Teitl Casgliad: Haverfordwest and Milford Haven telegraph

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 4 o 4
Full Screen
11 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Higher Salaries For Teachers

Higher Salaries For Teachers. IMPORTANT CONCESSIONS, PLEA FOR THE WORST PAID, i TEACHERS AND MARRIAGE. ALLEGED COWARDLY TREATMENT OF DEFENCELESS GIRLS. At a meeting of the Pembrokeshire Education Cotn- mittfie on Friday, the staffing sub-committea submitted an important schema revising the salaries of all teachers, except supplementary, In tha couury. This concession was made as a result of thy deputation from the County, Teachers' Association which recently waited on the Authority. The sub-committee considered the particulars of the scales of sala;ies drafted by Mr Whioher and the Yen. Archdeacon Hilbers and recommended that th9 following acstte be adopted:- CERTIFICATED HEAD TEACHERS. Average SalarIes. Attendance. Men. Women. £ £ I.' nder 10 90—12<) SO —100 -11-00 100-130 So-llo 91-L50. 120-150 100-130 151-200 130-160 10;5 1: -i 201—300 110-170 I it) -111) Over 300 150-180 120-150 i Anuual Itieretiiput-,t.). CERTIFICATED CLASS TEACHERS. Men, £ 80 — £ 120 Women, £ 70 —100. Annual Increment— £ 5. UNCEBIILTCATED TEACHERS. Men, £ 50— £ 70 Women, £ 45— £ 05. Annual Increments— £ 2 103. The Committee recommend that no scale be established for supplementary teachers, but that each individual case be considered on ifs own merits. The Committee recommended that the teachers attain the maximum of the grades by annual increments added to their present salaries—the first increment to become dne on the 1st of April, 1911. Moving the adopMou of the new scales, the vice- chairman (Mr Whioher) said that Grades B and C were amalgamated as one group, while in Grades D and E the minimum salary was increased by about £ 10 and the maximum by about X20. In the Grades F, G and 11, the iucresse was about £10 each. The revised scale was submitted in order to satisfy the teachers who had laid certain grievances before them. Principally, the obj act of the sub-committee hid been to benefit the smaller schools, as 70 per cent of the :chooJ'3 in the county had an average atteudauce of less than PO. These schools had suffered to some extent, and the committee recognised that the children attending them had a claim upon them which had been met to a certain extent by the new scale. Referring to the uncertificated teachers, of which there were a large number in the county, Mr Wnicher remarked that it was a mistake to assume that these teachers possessed no qualifications. They had to pass the Oxford senior, the Central Welsh Board senior, or some equivalent examination, examinations which would admit thsm to moat of the profes-ions. Although these ware not college trained yet they were not badly trained. As to the supplementary teachers each case would be dealt with individually on its own merits. MORE GEXEROUS TREATMENT FOR UN- CERTIFICATED TEACHERS. Mr W. T. Davies said the revision of the scale of teachers' salaries could not have been left in more capable hands than those of the N ice-chairman and Archdeacon Hilbers, but he urged that the uncertificated teachers should be daait with a little more generously. He suggested that their annual increments should be 1.5 per ItnGum and not t2 10s, and he proposed that this parti- cular recommendation be referred back to the committee with this object in view. Mr T. John seconded, remarking that the case of the uncertificated teachers was rather hard. Arch. Hilbers agreed with Mr Davies and Mr John and they proposed to meet it to a certain extent. There were uncertificated teachers who had been in the service of the Committee fjr ten years and to these they proposed to give a larger increment. The t2 10; a year was a mini- mum increment, the bigher increment being in accor- dance with the teachers' sarvices. While in some cases they had not fully ncceded to the teachers' requests, yet in the cases of the small schools the Committee had im- proved upon them. Those with the lowest incomes had been troubled by the increased cost of living, and the Committee bad acted on the principle of giving the greatest help to the weaker brethren. Continuing, Arch. Hilbers said it was necessary to give these increases if they were to retain the teachers in the county, because if teachers had to be obtained from outside the Committee would have to pay a very great deal more. He con- sidered that the Authority had a a very praiseworthy staff of teachers at the pre.,et-,t time. Dr. Davies said the teachers should understand that they were not to expect another increase of salaries after the passing of the new Education Bill. Mr W. Palmer Morgan supported the schema, remark- ing that the new scale of salaries for uncertificated teachers was equal to any in Wales. They were not prepared to pay the salaries which they would have to pay if they were all certificated teachers. No doubt the Committee would be accused of spending the ratepayers' money unnecessarily, bu1: iu reply to that he pointed out that no fewer than twelve bodies of managers had urged theqi to increase the teachers' salaries. He added that they had met the deputation from the Teachers' Associa- tion half-way. Mr W. L'.wrence also supported the proposal to deal more generously with the uncertificated teachers, who were a splendid belly. Arch. Hilbers asked Mr Davies not to press his amend- ment, and said it would be better if the matter were left in the hands of tho staffing sub-committee to deal wi!li in the way he had suggested. Mr W. C. Jones cordially supported the scheme, re- marking that the teachers deserved well of the Authority. At the same time tha increase i:1 the rates was serious, and he urged that the County Council be asked to pass a resolution urging larger Treasury grant?. Rev. II. EVJIIS seconded. PEMBROKESHIRE'S POSITION. Mr T. John said that in English Elementary Schools it cost 53s Id per child: ia Wales the proportion was 53 lid; in Glamorganshire 45J 21: in Monmouthshire 49s lOd, and in Pembrokeshire 5Gd 4d, while the present increase would make the proportion considerably over 60s per unit. In England eight headmasters were sufficient for 1,000 children, but in Pem hrokeshire they had twelve headmasteis to every 1,000 children. In this county there were 105 schools with an average attendance of less than 90. The growing expense, added Mr John, was getting unbearable for thinly populated counties like Pembrokeshire. Archdeacon Hilbers said the high cost referred to by Mr John was principally due to the poor attendance in Pembrokeshire. This county was nearly at the bottom of the list in attendance, and 2,000 children could not be absent every day without somebody having to pay for it. Every effort should be mads to improve the attendance, but he was afraid the slackness was to be attributed to the parents' want of appreciation of the educational facilities provided. Mr W. Palmer Morgan thought the poor attendance was due to epidemics. Co!. Roberts said he was pleased to fiad that the mini- mum recommended in each case was fair and reasonable. He hoped the Head Teachers would feel that the Com- mittee had made some little concession, and he hoped that the good relations which had always existed between them and the Authority would long continue. (Hear, he ir). MALE ASSISTANTS AND MARRIAGE. Rev. H. Evans thought that salaries should be based on experience and length of service rather than on average attendance. The deference between Certificated Head Teachers and Certificated Class Teachers was only one of accident, and they could not expect a certificated male assistant teacher to be satisfied with a salary ranging from fSQ to £ 12 ) a year. All corfcificated teachers could not be head teachers, and he thought that certificated class teachers should receive something more substantial beci-jse they ought to encourage the male assistant teacher to marry. It was said they must not encourage the uncertificated teacheis, but the Committee were penalising them, and it was monstrous to expect a man to work the whole of his life for -670 a year. It was really disgraceful. ("Oh" and laughter). They did not give the man a chance. He had every right to marry, but what was 170 a year to maintain a family Then as to the supplementaiy teacher. These were a defenceless class they wre really a large body of the teachers, and they were placed in a most dangerous situation. The Committee expected these teachers t) live on the miser- able pittance 01 631 a year. They ought to have a substantial increase. C )1. Ribprts We want to do away with them. Rev. B. Evans said that was quite right, but the Com- m'ttee were employiug them, aud these teachers could not help themselves. MliS L'ewellin They can help themselves by passing an examination. The Chairman said that if Miss L'lewellin waited until Mr Evans sat down she, like all ladies, couid have the last word. (Laughter.) Riv. H. Evans rspeatod thit these supplementary teachers could not help themselves. It was their misfortune that they could not pass an examination. S) long as the Committed retained their services these teachers were entitled to a living wage. "LAZY TEACHERS" Miss L'ewellin said these teachers could and did help themselves, and many of them became uncertificated teachers. T hen in lki turn uncertificated teachers could also go ahead and become certificated. It was not for the Committee to encourage teachers to bo lazy iu their wjt k, an I their was nothing to prevent theso teachers from studying and getting ahead iu their pro- fession. In conclusion she asked tho Cjmmittee to pass the scheme. Mr J. Harries agree i with the Rev. H. Evans as to the pjsition of the supplementary teacher, and said that ill the Hayacaslle schoool they had two of these teachers who were paid and £ 20 each. Their school had an average attendance of 91 per cent, while the nearest school h d only an average of OS per cent. Children attended the Hayscastle school a distance of three miles, and one little girl of nine had attended 12 months with- out missing, although she had to walk a distance of 2i iniles. The Vice CiiAirruan said there were a number of applications for increase of salary from supplementary teachers, and these would be dealt with on their merits at I the next meeting. It was har.Hy wise for the Committee toencnur?8tMch?stobes?ued,hMtiheyshou)d stimulate them to go on and become certificated Of course all teachers were not in a position to go to college, but they could get certiilcated by sitting at an examination which was held in the county every year. Mr W. P. Morgan remarked that some of the supple- mentary teachers were very good, while others were almost worthless, being ovur IS and vacciuated." (Laughter)- Archdeacon Hilbers observed that every proposal made I bad been for an iucrease and not a diminution of expenditure. 1 Chairman I am afraid the time has gone when we J could ever ruduco the scale. A member remarked that possibly there was a day of reckoning coming, but the Hev.. H. Evans said he did not believe the county would ever object to pay for education j so long as the results justified it-an observation with which the Chairman agreed. ] The scale was then adopted, and Mr W. C. Jones's ? resolution carried. i

Haverfordwest Guardians I

Haverfordwest Guardians. I MILFORD RELIEVING OFFICERS HIP. WARNING TO DEFAULTING OVERSEERS. A meeting of the Haverfordwest Board of Guardians was held on Wednesday, when there were present:—Mr S W Dawkins (chairman), Mr S Williams (vice-chair- man), Miss Beatrice Chambers, Mrs Higgon, Archdeacon Hilbers, Rev J J Evans, Rev Henry Brans, Rev A Baring Gould, Messrs W Howell Walters, W George James, Wm Roberts, J C Biwen, T G Lawis, J L Lleweiiin, Wm Perkii:% H W Thomas, R IIarrie3, Joseph Watts, T R Vaughan, George Bowen, J Williams, George Jenkins, T F Jenkins, R N Reyuolu3, Thomas Roberts, John George, J Thomis, W R Lewis, Thomas Lewis, W II Divies, James Jenkins, F P Gwyther, II Warren Davis, T James, A. Ja*res, W Phillips, J P Sinnett, II P Griffiths, E J Martin, J W Morris, G S Roberts, W 0 Griffith, and M Harries. NOT DISCOURTEOUS. Mr Howell Walters said that with regard to the refusal of the Local Goverument Board to sanctiou the appoint- ment of Mr Jenkins as relieving officer for the Milford district, the Guardians would remember that some months ago the Clerk was instructed to write to their County Member asking him to interview the Right Hon. Johu Burns. The committee had received no answer from Mr Roch. They did not expect him to make a special trip to London to iIftrrvie R Mr Burns, but the Guardians did not want the Local Government Board to foel they were trying to act discourteously. As the interview had been so long delayed he suggested that the Clerk be directed to write to the effect that the Guardiins were only waiting the result of the interview with the County Member and if the latter was not able to satisfy Mf John Burns so far as the Guardians were concerned, then they wouid be quite prepared to re-'ldverisc. They did not want the Local Government Board to think they were unnecess- arily holding over matters or acting discourteously. Rev H. Evans seconded, and it was agreed to. Rev A. Baring Gould asked if the L.G.B. would wait an indefinite time. Mr Walters replied that Mr Ronh would be going up to London on the re-assembling of Parliament. Rev. A. Baring-Gould hoped that a conclusion would soon b3 brought to the matter as it was very uimtis- factory at present. AID FOR DISTRICT NURSES. An application was received from the hon. secretary of the Goodwick and District Nursing Association asking the guardians to contribute to the funds of the Association in the same way as they did for the Fishguard district, namely, Is each pauper per year. The clerk (Mr Rogers) said that the Local Government Board in sanctioning the previous subscription pointed out that each application must come before them they could not give a general order to contribute to all associations. Mr W. George James thought that the Guardians had given a much larger sum to the Haverfordwest District X ursing Association. The Relieving Officer (Mr Thomas) mentioned that in the case of Haverfordwest it came to about 6d or Is per visit. Rev. H. Evans moved that the Goodwick application be granted, and this was agreed to. Archdeacon Hilbers thought that the whole matter should be looked into, and Mr T. Lewis said that other districts ought to be compared with Haverfordwest. Archdeacon Hilbers added that if they saw it compared better, Haverfordwest would want to be put on the same basis as other parishes to which a contribution was given. Mr T. G. Lewis said they could easily ascertain the sum paid to the Haverfordwest Nursing Association and the number of paupers in the town. It was only fair that each district should be put on the same footing, and he moved that the Haverfordwest Relieving Officer be requested to report as to the total sum paid to the Haver- fordwest Nursing Association last year and also the number of paupers in each parish in the town. Rev. H. Evans asked why the Guardians should manufacture work for themselves. They could deal with Haverfordwest when an application was received from the Nursing Association. Mr Lewis's resolution was agreed to. Mr J. C. BJwen: We shall have no end of applica- tions now. No doubt there will be one from Llangwm next month as they are having a nurse there. Rev. H. Evans Quite so, and I hope we shall have Mr Bowen's support. Mr Evans added that there were now school medical officers and school nurses and he did not see why the Board should enlarge their scope. NO DELEGATES. The Guardians were invited to send delegates to the conference of the Central Poor Law Conference in London on February 17 and 18. Rev. H. Evans said it was an important conference as the question of pauper lunatics would be considered. He considered they should be represented. Mr Jenkins (Haythog) moved that no one be sent as it was only an outing for two or three members who never took any part in the discussions. They could get the full report of the conference. To send delegates co the con- ference was a waste of money. Mr Martin Seconded Mr Jenkins's amendment to the proposition thftt the Chairman should attend. The Chairman It would not mean a frcchon of a farthing in the rates. Mr W. George Jenkins These farthings come too often. There were 25 in favour of the amendment and 12 against, and it was therefore decided that the Board should not be represented. DEFAULTING PARISHES. A letter was read from Mr R. A. Wheatley, clerk to the County Council, complaining of the late payment of the county precepts and stating that the Finance Com- mittee would be under the necessity of levying an increased rate in order to provide for a larger working balance. Archdeacon Hilbers said it was a very serious question. He was looking into the education accounts the previous day and found they would be overdrawn this month entirely because they had not got the rates in. Mr J. C. Bowen Mr Samson Williams suggests that the County Councils should spend less. (Laughter). The Clerk said there were three very bad parishes for paying. Mr W. G. James proposed that the Clerk should lay before the guardians at the next meeting a complete list of the parishes in default with a view of summoniug the overseers where necessary. Mr Howell Walters said it was no idle threat of the Finance Committee of the County Council. Some few years ago the auditor took the very strong course of sur- charging the treasurer because he allowed them to over- draw. They could not do as they used to as the treasurer would not allow them. Mr W. G. James hoped their action would have the desired effect. The Clerk undertook to supply the return.

I Haverfordwest District CouncilI

I Haverfordwest District Council. ROADMEN'S HOURS. The monthly meeting of the Haverfordwest Rural District Council was held on Wednesday afternoon, Mr J. L. Lleweiiin presiding. ROADMEN'S HOURS. A discussion took place on the roadmen's hours, referred to the Couueil by a sub-committee. Mr T. Lewis (Hanton) moved that all the men leave off work at four o'clock on Saturday after- noons instead of (j p.m. as at present. Mr Jenkins (Haythog), opposing the motion, said that by adopting the proposal they would very soon be in great difficulties. The men had very good holidays now. (Laughter.) They had an increase in wages without asking for it and now the Council were going to give them a half-holiday without ask- ing for it. That was not all. It was going to agitate the farm labourers. When he was at Roblestou the other day it was mentioned to him by the farm labourers. He was sorry to say that some of their men did not go to work at the proper hour. He moved as an amendment that the hours remain as at present. Mr S. W. Dawkins thought that Mr Jenkins was a little unreasonable. It was generally understood that a few hours every week, not a half-holiday, were conceded to farm labourers. lie seconded the resolution. I Mr T. Lewis asked if it was not a fact that some of the men stopped work at four o'clock on Satur- days. Mr Jenkins: It is no reason why others should follow. Mr T. G. Lewis appealed to the Council to look at the matter from a broad point of view. The tendency of the times was that workmen should have a little leisure He did not think that the motion if carried would lead to any agitation on the part of farm labourers. At the same time in future the Council would have to insist on roadmen being at their duty promptly each morning. Mr Thomas (Jordanston) seconded Mr Jenkins's amendment. Rev. H. Evans did not think farm labourers should enter into the discussion at all, because the road labourers were a class of men occupying a very responsible position. (Great laughter). He repeated that assertion. Furthermore, he be- lieved them to be a class, as a class, who rose fully to that responsibility. The road labourer was not a machine but a man of intelligence who did not measure his time by actual work, because when the rain had been tearing up the road and blocking up the gutter the labourer went to see to it. even on a Sunday. (" Oh.") He had seen it with his own eye;; and he thought they should add a little dignity to the road labourer. He was sorry they had to discuss the matter of giving a paltry time oil on a Saturday afternoon. For his own part he would like to move that the roadmen have the whole of Saturday afternoon off. Mr W. Roberts, who described himself as a man of the soil, supported the motion, and pointed out that agricultural labourers received advantages which roadmen did not. But he knew of roadmen who did not do a fair day's work, and the men who failed to give satisfaction should be dismissed Mrs Iliggon said it was quite true the Council had given the roadmen an increase of wages, although it was done in rather a half-hearted manner. She did not think that the roadmen were so well off as the -farm labourers. The resolution to give a reduction of hours was carried by 22 votes to 1;). FREYSTROP WATER SUPPLY. With reference to this matter the Sanitary Com- mittee decided to recommend that the Local Government Board be informed that the majority of houses proposed to be supplied would probably be closed and new houses built all other sites. HOUSES CONDEMNED. 11 was reported that at Lambston nine houses had been inspected and found unfit for human habitation. Two required repairs. Orders for the demolition of houses at St. Ishmaels aud Crundale were considered aud notice of intention to enforce orders were directed to be served. I

Pembrokeshire Education Committee

Pembrokeshire Education Committee. SCHOOL INSPECTION. WHOLE-TIME OFFICER TO BE AP- POINTED. TEMPERANCE TEACHING IN THE SCHOOLS. A meeting of the Pembrokeshire Education Committee was held at the Shire Hall, Haverfordwost, on Friday, when there were present --Ile S. B. Sketch (chairman), Mr J. Whioher (vice-chairman), Miss Lleweiiin, Archdeacon Hilbers, UP-V. U. Evans, Col. W. R. Roberts, Dr. Davies, Messrs W. Palmer Morgan, Hugh Saunders, G. B. Bowen, J. Howaid Griffiths, E. H. James, W. L iwreuce, J. Harries, W. T. Davies, Ll. Rees, J. H. Harries, W. O. Jones, T. John and B. L. Davies. NATIONAL UNION OF TEACHERS. Tha Committee were invited to send a representative to the annual conference of the National Union of Teachers. The Chairman was asked if he would attend, but Mr Sketch shook his head remarking that he had recollections of a similar conference at CMwyn Bay. A member then got up tacl proposed Mr J. Howard Griffiths, a motion that was too readily agreed to, for Mr Griffiths, sceptically looked around and then said he was sure the members were not serious. At that there was an out- buist of laughter, and the matter dropped with the Chairman slyly retorting .1 Were you serious, Mr Griffiths ? PRESSURE OF THE RATES. Moving the adoption of the finance committee's report, Archdeacon Hilbers said the present condition of their finances was very unsatisfactory, became while only X3,372 had been paid in of the precept issued for last November, the sum of L9,885 was now outstanding. They started the year with a working balance of L5,000, but owing to the non-payment if rates there was now an overdrawn balance of five or six thousand pounds. Mr T. John mentioned that last week the Pembroke Guardians sent in a cheque for over L2,000 to the County Council. Proceeding, Mr John said th3 rates were getting so oppre3sively heavy that they exparienced an enormous difficulty in collectiolk If rates were not paid in immediately the reason was that it was difficult to get them out of the hands of the ratepayers. He had often asked the County Council to undertake the collection of rates themselves and then they would know what it meant. The Chairman said there was no doubt a difficulty, but the difficulty must be overcome, otherwise educational work would be brought to a standstill. Uuless overseers realised the position thoy would be obliged to increase the rates. HOOK SCHOOL. The Chairmin said h3 hoped Hook School would be opened during February. The Architect reported that he had arranged with the tenant and agent of the adjoining field to lay a water pipe across the field to the school, subject to an acknowledgment of G1 a year and a compensation of £ 1 to the tenant. These terms the Committee now accepted. The appointment of Mrs Margaret Jones as cleaner at an inclusive salary of £ G 16a was confirmed. THE TENBY SCHOOL. Mr W. Lawrence asked what about the Tenby School, and the Chairman replied that he and the Architect had been over to see the Tenby Surveyor. The Authority had, however, been put to such trouble and expense that they had decided that the school should not be set back as proposed. It would be simply ruinous to the school to do 80. Mr W, Lawrence congratulated the Chairman on the firm attitude he had taken up, and the Chairman said the matter might now be regarded as at an end. SCHOOL MEDICAL SERVICE. The attendance committee reported having considered a letter from the Board of Education concerning the Committee's proposals for the re-organisation of School Medical Service in the County. The question of the appointment of an Assistant Medical Officer was deferred uutil the next meeting. The Board of Education wrote concerning the provision of cod liver oil, etc., to children suspected to be suffering from tuberculosis. The committee reoom- mended that this matter be left in the hands of the County Medical Officer. Mr W. T. Davies said the Board of Education were dissatisfied with the number of School Doctors engaged by the Committee, and the Committee were of the opinion that the duties could be carried out more effi- ciently and economically by the appointment of a whole- time School Doctor. At the present time £ 125 was paid every year for part-time doc'.cns. The Chairman reported that if the present system was maintained the Board of Education would not make the Committee a grant. If they appointed a whole-time man, however, half the salary would be repaid by the Board of Education. Dr. Davies agreed that it was more satisfactory to have a whole-time man, and the report was adopted. DOCKYARD SCHOLARSHIP EXAMINATION. The Clerk to the Pembroke Dock Governors wrote asking how many travelling allowances the Committee were prepared to provide in order to enable the School to prepare for the Dockyard Scholarship Examination. The Committee replied that they are prepared to consider any further applications for travelling allowances. Mr W. C. Jones said that unless candidates were fairly certain of the travelling allowance they would not go in for the examination. The Chairman said Mr Jones might take it from him that the Committee had no intention of withdrawing the travelling allowance as promised. TEMPERANCE TEACHING. Mr 1..1. Rees moved a resolution that systematic tem- perance teaching be given in the schooh once a week instead of monthly as formerly. Mr Rees went on to explain that by temperance was meant abstemiousness, and at producing healthy, decent, self-respecting and dutiful living. Miss Lleweiiin seconded, and Mr J. Harries supported. Col. Roberts said that if the syllabus were adhered to closely and taught sympathetically, enormous good would result from the inclusion of temperauce. It was their duty to do aU they could to foster the moral as well as the intellectual powers of the child, That was the whole meaning of education. Mr W. Lawrence and Rev. H. Eivans also cordially supported. The Vice-chairman said it was understood that tem- perance was total abstinence. (No, no.) Col. Roberts It is not total abstinence it is temper- ance. The Director said that as far as the code was concerned the subject could be taught uuder the head of hygiene and physical training or moral instruction. Mr W. C. Jones asked if they could not also include instruction in kindness to animals. The Director replied that provision was already made for that. The resolution was agreed to

LOCAL FOOTBALLI

LOCAL FOOTBALL. PEMBROKESHIRE LEAGUE. PEMBROKE DOCK ATHLETIC CLUB, 0 v. H.M.S. GOLIATH, 0. This Pembrokeshire League match took place on the Marble Hall Ground on Saturday last in stormy weather and in the presence of very few spectators. The Goliath winning the toss elected to play with the wind slightly favouring them. In the first, half the play on both sides was weak the sailors failing to take advantage of several chances. The Docks, who played only 10 men, seemed content to defend their lines, the respective goalies having only one shot to handle, Ebden saving a dropping shot and Tiller smartly saved with several of the opposing forwards almost on top of him. The score sheet at half-time was blank. During the second half the Docks practically monopolised the attack. Notwithstanding this Ebden had few difficult shots to negotiate as Penfold, and Reed up to the time of his disablement put up a fine defence and made good use of the touch line. With the final kick of the game L. Thomas was entrusted with a penalty kick awarded for a foul charge, but kicked into Ebden's hands, the latter easily saving. The game ended with a draw. For the Djcks, Barry and Griffiths played a good game, the former very cleverly intercepting on different occasions. Of the halves young Williams played well, Ginger Lewis again failing to reproduce anything like his old form. The forwards in mid-field were too clever for the Goliaths' halves, but their shooting was ill-timed aud feeble. L. Thomas was the only one to come near scoring with a shot that Ebden did well to keep out by conceding a corner. Bartie Lewis was out of position and missed several fine chances with practically an open goal. Ebden for the Sailors was safe, so also were both backs, but the team as a whole seemed disjointed, probably caused through the absenee of two of their best forwards, Williams and Foster. Oa the day's play they were vey unfortunate in dividing the points, as the Dockers should have won easily. BORDER REGIMENT v. MILFORD TOWN. I The meeting of these two unbeaten teams in a Pem- brokeshire League game took place on Saturday last on the ground of the former club, Llanioi Barracks, in the presence of a large crowd of soldiers augmented by many from Pembroke Dock and a few of the Itobiual loyal supporters from the fishing town. Milfood, who fielded their strongest available eleven, played with a very strong wind behind them, and took full advantage by scoring three fine goals (Mat Davies and Jeffries) before half time. On resumption the Soldiers immediately attacked amid encouraging shouts from their supporters, and, except for an occasional break away by the reds, continued to attack right throughout the second moiety, during which they had the assistance of the gale, but thanks to a fine defence by the Robins they had to acknowledge their first defeat of the season by 3-2. The wind undoubtedly spoiled what would have been a very pretty game as both teams play spectacular foot- ball and are apparently, evenly matched, for while the soldiers have an advantage in hoight and training the Robins are admittedly a smart eleven capable of playing splendid football. It was fortunate for them that they were in their best form, otherwise they would have re- tired with a blotched record. It would perhaps be in- vidious to mention any where all did well, but the recruit, Fred Hancock, deserves a word for his sterling play against such a wing as is possessed by the Border Regiment. The result caused much surprise amonst the supporters of the Army men as the game was confidently looked upon by them as ong yielding another two points to their favourites. The return match at Waterloo Road, Hakin, on February 14th should attract a fine crowd and he would be a boll man who would confidently predict the result. MILFORD AND DISTRICT JUNIOR I LEAGUE. MILFORD STARS, 1; v. MILFORD TOWN RESERVES, 3. The Reserves, losing the toss, had to play against wind I and hill, and this with a man short, WM no enviable task. Throughout this half, the Stars did really all the attacking, but failed to coutrol the ball in the high wind prevailing. Considering the conditions, they should have done better than scoring once through R. Lewis, especially as they allowed L. Mathias to equalise with a penalty awarded against one of their halves for holding. The score at half-time read 1-1. During the second portion the Young Robins kept the Stars strictly on the defensive, and scored two more goals through L. Evans, from 20 yards out: a beautiful shot and another by Harry Thomas with a clever over- head kick from the touch line. The game ended in a win for the Reserves by 3 goals to 1. For the losers, Harold King in goal did exceedingly well to keep the score to 3. He could not be blamed for being beaten by either, indeed he saved several very difficult shots, one of his saves at the end of the game being a very clever thing. The backs did not play their usual safe game against the wind-but they lifted the ball too much. Munning was the best of the half-backs line, and of the forwards Arthur King, at outside left, played well. For the Reserves, Clarke in goal had little to do. Mathias and Day, as backs, defonded well and were superior to the opposing backs as feeders, as also was the half. back line. It was in the control over the ball in the high wind prevailing that the Reserves held the advantage ever their young rivals, and considering they played a man short throughout the entire game, the strongest supporters of a smart little team, such as the Stars un- doubtedly are, could not but admit that the cleverest team deservedl won. Teams Stars.-G:)al H. King backs H Smith, L Mills; half-backs: W Young, Munning, Picton forwards: R Lewis F Thomas, A Davies, II Morse. A King. Reserves.-Goal G Clarke; backs: L Mathias, H Day half-backs F Mathias. L Evans, W Thompson forwards A Thomas, Burns, B Clarke, H Thomas. The match arranged to take place on Marble Hall ground between Pembroke Dock United and H.M.S. Canopus did not come off on account of the inability of the latter team to come ashore.

Advertising

WANTED, BUTTERMAKERS. British Butter is unquestionably better than foreign, yet the latter is often bought in preference This is an injustice both to the British producer and the buyer. It is an ni.tiry which could easily be avoided. The average Briush housewife believe- that butter presenling a rich golden uniform colour is the ideal. The foreign producer meets her wish, and all his butter has the rich golden colour which se'ls. A perfectly safe means is provided whereby the British maker can impart to'his butter just that golden colourin which will commend it to the eye, as decidedly as its quality will commend itto the palate. The remedy i; the "Silver Churn" butter colour, manu- factured bv Oldfield, Pattinson, and Co. of New Bridge Street, Manchester, the successful survivor ot the severest tests at the principal shows, where it ha, gained Firstt'lass awards for "5 years. Equally satisfactory is the high praise rt has won in the numerous dairies where it is regularly used. These competent approvals are due to the absence of any untvenness or muddiness in the colouring and to the fact that the use of "Sliver Churn does not affect the buttermilk The butter it'elf is not injured in the process; it is improved. Its delicate creamy tiavour is enhanced It should be clearly understood that I Silver Churn" is a vegetable pro- duct, entirely free from any aniline dye. (A guarantee by the makers to this effect will be given anv user desiring it It may be obtained from Chemists and dairy supply men in Ed., Is 23., 5s., 83, and 14s bottles. To secure satisfaction obtain the 11 Liilver Churn" brand. Free trial samples from the manufacturers; also "Silver Churn" Butter Powder. "Silver Churn" Cheese Rennet. "Silver Churn" Cheese Colouring.

MOTION PICTURE NEWS

MOTION PICTURE NEWS. ,lie-.v Director for "Alkali Ike" Features. From Los Angeles, California, comes die news that llarrv Edwards, recently of the Majestic Company, has been engaged to direct the nev. Alkali Ike series ot comedies. Mr. Edwards 'iad his first motion picture experience in a com- pany which has since become famous for the successful men it turned out. In that pioneer -oiiii),tii,y David llorsley was camera man, and imong the actors were Al. E. Christie (now of Nestor Filiiiz), Francis Ford (Bison 101), and Nlilton Fthriie), (101 Bison). Mr. Christie says 'hose wore t lie Shakesperian days of motion pictures, and the experience which bofcll players, deserve to be written in a book. 3attle Scenes Shown to Soldiers. The moving pictures of the filial battles !)c'lveei Buillat-iins 'tn(i Greeks during the second Balkan War are being shown to the soldiers of the I'nited States army. When shown at the armoury of the 71st Regt., these pictures were loudly applauded. Cinematographic Geography Instruction. 11 I I I ?, .An Urder by the separate School 150ar,1 0 Hamilton, Ontario, has been followed by the acquis tion of a series of motion pictures to be used in connection with geography instruction in lie school under the Hoard's jurisdiction. The Board recently purchasd Illotin picture machinci ,,i *n i)i, in,, s(,Ilool courscs more adaptable t, ''ie minds of children. LE\P FROM GALLOPING HORSS TO FAST MQVING TRAIN, I.iring feat by Ind an S'rl Irrth -om'ng tO I Bison Drax*: "The Prare Trail." Famous Actor Nearly Killed. Tn one of the scenes in "Samson," the great r >rthcoming Victor feature, the famous screen >cfnr, J. Warren Kerrigan, who was playing the ading role, narrowly missed death whil acting vitha lion. The mishap took place when the youth- .il. I-, t:lison comes to close quarte:s with the king .f beasts arftl breaks its jaws. Immediately he p'pearcd the lion sprang at Kerrigan, and but for ;\e presence of mind of tile (lit-ectol., J. Farrell McDonald, he would certainly have been killed. vlcDonald shot the beast, but not before it had he actor down. He rose from beneath the dead ion, covered in blood, but not seriously injured, flic animal's claws inflicted deep scratches on It-rrigan's forearm and shoulder, narrow Iy missing ae jugular vein. It was found afterwards that he iion had one bullet through the heart and two n the head, the latter being fired by two cowboys ■landing by armed for emergencies. « His Masterpiece Finished. Mr. Henry ivjcKae, it is announced, nas just inished his production, "A Vagabond Soldier," lie Bison 101 feature, ill which several lions are used, and which the famous du'ectop colli (Iers liis masterpiece.' Camera Man's Dangers. N. K. Whipple, a well-known camera-man in \meiK\a, wdiile filming a storm off Jersey Island, vas caught in some wreckage when the Octogon Hotel, at Sea Bright, crashed into the sea. Ile %vas carried out from the land and was rescued with lictilty. ?! More Injuries. Ramona Langlcy, the fascinating leading lady of the Nestor Company, is the latest to be num- b.-red amongst the motion picture injured. She had a serious fall while playing in an overall factory in a picce entitled," She was only a Factory Girl," and she is still in hospital. Another Florence Lawrence Film. Th; "Girl of the Woods" is another excep- tional picture featuring the marvellous film actress, Miss Florence Lawrence. L is a Vi. tor play, an I reveals t!ie extraordinary ability of this delightful actress.

Advertising

rmmmmmm tAKE K £ ATINGS* Tins LOZENGES

MILFORD HAVEN SESSIONS I

MILFORD HAVEN SESSIONS. I CONVICTION UNDER SHOP HOURS ACT. The Milford Haven sessions wjre held on Wednes- day before Col. Roberts (chairman), Messrs (>. H. D. Birt, J. B. Gaskell, Robert Cole and Dr. AV. S. Griffith. HAIRDRESSER FINED. George Miller, hairdresser, Milford Haven, was summoned for keeping open his shop on the weekly half-holiday in contravention of the Shop Hours Act. Gilbert Duncan, County Council Inspector under the Act, said he visited Milford Haven in December on the early closing day, and found defendant's shop open at 2 p.m. He kept observation on it until 2 30, and saw two customers enter. Witness then, went in, and saw one man being shaved and a second awaiting his turn. When he spoke to defendant the latter said, You have no business to enter my shop and interfere with me." He asked defendant for his name and address but he refused to give it. Defendant had been cautioned previously. Defendant said his front door was closed, but this Mr Duncan denied, and the Clerk said it might have been closed, but it was clear that customers could enter. A fine of Is no costs, was imposed. Col. Roberts did not adjudicate in this case. BAD LANGUAGE. William Gay,, fisherman, Milford, and Andrew Bjaidwood, fishing lapprentice, were summoned for using bad language in the public streets. P.C. Lewis proved the ofience, mentioning that the youths went away when spoken to. They were each fined 5s, costs remitted. James Jenkins, fisherman, Hakin, and William Thomas, fisherman, Pill, were summoned for a like offence. P.O. Lewis again proved the offence, and a similar fine was imposed. LOCKED UP. Peter Midway, fisherman, Pill, pleaded guilty to being drunk and disorderly in Charles Street on January 17th. Inspector Evans said defendant was in company with two sailors from H.M S Albion, and another young man, and his couduct was so bad that he was taken home. He came back again, however, and renewed his disorderly conduct and this time he was locked up. As this was defendant's first offence, he was fined 5s, costs remitted. A GRAVE OFFENCE. Edward George Franklin, stoker on H.M S. Albion, was charged with like conduct, and also with interfering with the police. P.O. Lewis said while he was taking Midway, the former defendant away, Franklin put his arm rouud Midway's neck and dragged him away for some yards. He was very drunk, and was using bad language. He also attempted to strike Constable Lewis. Inspector Evans said the police looked to thefe men to assist them rather than to obstruct them. Col. Roberts said the defendant had committed a very grave offence, and he would be fined 10s and 9s costs. HELPLESS. Geo. Haynie, fisherman, Pill, who was found by P.C. Lewis in a helpless state of drunkenness was fined 2b 6d and costs. HAD DONE HIM GOOD. William Summers, an errand boy, who was brought up six months ago, for doing damage to the Insulators on telegrap*h posts at Hakin, was brought before the court. Inspector Evans said he had kept an eye on the boy during the six months, and he had been of good behaviour. The proceedings had done him good, as well as other boys in Hakin. Mr Cranage, engineer inspector for the post office, corroborated the Inspector, and Summers was discharged.

No title

Christopher Sulavicz, a chemist's assistant at Budapest, confided to three girl friends his intention to commit suicide, and they poisoned themselves in sympathy. The girls died but Christopher recovered. Two Women Executed.—Katibor, in Sil- esia, was on Thursday the scene of the unusual event of a double execution, at which both the culprits were worsen. One had murdered her stepmother aud the other her husband. They were, as is the custom in Prussia, decapitated with an axe. Fox Hunt in the Sea.—Three Flam- borough fishermen were returning from fishing recently m a small boat, when they saw a fox swimming in the' water near Flamborough. They gave chase, and tried to catch the fox alive. But they found this impossible, and so, getting within oar's reach, they killed it by knock- ing it on the head with an oar, and drew the body on board. It is supposed that the fox had missed its foot- ing while running along the edge of the cliffs and fallen into the water. Poisoned Children.—At Alfreton, Derby- shire, on Saturday, Lillie Rumley, of Summercotes, the young wife of a collier, was remanded, charged with having adininistejed laudanum to her two children on January 26, with mtent to murder them. It was stated accused was arrested at her parents' home at Manchester. The husband, returning home oue day, found the children in a comatose state, evidently suffering from narcotic poisouing. They were placed under medical treatment. Prisoter ^appeared to be in a weak and nervous condition. Welsh Minister and Sanctity of Sabbath.— Preaching at Siloh Calvinistic Methodist Chapel, Aber- ystwyth, on Tuesday night, the Rev. H. Barrow Williams, Landudno, said he feared there was a feeling of indifference creeping over the country .in regard to reli- gion. The Preaching of the Gospel seemed to have be- come ineffective, and the frenzy of football mocked the feebleness of the pulpit. He had tried to preach the sanctity of the Sabbath at Llandudno, but he confessed that his efforts bad failed. The Sabbath at Llandudno was being sold bit by bit to the visitors, and there was left nothing worthy of the name of Sabbath, He had no doubt but that they were undergoing the some experience at Aberystwyth.

Advertising

R- r iE? c T t IF YOU PLACE YOUR. I B ORDER WITH US. | "f t The T h ousands of Tes t imonia l s B H we have received show H9 the advantage there is H in dealing with an HB old-established firm of Btt tried reputation. flH Hb List of SPECIAL SALE BARGAINS Nt free on application. KdOCIIS(MJPINK £ RV I Ibc- Great music Stores, ) BIUSTOL. J THE RLAL WELSH CURE i HAYMAM'S S BALSAM I ■ fiTT -DHI? ■COUGHS &C0LDs| I Invaluable in the Nursery BPS Bottles and 2 6 BfrW B OF ALL CHEMISTS AND S'RORES. m? Commerce House, Limited. THE PREMIER HOUSE FOR VALUE. Royal Worcester Kidfitting Corsets. ROYAL WORCESTER KIDFITTING CORSETS have for four years received HIGHEST AWARD of the LONDON INSTITUTE OF HYGIENE. We have taken up the Agency of the Famous Royal Worcester Kidfitting Corsets for the Town and District. Inspection of the New 1914 Models invited. COMMERCE HOUSE, LIMITED, HAVERFORDWEST. -Challllers' Cough Compound— THE 0- COUGH 1C.C.C.I CURE Made and Recommended by Qualified Chemists for nearly 100 years. THIS IS A RELIABLE GUARANTEE OF A CERTAIN AND SAFE COUGH CURE SUITABLE FOR ADULTS AND CHILDREN. J. H. LLEWELLIN (Late J. D. HARRIES), The Front Street Pharmacy, MILFORD HAVEN. One dose relieves, one bottle cures. One Shilling, post free. 692 OUR LADIES' TAILORING AND DRESSMAKING DEPARTMENTS are in charge of an experienced and capable Dress= maker. Her knowledge of the prevailing styles, no less than her skill in making up dress materials, ensures perfect satisfaction to our R = customers. = Why not give us a trial order ? ADAMS, DRAPER, &c„ Bridge Street, Haverfordwest. 475 CHILE! C. MIES, L l\ J ¡I,. J I .'J THE HOUSE FOR QUALITY. We make a special feature of giving the best possible value in all Drapery Goods. For quality and choice we can give complete satisfaction in the following departments:— A' Blankets, Curtains, Table Centres, Sheets, Table Cloths, Linens, Quilts, Glass Cloths, Calicoes, Ticks, Duchess Sets, Prints. MARKET STREET, HAVERFORDWEST. BLAND & SON, Motor Engineers, Haverfordwest. 1914 OVERLANDS FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY WITH Electric Self=Starter & Lighting Equipment. Agents for DAIMLER and NAPIER Commercial Vehicles, etc. Sole Agents for Pembrokeshire for the Standard 9 5 h.p. Light Car. Tel. No. 11. 1 Kindly call and inspect my Stock. ALL THIS SEASON'S GOODS. Footballs, Hockey Sticks and Balls, Guns, Golf Sticks and Balls, 1 etc., etc., BELOW STORE PRICES. j 1 Note only Address ARNOLD B. ABRAHAM, j CYCLE AND SPORTS DEPOT, 16, High Street, Haverfordwest. Printed aud Published by the Proprietors, WM. LEWIS & SONS, at their General Printing Offices Bridge street, in the Pariah of St. Martin, Haverfordwest, on Wednesday, Feb. 4, 1911