Teitl Casgliad: Abergavenny Chronicle

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Mae hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn eiddo i Tindle Newspapers

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
16 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
OUR LONDON LETTER1

► OUR LONDON LETTER. 1 [From Our Special CorrespondentJ} I It seems to have been generally assumed that the formation of the Coalition Govern- ment has been directly brought about be- cause two strong1 personalities like Mr. Churchill and Lord Fisher could not hit it off at the Admiralty, while affairs at the War Office also had something to do with it. It is, I believe, nearer the truth to say that the Coalition was bound to come soon, and that though the difficulties referred to may have helped to bring it about earlier than would otherwise have been the case, they were not the prime cause. Readers will re- member that some weeks ago, when refer- ring to the necessity of the consent of the Opposition being obtained before steps could be taken to prolong the life of the present Parliament, I mentioned the possibility that some of the Opposition leaders might enter the Cabinet. The resignation of Lord Fisher and the newspaper sensation only precipitated the reconstruction of the Government. The most interesting appointment in the new Government is that of Mr. Lloyd George to the new office of Minister of Munitions. Probably never before has a Ministerial appointment been received with such universal approval. Mr. Lloyd George is the one member of the Government who since the war began has succeeded in per- forming the miracle of pleasing everybody. He must smile sometimes if he ever finds time to compare the things said and written about him now with those which the same people were saving and writing only a year ago! As Minister of Munitions, he is the right man in the right place. Possess- ing boundless energy and a wonderfully magnetic personality, no man is better fitted by natural gifts for inspiring enthu- siasm. His name will have with the workers something of the magical influence of Lord Kitchener's with the men of the new armies. There will be plenty of work for the Minister of Munitions in organising and directing the army of two million workers so as to obtain the best results. Mr. Lloyd George, it is understood, al- though no longer Chancellor. of the Exche- quer, will continue to reside at the Chan- cellor's official residence, at No. 11, Down- ing street, next door to the Prime Minister. Mr. McKenna, the new Chan- cellor, lives, however, only a short distance away, and can walk to the Premier's house for a Cabinet meeting or to the House of Commons in five minutes. His residence is at a corner of Smith-square, Westminster, and is one of the most charming houses in London. It was built only a year or two ago, from designs by Mr. Lutyens. One of the most striking recruiting appeals yet issued comes before the eyes of theatre-goers once a night when the safety curtain comes down. It runs like this: "This is the safety curtain of this theatre. The men of this country are the safety cur- tain that shields it from ruin and our women and children from death and worse than death. Are you part of that khaki safety curtain? If not, why not?" Talking of recruiting reminds me of a smart idea worked by a speaker at a meeting in the Temple Gardens on the Embankment a few days ago. After the officer had spoken a civilian mounted the platform. "All who are in favour of conscription," he said, "hold up your hands." A number of hands shot up. "Now," said the speaker, "all who believe in voluntary service." There was a similar response, and among those who held up their hands were several of military age. "Good," was the comment. "If you believe in voluntary service, here's your chance. Sergeant, look after them." And the ser- geant did. .There was never any sign of public sym- pathy with the tramwaymen on strike. It was felt that, even though their grievances might be of such a nature as to demand re- dress, they had adopted a wrong method to secure it at a time like this. They ought to have put their case before the public and the County Council in a fair and straight- forward manner, and not have determined on a strike until all other means of settle- ment had been at least attempted. As a matter of fact, the general public were ignorant that the tramwaymen had any grievances at all until the strike had begun. The running of the cars was stopped, and the public, especially the great army of workers who come up to the City from the suburbs every morning, have suffered a vast amount of inconvenience. That a body of men in the public service should have ceased work in this arbitrary fashion only aroused resentment, and deprived the strikers of the measure of public sympathy and support which would have been theirs under other circumstances. The decision of the County Council that strikers of military age must return their uniforms, was a serious blow to the strikers. These men will not be re- engaged unless they have been rejected by the recruiting officers. Women are already "helping splendidly in the great national emergency in a variety of ways. They are doing Red Cross work, | making comforts for the wounded, driving motor-cars and vans, tending lifts, acting as commissionaires, taking the place of police- men, and many other valuable and necessary things. There had been pointed out a way in which good service may be rendered by women in their own sphere, so to speak. The Distributing Trades' Committee has issued through the Home Office an appeal to shop- pers. most of whom are women. They are asked to shop early, to be patient if some- body does not rush forward to attend to them as soon as they enter a shop, and to carry small parcels themselves instead of leaving them to be delivered. They are asked also, when sending orders, to take a little trouble in stating clearly what it is they require, and to give as long a time as possible for the execution of the orders. All these points seem small euogh in them- eelves, but if all shopping women give them careful attention, as all can without putting themselves to anything more than trifling inconvenience, they will mean a considerable saving of labour in the shops, and make it possible for many more men to enlist. It is pleasant to know that the appeal, which ap- plies, of course, to the whole country, and not only to London, has already had a good effect, and fever parcels have been delivered since than in anv similar period for a long time past. A. E. M.

THE SEVENTEENTH LANCERSI

THE SEVENTEENTH LANCERS. The 17th Lancers have a Scottish origin, and were raised in Midlothian by Colonel, • afterwards Sir John Hale, in 1759. The honours list of the regiment is, "Alma," "Balaclava," "Inkerman," "Sevastopol," "Central India," "South Africa, 1879," and "South Africa, 1900-02." It may safely be said that there is no regiment which has a greater fascination for the public than the "Death or Glory Boys," so called from their g-rim badge of a Death's head, a gruesome device chosen by the first colonel of the regiment, Hale, partly to commemorate the death of Wolfe at Quebec and partly to instil into the minds of his men a high spirit of duty. Under the skull and cross- bones appear the words "or glory." Colonel Hale was with the hero of Quebec when he fell in the hour of victory, and he brought the despatches home. The strange badge ap- pear on the appointments of the "White Lancers," and is worn in silveT by the ser- yeants above the chevroES on their right trm.

No title

OUR CHILDRENS CORNER I

OUR CHILDREN'S CORNER. By r I UNOLE RALPH. MR DEAB CHILDBEN, Have you taken your country ramble yet, or started on your paper? If not, you must hurry up, because June 10 will soon be with U3 now. The daya rush by so rapidly that a whole week seems to have gone com- pletely before one has had time to say Jack Robinson," and I do not want any of you to miss this splendid opportunity for proving your skill at essay writing. Be- sides, I want to hear of all the fun you get up to, and I like to know that the children are enjoying themselves, sporting in the sunshine whenever they have the chance. Laugh and play while you may, for child- hood so quickly passes. There is 80 much sorrow in the world to-day that it does one good to see you children enjoying life and liberty in the green fields and meadows. "Catch the sunshine, ere it flickers Through a dark and gloomy cloud; Though it falls so faint and feeble On a heart with sorrow bowed. Catch it quickly! It is pusing I Passing rapidly away; It has only come to tell you There is yet a brighter day." The clouds, of course, are not always dark and gloomy. Oftimes they are edged with crimson and gold, and reflected in the skiea round about them one sees the beautiful shades of the furze and mountain heather, bearing promise of the brighter days in store. I am printing a very interesting puzzle for you this week, and have some splendid prizes for the members who send in the most correct solutions. Neatness as usual must count as well, and I want you to take great pains with your entries. Write me your Country Ramble paper first, and then try this competition, which I will keep open until June 24, which will give you plenty of time. Do not forget my address is 8, La Belle Sauvage, London, E.C. Once again,' good-bye until next week With much love to all, Ever your affectionate, UNCLE RALPH. THB CHILDREN'S CORNER UNION. FOUNDED BY UNCLE RALPH. (Open to Boys and Girl* under 15 yean) Please enrol me ai • Member of the C.C.U." My age it yean. IVame Á ddre" .n. Date When lienecl poet to UNCLE RALPH,9, LaBkllb SACTAOB, LOKDOK, K.C. Mtnktn InltUt as iUsmlaaUd niakiriUi carl suitable far framlnc. should eacles* peaar Stan) with this lens. FOUND UPON THE SEA SHOBE. I (Prize Competition.) I (Open to all boys and girls under 15 years.) As I was walking along the shore one beautiful summer morning, when the birds were singing gayly in the trees, I picked up from the sand a marine plant, and on examining it I found it to contain the fol- lowing :— 1. A large body of water. 2. That which produces plants. 3. Freedom from pain, want or anxiety. 4. A female sheep. 5. Paper, tow, eto., to stop the targe of a gun. 6. A pronoun. 7. A useless plant. 8. A bird. 9. Moisture. What did I pick from the sand, Md what I did it contain? OUR SHORE'S DEFENDERS. I "King of the Castle am I, Molly is Queen Enemies falter and fly When we are seen. "Yes, and we built it alone- Isn't it grand? Really and truly our own Castle of sand!" THE TERRIBLE MONSTER. I There was great commotion in the Land of the Forest Fairies, for Cornlet, one of the fairy soldiers, had- come running to the King and Queen to say that the forest WAS invaded by a terrible monster. "It is Like a walking /mountain," he cried in great excitement, *and it ia so high that I cannot see what it is like on the top. As it moves it crurhes everything under its great feet, which -are like ours only a mil- lion times bigger. Whatever can it beT" The King and Queen looked at each other in wonder, and all the forest fairies gathered round them. But whilst they were all talking they sud- denly heard a loud noise coming nearer and nearer. And the closer it came the loudez it was. The Queen shrieked and hid her face on the King's shoulder, but the King was trembling so that she couldn't keep it there. Suddenly the noise stopped. They all looked up and saw the terrible monster standing in front of them. "Why," cried the King in a loud voice, "it must be a human being! Soldiers, attack it I And the brave soldiers of the forest fairies, who were armed with tiny bulrushes, bravely rushed at the huge feet of this terrible 1 monster. But no sooner had they tried to pierce them with their bulrushes, than the feet suddenly gave a spring into the air, and all the brave forest fairy soldiers were sent rolling on the ground, whilst the terrible monster ran away as hard as ever it could, making a noise that seemed to the fairies louder than thunder. But they were all very pleased that it had gone, and the King pinned acorn medals on to all his brave soldiers. And the terrible monster, who was really Tom, the woodman's Bon, who, being very naughty, had run off into the forest alone, now ran crying home to his mother. He promised her that he would never go off into the forest by himself again, for there were prickly insects there which stung his feet, and made him want to run home!

I A BRAVE GUNNERI

I A BRAVE GUNNER. I A story of conspicuous bravery on the part of a gunner of. the 2nd Battalion of the Berkshire Regiment, when that regiment with others was so badly cut up, is told by Private Garlick, of the machine-gun section. During a heavy bombardment, he says, a gun manned by Private Davey was put in an exposed position, and when the team had accomplished their task it wae found that with the exception of Davey all the company had either been killed or wounded. A gunner from another company went to hie assist- ance to feed it, but was very soon killed. A8 a result Davey was left solely to work the gun, and played it on the enemy for several minutes until he was wounded by heavy shot in the head. The Germans then made a charge on the gun, whereupon Davey, see- ing that he had no chance of getting it away, dismantled it, and 80 ren?= it useless. He then crawled away.

No title

The Rev. F. E. Watson, a Wesleyan minister of the Blyth (Northumberland) circuit, has entered the shipyard of Messrs. Palmer, on the Tyne, to help the workmen to "deliver the goods," according to their promise to Lord Kitchener.

IMOTHER AND HOME

I MOTHER AND HOME. The kind of man she should marry is a problem of deep interest to a woman. Don't marry merely for a home. Such marriages are almost always unsatisfactory. While you may wisely insist that before entering with him on the married state your lover should be able to maintain you, don't be afraid to marry a poor man. Remembei that an increasing proportion of wealthy and successful men spring from the ranks, while the rich of to-day are often to-mor- row'a poor. Marry a man nearly your own age, and a man who deserves the name-a fellow with character and intelligence, pot a noodle, or a tailor's lay figure. Finally, don't marry a man to reform him. The risks are quite great enough when a woman marries a man who does not need reform* ing. CUPID AND COMMON-SENS*. An observant lady asserts that the girl of to-day no longer seeks the ideal man. The modern maid takes a practical view of matrimony, and in most cases looks out for a capable commom-sense man, one who has a business or profession, and who has brains and energy enough to raise himself in the world. A man of this kind does not make a Tomantic lover, and his courtship differs from that which was in favour with our ancestors. He does not kneel to his adored one, make verses to her eyes, or express his devotion ioi high-flown language. If he did it is probable that the lady would dismiss him as a sickly sentimentalist. So practical has she grown, indeed, that even if he gives her few presents, she does not complain, for she argues that it is more to her advantage if he adds the money to his banking account, so that they may be able to marry the sooner. The result is that although matrimony has become more prosaic than it was, there are probably fewer matrimonial mistakes, for where practical common-eense prevails many pitfalls are avoid3d. WHUK LOVE PKEFI-KXES. Now and again a woman finds herself eon* fronted by the problem whether she shall marry a man whom she loves, but who has no special regard for her, or another man, who loves her devotedly, but whose affection she only partially returns. In such circum- stances the average woman doubtless feels that should she marry the latter she will never forget her love for the other man, and will consequently be liable to waver in her loyalty to her husband. On the other hand, she will argue that by marrying the man who has no special affection for her she runs grave risks of an unhappy marriage. "Marry neither," would probably be the advice of some people to a girl in such a position, but such counsel, if followed, might easily Tesult in making two people permanently unhappy. The best advice, then, would be that the girl should marry the more loving man, first explaining the sxact state of her feelings to him, so that he shall be under no false impression. This is by far the safer course, and the one most likely to result in a happy marriage. WHEN YOU SNEEZE. I Some people are apt to think that sneez- ing is the sure sign of a cold, but there are a. number of things that may cause you to sneeze quite apart from when you have con- tracted a chill. You have probably noticed how the smell of the pollen of certain plants will cause some people to sneeze, whilst others may be affected by the sudden appearance of a bright light. Then very few of us can refrain from sneezing when we come in contact with a shower of dust. You may not know that when you have a cold sneezing is one of Nature's aids to cur- ing you. When you sneeze you suddenly stir practically every muscle of the body, which sends a flow of warmth right through you, and thus fends off the possibility of further cold GRIT IN THIC EYN. I Children are very apt to get foreign bodies into their eyes, and often a trifling acci- dent may cause the child considerable pain. [ Sometimes, vhen travelling, smuts from the engine will enter, or when at play particles of sand or grit will enter, and unless re- moved, inflammation of the eyes will follow. The child must not be allowed to rub the eye, as pressure tends to embed the offend- ing particle still farther in the membrane covering the eyeball. If tears can be in- duced, the natural remedy will often re- move the grit or other offending particle, and a tiny camel's-hair brush drawn across one corner of the eye will often provoke these. Blowing the nose very hard will sometimes help. The eyelid should be care- fully raised and gently turned back until the foreign body is discovered. It may then be swept out with the little brush, or, failing this, a feather. A drop of olive or castor oil should be dropped on the eyeball and the eye covered with a bandage if the speck cannot be removed, and it is wise to then summon medical aid. The sight is too precious a thing to run the risk of any serious injury, which may so readily follow an accident to the eye. CAN'T YOU SLEEP. I There is no more deadly foe to beauty than sleeplessness, but insomnia would seem to have become a disease, so often are physicians called upon to prescribe for it The reason for lack of sleep must be sought out before a cure can be effected, and most doctors will at once declare that the remedy is in the hands of the patient herself, and that drugs will do little good. One of the greatest hindrances to sleep is thinking, and even if the thoughts are of pleasant things they will often keep one awake. How much more if the thoughts circle round some worry or other. The disquieting thought should be pushed aside with a firm hand, and as far as it is possible to do this, the mind should be made a blank. Sleep will often follow within a few minutes. LOOK AFTER YOUR EYES. The first essential to eye beauty is healtn. [n ill-health the eyes become dull and strained looking, showing deep hollows beneath them as a result of sinking right back into their orbits. Very often, also, the eyelids become red and inflamed. To correct this state of things your general health must be improved. Do not r closely-printed newspapers in quick-moving trains and omnibuses. Some women will bend for hours at a stretch over the finest of fine needlework, and this in the poorest of light in many cases. Others will go out in brilliant sunshine without a hat or parasol, exposing their eyes to the full glare of the sun, or they will read with a bright light right in front of them. They do all these things and then surprised if in time their eyes show signs of weakness. If you want to care for your eyes properly, never read in the train, always do needl- work in a good light, and when reading iu an artificial light see that the light is be- hind you so that it is reflected directly on your paper or your book, and not straight mto your eyes. CORNS ON THE HANDS. Although we usually associate corns with the feet, they occasionally appear upon the hands, and then cause both pain and annoy- ance. They should not be cut or picked, but a bread poultice should be bound over the afflicted part on retiring to rest. In the morning the skin will have softened, and the corn can be easily removed. Old wives say that if picked out by the finger- nails corns do not grow again 80 quickly. Anothe,e method is to dip a crumb in lemon juice and to apply it to the exact centre of the corn. The acid acte upon the corn much in the same way as acetic acid, which is another remedy for corns. Care should be taken not to injure the surrounding skin, which is more sensitive to the acid than the hard skin around the corn itself. I

No title

Mr. Herbert Shaw, secretary of the New- castle and Gateshead Chamber of Commerce, announces concessions in the granting of coal export licenses. The Coal Export Control Committee will consider applica- tions for licenses without the name of either a definite steamer or substitute being mentioned on the application again. Where it is necessary to increase the named cargo quantity the committee will allow an in- crease margin of 10 per cent., not to exceed 200 toaa.

No title

Window Boxes. — These may now be planted for summer display. They should be provided with drainage, and filled with good soil, such as two parts loam, one part leaf-soil, and one part well-rotted manure, which will suit the plants well. There are various subjects that can be used for win- dow boxes, but few equal ivy-leaved pela- goniums and marguerites; the former should be allowed to hang over the front. Mrs. F. Sander is the best marguerite to grow, as its double flowers are very telling. Fuchsias, heliotropes, hydrangeas, verbenas, and salvias may also be used. < e Grafted Stocks.—Attend to the removal of growths which start from below the point of grafting. If this is not persistently followed up the scion will be robbed and make little IDUPPOETINO SCION AND SUMMER TREATMENT or STOCK. A, growing scion supported by stake firmly tied to stock a. a, a, a growths on stock which must be rubbed off. headway. If not already done, see that each ticion is securely fastened in position, or as growth extends it may be torn from its union with the stock by rough winds. The Rock Garden.—Many of the occu- pants of the rock garden like the mossy saxifragas, aubrietias, and similar subjects have passed out of flower. Remove all dead tlowers. The work can be well done with a pair of shears. If any of the plants like the louble arabis are inclined to overgrow some of the smaller subjects, they should be well cut back round the edges of the clumps. Keep the rockery free from weeds, and damp it over during the evening after sunny days. It must be kept tidy, for there are still many subjects to bloom, like the helian- themums, dwarf campanulas, veronicas, hypericum reptans, etc. Gentians.—These have finished flowering, and if it is desired to divide and replant any of the clumps the work must be done at once Gentians require a rooting medium of a loamy texture. Grow them in full sun- shine, but they succeed best if kept moist at the roots in summer without being too wet in winter. Plant very firmly, and water the plants regularly in dry weather. Estab- lished plants derive benefit from a light top dressing at this season. If granite chips are used for the purpose they will help to con- serve moisture around the roots. Gentiana acaulis is the most useful and effective variety. G. verna is more difficult to grow. < < Raspberries.—The young canes are now growing rapidly, and the weaker ones can be removed with benefit to the others. Five to each root will be sufficient to retain. The raspberry bed will be greatly benefited with a mulch of short manure applied after the weeds have been removed. Cordon goose- berries of early varieties grown for dessert should have the side shoots shortened back to five leaves from the base. Regularly hoe the quarters of bush fruits to keep them free from weeds. « Parsley.—Early raised seedlings should be planted out when small. Those who grow a stock of parsley to exhibit in pots should not plant in the usual way in the soil, be- I GROWING PARSLEY FOR EXHIBITION. I ) cause, do as one will, parsley when large re- cause, lifting. It is better to prepare a piece sents of ground by laying a bottom three inches deep of cinders and ashes beaten quite firmly, and on this material in which the parsley will root. < The Week's Work.—Flower beds may be filled now with zonal and ivy-leaved pelar. goniums, petunias, fuchsias marguerites, carnations, lobelias, antirrhinums, alyssum, violas and pansies. For foliage effect use ooleuses, cineraria maritima, oentaurea candidissima, begonia, semperflorens, beet and echeverias. Asters, stocks, phlos drum- mondi, ageratums, nemesias, nicotiana, mari- golds, scabious and salpigloesis may all be planted now in groups in borders, or to fill beds. Give preference to well hardened plants. In order that mignonette, annual chrysanthemums, clarkias, larkspurs, lupins, candytuft, nasturtiums and coreopsis should develop into bushy plants which will flower profusely, thinning out should continue. The principal work with indoor grapes is the thinning of berries. Reduce the number of bunches and keep the sub-lateral shoots stopped to prevent overcrowding. Ventilate before the sun raises the temperature to dis- sipate condensed moisture on the berries. Continue thinning the apricots, peaches, and nectarines. Both under glass and out- side. Thin sparingly until immediately after stoning, then reduce the fruits to the final number, not more than one to each six inches. When the gooseberry crop is heavy on bushes and cordons liberally thin the fruits and use for cooking. Mulch the soil over the roots with manure. The cherry trees will continue healthy and vigorous if kept moist at the roots. Liberal applica- tions of water are necessary for trees against walls. Keep the young growths free of green and black fly. Strong vege- table marrows in pots may be planted out now in open positions liberally enriched. No protection should be needed if they have been grown hardily. As the tomato plants in pots, boxes or borders under glass extend in growth, secure to stakes or wires, and rub out side shoots. Shake the trusses of bloom to disperse the pollen and secure a set of fruit. Establish more plants in fruit- ing positions. Thoroughly harden plants in pots for outdoor planting. The first pricked- out celery seedlings are now strong enough to plant out in trenches. Those for single rows may be fifteen inches wide and nine inches deep. Work into the bottom some rotten manure. The plants may be eight inches apart. Make the first planting of brussels sprouts if strong seedlings are ready in boxes or frames. Plant two feet apart in rows two feet asunder. Maize or Indian Corn.-Well grown examples are very delicious when properly cooked. It is important to have strong plants to put out now to obtain well-grown coles. The plants succeed best in rich, well- cultivated soil, and should be given a warm, unuy position. Do not allow them to suffer from want of water at the roots, and when well established give liquid manure.

No title

Since the outbreak of war, and including about 2,000 Army reservists called up on the mobilisation, Manchester and Salford have given nearly 99,000 men to the colours. A further sum of X30,000 has been handed to the Commission for Relief in Belgium by Sir Timothy Coghlan, Agent- General for New South Wales. This amount brings up the total of the New South Wales contribution to nearly < £ 250,000.

MANY FIRES IN OUTLYING DISTRICTS I

MANY FIRES IN OUTLYING DISTRICTS. AIRCRAFT SEEN AT VARIOUS PLACES. A Zeppelin raid took place over London on Monday night. The first official announcement of the raid was contained in the following communique issued by the Admiralty early on Tuesday morning :— "Zeppelins are reported to have been seen near Ramsgate and Brentwood, and in cer- tain outlying districts of London. "Many fires are reported, but these can- not actually be connected with the visit of the airships. "Further particulars will be issued as soon as they can be collected and collated." Before sending out the announcement of the raid, the Press Bureau issued the follow- ing notice:— "The Press are specially reminded that no statement whatever can be. published deal- ing with the places in the neighbourhood of tmdon reached by aircraft or the coume supposed to be taken by them, or any state- ment or diagram which might indicate the ground or route covered by them. "The Admiralty oommunique gives all the news which can properly be published. These instructions are given in order to secure public safety, and the present intimation might itself be published by the Press as ex- plaining the absence of more detailed re- nort." PREVIOUS RAIDS. The principal air raids prior to last night's attack, have been as follows:- Yarmouth (Jan. 19).-Two persons killed. King's Lynn (Jan. 19).-Two persons [ killed. Tyneside (April 14).-One person injured. Lowestoft (April 16).—Three horses killed. Maldon (April 16).-No casualties. Kentish Coast (April 16).—Taube drops bombs without serious damage. Southend (May 10).-011e hundred bombs dropped; a woman killed. Ramsgate (May 16).-Hotel wrecked; one death. Southend (May 27).—Woman and child killed. In the first Zeppelin raid on England (Jan. 19) the towns visited were Yarmouth, Sandringham, Sheringham, Cromer, and King's Lynn, on the East Coast, and four persons lost their lives-a man and an elderly woman at Yarmouth, and a youth and a young woman at King's Lynn. The King and Queen, with the Princess Mary, the Prince Henry, and the Prince George, had left Sandringham on the day previous to the raid. The second raid took place on April 14, nearly three months later, and this time the North-East Coast was visited. Twenty-four bombs were dropped on Blyth, Cramlington, Bedlington, and Wallsend, but only one person was injured, and the damage done was trifling. Two days later bombs were dropped at Maldon and Loweetoft. Damage was done to property in both towns, but no lives were lost. At Lowestoft the "casualties" were three horses killed. On the afternoon of the same day a Ger- man aeroplane visited the Kentish coast, but was attacked by gunfire and pursued by our airmen. A bomb dropped at Sitting- bourne, and. another at Faversham fell about 100 yards from a hoepital containing 30 wounded soldiers. Nearly a month later, on May 10, German air raiders paid their fourth visit, and on this occasion Southend suffered. About 100 bombs were dropped on the town and the suburbs, Leigh and Westcliff, and one woman was killed. The bombs were of the incendiary type, and a number of houses and a timber-yard were destroyed. The fifth raid took place a week later (May 16), when a Zeppelin dropped bombs on Ramsgate and at Oxney, near Deal. At Ramsgate, between 30 and 50 bombs were dropped, four persons were injured (one of whom died), and a good deal of damage was done to property. Southend was visited for the seoond time on Wednesday of last week, and the raid re- sulted in the deaths of a woman and a child and serious injuries to another woman. On Southend 26 bombs were dropped, on West- cliff 14, and on Leigh 31. The Germans used a new kind of incendiary bomb, heavier and more bulky than on previous occasions. The damage done to property in the town was considerable. It is stated that the air raider was damaged by British artillery and fell into the sea.

FOUR PERSONS KILLED I

FOUR PERSONS KILLED. I At five o'clock on Tuesday afternoon a communication was issued by the Press Bureau, giving further particulars. It ran:— "Late last night about ninety bombs, mostly of an incendiary character, were dropped from hostile aircraft in various localities not far distant from each other. A number of fires (of which only three were large enough to require the services of fire engines) broke out. "All fires were promptly and effectively dealt with, only one of these fires neces- sitated a district call. The fires were all caused by the incendiary bombs referred to. "No public building was injured, but a number of private premises were damaged by fire or water. "The number of casualties is small. "So far as at present ascertained, one infant, one boy, one man, and one woman were killed, and another woman is so seri- ously injured that her life is despaired of. "A few other private citizens were seri- ously injured. The precise numbers are not yet ascertained. "Adequate police arrangements, includ- ing the calling out of special constables, enabled the situation to be kept thoroughly in hand throughout."

GREAT FRENCH AIR RAID

GREAT FRENCH AIR RAID. BOMBS ON GERMAN EXPLOSIVES FACTORY. The famous German manufactory of the Badische Anilin und Soda Fabrik, at Lud- wigshafen, which is now a great depot de- voted to the making of explosives, has been bombarded by French aviators and set on lire in many places., Ludwigshafen is on the Rhine opposite to Mannheim, and the aviators were nearly six hours in the air. The Badische factory was, prior to the war, probably the greatest dye works in the world. The French official communique says that the raiding squadron was composed of 18 aeroplanes, each carrying heavy projectiles. The results, it is stated, proved the efficacy of the bombardment. Several build- ing were struck, and fires broke out. The aviators covered a distance of over 400 kilo- metres. This expedition against one of the most important factories of explosives in Ger- many was undertaken by way of retaliation for the German air. raid on Paris.

No title

In order that no delay should take place in the work of Messrs. Vickers' and other munition factories, the customary Saturday cricket match was played on Sunday at Barrow. A protest had been raised against Sunday cricket, but the retort that Sunday golf took place regularly was apparently found unanswerable. While a private in the New Army stationed at Sheerness was cleaning his rifle it went off, and Rifleman Thomas McGarth, of I Bethnal Green, was shot dsad.

No title

When giving sticky medicines to children, dip the spoon in boiling water, then take uiI the medicine, and it will leave the epooa easily. When milk has been burned, pour it at once into a jug and stand it in a basin 01 cold water until it is cool, when it will be found to be quite free from the burned smelJ and taste. To clean white paint, boil two or three onions in the usual way very thoroughly, then use the water to clean the paint with- out soap. All the dirt will disappear, leaving the. paint white and glossy. To clean a white felt hat, mix magnesia to a paste with cold water. Allow to stand for a few minutes, then apply evenly to the hat with a brush. When the paste is quite dry brush off the magnesia with a clean stiff brush, and the hat should be quite clean. If very soiled two applications may be neces- sary. To make candles last double the usual time, take each candle by the wick and give it a good coat of white varnish. Put the candles away a day or two to let them harden. The varnish prevents the grease from running down, and so prolongs the life of the candle. When Te-heating meat, place some gravy in a deep frying-pan, season it and make quite hot, put in the meat and simmer gently, but do not allow to boil, as boiling' makes the meat tough. I YOUR MEAT BILLS. It is not economy to order your joints from the butcher. Go to the shop, choose your own joint, ask the price, see it weighed. and, if possible, take it home with you. The srving thus effected is considerable, and vou get exactly the joint you require, and only as much as you desire. I To COVER JAM POTS. Cut tissue paper about one inch larger than pot, have a little milk in a saucer, and moisten the edges of the paper, then squeeze on to the pot gently, or the paper will tear. This will stick very firmly, much better than with paste, and is done more qiuckly. I RUSTY CURTAIN HOOKS. For rusty curtain hooks, place them in a how] and cover with cloudy ammonia. Leave for half an hour, and then just stir them around with a stick. The hooks will look like new. If the points are difficult to put through the fabric, push them into a bar of soap, and they will afterwards slip in quite easily. I CARE OF DOORMATS. V ■■ Front doormats should not be beaten, but rolled right side outside two or three times. The dirt will fall out quite readily, and a good brushing will complete the process. By this method doormats last much longer. Old mats and carpets should not be discarded. The mats may be covered with the best part of the carpet, thus making a pad to stand on while ironing, which ia a great boon to the tired feet. One of these pads placed at the bottom of the cellar steps, on which to wipe the shoes, keeps the steps much cleaner than without, thus saving labour. To CLEAN A SADDLEBAG SUITB. Brush up and remove all dust; then get an ox-gall at the butcher's, burst it in a pail, and fill the pail up with cold water. Soak a swab of soft rags in the solution and wipe over the covers, taking care not to have the rag too wet, or the 6tuffings will settle and cause the seats to bag. Another method of renovating is to make a paste of fuller's earth and clean water, lay on the covers with a pound brush; allow to get thoroughly dry, and then brush out the powder with a stifr furniture brush, when. the dirt, etc., will disappear with the powder. This must on no account be done until the fuller's earth is dry. SOME USEFUL RECIPES. SAVOURY PODDING.—Put all the stale pieces of bread you have into a bowl, pour over boiling water, then drain thoroughly and beat with a fork. Add one tablespoon- ful of chopped parsley, one tablespoonful of suet or dripping, a little grated lemon-rind, pepper and salt, and one eg. Beat all well together. Put a little dripping in a roast- ing-tin and bake in a quick oven. Cut into squares and serve with the meat. You will find it an economical and tasty addition to the dinner. BANANA PUDDING.—Peel and chop finely six good bananas, and mix them with a quarter of a pound of grated beef suet, six ounces of fine breadcrumbs, two tablespoon- fuls of sugar, and a teaspoonful of baking- powder. Beat up two eggs, add a gill of milk and a little vanilla essence. Add this to the suet and bananas, mix well together. and pour into a buttered tin. Steam for three hours. Serve with caster sugar. POTATO DOUGHNUTS.—Into one pound of flour and half a pound of cooked potatoes rub four ounces of dripping, a little allspice, and two ounces of sugar. Mix a tablespoon- ful of yeast with two cooking eggs and a little warm milk; work all well together, and put in a warm place to rise. Roll out about half an inch thick, cut into shapes, and fry in boiling fat for about five minutes. Drain on kitchen paper, and sprinkle with sifted sugar. FISH AND RICB CROQUETTES.—Put a quarter of a pound of rice into a sauce- pan with an ounce of butter and a pint of milk, simmer slowly for an hour and a half, by which time the rice will have absorbed all the milk, and do not stir it while it cooks. When cooked, add a seasoning of salt and stir in the yolk of an egg. Turn on a plate to cool. Have ready some cold cooked fish, mixed with a little thick white sauce (previously seasoned). Take portions of the rice, roll into balls, make a hole in the centre, fill with the fish mixture, close up the hole, and brush over with the white of the egg. Roll the balls in fine bread- crumbs, and fry in hot fat. Drain and serve with sauce. SAVOUBY CABBAGE.-Boil a firm white cabbage fifteen minutes in salted water, pour off the water, and add fresh. Then boil until tender, set aside until cold, and chop finely. Butter a baking-dish and fill with chopped cabbage. Make a sauce with: One tablespoonful of butter, one tablespoon- ful of flour, half pint of water, in which the cabbage was first cooked, salt, pepper, elir ingredients over the fire until smooth. Season with salt and coralline pepper, add four tablespoonfuls of cheese finely gratwd. Pour the sauce over the cabbage and btike ten minutes in a quick oven. STEWIm RABBIT.—This is a tasty and iLn. expensive dish. Clean the rabbit and cm it into neat joints, which may be sub-divided if liked; sprinkle with salt and a I.ttle pepper. Cut some salt pork into gnall cubes, and a good sized onion into slices. Put these ingredients with a little stock or water into a stewpan, with sufficient pearl barley, or groats, or rice, to form, when cooked, rather a thick stew. It should cook very slowly, and be stirred frequently to prevent burning, adding more stock, or water, if needed to swell the rice or groats properly. Groats make a nicer dish than rice or barley do, but tastes differ, and the flavour of groats may be disliked by some. Cooked in this way a rabbit goes twice as far as it would if boiled in the tlsual way.

No title

To replace the 74,000 railwaymen who have joined the colours, applications for various posts, such as booking clerks, tele- graphists, ticket collectors, porters, and carriage cleaners have been received from more than 30,000 women. "I mean to fight, to defend my country, and to avenge the death of my father on the Boches," protested thirteem-year-old Julien Bloquelle, who had attempted1 to fol- low a French infantry detachmaafc to. the front, over a distance of ten mil.