Teitl Casgliad: Herald of Wales

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
33 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

NEATH AND DISTRICT BILL-POSTING CO. ADVERTISING CONTRACTORS. Owners of all the Principal Hoardings in NEATH and District. For Terms, &c., appiy.- Manager, 45, London Road, Neath.

Advertising

A SOLDIER writing from the trenches says;- "The c Herald of Wales' I is a weekly comfort. J

ZEPP BROUGHT DOWN

ZEPP. BROUGHT DOWN TEN RAINERS VISIT THE EAST COAST. Press Bureau, Monday, 12.31 a.m.—The following communique was issued by the Field-Marshal Comman.ding-in-Chief Home Forces at 11.45 p.m.— A number of hostile airships crossed the East Coast between 9 p.m. and mid- night. A few bombs have been dropped near the coast, but no damage has yet been reported. The raid is still in progress, and some airships arc in the vicinity of London, where some guns have been in action. A later report says:- An airship is just reported to have been brought down in ilames north of London. The following communique was issued by the Field-Marshal Commanding-in- Chief the Home Forces at 10.30 a iu Ten hostile airships crossed the East Coast last night between nine o'clock and miclniglit. One airship approached the north of London about lU.6 p.m., but was driven off by gun-fire and pursued by aeroplanes. She attempted to return from the north- west, but was attacked by guns and aero-! planes, and brought to earth in flames in the neighbourhood of Potter's Bar shortly before midnight. A second airship attempted to attack London from the north-east, but she was driven off about 1.0 a.m. A number of bombs were dropped, but no reports of casualties or damage have yet been re- ceived The remaining airships wandered aim- lessly over the Eastern Counties and Lincolnshire. Bombs were dropped promiscuously but mo-st of them appear to have dropped in open country without causing damage. TJie airship which was destroyed was of the latest type. A representative of the Press Associa- tion, describing the scene at the spot where the Zeppelin fell, says:—The Zep- pelin fell in a held. and in the middle of the wreckage there stands the remains of a huge tree destroyed by the fall of the airship Round about the tree can be seen the huge iramework, twisted and twined, and presenting an amazing sight in the starlight. Burning in the middle of the wreckage are the remains of one or more of the petrol 1-anks. Now and then a body would be extracted from the*burning mass. and one of the first bodies recovered is believed to be the commander's. All the bodies recovered were fearfully burned, and death must have taken place in mid- air. THE CASUALTIES. I Further statements issued by the Field- Marshal Commanding-in-Chief Home Forces at 3.30 p.m.: Police report that the total casualties as a result of last night's air raid were: "One man killed, and One woman injured, The material damage was insignificant, although the raider- covered a wide area and dropped a great number of bombs. Four houses were damaged, some glass- houses were demolished, and a number of windows were broken. Three more bodies of the crew of the Zeppelin brought down at Potters Bar were recovered on Tuesday. This brings the number up to twenty. The search is proceeding. An inquest was held on Tuesday at a village North of London on the body of a middle-aged man who was killed during Monday morning's raid. The evidence showed that the man was killed whilt. standing five yards from a bomb hole. Eight bombs fell in one field, and over 40 in the neighbourhood, without causing any damage to property. A verdict in accord- ijlce with the evidence was returned.

FAMILY LITIGANTS

FAMILY LITIGANTS. Cwmavon Woman's Claim for Wages. At Aberavon County Court on Tuesday- 'before his Honour Judge Lloyd Morgan, K.C.—Sarah Jane Bowen, 7, Lower-row, Cwmavon, sued her sister, Lucy Bowen, music teacher, and her brother, Thomas 4Bowen, Corseinon, the executors of their father, Thomas Bowen, Clynderwen, Cwm- avon, for £:H¡ for domestic service and attendance for oti months at t1 a month. Mr. Lewis M, Thomas was for plaintiff, Mr. Moses Thomas for Lucy Bowen, and Mr. Griffith Jones (instructed by Mr. Harries Bowen) represented Tlios. Bowen. It was explained for plaintiff that during her mother's lifetime she was paid 5s. a week, and the same arrangement was made with the father after her death. For the three years he lived he paid her nothing. He was receiving 15" a week from two sons in repayment of money he had lent. When she spoke to her father about paying, he referred her to the brothers, who were not regular in their contributions Lucy Bowen, who is the organist of All Saints Church. Cwmavon, though nomin- ally a defendant, supported her sister's claim. In reply to Mr. Griffith Jones, she admitted that shortly before his death her father nominated her for i;77 in the Savings Bank. Thomas Bowen, in reply to his Honour, said fitat durinl- his father's life his sister did not ask him for the money. On his death she presented the bill for 1.16. In giving judgment for defendant, his Honour referred to statements in evidence that the deceased owned a small house on short lease, £ 240 in the bank, and lived on the old age pension with the repayment money. It vrsfs not likoly that a man in his posi- tion would employ his 'laughter as domes- tic servant and pay her all his old age pension. I-

BRITONFERRY COUNCILI

BRITONFERRY COUNCIL. I The monthly meeting of the Briton- ferry District Council was held on Thursday, Mr. Jas. Thomas, J.P.. pre- siding. An application by the South Wales Motor Co. for a renewal of ten licences for their 'bust's through Britonferry was deferred, and the question of complaints which had been made of the 'buses re- fusing to pick up and let down passen- gers were to be laid before the company. An application for an increase of 36. per week made by the employes of the Council was made, and it was de- cided that the application be granted. it -was decided that on and after Sun- day next the public lamps should be lighted up to eleven o'clock each night and from 5 o'clock to daylight each morning. It was deicded to support Neath in their aplication for the National Ei&- teddfod in 1918. Councillor George Davies brought for- ward a motion standing in his name re- garding the supplies of coal for the needs of the town for domestic purposes. He moved that the Council undertake to I open a register for the purpose of register- ing the needs of the district with regard to c?Md. and to request the inhabitant? te..r i5 tr th

WEARING THE BREEKS i

(WEARING THE BREEKS. I A Mere Man on Margam I Innovation. The air of Port Talbot and Aberavon seems decidedly bracing. We fail to un- derstand why the Beach development magnates have not made more of the fact. Recently girls at Margam took to bracing themselves for the only reason for which people do brace themselves, i.e., to sus- pend their trousers thereon. For weeks the girls at Margam have discarded the femine and adopted masculine attire, be- cause they found this mode more con- venient for their work. Many contem-, poraries prophesied that the revolution in Margam was likely to prove the fore- runner of similar revolutions all over the country. This has been the case in many agricultural districts, but few instances are reported of the intrusion of girls in trousers into the towns. Port Talbot seems blessed or otherwise with such an intrusion. Milk girls at Port Talbot have now been affected by the trousers epidemic and are to be seen wearing the much dis- cussed article under a raincoat. One of the girls .-ays that she does so lwai-Lse the milk spoils the skirt, and presumably petrol does, because these young ladies find the trousers very convenient for riding a motor-cycle in their spare time. Many residents are debating whether the trousers will be introduced into the draw- ing-room, because the boy—the darling boy—will spill the tea. This conjures up visions in the form of the newest Port Talbot models and the demand for artists with ideas to develop the new fashions which will eclipse anything we mere men could ever imagine. The local fashionists arc no doubt discussing this aspect of tho new development in the event of the trousers epidemic spreading. We shall no longer hear of petticoat gout, but instead we shall have lost the delights of frills and flounces. Mere man will no longer be trapped among the network of ribbons and laces, but he will look upon the flapper its saerely a thing in trousers, and when this comes along we may be ready for the tax on bachelors. There'll be some!

WAR SAVINGSJ

WAR SAVINGS. J A Meeting at Aberavon. Major Richard Rigg, a commissioner of the National War Savings Certificates Committee, concluded a three days' con- ference in South Wales, at Aberavon on Friday night. The Mayor (Councillor P. J. Jacob) presided over a gathering repre- sentative of the borough and the Margam district. Major lligg, emphasising the impor- tance of thrift in securing a lasting peace, said that if everyone of the 48 millions ot this Kingdom were to become a Scrooge the money power of the British Empire j would be irresistible. All money spent unnecessarily constituted a sin against j the State; they must usher into Britain -in era ot simplicity, and sacrifice luxury for the sake of the men who were sacri- iismg their all at the front. At the doo-e he paid a tribute to Mr. Black, the organising secretary for South I Wales, for the manner in which he had arranged the conferences. Mr. Black, speaking on the practical side of the work, urged the formation ot war savings associations in connection with trade unions, day schools, henelib and friendly societies, as well as chapels and churches. He illustrated this by re- ference to the excellent work already done in other districts of South Wales. Councillor John Davies moved a resolu- tion forming those present into a central war savings committee for Aberavon and Margam. Alderman Smith seconded, and the motion was adopted. The Mayor of Aberavon was appointed chairman, with Mr. Ed. Lowther (chair-! man of the Margam Urban Council), as vice-chairman, and the Town Clerk (Mr. Moses Thomas), and Mr. D. E. Jones (Clerk to the Council), were chosen joint secretaries.

HOTEL BURNT DOWN

HOTEL BURNT DOWN. Falstaff Hotel, Liverpool, was destroyed by lire on Tuesday. The licensee and his family were rescued by means of a fire-1 escape. There were many exciting scenes.

NEATH AND THE 4 NATIONAL

NEATH AND THE 4 NATIONAL.' The Guarantee Fund raised by the Neath Provisional Committee of the National Eisteddfod, 1918, has reached over £ 1.000. Among the guarantors are Mr. T. J. Williams, MP.. Swansea. UftO guineas, and Mr. E. Evans Be,all, J.P., Sir Griffith Thomas, and Mr. Wv J. Stephens, i:100 each. I

SILENCE IS GOLDENI

SILENCE IS GOLDEN. I Thomas Oxford, a Canning Town boiler- maker, who was lined £5 or 31 days' im- prisonment at West Ham, on Tuesday, had stated in a public-house: Donit go to bed to-night, at any rate not before 11.30. 1 have just come fi-oi-ti which is in total darkness. There is a big fleet coming over to-night. I know it for a fact." A special constable had overheard him and he was arrested.

A PORT TALBOT ORGANIST I

A PORT TALBOT ORGANIST. I At Penycae Chapel, Port Talbot, Mi-s Gweneth Jenkins was presented with a mahogany quarter chime timepiece, six volumes of Grove's Dictionary of Music and Musicians, and a large framed photo- graph of her Sunday school class, as a mememnto of her appointment by merit as organist of Tabernacle Newydd Congre- gational Church. The members of Salem Congregational Church, Sandfieids, also presented her with a volume of Bee- thoven's Sonatas. Mr. David Rees, super- intendent of the Sunday school, presided, and the gift was handed over by Mr. David Evans, treasurer. The Hey. Ogwen Griffith, Messrs. Rhvs Nicholas, Thomas Williams, John Phillips, J. and G. T. Llewelyn spoke hig-h ly of Miss Jenkins' abilitv. Durintr the evening songs were, sunsr by Misses Edwards and Rees Ed- wards. Miss Gwen Jenkins r-nve a recita- tion, and the meeting closed with "Hen Wlad Fv' N hadau," Mr. G. T. Llewelyn taking the solo.

BRYN MALE CHOIR I

BRYN MALE CHOIR. I An at-home was held at the Grosvenor Hotel on Saturday by the members of the Brvn Male Choir for the purpose of pre- senting Miss Gertie Thomas, R.A.M., their accompanist, and Pte. Bryn Evans, con- ductor, now of the Mechanical Transport, for their services to the party. Mr. Tom Clement, secretary, acted as chairman, and spoke in hicih terms of the way the re- cipients had contributed to the success of the choir. Mr. Hopkins made the presen- tation to Miss Thomas, and Mr. G. P. Llewellyn to Pte. Evans. Both suitably responded. An excellent musical pro- gramme was contributed to by Mr. Joe Jones, Mr. E. Bidder and J. Thomas. Th singing of Hen Wlad fy Nhadau brousrht a pleasant evening to a close, Mr. ¡ ( j r „ f 1" 11"\

A MONTHS LOSSES

A MONTH'S LOSSES BRITISH TOTAL FOR SEPTEMBER, 119,000 1 Foli.Twing are details of the losses given under princilial lieadings in the casu- alty liits issued by the War Office and published in our coloumns from Septem- ber ] to September 30, says the Daily Telegraph." The list include casualties reported !:rom all points at which our armies are engaged :— N.C.0.6& Officers. Men. Killed 991 16,082 Died of wounds 229 5,354 Died 24 1,154 Accidentally killed 4. 93 Wounded 3,817 31,282 Wounded and missing 34 344 Missing, believed killed 47 86 Missing. 265 9,765 Prisoners otf war (i 89 From these must be deducted the fol- lowing First reported killed, wounded, or missing; afterwards reported not killed, wounded. or missing if 469 This leaves the totals as follows: Officers. 5,103 Men 113,780 The figures for July and August res- pectively were: Officers .7,071 Men 52,001 Officers 4,693 Men 123,097 The lull list includes a number of modi- fications of casualties previously reported. From the Admiralty during the period have been issued lists of casualties sus- tained by officers and men. Of these the details are: N.C.0.6 & Officers. Men. Killed 11 114 Died of wounds 14 Died 9 4 Drowned. 1 16 Dangerously wounded 11 Severely wounded 1 4 Wounded. 10 130 Slightly v.-ounded 4 11 Injured 15 — Missing. 4 10 Prisoners of war 3 15 Totals 58 329

STR UCKWITH A BOTTLE

STR UC-KWITH A BOTTLE. Serious Assault on a Neath Wife. At Neath on Tuesday John Hillier, labourer, of Lake's-court, was charged with unlawfully wounding his wife Kate, I by striking her on the head with a bottle. The woman appeared in court with her head swathed in surgical bandages, and appeared very distressed. P.S. David E^ns spoke to arresting ac- cused in Windsor-road that morning, and when charged with the offence he replied: I did not strike her with a bottle; I struck her with her own boot." Witness said he afterwards visited the house and produced an empty flagon, which he found on the floor of the kitchen. Accused: You will find dozens of fla- gons in the house Chief Constable Higgins asked for a remand until Friday, which was granted.

MR TOWYN JONES MP

MR. TOWYN JONES, M.P. Among the chosen preachers to take part la services on Wednesday evening in con- nection with the great meetings of the Congregational Union of England and Wales at Birmingham, is the Rev. Towyn Jones, M.P.

WELSH OFFICERS WILL

WELSH OFFICER'S WILL. Major George Ryding Sankey Gardner, R.F.A., of The Hawthorns, Porthcawl, formerly of Brynomlwg, Neath, who died on June 25 at 1 he Australian Stationary Hospital, Ismailia, Egypt, left £533. Mr. Clement Sankey Best Gardner, of Rock- wood, Neath, is the sole executor.

DOUBLE WAGES BY TRICK d

DOUBLE WAGES BY TRICK. d- Drawing double wages by means of a trick led to the appearance of William Osmond, a Crynant. collier, at Neath County Sessions, on Friday, on a charge or obtaining £6 5,s. fld. by fåltSe pretences. Mr, Windsor WTilliams prosecuted, and Mr. Arthur Evans defended. It was stated that defendant and his son worked together at Llwynon Colliery. On August 19 the son called at the pay office, presented the ticket, and drew the wages, 1:6 5s. 9d. A Little later defendant called for his wages, and a week later ho still maintained that he had not Ill paid, and the company made it up. When the fraud was discovered, defendant ex. pressed his sorrow and asked for forgive- ness. He had since repaid the company. A fine ot 40s. was imposed.

OFFENCES AT NEATH

OFFENCES AT NEATH. John Rees Jones, (--other. Onllwyn, was at Neath on Tuesday fined 10s. for drunken and disorderly behaviour. P.C. Barratt proved the case, and defendant expressed sorrow. Thomas Bees, Crythan-road. pleaded guilty to a charge of obstruction in Lewis- road the previous night, and a fine of 10s. wa,s imposed. Mr. S. T. Savage. 24. Burrows-road, Swansea, states that he is in no way con- nected with a man of the same name charged at Swansea Police, Court en Saturday with a night offence.

INSURANCE AGENTS AT GLYN NEATH

INSURANCE AGENTS AT GLYN. NEATH. A meeting of insurance agents was held at Bethania Vestry. Glyn-Xeath, on Mon- day. Mr. Wm. Williams (South Wales District Council secretary) presided, and in Welsh poetry gave a vivid description of the non-unionist agent. Mr. Tom Thomas, Swansea, dealt at some length with the block system, which he said was a menace to insurance agents. It was time, he urged, to organise their forces to combat the pernicious system. If the agents were properly organised they would be the most'powerful trade union in the country. Mr. J. B. James (E.C. mcmVr) ispolie on the lwn(;tts of being a member of the National Union of Agents. A new branch of tho N.U. was formed in the district, and the meeting terminated with the usual votes of thanks.

ALLEGED FALSE PRETENCES AT I NEATHi

ALLEGED FALSE PRETENCES AT NEATH. Owen Mochun, of no fixed address, was again beforu the Neath magistrate on Friday churged with obtaining food by false pretences from Edith Jones, Leonard- street, the wife of a soldier, and also with stealing an overcoat, value 13. Mr. Windsor Williams prosecuted. It was stated that prisoner called at Mrs. Jones* house, represented himself to be a foreman under the G.P.O., London, and booked lodgings for himself and his brother, lie was giveu food, and then went out, saying that he was going to a cinema hall. Prior to this hs said his clothes were shabby, and borrowed a Bur berry overcoat. He did not return, and subsequent enquiries showed that he had pawned the borrowed overcoat for 6s. 6d. i Prisoner, who declared that the coat I —, ? -—?'n him. ?'3? committed for tr1,,1 I

Advertising

?!)mm )M -———-JJ?! m!?!——t » ,1 BABY SOWERSBY. I Had given up all hope. 61, Brownlow Street, Park Grove, York. Sirs, 19th June, 1916. I could not feed my baby myself, and by the time he was thirteen weeks old we had given up all hope of rearing him. I carried him about on a feather cushion. and twice to all appearances he lay dead in my arms. Our doctor recommended Virol, and I got some at once. From the first feed with Virol he has gone on, until now, at fourteen months, he is a fine, healthy little fellow. I shall con- tinue to use it while he is teething. Yours faithfully, K. SOWERSBY. VIROL For tiredness, nervous exhaustion. and sleeplessness, take Virolised milk three times a day. (A teaspoonful in half-a-pint of warm milk.) In Glass and Stone Jars, 1/ 1/8, and 2/11. YIROL, LTD., 148-168, Old Street, B.C. British Made, British Owned

DEARER MILK

DEARER MILK. Milk is to be a penny a quart dearer in Swansea and district. When the local Wholesale and Retail Milk Vendors' Association met at the Waverlev Restaur- ant, Cradock-street, Swansea, on Tuesday evening, the position was thrashed out for several hours, and the decision to ad- vance the price was eventually arrived at. The proceeding?, which were in camera, and which were presided over by Mr. H. Davies (Manselton), can be characterised as the culmination of a recent decision of the farmers to raise the contract prices. The general feeling of the gathering was that the extra charge upon the contracts was quite unjustified, but the vendors had no alternative but to correspondingly increase their selling price. There are quite a number of instances in the Swan- sea district where dairymen, who could not see their way clear to pay the addi- tional charge, were without supplies for several days, and customers, therefore, had much difficulty in securing milk for their daily needs. So far as the farmers' action is con- cerned local milk dealers are entirely powerless, for the farmers have no trouble whatever to dispose of the milk to other dairymen in other districts who are in a better position to pay the price demanded. There is a strong feeling amongst the wives of the towji against any decision to advance milk prices from their present standard, but so far as the local dealers are concerned, there is certainly justifi- cation. We were faced with the raised contracts," a prominent vendor said to tiie Cambria Daily Leader, and much though we regret having to make an ex- tra charge when everything is so dear we have no other alternative, but it is natural that we cannot sell it at a loss."

IMR W BRACE MP AT SWANSEA

I MR. W. BRACE, M.P., AT SWANSEA. I Mr. Brace, Under Secretary of State for Home Affairs, visited Swansea a few days ago to meet representatives of some of the local industries of the western area of South Wales. The proceedings were pri- vate.

I HOUSEMAIDS FATAL FALL i

HOUSEMAID'S FATAL FALL. I A verdict of "Suicide whilst of un sound mind was returned at a Maryle- bone inquest on Tuesday on a housemaid who opened a bedroom window, crawled along a coping for three or four feet, and jumped 45 feet on to some railings. When found she was still impaled, her head and hands hanging on the pave- ment.

I FAMOUS WELSH AMERICAN I

FAMOUS WELSH AMERICAN. I The death is announced of the Hon. T. L. James, who was the Postmaster- General of the United States during the presidency of James A. Garfield. He was one of the best-known Welshmen in America, and was also a member of General Grant's Cabinet. He commenced life as a compositor, spent 10 years as a journalist, and his fame began on leaving that profession to become a rote collector. At the end of bi, life he was the president of the Lincoln National Brink.

I A PUGNACIOUS WIFEi

A PUGNACIOUS WIFE. i Well over six feet in height, a bnrlv young coalheaver on Tuesday sought the advice of the Willesden magistrate. "What am I to do about the missus?" he asked. She has locked me out for two nights. She knocks me about, and I don't know what to do," he added. The Magistrate: What is the cause of the trouble? Applicant: Well, she gets cross when I go holue to &ee my mother, and when I get back-1 am locked out. She comes round to my work and knocks me about, and I am the laughing-stock of all the men. The Magistrate: We will send the court missionary round to see her and he will talk to her. Applicant: I daren't go back to her now.

No title

Bv a new Army Council decision future candidates from H.M. Forces for permanent Army commissions by way of Wf?lwich Academy, Sandhurst College, and the India training col!e?? must be under 21, and be recommended by their j man dint*

SIR HAIG SUMS UPI

SIR Ð. HAIG SUMS UP SPLENDID RESULTS OF THREE MONTHS' SOMME FIGHTING. I Press Bureau, Wednesday, 12.50 I). The following dispatch, dated October; 3rd, giving a summary of recent opera- tion, has been received from General Headquarters in France: It is now pos- sible to give a further account of the fight- ing which succeeded the advance of Sep- tember 15th. That advance, which won us Courcelette, Martinpuich, High Wood, Flers, and Bouleaux Wood, had created several minor .salients in our front, and it was necessary to advance the line between them. This was the task of the succeed- ing week. On September 18th we carried the work called the Quadrilateral, between Girichy and Bouleaux Wood. This re- doubt, which was of considerable strength and tactical importance, has successfully resisted our attacks of Sept. 15th, and thereby limiting the extent of the suc- cess of our right flank. From September 19th to September 21st the weather was wet and stormy. Nothing beyond minor operations was undertaken by us, but numerous German counter- attacks were repulsed. TRENCHES TAKEN. On September 22nd, we advanced our front between Flers and Martinpuich by the capture of two lines of German trenches, and on the following day we gained ground east of Courcelette. By the evening of September 2ith, we had com- pleted the preliminaries for the next fctage. On Monday, September 25th, there was a general advance on our whole front from Combles to Martinpuich. The topo- graphy of tho ground over which the operations of the 25th September took place deserves study. The general nature of the country itself is gently undulating. The main backbone of the ridge runs from above Thiepval past the south of Martin- puich through the wood and Ginchy to Morval; then, crossing a slight dip, it rises again to the salient of Fallisel between Morval and Sailly Faillisch, a valley in which lies Combles, runs south-west, join- ing the Somme. From the ridge the ground slopes gently towards north and north-east. NATURAL STRONGHOLDS. The villages in this area are sur- rounded by trees, and are natural strong- holds, fortified by every resource of modern engineering. On Sept. 25th Les Bocufs and Morval were carried, and our line in this section was advanced for more than a mile. The capture of Mor- val, combined with the French pressure in the south virtually isolated Combles. Next day we reaped in full the fruits of these successes. Combles fell to a com- bined movement of British and French troops. In the centre we carried Gueude- court, and on the left, attacking up the ridge from the south, we stormed Thiep- val and won the Zollern Redoubt on the crest to the east of it. These victories brought our front at more than one point within a mile of the German fourth posi- tion west of Bapaume-Transloy road. Several thousand prisoners and a large amount of war material fell into our hands. Our losses were singularly small. I CLEARING THE RIDGE. The past few days have been occupied in clearing the Thiepval Ridge, w here the strong fortress called the Stuff Redoubt has been reduced and almost the whole of the Schwaben Redoubt is in our hands. We have also pushed forward in the direc- tion of Eaueourt FAbbaye and Le Sars. The enemy has fought stubbornly to check our advance, and since September 15th seven new divisions have been brought against us and live against the French. The severe and prolonged strug- gle has demanded oii the part of our troops very great determination and courage. A SUMMARY. I At the end of September the situation may bo summarised as follows: Since the opening of the battle on July 1st, we have taken 2(j,73G prisoners. We have engaged 38 German divisions, of which 29 have been withdrawn in an exhausted or broken state. We hold the half-moon of l the upland south of the Ancre, occupy every height of importance, and so have I direct observation of the ground to the east and north-east. The enemy has fallen back upon a fourth line behind the low ridge just west of the Bapaume— Transloy road. THREE MONTHS' OFFENSIVE. The importance of the three months' offensive' is not to be judged by the distance advanced or the number of enemy trenches and lines taken. It must be looked for in the effect upon the enemy's strength in numbers, material and moral. The enemy has used up his reserves in rejjeated, costly and unsuccess- ful counter-attacks without causing our Allies or ourselves to relax our steady and methodical pressure. In this action troom from every part of the British Empire and British Islands have been engaged. All have behaved with discipline and resolu- tion of veterans. OUR AIRCRAFT. Our aircraft have shown in the highest degree the spirit of the offensive. They have patrolled regularly far behind the j enemy's lines, and had fought many battles J in the air with hostile machines, and many with enemy troops on the ground. For every enemy machine that succeeds in crossing our front it is safe to say that two hundred British machines cross the enemy's front.

GOWER GUARDIANS I I I

GOWER GUARDIANS. At the GoweV Board cf Guardians on Tuesday, Mr. John Harris (Mumbles) presiding, it was unanimously decided to grant the application of the Assessment Committee for consent to appear as re- spondents to appeals at Quarter Sessions in respect of the assessments of the Beaufort Arms and Pilot Inn in the Parish of Oystermouth. It was also decided to apply for an ex- tension of the period "tmdioned for the closing of the casual ward. I The Master (Mr. G. H. George) said that the number of tramps was decreas- ing monthly. Contribution orders for the ensuing half-vcar were issued to the extent of £ 5,833.

THE DECAY OF PITWOOD I

THE DECAY OF PITWOOD. Mr. Percy Groom, professor at the Im- perial College of Science and Technieology, in a paper read on Monday before the London Chamber of Commerce, advocated a greater growth in the Empire of coni- ferous trees, and he estimated that there would be a saving of a million pounds per annum in the cost of pitwood alone if we did so. In a, subsequent conversation with our London representative, Mr. Grporn stated he had started on a spries of investiga- tions with the view to checking the decay of pit props in mines, and his investiga- tions had gone so far as to indicate that this could be done by the cheapest of all ways—by sanitation, which would keep the wood healthy.

NOT ENOUGH WORK

NOT ENOUGH WORK The Strange Statements of a Munition Worker. I The West Wales Munitions Board met l on 1 uesday afternoon, Mr. j. Yaughan Edwards presiding. Messrs. B. Bennett and W. Pugh, assessors, were present. In reference to a case which occupied the attention of the court last week, in which a man said he received too much money and that work waf slack. • The representative of the firm was asked if he would like to make a state- ment, and he said he would, but not on oath. He said he would make no state- ment re the granting of certificates on the grounds of domestic hardship, but would say that it was definitely estab- lished by evidence lately given before the court. The conditions which now prevailed were precisely the same as they were when the men accepted employment. Further, during the whole course of their employment these men were entitled to week-end leave, and they received money to the amount of their return railway fare. He claimed that leaving certifi- cates could not be granted on these grounds.—With regard to the insufficient work to keep these men employed, grave suggestions were made with regard to certain motives for prolonging the contracts for their own profit. He realised that the ,tribunal was principally concerned with the considera- tion of the facts of the case rather than the motives governing these facts. He was convinced that if certificates were given to the men on these grounds it would he taken there was some truth in the statements or suggestions. They were quite irresponsible expressions of opinion and unsubstantiated by any proofs. With, regard to the alleged enforced periods of idleness, it appeared to him (the speaker) that. the periods took place within two weeks. One claimant said he had been idle for eight mouths out of eleven. The claimants admitted that they had made no protest during this time, and did not do so until after tendering notices on September 5th. One claimant differed from all the others, and he said that he made a protest by a remark to an unspeci- fied person, which was to the effect that he would be glad to get out of it." The claimants were unable to say whether their notices were tendered before or attor the shortening of hours due to the reduced lighting. It seemed, said the speaker, that as soon as the wages of the men were reduced from £J 5s. to X3 16s., thQ long dormant consciences of the men awoke, and they commenced to protest against these ill-gotten gains. As for the slacking, it was inevitable where a large number of men are employed. He had been compelled to discharge men for slacking, but he strongly denied that the slacking was brought about by any deliberate intent to prolong the contract, or by the desire of the men to avoid the work. In all con- tracts there was waiting for materials in normal times, and that was inevitable in abnormal times like these. The allocation of work was difficult when 250 men were employed in 40 or 50 different sections. He was prepared to admit that super- vision had not been so plentiful as it would have been in times when men could be found to undertake the work. To get all the men necessary—some 50—was impossible, and it was a loathsome thing to say that a man who was work- ing for his King and country would loaf if a supervisor was not near him all the time. And further, it was a ridiculous statement to say that the job was not finished because the man would have nothing to do. The Engineer in charge of the contract said he had never received instructions from tMe employers to prolong the con- tracts. He had received instructions not to discharge more men. He knew of men who left the factory without permis- sion. Mr. J. Vaughan Edwards: When they went away did you give them permis- 6ion Were they paid?—No. Were they prosecuted?—No. Are you aware of your own knowledge on what basis you are paid?—No. You are not aware of the contents of the contracts?—I am not. Why is the piece-work method em- ployed in the works? Witness did not reply. Wjitne-.s said he would not like to answer the question why he did not measure the work as a check, but lie added it would be disadvantageous to the workmen. Mr. Vaughan Edwards: Would it be unfair?—No. Mr. Edwards: You say the lineal measuring is not a feasible indication?— That is so. Witness eaid that lie had an approxi- mate date, but this was prolonged. Returning to the absence of the men. the Chairman asked: Can you say why these men were idle?—I can give no reason Mr. Yaughan Edwards: You said three men were kept cooking. --Tliev were to assist in the shop in addition to cooking food for i liQ. foremen. The claimant then asked a. question and elicited information to the effect that the foreman who was in charge of the works had himself been discharged for slacking. The foreman was in evidence lait week when the men made the charge that the men were not properly utilized. Mr. Conway Lewis appeared for the men. The Chairman: You agree that there has been a large number of hours of over- time worked. -r,-as this ove/time done unless you were to get tl-lt work done in a specified time?—To get the work finished. The Chairman again referred to the discharge of the foreman, and asked the Engineer: You say he was discharged at the instance of the main contractor?- Yes. Would vou discharge a man on one in- stance?—T was asked to remove the man. But sr.relv not on one instance. You had nothing else in view.P-Tho witness did not answer. Witness said that though measuring wa", necessary in making an estimate, yet he would not measure to ascertain the progress. Witness, in reply to the Chairman said that the slacking was not due to the sug- gestion on the part of the contractors BY the firm's representative: Witness said he knew nothing of the amount of work remaining to be done or the time in which a contract was expected to bo completed. You aid that the men could slack if they did not report?— Yes. Would it be neceesary for him to con- ceal himself?—I would not see him, but hi" foreman would. The Engineer in charge of construc- tional work, in stating the case of the discharge of the foreman said: On the Sunday previous to September 12th, at 7.30 a.m., 1 went to this man's cabin, and I saw him lying on his back presumably when he ought to have been at- tending to his work. He was reported, and after consideration was removed. Br the representative of the firm: Are there a number of inspectors covering these areas?- Yes, rigorous watch was kept on the employes of the sub-con- tract. Witness had found men loitering, and in punishment a deduction was made in wages, and in some case's dismissal was the result of complaints. Witness said that he was satisfied there had been no avoidable inefficiency either in the allot- ment of work or in the supervision during its performance. By the Chairman: Could the sub-con- tractor connive with the men to deceive you for short perio(ts--Yes. For a week ?—No, I think net. Supposing the men were slacking or conniving with the firm to deceive you, is your supervision such as to ensure your detecting it;- I cannot say so. The assistant engineer and supervisor said lie spent from six to seven hours in the building every day. lie found no more slacking in the works than was usual in sub-contracted works generally. The slacking took place when there was work to do. At this stage of the proceedings, the Chairman asked the representative of the. firm how many witnesses he intended to call. The representative said he had five witnesses who would give corroborative evidence. The Chairman then said that the court would stand adjourned until Wednesday next week, when the remaining evidence would be taken. At the suggestion of the Chairman, the foreman who was discharged will be subptened to give evidence in the next hearing. The decision of the tribunal will be given at this hearing. I

Advertising

'Win earn is' is I wonderful foi 1 Weakness ■ Every movement of the body ffl uses up a definite amount of n vitality. That is why you feet jfl |H | tired at the end of the dav. H When you overtax yourself, ■ H or when your vitality is under- P ||i mined by illness, your whole ij ■ system becomes too exhausted B 39 to recover its lost vitality with- g out assistance. Your system 9 a is like a plantthat is drooping- ■ for want of water. And just 8 as water revives a drooping ■ plant—so Wincarnis' gives S new life and new vitality ■ to a weakened constitution. ■ Because Wincarnis pos- jl sesses a four-fold power. It 9 is a Tonic, a Restorative, a n Blood-maker, and a nerve Food-all in one. Therefore ■ creates new strength, new 9 blood, new nerve force, and 8 new vitality. The benefit begins from the first wine- 9 g-lassful. You can feel it doing n you good. You can feel every wineglassful giving you more B strength than you had before, 9 and surcharging your whole I system with newvitalitv. That 9 is why over 10,000 Doctors H recommend 'Wincarnis.' .-All Wine Merchants and M licensed Chemists and B Grocers sell Wincarnis/ ■ Wiil you try just one bottle 8 Begin to get well 1 FREE. N Send the Coupon for a free » trial bottle of Wincarnis' B not a mere taste but enough to do you good. COLEMAN & CO., Ltd., W342, Wincarnis Works, Norwich. Please send me a free (rial bottle of Wincarnis,' I enclose FOUR penny stamps for postage. Name — Address Herald of Wfilfp." Saturday. Oct. 7.

HIS fcOST MEAL

HIS fcOST MEAL. At Nfeath on Mfiaday. a series of •# ences under the Xiquor Control PwK&r were alleged against Rees John George, landlord of the Lamb Hotel, The Parade, his wife Mary George, and Frank Biggs, 5, Elias-street. Mr. Edward Powell prosecuted; and Mr. L. M. Thomas de- fended, pleading not guilty. P.C. Will Hopkins spoke to visiting the Lamb at 11 o'clock on Wednesday morning, and 'seeing Biggs in the tap room with a pint of b £ er in his hand. Witness did not know that Biggs was a handy man at the jLawib, und that liis daughter worked theie as a servant. Mr. L. M. Thomas admired the facts, hut characterised the technical offence committed a9 an absurdity. Biggs was a servant man, and was given beer and promised bread and cheese in tie kit- chen, but unfortunately lip did not reach the kitchen. The Chairman (Mr. W. B. Trick): Did he have the bread and cheese? Mr. Thomas: No, the policeman came on the scene, and did him out of his meal throngh frig-ht. tJ,aughtr). The Chairman, in giving ?1? decision of the Bench, @aid they had taken all circumstances into consideration, alvi decided to dismiss the summons against the landlord for permitting liquor to be consumed, and imposed a fine of 20s. upon Mrs. George -and I'll ilJ Printed and Published for the Swansea Press Limited, hv ARTHUR PKKN-ELL HJGHAM. at Leader Buildings. Swansea. I