Teitl Casgliad: Herald of Wales

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
39 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

Heard's Stands Pre-eminent FOR FIRST ijLASS FRUIT, VEGETABLES, and CONFECTIONERY. WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. HEARD'S STORES, 17, Station Road, PORT TALBOT, 67, High Street, AB-E RA V ON, a. Parade, NEATH, 18, Windsor Road, NEATH.

Advertising

Picture Palace, Pontyberem. WEEK COMMENCING XûX. 20, 1916. Usual EXCELLENT SHOW of PICTURES. POPULAR PRICES: 4d., td., and 9d. Thursday, Doors Open at 6.15, to com- mence at 7. Saturday, Doors Open s 3J. to commence at 6.45 and 8.45. MATINEK ¡ Thursdays at 4 o'clock, Id., 2d., and Sd.

IODION AR BYNCIAU YR WYTHNOS

IODION AR BYNCIAU YR WYTHNOS. (Gan "AWSTIN.") Wrth ddechreu fy llith am yr wythno6 too, goddefer i mi dalu dioicti i niter o ddarLLenwyr y Goloin Gyinraeg am lythyrau wyf wedi eu derbyn oddi- wrthynt ya cynwys Uongyfarchiadau, anogaethau a nodion defnyddiol ar des- tyuau derbyniol eysylltiedig a symud- iada i oonedtaetliol a materion personol a lleol. Y niae y fath ohebiaethau nid yn unig yn galondid i bererin egwan, ond hefyd yn gymorth i gadw i fyny ddiddor- tlttb ac amrywiaeth y nodion hyn o wythnQ6 i wythnos. Nid ocs eisiau i mi enwi neb. Y mae amnaid yn ddigon i'r call a'r gwybodus. Da genvf gad ar ddeall i gyfarfod cyntaf Cymdeithas Oymreigyddiou Cas- tellnedd a'r cykvii, am y tymor, drui nllan mor eithriadol o lewyrchus, ar yrcweliad y Parch. Ben Davies, Pantteg, i ddarlithio ar Ganeuon Watcyn Wyn." Yn y gadair yr oedd llywydd y gymdei- tlla.&-YT Henadur John Jordan, Parcy- deri, Llansamlet, ac yr oedd yn brcsenol aifer liosog o'r aelodau, yn cvnwyis rhai t) Gymry mwyaf selog ac adnabyddus y dref a'r ardaloedd o g-wmpas. Bruidd y mae angen dweyd fod y dclarlith yn un o'r pethau goreu. Pwy mor gymwry6 i siarad ar Watcyn" a Ben Davies? Magwyd hwy ar yr un llecyn wrth drood y My-uydd Du. Buont yn chwareu ar lan rr un nant, ac yn yfed yr un awelon. Ceisiodd y darlithydd olrhain hanes, a dehongli teithi cymeriad y gwrthrych drwy y canon on, gan gyineryd gv/a'hanol gyfnodau ei fywyd. Dechreuodd gyda chyfnod y caneuon i ddiarhebion a hen ddywediadau ardaloedd Brynamman a Chwmllyniell, ar gyfer y Cyrddau Ceiniog"; yna y caneuon dirwestol, yn Ughyfnod boreu dirwest yn yr ardaloedd, Han y blodeu&i yr ilybarch. R. Price, Cwmllynfell; wedyn y caneuon serch, Kyda rhai crefydd i ddiweddu. Ac wrth anfon ataf am y cwrdd, dywed cymrawd bywiog. Hyfryd oedd gwrando yr engreifftiau o lvonynt. Teimlem fod yma ail i Ceiriog mawr." Anfonodd y llywydd a'r vsgrifenvdd (Mr. John E. Evans) apel allan yn ddi- weddar ar ran y gymdeitha.s. Ymysg pethau ereill, caitn a ganlyn ynddi: Gwyddoch mai amcan y gymdeithas ydyw cadw y Gyraraeg yn (yv; a meithrin y goreu yn mywyd ein eenedl anwyl. tleni y mae genym rtwwm arlxiixig dros Nyn eich cydweithrediad. Credwn y liwyddir i gael yr Eisteddfod G

THE MEN OF 41 I

THE MEN OF 41. A new point concerning man of 41 was the subject of a telegram from the Local Government Board read at Wednesday 1 night's meeting of the Woking Tribunal. It has been suggested that a man who had offered himself for enlistment and had been rejected since August H. 191."), was not within the operation ot' the Mili- tary Service Act if he attained the age of 4-1 before Octobcr 1, 1916. In reply the Secretary of the Local Government Board wired: "The Board agreed that the man is not wrthin the ¡ Act." The settlement was announced in the King's Bench on Thursday of the action brought. by Mr. J. B. Thomas, M.P., against Mr. Sicvier and the proprietors and publishers of the Winning Poftt." A libel was complained of which was contained partly in writing and partly in cartoon. Defendants had witbdrav-n their defence, and ox pressed regret for the publication, and had paid plaintiff a, Purn for costs and damage?. The Lord; Chief Justice allowed the rceord to be j withdrawn, j

THURSDAYS BRITISH OFFICIALi

THURSDAY'S BRITISH OFFICIAL. During the night there was con- siderable enemy shelling of our battle front north and south of the Ancre. Otherwise there is nothing to report. ———— —

I THURSDAYS SERBIAN OFFICIAL

THURSDAY'S SERBIAN OFFICIAL. Our troops, in collaboration with the French troops, have definitely occupied after violent combat, all enemy positions south of Tetadci. The German troops who defended the positions were obliged to take flight, those of them who were not killed being taken prisoners. Already 500 German troops with two officerQ and rive N.C.O's were i counted cn this day. There are no details as yet concern- ing the booty 'taken. We have taken from the enemy two more villages ,Tetaci and Gules, The latter, which is not marked on the map, was captured by the valiant Col. Boystav Padlovitch. He fell gloriously at the head of his regiment.

I THURSDAYS FRENCH OFFICIAL

I THURSDAY'S FRENCH OFFICIAL. Tc the north of the Somme the ene- my did not renew his attacks on our front. To the south of the Somme we at- tacked during the night the east- ern portion of Pressoire occupied I by the enemy, after some trench elements resisted with admirable energy. Thanks to the tenacity and the stub- bornness of our troops, we threw back the Germans beyond the village after a fierce combat under a bombardment of extreme vio- lence. Pressoire is entirely in our posses- sion, and our gains of Nov. 7th have been integrally maintained. According to further information, the enemy who engaged in yes- terday's attack—forces belonging to three different divisions—sus- tained very heavy losses. These were the only result of serious repulses sustained. To tho west of Rheims a further surprise attack, attempted by the enemy against one of our trenches following upon an artillery pre- paration, failed under our barrage lire. There is nothing to report on the rest of the front. ARMY OF THE EAST. On the Struma front the English captured, after a brilliant combat, the village of Kakaraska, on the eastern bank of Lake Tahinos. The Bulgarians fell back on the left bank of the Nihor stream. On the Cerna front, despite rain and snow, our offensive continues victoriously. In the bend of the river the battle has been extremely bitter. The violent counter-attacks of the German Bulgarians, launched during the night of the 14th and 15th, were unable to succeed at any point in checking our ad- vance, and they proved murder- ous to the enemy. Four hundred German prisoners were left in our hands. The Franco-Serbian troops continu- ing their successes to the north of Pepabei, have progressed towards Jaratok, to the west of the Cerna. The enemy, under the power of our artiliery fire and the energetic pressure of our infantry, aban- doned during the night the prin- cipal positions which he had forti- fied for some months past. The Franco-Kussian forces pursu- ing the adversary in the plain to the north of Kenali, have reached the right bank of the Viro Hiver, six kilometres to the south of Monastir. We have occupied the villages of Zabani, Pored in, and Velusina.

THURSDAYS RUMANIAN OFFICIAL1

THURSDAY'S RUMANIAN OFFICIAL.1 In the region of Dragoslavele the enemy attacked with violence but without success, and has been re- pulsed with heavy losses. In the valley of the Alt violent com- bats have taken place on the left bank. Our troops have withdrawn towards Aresul and Ra-dacmesti. On the right bank we have main- tained our position. In the region of Jiul our troops have also retired in the direction of Oopacioasa and Carvesti. All along the Danube the situation is unchanged.

BELGIAN OFFICIAL

BELGIAN OFFICIAL. Havre, Wednesday.—To-day's official communique says that, following upon raids on the German trenches in Dix- mude, some prisoners were brought back into our lines. During the day there was considerable artillery activity along the whole front of the Belgran Army.

KING AND HIS TROOPS

KING AND HIS TROOPS. The following telegrams are placed at the dibj.-vsal of the Press:— The King to General Sir Douglas Haig. I heartily congratulate you on the great success achieved by my gaUant troops during the lxwt three days in the advance on both Bidffi of the Ancre. Further captures of the eu,pmy first line trenches, under special difficulties, owing to the. recent weather, redound to j the credit of all ranks." }\1IIim ,Sir D. Hais: to the King, On behalf of all ranks to which your I Majesty's message has been communicated I retu-i-n grateful and respectful thanks."

NIGHT LIFE IN BERLIN I

NIGHT LIFE IN BERLIN. I Berne, Tuesday.—A fierce denunciation of Berlin kultur has been published in pamphlet form by a well-known German novel writer, Mine. Marie Diers, who de- clares that the German capital is a dis- grace to Germany. While millions of Germen men are giving their lives at the front," says Mme. Diers, Berlin is filled with crowds of callous pleasure seekers, profitmongers, ghouls, vultures and adventurers. Heedless of human suffering in which their own countrymen are participating as much as any, they pursue their selfish lives of greed and infamy."—Wireless Press. —

IPOSTHUMOUS VCs

POSTHUMOUS V.C.'s. Among the posthumous V.Cs awarded by the King on Thursday was that won by the Boy Cornwcll in the Battle of Jutland. His Majesty handed it to his mother.

ICOLLIERS SUICIDE I

COLLIER'S SUICIDE. I A tragic affair occurred near Llanelly on Wednesday evening, a married man named Henry Evans, of Terebeddod Cot- tages, near Furnace, being found hang- ing in the passage of his house. It ap- pears that deceased's wife left the house about noon for the purpose of taking food to her two children, who were in school at Felinfoel. At the time de- ceased was in the house alone, and on his wife returning at five o'clock the tragic sight described above met her gaze. She ran for assisance, and when the police arrived the body was cut down, life being extinct. A fortnight ago deceased, who was a collier aged 40, received a notice calling him up for the Army, and he appeared to have worried about it. It is stated he threatened to commit suicide before he would join the Colours.

WELSH POTATOES I

WELSH POTATOES. I South Wales potato importers are await- ing the Government's decision regarding the Irish potato supplies with some anxiety. If the whole of these supplies were prohibited, as the Nationalist.. sug- gest, it would be a most serious matter for nearly three-quarters of the exported crop of Ireland comes to South Wales and West of England centres for distribution. The case of the potato importers was put before Mr. W. Runciman, President of the Board of Trade, on Tuesday by a deputation in- troduced by ?r. T. P. O'Connor, M.P., which included the fcHowingr repTesenta- tives of the local trade:—Mr. A. W. Calla- g-hnn. Mr. W. Young, Mr. E. England, Mr. Travy England, Mr. Virgo, and Mr. Roland Adams. Mr. Caliaghan made a number of suggestions, which Mr. Runci- man promised to comHid-er. It is antici- patoo. we learn, that if the Government have to resort to drastic measures, the prohibition will be partial and not abso- lute.

WANDERING VIOLINISTI

WANDERING VIOLINIST. Styled the Wandering Violinist on the stage, a man named fiinaldo (who ap- i peared at Swansea recently), refused to pay 225 on a promissory note on the ground that it- was given for a debt in- curred at. poker. When Mr. J. de JFrece, variety agent, sued him for the amount I at Westminster County Court on Wednes- day he said -he played poker at Johannes- burg with Joseph L. Sachs, theatrical manager, and four other men, and in one day lost. < £ 200. Sachs denied that he had ever played poker with the defendant. Mr. Storry Deans: Did you play the game at the hotel with locked doors?— That is not so. Is it true that you were playing a royal straight flush ?--It is not true. Judgment was reserved.

A CURIOUS REASON I

A CURIOUS REASON. Tha this father and mother could not write, and so if he were called up his five brothers in the Army would get no letters from home, was the curious plea of B. Wicks (25), married, a labourer, at Reading Tribunal on Wednesday. He had been passed for general ser- vice, and was given three months' ex- emption, with leave to appeal again. A firm appealed to the Spring-gardens Committee of the Appeal Tribunal on Wednesday for a co^t price clerk, aged 40, single, and passed for general service. It was claimed that he was indispens- able. The appeal was dismissed.

ACTORS DEATH I

ACTOR'S DEATH. Mr. Edward Sass, the actor, and brother-in-law of Mrs. George Edwarde6, died on Wednesday morning at his resi- dence at New Maiden. Originally a clerk in the bank of Glyn, Mills, Currie, and Co., Mr. Sass appeared on the stage at Swindon in 1878 and made his first appearance in London in 1882. Later he spent some years in Australia, and after coming back to London was in the regular company at His Majesty's Theatre for seine time, taking parts after- wards in many well-known plays. I

MANUFACTURE OF INTOXICANTS I

MANUFACTURE OF INTOXICANTS. I Sir Alfred Mond and Mr. Sidney Ito bin- son are among 16 other members of Par- liament who on Wedneeday night handed in notice of motion to move at an early date that, in view of the grave statement of the President of the Board of Traide as to the shortage of corn, sugar, and other food supplies, this House is of opinion that the manufacture of intoxicating liquors should be prohibited

AMMAN VALLEY TINPLATERSI

AMMAN VALLEY TINPLATERS. Quite a crowd of (inplate wo kmen at- tended before the Military Tribunal held af New Bethel Vestry. Garnant, on Wed- ntsday. Captain Edwards, Maj jr Harries, and Sergt. Walsh, D.C.M., represented the military authorities, whilst Mr. D. Jen- kins, Tin pi ate Workers' (Jnion, was pre- sent in the interests of the men. The causes were deferred to a future meeting, which will be held d an early date.

No title

Mrs. Emma Venn, of West Cross Farm. j Westcross, near Swansea, wfco died on February 22nd last, left estate valued at with net personalty of « £ l,2i)7. Probate of her will has been granted to her grand-daughter, Isabella Mary, wife of Mr. Frederick Meredith, of Liwynon, Westc.ross-lane, -Westcross, and his grandson, Mr. Alhert E. Weetcrott l Venn. of Glen Farm, Weetcross, farmer.

i WAR SUMMARY I

i WAR SUMMARY I Friday. According to to-day's British official there was considerable artillery activity on both sides of the Ancre during the night, a large number of gas shells being used. To the north-east of Festubert hostile trench mortars have been silenced by our artillery and trench mortars. The Russian communique states that on the western front, in the region of Skavov, the enemy several times launched attacks, as the result of which the Russians were compelled to fall back to their second line of trenches. In the region south of Dorna Vatra the I enemy compelled the Russians to aban- don some heights. The battle is still proceeding. In Transylvania, west of the Buyou, the enemy resumed the offensive, and pushed back the Rumanian troops four versts to the south. The Rumanians have assumed the offen- sive in the direction of Predeal. On the Danube front the Rumanians are fighting for the possession of Cernivoda Bridge. SATURDAY. The British official despatch issued this morning speaks of a big British ad- vance. Lost night the eastern portion of the liegina Trench, being a continua- tion of the trench captured on Oct. 2nd, was stormed and captured on a front of 1,000 yards. The position has been joined up and prisoners of two regiments taken. Naval aeroplanes belonging to the British have raided Ostend and Zeebrugge. A great weight of bombs were dropped with satisfactory results. At Cardiff last night there was a citizens' demonstration to protest against the false peace agitation. A message from Athens says that the Ger- man Minister there has informed the Government that the handing over of Greek guns and rifles to the Allies would be considered by Germany as a breach of neutrality. The Russian Fleet have bombarded Con- stanza and Mangalia, causing heavy damage. Stories of German brutality and blood- shed have come to hand. MONDAY. A British official message, dispatched from France this morning says that enemy positions have been attacked on both sides of the ATe. Numerous prisoners have been taken. The Ger- man trenches have been entered south- east of Armentieres. v The Serbians have been going from suc- lees6 to success. On the night, of Satur- day they not only broke a Bulgarian counter-attack but continued their vic- torious advance towards the north, in pursuit of the beaten ene ny. The village of Polog is entirely in our pos- session. Earlier advices from the spenal corres- pondent with the Serbian Forces state that the Serbians have, by virtue of their gains, been able to establish a strong bridgehead across the Cerna. They have also captured a large cam- ber of prisoners. The German Press welcomes the Chan- cellor's pacific consideration of ques- tions influencing a possible peace. TUESDAY. Over 1,000 prisoners have passed through the collecting stations since yesterday I morning as a result of the new British advance, A Headquarters message states that we have stormed the heavily fortified village of Beaumont Hamel. and have advanced to the outskirts of I Beau court-Sur-Ancre. Earlier messages speaJc" of the collapee of strong German fortresses before the Brituih onslaught, which resulted in the; penetration of the enemy lines on a front of nearly five miles. A war 001' respondent anticipated the fall of Beaumont Harnel, considered by the Germans to be impregnable. Cardinal Mercier has sent a lengthy pro- test to the civilised world against the deportation of Belgians to Germany, for the purpose of compulsory labour. A Berlin telegram claims the capture ol the Dutch steamer Batavier VI. which, it is alleged by the enemy, carried con- traband. The Rumanian official says that in the region of Drogoslavcle the enemy at- tacked with infantry and artillery, com- pelling the Rumanians to give way on the left wing. On the Alt the enemy attacked with vigour, the positions changing hands several times. Finally, by using superior forces, the enemy made progress. WEDNESDAY. Irk their attacks north of the Ancre the British have taken more prisoners, the numbers of which will be reported later on. During Tuesday Bight the ground won in our attacks was secured. The Serbians are fighting with character- istic bravery. Besides the losses inflicted on the enemy they have taken a thou- sand more prisoners, the greater part of whom are Germans, including the commander of a battalion and several officers. There has been activity on the Belgian front in the nature of a violent recip- rocal bombardment. The artillery duel was particularly lively in the region ol Dixmude. According to a special correspondent of the Paris Liberte" in the fierce fighting at St. Pierre an entire German battalion with its officers was sur- rounded and captured. THURSDAY. Signal successes have been gained by the Serbians, in collaboration with the French. They have definitely occupied all the enemy positions south of Tetadci. The German defenders took to their heels, leaving hundreds at prisoners and a quantity of booty behind. Two im- portant villages also fell into the hands of the Allies. To-day's British official states that there was considerable enemy shelling of our battle front north and sotttii of the Ancre during the night. The King has sent a message to Sir Douglas Haig congratulating him upon the great success achieved by his troops during the past three diiys. Sir Dtroglas has returned grateful and respectful thanks. Imeriea's protest to German y against the enslavement of the Belgians has met with general approval. It is said to mark the beginning of a more vigorous foreign polic".

BElCIAS IN BONDAGEI

BElCIAS IN BONDAGE I AMERICA'S PROTEST TO GERMAN CHANCELLOR WASHINGTON, Nov. 15. The American protest to Germany against the enslavement of the Belgians ,nt of the 13elgiall meets with general approval, and in tome quarters it is accepted as the beginning of a more vigorous toreign policy which, it has been predicted, would aignalise Dr. Wilson's re-election. Commenting on the latest German barbarity, the New York Tribune" says:— From the outset of the war the Belgian episode has endured as the final damna-tion of modern Germany, and it is the one thing about which there is no argument in America. It is the one phlise of the war which is settled—not for the duration of the war, but for the lifetime of the D'en and women now alive. We are numb w the horrors of this war; we are deafened with charges and counter-charges; but in the matter of Belgium our minds remain clear and fixed." There can be, says the Tribune," no peace while this spirit dominates Ger- many. Belgium is the sign manual of Ger- many. Whenever the world needs a fresh illustration of what German "Kultur" and German spirit mean it is 1rupplioo In Belgium and furnished by the agents of the German Emperor. One thing is cer- tain; there cannot be peace between Ger- many and civilisation while Germany re- mains the exTxmcnt of all the things that mean the destruction of civilisation and the denial of common humanity. No one can want peace enough to surrender Bel- gium for all time to the beasts who now occupy it or to the beastliness which Ger- many practices there and elsewhere when- > ever it suits a German purpose.-H Daily Telegraph/'

SWEETS IN THEATRES

SWEETS IN THEATRES. The Home Secretary announced on Wednesday night that the general sale of confectionery in places of entertainment would not be permiseable under the new closing order, but the Home Office has, in reply to inquiries, expressed the view that the customary sales of sweets to persons attending a performance in a place of entertainment for consumption m the premises would come within the exception for the sale of refreshments. He had promised the confectionery trade that if evidence can be produced that places of entertainment effectively com- i pete with outside shops and are trying to 1 develop a trade beyond the sales which were customary before the order, he will consider the matter further. Mr. Samuel announced on Wednesday evening that the Courts have decided under the Shop Hours Act that a shop- keeper may erect an automatic machine outside his shop if it be on his own pre- mises, and that such machines are not subject to closing orders.

BODY IN FISH KETTLE I

BODY IN FISH KETTLE. Charged with the murder of her 2! years old son, Florence Mabel Jones (28), who was tried at the Old Bailey on Wednes- day, declared that she had gone out for half an hour, and on returning found the baby dead in the bath. The bath was really a fish kettle, in which were five inches of water. Medical evidence showed, however, that there were numerous bruises on the body, some made a few minutes before death, which was due to a fractured skull and not drowning. The prisoner, it was stated, had been in Colney Hatch Infirmary for two years. When found guilty of manslaughter the prisoner, folding her arms, declared: U I accuse the foster-mother. I will swing for her when I come home. I want an appeal/' After sentencing her to twelve months without hard labour, Mr. Justice Darling was mentioning her appeal when she interposed with the remark, Oh, not now, when you have passed such a light sentence."

SHOCK AND BIGAMYI

SHOCK AND BIGAMY. When Lucy Mansfield (27) pleaded guilty at the Old Bailey on Wednesday to bigamy it was stated that her husband joined the Army at the outbreak of war and that she received 28s. 3d. separation allowance. In April last she went through a form of marriage with a friend of her husband's, who was also a soldier. She then received a further allowance of 16s. a week. The prisoner's husband, Albert Mans- field, said he wrote to his wife saying he was to be court-martialled and shot. He was suffering from mental derangement through shell shock at the time. Counsel: The story was pure romance? —Witness: Yes. The second husband, it was stated, had gone to the front, and was now missing. The Recorder postponed sentence.

STEEL WORKS EXPLOSION I

STEEL WORKS EXPLOSION. I Three Men Injored at Morriston on I Monday. About 10 o'clock on Monday morning i an explosion took place at the Upper Forest Steel Works, Morriston. Some of the men were charging the furnace, when damp metal got mixed up with it, and this is presumed to have caused an explosion. A number of men were injured. One, David Jones, single, of Banwell-street, Morriston, was severely burnt about the face and body, and conveyed to Swansea Hospital, where he was detained. Two others were slightly injured-D. J. Rees, married, Clase-road, and J. David, married, Pentemalwed.

SUBMARINE WARFARE

SUBMARINE WARFARE. In the Admiralty Court on Thursday, the President (Sir Samuel Evans) pro- nounced the Norwegian steamship Rabbi (since sunk by a German submarine whilst bound from Swansea with ooal) alone to blame for a collision which oc- curred on July 21st, in foggy weather, off Pendeen, Cornwall, between that vessel ana the steamship Hornley, belonging to Furnies, Withy and Co., of Newcastle, West Hartle.d Liverpool.

No title

Mr. Evaristo Lucarini, manager of the T/aldorf Hotel, was tinea £ 15 at Bow- street Police Court on Wednesdaj- for fail- ing to enter particulars respecting aliens staying at the hotd. and for faiHDK to t'?qrtr? pcrao?s staying at tb? h?t?t to ?ujni&h particulars respectiag UMNl?t€s.

I150 KILLED 650 iiiJUBED I

150 KILLED; 650 iiiJUBED I APPAUIKG EXPLOSION AT ARCHANGEL I Copenhagen, Thursday.—The Stock- I holm Tidmingen learns from Harpor-; anda that some days ago an explosion oc- curred on board the Russian ammunition steamer Baron Breceni, which was lying in the harbour at Archangel. This steamer, and the steamer Earl of Dhar- ther, were destroyed and sunk. Several buildings near the harbour, and two barracks were set on fire and burnt down. One hundred and fifty persons were killed and 650 wounded.

EXLANDORE PASTOR I

EX-LANDORE PASTOR. I The Jubilee meeting in connection with the Pembroke Congregational Church, j Clifton, Bristol, which was held on Mon- daj evciting, is of especial interest to Swansea folk, as Swansea people have 1 1 taken a prominent interest in the support! of the church. At the meeting a presentation was made to the present pastor, the Rev. D. Cer-[ wyn Harries, who has -held the post since 1908. The rev. gentleman, who for many years was pastor of Old Siloh Chapel, Landore, Swansea, L, very popular with his colleagues, and ample testimony was paid to the good work which he is doing. in his speech, the Rev. Dr. Arnold Thomas, of Highbury Chapel, said that he was intimately acquainted with" the ministers of the chapel from the early I days. Further, he did not know that the church had ever been in a more hopeful condition than at the present time, for Mr. Harries put his whole heart into his work. (Applause.) The presentation, which was an entire surprise to the worthy minister, con- sisted of 'the sum of .£71 10s. In the earlier portion of the meeting. Mr. Henry Burnes, one of the speakers, outlining the history of the chapel for the last 50 years, mentioned the name of the Rev. Samuel Luke. I Another point of great local interest j lies in the fact that Mrs. Luke, the Rev. Luke's wife, was a native of Swansea, and earne-d fame by the composing of the well- known hymn, I think when I read that sweet story of old." She died in Febru- ary, 1906.

STANDARD BREAD

STANDARD BREAD. Medical men are strongly in favour of the universal use of Standard Bread as now required by the Government. Five years ago the Standard loaf was described and advocated by eight leading men in J1 the following manifesto:— We, the undersigned, believe it to be a national necesrity that a standard should be fixed for the nutritive value of what is sold as bread. Such a standard has al- ready been enforced by law for milk. The ttandardieation of bread is even more im- portant, bread and flour forming about two-fifths of the weight of the food con- sumed by the working classes and con- stituting almost the whole diet of many poor children In view of the inferior nourishing' qualities of the white bread commonly i sold in this country, we urge that legisla- tion should be passed making it conipul-1 eory that all bread sold as such should. unless distinctly labelk^l otherwroe, be made from unadulterated wheat flour containing at least 80 per cent. of the whole wheat, including the germ and semolina. William H. Bennett, K.C.V.O., F.R.C.S.' W. A. Bond, M.D., M.O.H. Alfred Fripp. K.C.V.O., C.B. Alfred Pearce Gould, K.C.V.O., M.S. Arthur Latham, M.D., F.R.C.P. Hector Mackenzie, M.D., F.R.C.P. J. J. Perkins, M.D., F.R.C.P. J. F. J. Sykes, M.D., D.Sc., M.O.H. j

COST OF LIVINGI

COST OF LIVING. Retail prices of food in the United King- dom on November 1 were about 5 per oent. higher than a month earlier, and showed an average increase of 27 per cent. in comparison with the prices ruling on November 1, 1915, states the Board of Trade Labour Gazette." A large proportion of the increase dux-1 ing October was due to the rise in the price of potatoes, the average retail price on November 1 being about 9Jd. per 71b. compared with 4id. a year ago, and Sid. on the corresponding date in 1914. The price of milk increased by about, 7 per cent. during the month to an ave- rage price of 5id. per quart. On Novem- ber 1 eggs were dearer than a month earlier by 19 per cent., and fish by 13 per cent. Granulated sugar and eggs were dearer than in the previous year by 39 and 34 per cent. respectively, and in- creases during the year of about 20 to 25 i per cent. were recorded for flour, bread, milk, butter, cheese, fish, bacon and meat.

INDIAN WHEAT j

INDIAN WHEAT. j The Press Bureau issues the following:— The Royal Commission on wheat ,?; plies anno-anom that the Government of India have recently sanctioned the expo., from India of 400,000 tons (nearly 1,900,000 quarters) of wheat for shipment during November, December, and January. The whole of the w heat will be slapped to the United Kingdom, France and Italy, uncie. the arrangements made by the Royal Com- mission. — —

I TRAGEDIES OF THE RIVER

TRAGEDIES OF THE RIVER. Two bodies were recovered from the Severn at Shrewsbury on Wednesday. The first was that of Gladys Griffiths, a young clerk employed at the Army Records Office, who disappeared the previous night. Her umbrella, gloves, and purse were found on the rive bank, together with a letter to her mother. The other body was that of Henry Griffiths, an old soldier, missing since October 22.

i MR SJDNEY PICKLES

MR. SJDNEY PICKLES. Mr. Sidney Pukles, the young Aus- tralian airman three years ago fl.-w i across the Channel with his mothe as passenger, was married very quietly en AX'dTie.sdav al- St. Cl)ure-b,, Pic- i cadillv, to Miss A. R. E. Marks, of 13amp-! stead. Only a few peopie wore present,. and the bridë was attended by one small, bridesmaid.

I EGGS AT 43 EACH

EGGS AT 43. EACH. I Eggs are now selling in Haverfordwest I at hI. >ch, an unprcedented price.

TANKS AT WORK

TANKS AT WORK A GEBMAK DESCRIPTION OF THE iHACt-Kic The Tank figured in the battle south ot the Ancre. It Lad a iittk show of its own—a highly successful performance, re- sulting in a considerable nUll.,IJer of Ger- man casualties. It inspired the only surioos resistance in this part of the new battlefield. Three hundred Germans died around Gueudecourt in trying to capture a tank some weeks ago, and the same late oveJc their equally reckless country- men on Tuesday morning. The tank had crawled comfortably down to the Ancre to do a little destroying of trench works. The infantry had not come up, and the tank wore a deceptive air of loneliness and discomfiture which impressed the enemy. A iew Germans poking their heads out of dug-outs, con- cluded that it had died suddenly, and re- 6«oi"pd t"- try for the Iron Cross. Little parties crawled up to the tank and pelted its plated sides with explosive.. Nothing happened. Still more Germans came out of the ground with more bombs. Th tank liked it. This tickling with hand grenades proceeded for some time, when quite suddenly the tank came to life and spat flame and cartridges from sundry hitherto unfcoen apertures in its hide, strewing Gknoan corpses over the craters with great liberality. A few frightened survivals hugged the crevices in the mud, whence they were fished out by British infantry. he tank did good work in rooting out machine guns that had escaped the bom- bardment. Judging from the battered weapons found on the battlefield, and from the statements of prisoners, the enemy's losses in machine guns have been unusually severe. A GERMAN DESCRIPTION. The following account of the tanka is sk-nt to the Dusseldorfer General An- zeiger," October 23, by its correspondent on the west front, Dr. R- DamnierL- The clumsy steel box with sides one inch thick has appeared in a different form between Combles and Thiepval. It has usually the shape of an egg, which moves on endless chains. In the front the chains jut a little beyond the body to enable the machine to cross trenches and shell holes. The machine is guided by a kind of tail, the wheels of which dig into the sides of the trench and shove it for- ward with a jerky motion. The armoured car with rbs crew of one officer and seven men, carries two six- pounder guns in turrets stuck on the sides like swallows' nests. There are also foui to eight machine guns at loopholes which can be closed. It is lit inside by elec- tricity. On good ground it has a maxi- mum 6pevd of five to miles, in po: ground torn up by shells at most one 11 two miles. The engines are motors of loû-h j- can only turn in wide curves, and ;« avoid the larger craters. Its object i. o clear trenches and obstacles, and accord- ing to orders discovered it can be n- against machine-gun positions, and f": I: in certain circumstances, against batteri, and it may advance with or without in- fantry. They carry ample supplies o4: munitions,' provisions for several days, and a cage with carrier pigeons. None seems sorry to be a prisoner, whether Wurtemberger, Rhinelander, or Prussian of the Guard Reserve. some have fought sinoo the beginning of the war, having been in the first affairs in Belgium.- Others had been exempted until recently, but had at last been called to active service, because nobody is ex- empted now." Whatever they are, they seem to be war-weary. One man said, With us it is all talk of peace. I am going to learn to love the Engii&h." And he would not see any humour in the sug- gestion that it was a little late to begin. One of the correspondents eaor a wounded British soldier helping a wounded Germaa prisoner into the clear- ing station- Both had got it in the foot,- both mom on-- boot and a bandage, both limped painfully. The Briton had a hand under the Teuton's arm. and was encouraging him in the lingua France of all the world. "No walkee much further,- he said. "Soon ttiere now. Compree, Fritz? "la," groaned Frits. He "ooofr pd.. The German private when taken pris- oner is usually very humble, and 80 glad to be taken and to fmd that he is not to be eaten alive that he is commonly grate. ful for ail that is done to him. The offi- ce ns, with occasional oonspieuuous ex- ceptions, are too often merely sarme. immediately after the trenches down to the river had been captured oaz men strolled about above ground as if they were out for an airing. They packed ua relics. They shared out German cigars and sat on parapets smoking them. They Leapt hilariously straight from war iato aggressive peace. No retaliation was at- tempted. Machine guns were silent and shelling was distinctly below the normal. It is not impossible ihat our sudden blow north of the Ancpe, and ow grip on the high ground, may so alarmed the enemy, that he is too basy moving his nearer guns to safer peaces to be able to give UI6 much attention. In this immediate neighbourhood of the Ancre he has. or recently had, about 1,000 guns. He hat certainly not male the best use of thesn during the last two days. In all my eearch to-dav (says t. covrc-s- pondent), I have not found on" of enr men who actually got to close quarters with a German who fought. I believe there uar« been some bayonet wounds reportd-l have heard of one—but nearly all cur casualties were caused by long range fire, some by machin-. f:116, but on the w hole a smaller proportion than usual, the greater nuuiber being from shrapnel or shell splintere.

ARMY CHAPLAINS

ARMY CHAPLAINS. Some tiID-P ago, in rwponve to requ?sts trom English, Welsh and Scotch non- Anglicans that there should be more uni- formity and equalisation in the appoint- ment of chaplains to the Forces, Mr. Lloyd George set up an Interdenomina- tional Chaplaincy Board of which, since its appointment, nothing ha.8 been heard. Mr. J. Hinds has now put down a ques- uor to ask who comprises the board, whether they nave held a-ny meetings, and what they have done, and are doing.

No title

In giving a woman permission to take her baby wiih her to HoIlowAy the tier Ixtbv %-i i.P- Recorder at tbr. Old l>,uiey on Wednesday -aid he underevwd there were numer0118 uabies with their mothers at .the prison Majo*-Gener«I Sir Herbert Vaughan Cox has been anointed «eoret»ry in the military department of India Office 'n succession to G,onera.1 Sir Edmund Barrow, wbo-e tenure expires under the iimit of aje in January nex*