connected with the Central Labour College was referred to a committee consisting of Messrs. E. Morrel, W. L. Cook, F. Hodges, and Noah Rees. The banksmen's question received at- tention, and it was resolved to disband the sub-committee in order to proceed with fresh arrangements at the next meeting.

IGUARDIANS AND A GOWER CASE

GUARDIANS AND A GOWER CASE. At Thursday's meeting of the Swansea Guardians, on consideration of the House and Graig House Committee, Mr. W. A. Thomas called attention to a refusal to admit to the institution infirmary a Gower case suffering from hip disease. Mr. W. A. Thomas inquired whether this was due to lack of accommodation, and on receiving an answer in the nega- tive, he submitted that there ought to be sufficient good feeling between neighbour- ing unions to induce them to provide for cases of this kind. Mr. Owen: Gower should make the repreesntation; it is not our case. Mr. W. David thought they could easily employ a nurse from Swan sea there was nothing to prevent them doing that. The minutes were adopted.

No title

Frederick P. Weiner, 29, a German, was sentenced to three months' imprisonment at the Thames Police Court, on Wednesday, for failing to give the police the date of his arrival in England. A man over military age can preach two sermons a week," said the Rev. Bramwell Sayer, the young pastor of the Herne Hill Congregational Church. so I shall fight." He has. gone into khaki and training. Wellington, Thursday.—The New Zea- land Government, on behalf of the Im- j>erial Government, has placed an order for sheep-skin coats for the troops in France. New Zealand troops in Gallipoli will be provided with winter coats of .plain Basil dark tamed sheep-skin,

I DESTITUTE BELGBANS

I DESTITUTE BELGBANS. I WELSH SCHEME TO FEED OUR STARVING ALLIES. We are informed that Mr. H. Davies Evans, Lord Lieutenant of Cardigan, has accepted the presidency of a Cardigan County Committee whose object is to save from starvation the many millions of Belgians who still remain in Belgium, and whom the Germans refuse to feed. The County Committee, which Mr. M. L. Vaugban Davies, M.P. for Cardigan, has joined, will co-operate with the National Committee for Relief in Belgium, of which the Lord Mayor of London is chairman. The Belgian minister is the only honorary member of this national organisation, and the Duke of Norfolk is chairman of its executive council. The appeal to the nation is signed by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Cardinal Bourne, the President of the Free Church Council, Lord Lansdowne. Lord Rose- bery, Lord Bryce, Mr. John Redmond, Mr. Arthur Henderson and others. TJndei their auspices a consolidation is being effected of all similar funds throughout the country. The Lord Lieutenant is also supported by the Mayors of several boroughs and by the chairmen of many Urban and Rural District Councils throughout the county. Clergymen and ministers of all denomination^ and other influential people are actively co-operating. County Funds. Throughout the county funds are rapidly being opened in response to the appeal of the County Committee, while funds already in existence are contribut- ing, directly or otherwise. Among the towns and districts thus already" doing the bit" to keep alive the unfortunate millions in Belgium are the following:— Aberayron, Aberystwyth, Llandyssulj Lampeter. A number of other towns and district arfc arranging to support the movement. The aim of the County Committee is to secure steady weekly contributions, how- ever small, from every part of the County,, For less than thirty shillings ten Belgians can be kept alive in Belgium for a week. It will thus be realised how much can be done with a little money. Wo are informed by the National Com- mittee for Relief in Belgium, whose head offices are at Trafalgar Buildings, Trafal- gar-square, London, that since their appeal was issued contributions amount- ing to over £150 have been received from Cardigan. Including subscriptions from all parts of the British Empire, the National Com- mittee have received, since the beginning of May, the splendid sum of £ 750,000. Every penny of this has been used to pur- chase food for the long-suffering Belgians, as the working expenses of the National Committee are generously provided for. from another source. Over Million Destitute People. There are one million five hundred thou- eand destitute people in Belgium. If they are to be kept alive through the coming winter with its intense tragedy of hunger, and its pathetic wait for Ion-, deferred release from German yoke, money must be provided more plentifully than heretofore. The object of the County Committee is to see that there shall never be levelled against this coun- try the accusation that the bulk of the Belgian nation were allowed to starve and die. In thirty-five other counties of England and Wales similar funds have been opened under the presidency of the respective lords-lieutenant. With the approval of His Majesty's Government, all contributions sent from this and other counties are transmitted, intact, by the National Committee to tha Neural Commission for Relief in Belgium. Under the chairmanship of Mr. Herbert Hoover, this wonderfully effective Com- mission have fed the people in Belgium ever since the Germans denied them bread. His Majesty's Government is satisfied that none of the food thus sent falls into the hands of the Germans.

I WELSH COALOWNERS

I WELSH COAL-OWNERS. I Scheme of Voluntary Agreement to Deal With Export. On Wednesday afternoon, representa- tives of the Welsh coal trade and its allied interests were in conference with the Coal Export Committee, which is the authority charged by the Government with the responsibility of granting licenses for the export of coal. .The conference took place at 68, Vic- toria-street, where the coal export busi- iiess is transacted. Mr. Russell Rea, M.P., Sir Richard Redmayne (his Majesty's Chief Inspector of Mines), and Sir Douglas Owen form the committee, and all three were present, together with the representatives of the Admiralty and the Board of Trade. Mr. Hugh Bram- well has been appointed chairman of the committee—it is called the Home Con- sumption Coal Sales Committee for Mon- mouthshire and South Wales-but he was not able to attend to-day, and Mr. T. E. Watson (the vice-chairman) headed the deputation, which was representative of both the Eastern and Western Districts of South Wales. The Eastern District was represented by Messrs. A. J. Griffiths, T. Vyvyan Rees, F. B. Saunders, H. J. Heath, W. R. Hann, and M. J. McNiel, and the Western District by Messrs. Charles Cleeves (Swansea), Evan Wil. liams, David Williams, and R. L. Sails, Mr. R. W. Hawkins (secretary of the Car- diff Chamber of Commerce) accompanied the deputation as secretary. Mr. Watson introduced the deputation, and explained that after the passing of the Bill for limiting the prices of coal the interests involved in the coal ex- port trade of South Wales had met to- gether, first in the Eastern and Western Districts separately and afterwards as a. joint body, in order to see what could be done by co-operation, to meet the diffi- culties which that legislative scheme had brought with it. As a result of the dis- cussions and considerable amendment1 of the original schemes, a memorandum of agreement had been drawn up, the terms of which they desired to submit to the Coal Export Committee in the hope that they would consider the arrangements satisfactory. Af r. Watson then placed before the com- mittee the details of "the agreement, and over two hours and-a-half was spent in discussing various aspects of the ques.. tion. Mr. Russell Rea thanked the deputa- tion for the trouble they had taken in coming to London, and expressed the hope that the agreement voluntarily entered into .between the Welsh coalowners would help the smooth working of the export trade under the conditions imposed by ,the war. He pointed out that the etwa- mittee could not give formal approval crI the scheme to-day, but he assured them that all its points would-be sympathetic ally considered.

No title

As a result of the Zeppelin raJd on Mon. day night there was an increase in the num- ber of applicants on Wednesday for Govern- ment insurance policies, but nothing in the nature of a rush at any of the larger offioea. No one can get compensation unless in- sured. The premium for aircraft risk is 'am ser cent. Mr. Justice Bankes is this week utills* ing his vacation to good purpose by act- ing as enumerator under the National Registration Act for a portion of hln native parish of Northop, Flintshire. Wages of engineers employed on the North-Eastern Railway have been advanced 3r. a week on time rates and 7J per cent, on piece rates, retrospective from March 5. Dr. Hedley, Roman Catholic Bishop of Menevia (South Wake), is reported to* be very cxitioalix ill.