Teitl Casgliad: Herald of Wales

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 10 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
22 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
WESTERN MiNERS AGENT

WESTERN MiNERS* AGENT ..—- DEATH OF MR. W. E. MORGAtf, SWJUSu LABuUli LlAjiK. We regret to record the death of Mr. W. E. Morgan, of Swansea, the wolt-known miners' agont for the Western District, which tOOA: place at his r{.ideuœ. No. Ia2, King Edward-road, Swansea," after a long liLness so patiently and heroically borlir that he attended to his ciutie;s almost to the last. lie parsed away just before mid- night on Saturday, diabetes being the primary cause. Mr. Morgan belonged to a fine type of Labour leader. A cultured mail of more than average insight, though unassuming and a voiding the limelight, he devoted tno whole of his energies to his duties, and by his ability, his moderation, his fairness, and integrity, won the confidence of em- ployees as well as workmen, and th.usof tec was able to succeed in settling complicated industrial disputes to the advantage of tho men he led when others might have failed. So one had a better or more intelligent grasp of details connected with eoliiary working, and this. coupled with his urbanity of manner and his unquestioned conscientiousness, contributed to hia ex- ceptional success as a Labour loader. Born 57 years ago at HIlos, Pontardawe, he started work in the Main Colliery, Bryncoch, at the early age of nine. Even as a boy he was of a very studious dis- position, and devoted all his spans moments to self-culture. When 18 years of age he suffered the misfortunA of a fracture of the thigh, and though tliit accident left its impress on his physical condition throughout the remainder of his. lite, it may also lie regarded as the turn- ing influence of his life, for during the period of his physical incapacity he con- centrated in improving his mind. lie was the first secretary of the local Union, which grew into the Swansea Valley Union, and then he became the first secre- tary of the Western District Miners' Association. Ho was a member of ilia Ciiybehyll School Board, and had the dis tinction of inducing that body to take the lead in Wales in the direction of in- troducing the teaching of Welsh into tha curriculum of elementary education. li* was also a member of the Cilybebyll, Parish Council, a member of the Board of Governors of the Ystalyfera Intermediate; School." a prominent co-operator and chair- man of the Alltwcn and pontardawe Co. operative Society. cw. leaving Alltwen to become ruill agent and secretary to the WesterOj Miners' Association in 190(1 the member. of the various public liodies with which h" had been so intimately associated pre. tinted to him an illuminated address, in. which the late Mr. Herbert Lloyd and hi* co-signatories bore testimony to his valu- able work in the interests of the masses and the community at large, to his de- votion to his public duties, and to th6 ability he displayed as an administrator liis removal to Swansea and iiis occu- pancy of a position which practically meant the leadership of the local miners irt&ofctal- entering on a sphere of never- ceasing activity in the cause of the men whose interests were committed to iiis "fHë;nnd'it says much for his upright- ness aud urbanity that he maintained t be resect and esteem of all he came Û < intact with. And although in recent yea 1*4 illness overtook him and his failing health was manifest to all, he manfully flllck to his duties to the end. Jle leaves a widow and two married daughters. His 6pn piedef'ased him at the a- 25 only seven weeks ago, and there is no doubt that this bereavement hastened his own end. Why an Elector Voted Against Him. 1110 late Mr. W. L. Morgan, miners' I agent, took a prominent part as arbi- < rato r in the hauliers' strike in 1g £ S.. n at eip j rirne, a mem- ber of the Pontar- da w e Board 0 f Guardians. It was recorded of an elec- tion that he fought against Sir John T. 1 >. Llewelyn that M-. Morgan secured every. vote in his district with four exeepfions. later, two oi t hese voters appeared and stated that they withheld their votes been use they did not want Mr. Morgan to leave Pon tarda we! He took an especial interest in the land question, and often toured the whole of the district on foot, making notes and investigating into the owner- ship of the various plots. He was a noted bibliographer and a keen educational student. As a member of the South Wales Executive Council and District Council he visited France, Belgium, and Holland.

SWANSEA LICENSEE FINED I

SWANSEA LICENSEE FINED John Ackland wae summoned at Swansea on Monday to answer an adjourned sum- mons for permitting drunkenness on his licensed premises, the Olive Branch, High- rtreet, on January ilat. Mr. H. King- prose- cuted, and MT. Mar lev Samson (instructed by Messrs. Viner Leeder and Morris) de- iended. inspector Fk-lirer said that, accompanied by Sergt. Williams, he visited the hoiwo and found a man and woznaji in the smoke-room. Witness asked them to got up, when it was seen they were both very drunk, especially the woman. She would ha v-e fallen bad she not been caught oy the officer. Witness dr&w tee attention of ALrs. Acklanc, the landlady, to tho condition of the man aoid woman. She replied that they had cdly just an, in the presence of the ■^t^ady site only had one drink, a 1.¡e>ttLe cf at-cut. Ho ha-ti to get the assistaoce of other Qmceré; a.nd a civilian to get the woman to the police station. rgt. Willi.a.tn.s corroboraied, and said that the women was violent in the cell. for the ?Mn?, ?bmitted :h.. a.f. \?, ?. Ackland never ?w ?y person K?OMC u; that &he did ?t serve them; a? t.h?t, urder whole ? the i !um?zan?ces bhe coul? d not r??bly be held w have bB beld to liav permitted druukcn?Me. Mrs. Ackland, the laiidlwiy said they had held the tor a»jen aud durillgb that period there had been no convictiQIJ fehe said that she eerved throe persons iu the smoke-room and returned to the bar. She could not see into the iinoke.rooin with- out opening the window. So far .she knew at that time there were only t-hnee pereorig in the room. She saw no others enter. r,,oi: did s-he aerve any others. When 1 iispe-ctor Fielder called her, she found. in addition, tiiis man &nd woman in the r.mok-mom. She had not t.£en them )>efore, todd Inspector Fielder so. Elen James and W. Hunt, who were .-e. -111-t a,t tle me, agreed that the landlady did not eee the man and woman, who were drunk coming in. The ^asistrates considered that a caM had been made out. and fined defendant 15. = ■' T

I STREET OBSTRUCTIONS II I

STREET OBSTRUCTIONS. II ..At tbe Swaneea Pcli ce Court on MOll- At the lwaaeea Police Court on Moa- I, day. Messrs OI&en and Knuteoc, 8hip ch.mdmrs, Pier-street, were summoned for causing au obstruction by allowing a handtruck, a basket, and a bicycle, and a II number of casks to remain in Pier-street. Defendant was fined 10s., the magistrate hoping that no further wa-, Liiug would ber requited. ? 

Advertising

^■Wwa—iw imuumjii ill iw—WO^  BABY HAKGRAVIia, Had Whooping Cough I and Bronchitis. 4. Woodland Terrace, Kedland, BristoL Nov. 29th, 1915. Dear Sir, I am enclosing a photo of my little boy, 11 months old. He only weighed five pounds when born, and when six weeks old he had at the same time whooping cough and bronchitis, and we never thought he would recover. On the doctor's recommendation I gave him Virol and he took no other nourishment for over a week. He is now healthy and strong as you may see, thanks, I believe, to his having had Virol with his food ever since. Yours faithfully, E. V. Hargraves, VI In Measles and Whooping Cough, I Virol should be given to children Ii of whatever age. Virol increases their power of resistance and recovery, and strengthens them against dangerous af ter-ef fects. In glass & stone jars, 1/ lIS. & 2/11. VIROL, LTD., 182-IS6, Old Street, E.C. S-H

I AMMAFSRAPIASWE

I 'AMMA?FSR?APIA?SWE?!? Former Master at Port Talbot School. The mirriage was solemnised at Sardis Church, Pontypridd, on Saturday of Capt.. A. J likhard, Br;> nihri, Ammanfcrtl, eldest son of the Rev. and Mrs. W. Richard, and Alius Marie Williams, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrfl. S. V illiams, of Clynderwon, Maesycood. Pontypridd. The ccveraony was performed by the Rev. W. Richard, father of tho bridegroom, assisted by the Rev M". Owen (pastor). Tho bride- was given aw-ty by her brother, Mr. J. Williams, and Mi, Alice Williams, sister, was the brides- maid. Mr. Gwynne Richard, brother of the bridegroom, acted as best man. Owin to the military exigencies Captain Richard returned to his battalion on Situ- d ly night. He is an M.A., and formerly a master at the Port Talbot Higher Element- ary (School.

AFTERWAR PROBLEMS I I

AFTER-WAR PROBLEMS Mr. D. Lleufer Thomas, Mr. J. A. Lovat-Fraser, and Mr. Edgar L. Chappell write us on hehaif of the South Wales Garden Cities and Town-Planning Asso- ciation, cmphasinging the supreme im- portance of preparing without; delay for social reconstruction after the war, and more especially for the provision of an adequate supply of dwellings for the work ing-cl&seee. We, do not urge the actual construc- tion of houses at the present time," they say, as the demands of the nation in regard to labour and capital are so great that any considerable cottage-building activity is for the moment both undesir- able and unpraeticable. The impossibility of bililding at present, however, should not blind us to the growing seriousness of the housing problem and to the great need of preparing for its solution as soon as conditions become more favourable. It would assuredly be a very short-sighted policy to postpone the consideration of after-the-war problems until v.-o are brought actually face to face with them. or Leading authorities prophesy that, when munition work ceases and our armies are demobilised after the termina- tion of hostilities, there will bo a most serious dislocation of trade and industry, and a wide-spread prevalence of unem- iidoymont, unless foresight is exercised and schemes are prepared immediately for the absorption of labour on construc- tive undertakings. The building trader constitute the second largest ludnstrial group in the country, and thousands of the returning soldiers will he, skilled men who have spent all their lives in building work. To provide employment fur thew men at their own occupations is eoujid economy, and we strongly urge that employers of labour, local authorities, housing socie- ties and companies, as well as individual speculators, will be doing work of the higiie.;t national importance if they pre- pare estat-a development and housing schemes now. so that actual building work can be commenced immediately after peace is restored." Our Association, which is a purely propagandist body. will gladly render information and advice gratis to any per- sons, associations or local authorities, which contemplate the preparation of town-planning, and housing schemes."

Advertising

HHnjflM THE SEAL WELSH CUKE BALSAM | CSUGHSiCSIDS l la?Suable in tbe Nursery ? Of aU Ch?uists an d Stores. |i|[f

THE iYSTERYSHiP

THE iYSTERY SHiP, DERELICT SCHOONER IN THE BRISTOL CHAHKEL For several days past masters going out of Swansea port have been warned against a derelict craft which had been, observed beating up the Brictol Channel, and had become dangerous to navigation, The craft had been aeeu by parsing steamers deep iu the water, with only her masts standing well out. The Customs Collector (Mr. A. R. Daw-son) ccmmuaiuated with the Ad- 'miralty, who immediately sent a patrol boat to search for the mysterious craft, and early on Sunday morning she was sighted off Lundy Island. The patrol boat, upon getting closer, dis- covered the vessel was in all apparently sinking condition, and her sails and fcpaivi indicating that the. had undergone tho brant of the recent boisterous weather, The craft, on inspection, proved to be tho schoonef J. L. Ivelson, of Barbadoes. official number 11,2092; registered at Bridgetown. Harbadoc.s, gross tonnage 2g, net tonnage 249. So far a.s can be gleaned from he,r log- tóecause w hen she was boarded there was no living soul of her crew to be eoen—she jft. West Passage, Ireland, on January Sth, with a crew of ten. It is then sur- mised that she was making for Fowey. Cornwall. That she arrived there safely there- is no possible doubt, for she ub quently sailed away from there v/iih a cargo of china clay, and Ava-s bound with it for Halifax, Nova Scotia. That, it appears, was the last heard qf her until she wa-s picked up by the patrol boat and brought to Swauee-a about eight, o'clock Ðn Sunday morning and moored near Pockctt's Wharf. She will remain there in charge of the Collector of Customs lLltil her owners or their agents take, her over. We understand that the crew of the J. L. Nelson, which left in one of the boats when her condition hecame serious, has arrived in London, having, presum- ably, been picked up by a passing steamer Ll bound for London.

SWANSEA BATTALION OFFICES I

SWANSEA BATTALION OFFICES. I I Second-Lieutenant G. A. West, cf the Swansea Battalion, who Las been wounded. Lieutenant is not a Swansea boy, having joined the .Battalion whilst they were in training at Win- chester. Ho has been out at tho lronti, before, this being his second sojourn in the trenches. MOND NICKEL WORKS MUSICIAN, Lce.-Cpi. Alfred W. .tonkins, son of Mr. Thomas .lenkior:, j Islwyn, Villas, Lon- 1 a s Liansamlct, joined the B'.A.M.C. and was drafted 1o 1 h e Dardanelles, rom which place lie Las been inva- lided to tlli country and is now at Shef- field Hospital. -Be v/jiti previous to en- tering r.c (Cardiff) employed at the Mond Nickel Works jn the laboratory. He will he rernernLtercd as or>^ of the timt young violinists in Swan- sea district, having won numerous prizes. He was also a member of the Mond Nickel Works Orchestra, and from childhood has been a staunch Rechabite. k FALLEN NEATH HERO. King's Sergeant j .JG Davioe, the i Xeath hero, has tallell in action. In November last he was awarded the French Military Cross, repommended, for the D.C.M., and promoted sergeant on the field for his conduct in bringing in a wounded com- rade. Joe was ex- tremely well known and popular. J n pre-war days hs worked as a collier at Seven Sister* and played Enj:by for K- I'vun..His mouier resides at Penvdre, Neath. KILLED IN AUGUST. 1915. Mr. W. K. John, of 32. '],>>p-road, Mor- riston, h". received ncr-s that his son. Private E. <3. John, of the Sth Weleh (i'ioneer) Battalion, was killed in action on August 8th of !,)-t vear. Previous to this I I i. John had heard lIn- officially that his son WHS missing, but had been un- ;1 h]p to oht¡lil1 ;1.(.S of his LÙp- The deceased, who was 2; years of age, was prior to the war em- t li c,  T) t), r ;vpd

R S B RAILWAY

R. & S. B. RAILWAY SHASEHOLDERS RECEIVE A FA.OIMdlE HEPOHT The annual meeting of tho proprietors of the iihondda and fcj-vvansea Bay iiaihvay -was held at the Hotel Metropoie, Swan- sea, on Saturday afternoon. iLr. (ieorge Peer, J.i'. (chairman of tho ciirecvorb) presided, and the other directors present wilr. W. Ii. P. Jenkins, J.P., Bristol (.deputy chairman), Mr. Fred E. Jacob (Bridgend), and Mr. William Davics (Glyn Noatti;, with Mr. E. Lewis Jones (secre- tary), and the following shareholders: iLeasis. S. W. £ ockney, TrehaniG, G. V. Pe-rrVj Thomas Yorath, H. T. Hall, S. Cropper, J. H. Tavlor, E. D. Edwards, W. W. Mundy, W. W. Llewellin. W. D Roberts. Y. U. Cawkar (auditor .i, W. CIt-Ment., j lderman J. Jordan, Daniel Evans, W. H. John, D. Eobertson, and David Wilaiam: In moving the adoption of the report of the directors and statement of accounts, a digest of which has already appeared in our columns, che Chairman said tha abnormal condition of things at tho moment did not óinel an opportunity of saying much that was new in connection with the railway- The railways of the Kingdom were still under the control of the Government under the Rfgnlatiun cf Forces Act, 1871. The railway companies will receive for the year UH5 the amount as for lftli subject to the railway companies be-aring a. proportion of the war bonus payable to the employes. Under these circumstances the receipts for 191-i were just about what they were in 191-i, and 1.1;2 rate of dividend was the same. They earned during the year 1.91 i £1,271 more than was required to pay the minimum dividends, and a moiety of that amount, viz., f{j3.J nad been credited in the accounts. The juiietio-n between the R. and S.B. Railway and the Great Western Railway at Neath River bridge, and the improved junction at Court art had been com- pleted and brought into use. The line between these points had aiso been im- proved for faster running. The expenditure on capital account durinyi tli.- year 1915 was £ 8,027. The largest of tho items was the balance oi the cost, of the improved juaction at Court Sart and th<> improvements in the railway betv/een that junction and Neath River bridge. The running sheds, the rolling stock and permanent way, and everything appertaining to the property of the com- pany, the Citairrnaii fdded, wa'.i in per- fed order. Two of the directors, Colonel Charft's Wright and Lieut. Milbourne Williams, were serving their lviug and country in the Army, and he looped that next yr).r they would have returned safe and sound. Mr. Jenkins fcconded, and the resolu- tion was adopted. On the motion of Mr. Jacob, seconded by Mr. W. Davips, dividends were de- clared of 2\ per cent, on the preference shares and ii per cent. on the ordinary shares, Mr. Yockney—to whose engineering achievements when the line was con- structed the Chairman referred in terms ot high praise—moved the re-election oi Mr. Jenkins and Lieut. Milbourne W-il- knms, the retiring direct ore. He re- ferred to the strenuous fights the company went tli rough in the early stages of the concern, and said the directors had not only carried on the line under great difficulties but had brought the under- taking now into Tteacernl' waters. The completion of the junction between the company's line and the G.W.R. at Neath River Bridge wa* an achievement of the greatest public advantage, and he was sure it would result iu increased profits. Mr. John Taytor seconded, and the meeting concurred. Mr. Jenkins replied on behalf of his afcs^ni- colleague and bimeclt'. Mr. C'asvker was re-ek-cted auditor, on the motion of Mr. W. W. Llcwellin, seconded by Mr. Oapper. The Chairman paid a warm tribute to the manner in which the officials of the company, fvim Mr. John Da vi d ("general manager) downwards, looked after its IlJ- terests, and said he had never worked with a better lot of officials and men during the period he had been connected with 

MaTHER YOUR CHILD HEEDS A LAXATIVE

MaTHER, YOUR CHILD HEEDS A LAXATIVE! If Tongue is Coated, Stomach Sick, or the Child is Cross, Feverish, Constipated, give California Syrup of Figs." Don't scold your fre-tful. peevish child.! Soe if the tongue is coated: this is a sure sign that the little stomach, live" a.?d bowels are clogged with bile and iniper-j fectly digested food. When listless, j .v.lc, with, tainted breath, a cold, 0r 8 .-0re throat; if the chti'd does not oaf. sleep or act naturally, or hat stomach-ache, indiges- tion or diarrhoea, give a. tea spoonful of it few hour<, all the waste matter-, bile and fermenting food itiU pass out < f tl].. bowels, and you 'have a healthy, playi'ul ygair.. Children lose this harmless fruit laxative. and mothers can rost cusy a-fier giving it, bf^catiso it never fails to make their little ineide-s swcel and whok'-sorar. Keej) it handy. Mother! 1\ little given to-day saves a sick child to-morrow, but get the genuine. Ask your chemist for a hoi tie of California Svrup <'j Figs, which has directions for babies, children of oil agos, and for grt>wn-ups plainly 0:1 the 1 Kittle. Remember imitations arc •sometimes substituted, so look and see that your bottle bears th? naiuf of the California Fig Syrup Company." Hand 7,, -iij) back with contempt any ot her fig syrup. All leading cherniate cell California S3 rup cf Figs," Is. 3d. and 2s. per bottle.

No title

Welsh cheese, once 3d. a lb., gold at Sd. and 9d. a lb. at Carmarthen on Saturday. Kinema pictures of crime which in-, flaenced children to steal should be put down by th? Government, said .Sir Henry Ij H?nctrdi at Northampton en ?'n?n-day. Cf tie 5:J men o*; th," Surrey Eescinient- prisoners in 0 em any, ;;I adopted, and through me Queen's Phisnners' Be-lief Fund Gl.OCO jra-ceL. ecziiiort-s ixava bseji IoiCn.t..

Advertising

Links in Britain's Chain of War (First Series) to- 7. Tiz e Tf,ars of 1792 1801 t In the Wars of 1792-1801, Britain's fillL, ''A I -T | Naval resources were • < t) u greatly strengthened and did S —- splendid service abroad. Pears l|||| /$ during this time was the great ^Spl |l||r fashionable novelty in toilet scaps ??  and was sold at a high price to ?.e???? the ladies of the Court and Society e a r has served with honour and distinction from one war period to another during six reigns —those of George 111., George IV., William IV., Victoria. Edward VII., and George V.—contributing materially all the time to the health, freshness, and appearance of the men of the Service and of the general public. Always incliBde Pears in your Parcels to the Front. The World's Leading Toilet Soap the Most Economical Dries quickly and does not soften in use.

PLIGHT OF BULGARS

PLIGHT OF BULGARS —————— e'l .—————. Badiy Fed, Scantily Clothsd, and PracticaKy Bootless. Private Ike Harries, of the 6th Royal Irish Fusiliers, has arrived at his home in Mount Pleisant Inn, Ammanford, after participating in sev- eral of the eastern spheres of opera- tions. His battalion bdollgcd to the fa- mous 10 th Divi- sion '—the-only Brit- 1811 force which came to gripa with the Bulgars in Southern Serbia. Tho brunt of tho fighting at ."uln.. Bei." also fcli -j their lot, and it. ivas tbey who cap- lured Chocolate lilil at tile point of tlie bayonet. Out cf many tight curncr., nc emerged unscathed, only to be stricken with dyseutry at Salonika, whence he was invalided home. Civing a glimpse of lib; experiences with much modcoty lo ? Leader i-ep-ortcr. he stated that his division, which in- cluded r-everal Greenhill men attached to the Aiii niters, here jiu.shed forward from Salonika to etiect a junction with tJw retreating Serbians, but the difficulty of rapid advance ??s tremendous in view 01' the lack of proper roads ari('I the hilly nature of the ground. They crossed the Serbian frontier, and nsoon began mix- ing mnlter6" with the Jiulgars. For five or sis days fighting went on continuously, but the Iiidi .division yielded not .Ill inch until its fiank became imperilled. The fighting was tierce, and the Bulgni-s showed theiiiselv^s ii^ttcr iigh-cr,, in the open than the Turks, but the latter were behind fc.-er. Although greatly outnumbered, v.ifhdrawal was success- fully ferried out, and good care was taken lhaf no ttores nor auimunition was left to the enemy, ar.d tb" guns that perforce had to be left behind were rendered use- less The Pulgars, he FPid, badly fed, scantily clothed, and practically boot- and were even then "ir.k of the wiioie th:n?. As proof o; 1'?, th?y loucd d  (>: ;m)]:f ;1 themselves up to tue Jariiisp, O>VIJ< prironc-s. pre. Harris's narrowest escape w- at Suvla. when a shell dropped within three yards of him and two cMnrade*. j Luekiiy it did r»oi cx]>lode, or else it i; s P. p I .I "goners. At t lie binding at Suv 1¡-" fbsy and Harris remarked that many times i he harl earre-stly hmged to be nr-ur even I the water-tap at home. Tiikon ail. round, the Turk?., 7cN, not a bad type of Irghting me: But they ha.d this v. ee. kr.o.'thev did net. reii -h coid ytr-cl..fit the, temporary security <*•? their • own  much cover ;va a box of natchcs could give. But when the uitcom- j ing infantry swept up the rising slopes lilic a sureirg billow, and gained the eminence, i the Turks scampered in aU directions, all- inr: AJJ:h! \)jah!" In the chur? on Chcco!a!p HiU Harries was in the fiercest of the rny, end h? i?- eurrrised till Jo-day ?3v he survived that j irfe.'no of shot .i;ul shell Hurias hi? ;hree iuontbs' stay on (jaiH- poli !t wa..hi!' boed luck to meet a number cf compatriots, and one or two from h»s native heath. But fortune never brought him face to face with Q.-M.-S. W. Morgan, the rcpnt-.tion f bcinfZ a cSitic.it Cjuart.er-master. ex- ercising, as he did, the greatcf-t cave in jjcttin-T supplies nnd stores provided for and attributed amongst hio units. Harries has sufficiently recovered to en- able the Sghting spirit to assert itself. His last words to the "Leader" reporter were that he was anxious to be back cnee more at the scene cf operations—Fr3nco prefer- ai'lv, for change.

Advertising

EXHIP SPY CAPTURED

EX-HI.P. SPY CAPTURED Boastful German Run to Earth. Is New York, Sunday.—Trehitscn Lincoln, the ex-M 1'. ana dormer German epy, wh:> styled himself the brainier man m tne world," and defied the police to find him after* he made his escape over a month ago from custody, was retaken last night in this city by the police. Since Lincoln's escaiie from Deputy Marshal .lolin^on at a Brooklyn restau- rant, where they were lunching, Lincoln had apparently lived in several of tiie lower-class lodging-houses in New York. It was through the keeper of one of thase that the police were put in touch with him and were able to arrest him. Lincoln kft this lodging-house without paying his bill. The. proprietor, through hi- connection with .?.bt-r lod?ing-hou?:' olke on various occasions and was unsuspected. Since his escape Lincoln has several times written to the newspapers in boait- fashion, remerfeing on hi., own clever- ness. Though lie will doubtless h bandied over to the British authorities for extradition on the charge of forgery, he may (I.. nrst Iw retainr-d if: thip coun- try by Mr. William Offtey, the Sujierin- tendent of the Department of Justice, for at the time when Lincoln e--t he was engaged in translating German code mes- sages for department. Lincoln*'? knov,-]edge of the German secret .service exceedingly valuable in this connect ion. hen he disappeared it wps found that a number of those valu- able paper-s «. also gone. It will be necessary to A these back if possible, and ais-s to iind Lincoln's confederates, -i? it 's c»h1in Iw !nn?t hav" had aid and money in iiii,! a-O, aiid

WHY TiiE TRAlfi WAS STOPPED

WHY TiiE TRAlfi WAS STOPPED. A a extraordinary case was toid at Swansea Police Court en Saturday, when John Davies, of Dunvant, was i-ummoned for behaving in a disorderly manner in a iram on tiie L. ard N.YV. K:«.il'vay, and ♦ tif'rfcring .vitn the comfort cf pas- :,engr-n.. i!r. Kupert Lewis proseeutcd, a: Mr. Lr.w«Ir. Harris, on behalf of his client, ad- mitted thero had been an offeree, but under great provocation. Ho was quiet until his wife was insulted. Tiie magistrates expressed the view that the assault was brutal. Defendant was lined iAs.

ADMIRAL S DEATH r iI

ADMIRAL S DEATH r i. rod out on Sunday ;.y tho French orheia! "At the express request of King Alfonso if Spain, the Czar has commuted the sen- death i«issed upon the German Admiral von Mauler."

I PRIVATE TO CAPTAIN

I PRIVATE TO CAPTAIN l PUSMARL HERG'S ACHIEVEMENTS KtUuubiotii AT iWAIIOLA A very pleasing function was held at tho Lxchange it est a u rant, Swansea, on Saturday eiening. ine occasion was all informal welcome to Captain Cranston, of Fiasmarl, Swansea. Captain Cranston is a man with a remarkable record. He is an old Army man, having eerved through the South African War with. great distinction, lie has passed through ail ranks, from that of private to captain. He i-s exceedingly well uwwii 111 the dis- trict as a clever all-round athlete of mere than local fame. He was promoted cap- ain from sergeant on the held, tor dc~ I tmqui'shed service, and in one of the tng e.igag'ineuts in lrance recently, he was th? only officer left of two companies. During tho South African War he earned lame elf, one of the finest tliarp- | shooters in the Northern Command, lie | s?:-v» d first in the lioyal Scotch Fusiliers, then in the Koyal Scots Greys, and in the latter regiment lie distinguished himself ¡i-G an extremely clever forward in football and an expert boxer and wrestler. As a sergeant in the Scots Grøys (France, A':gust. -ii the retreat from Mors lie iwrformed a remarkable* feat in marksmanship when he suceee-dcd in bringing down a German horseman at a thousand yyrds' range. For this achieve- ment lie was personally complimented by the commanding otiiccr. A reconnaissance which he carried out resulted in the cap- ture of 50') Germans hy the 15th Cavalry- Brigade, on the ?darne. was person- ally commended by MajoIleral CIK-T- wod*, and promoted Soi^sfiron Sergeant- Major on the field, besi-Jrs being men- tioned ii) dispatches. For further ticule.ty brifliant service in August ht- speared p commission in tho Scots Grcn-s, and as a result of the lecent advance waf. promoted captain. His ability as an athlete j", amplified^, inasmuch as he is the Champion Swords* man of the North of England and Scot- land, having won the championships in. the sword v. sword. 

WOMAN SPY CAPTURED

WOMAN SPY CAPTURED The first intimation the public has -re- ceived of the recent, arrest, trial, and con- viction of a woman spy in this country was supplied in the House of Commons by the Home Secretary in reply to a question. It is satisfactory evidence cf the alert- ness of the spy washers that the woman —a forei,Tiei,-was detected within a week. Replying to Mr. Philip Snowden, Mr. Herbert Samuel said: A woman was tried ns a spy at the Central Criminal Court before three judges and a jury, was found guilty a.nd sentenced to death. An Appeal was made to the Court of Criminal Appeal, and was heard by five judges and dismissed. After consultation with the judges, the sentence has been commuted to one of penal servitude for life. The woman'a activities were discovered within six days of her arrival in this country, and from that Üm until her arrest all her com- munications were effectively intercepted. Mr. Snowden: Was she a British sub- ject or an alien r Mr. Samuel: Not a British subject.

No title

The TTnion Castle liner Comrie which went ashore off Mombasa, bas bees refloated.

Advertising

P°r Cakes, Pastry, Puddings and Pies. Bu AI&RWIClEiSls BAKING POWDER.