Teitl Casgliad: Abergavenny Chronicle

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Mae hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn eiddo i Tindle Newspapers

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
22 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
NOTES ON NEWS j NOTES ON NEWS 1

NOTES ON NEWS. j NOTES ON NEWS. 1 Most of the people in this country, whether in favour of compulsory military CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS. service or no, will have little patience with the body calling itself the "No Conscription Fellow- ship," which is appealing for the signa- tures of men "likely to be called upon to undergo military service in the event of conscription, who will refuse from con- scientious motives to bear arms because they consider human life to be sacred, and cannot therefore assume the responsibility for taking human life. Whatever the consequences, those who take this pledge are "to obey their conscientious convic- tions rather than the commands of Gov- ernments. A sincere conscientious con- viction is always to be respected, but one cannot help but suspect the consciences which are quiescent while others are fight- ing the battles, and only become active when their owners fear that they may be called upon to fight themselves. The mem- bers of the No Conscription Fellowship" should remember that these others, who have enlisted out of patriotism, are fight- ing and dying for them, and for their wives and children. They are fighting and dying for liberty, and whatever the No Conscription Fellowship" may say, the brave men at the front think, and quite rightly, that it is a cause worth dying for. The men who have selfishly accepted their eacrifice only bring themselves into con- tempt by talking about their own "con- scientious convictions" now. We may hope and believe that we shall get all the men we want without resorting to compulsion, but the men we must have, and if the voluntary system will not produce them then other means must be adopted. But the voluntary system has not yet broken down. No time has been lost by the Govern- ment in announcing the constitution of CONTROL OF DRINK TRAFFIC. the Central Control Board for the liquor traffic in munition areas. With the exception of the Act forbidding the sale of immature whisky, this is all that remains of the scheme which was introduced to deal with the drink problem in war time. The Act which confers the powers has a wider application than merely to those parts of the country where munitions are being made. It covers any area where "war material is being made or loaded or unloaded or dealt with in transit or where men belonging to his Majesty's naval or military forces are assembled. It seems, therefore, that the new Board's operations may, if it is thought necessary, extend to practically every large town in the country, and to a great many small ones. The powers of the Board enable it to take complete control of the drink traffic in clubs, grocers' shops, and railway refresh- ment rooms, as well as in ordinary public- houses. It may "sell or supply, or con- trol the sale or supply, to the exclusion of any other person; acquire either tempor- arily or permanently any business or pre- mises, whether licensed or otherwise; and establish refreshment rooms without licence for the sale of either intoxicating or non-intoxicating liquors. The powers of the Board are to last to the end of the war, or to twelve months after that date, if it is considered necessary. A beginning will no doubt be made in the great manu- facturing centres and the chief ports. In the first weeks of the war we heard » good deal of the imperative need for NEED FOB ECONOMY. i economy. We heard of wealthy people reducing their expenditure in various ways, having only two or three courses at l • • il _1 Lt. uuiiier, ana so Dnnging inemseives in tillIS particular to something only a little above the standard to which poorer people had been always accustomed. The poorer people began to economise, too, in ways of which only thrifty housewives and good managers are capable. As time went on the necessity for reducing household ex- penditure seemed not to be so keen as had been anticipated. Work was plentiful, wages were good, and the cost of foodstuffs did not increase alarmingly. People began to go back to their ordinary way of living. And then prices did begin to rise. Bread, meat—everything went up and up; it was a gradual process, a penny on this thing and a penny on that, until now the domes- tic budget of the workers has reached a figure considerably higher than can be compensated for by the increase of wages conceded to some classes of workers, but not to all. The necessity for economical living presses now upon most of us; the housekeeping allowance must be made to work miracles, and personal expenses kept down to the lowest possible figure. In some cases there will be no margin at all, and in others very little; but it is a national duty at this time to save wherever it is possible; for there will be a call later on upon the savings of the people. We are not supposed to be a particularly provident people in our house- keeping arrangements, and there are many households in which economy will seem difficult, if not impossible. Women of ex- perience and ability might perform a very useful war service by organising and con- | ducting classes in real domestic economy in every town and village. The Government have had under con- sideration the best means of preventing THE PRESS AND THB ENEMY. the disclosure of informa- tion or the publication of statements in the Press which might assist the enemy or interfere with the successful prosecution of the war. n This is the opening sentence in a notice issued by the Press Bureau, which states that the Director of Public Prosecutions will henceforth be charged with the duty of instituting proceedings in the event of infractions of the Defence of the Realm regulations by publication in the Press of prohibited matter. It is evident that cer- tain sensational statements which have ap- peared in print lately have caused the Government to see the necessity of putting this matter on a proper footing. Until now there has been no central authority for taking the necessary proceedings, and there has perhaps been a disinclination to take action in certain cases where, to the ordinary person, it has seemed that infor- mation which certainly ought to be kept from the enemy has appeared in print for all the world to see. Censorship in war time is a necessity which we all recognise, but to be effective it must be firmly and equally administered. It certainly should not be possible for one paper to create a sensation by flouting the Censor and dis- regarding regulations which other papers loyally observe.

BELGIANS CALLED TO ARMS I

BELGIANS CALLED TO ARMS. I The Press Bureau have issued a notice signed by M. Hymans, the Belgian Minister in London, ordering all Belgian malee of eighteen to twenty-five years of age to obtain from the police before June 20 a form of enrolment, and men arriving later to enrol themselves within fifteen days of landing in England. The men so enrolled will be called upon to report themselves before a recruiting com- mittee. ————— .—————

No title

The Norwegian steamer Konigshaag has brought into Blyth (Northumberland) four- teen bags of flour and a number of life- belts picked up thirty-live miles off Coquet Island. The lifebelts are marked "Steam- ship Minerva," and apparently belonged to the vessel of that naane which was torpedoed by a German submarine off the -"gotone.

FAILURE OF GREAT GERMAN ADVANCE II

FAILURE OF GREAT GERMAN ADVANCE. I I "PHALANX" DRIVEN BACK. News of the battle in Galicia, where the Austro-Germans are making a tremendous effort to take Permysl, is contradictory. From the Russian report it would appear that the Austro-German attack has largely spent itself, while reports from German sources speak of a capture of three forts north of Permysl, and the driving of the Russians out of Stryj, sixty miles south- east of the fortress, with heavy losses. In a despatch dated Tuesday, the special correspondent of the "Daily Telegraph" at Petrograd says it seems no longer prema- ture to say that the great Austro-German advance from Cracow has failed. The ques- tion now is to what extent. There are many factors in the problem of which it would be absurd to deny that we are com- pletely ignorant, but in the facts known to us it would appear that Mackensen's vast army is in a position that is already un- tenable and might easily become exceedingly perilous. It was the enemy's plan to surround Permysl both in the north and south and cut the railway connecting the fortress with Lvoff by bringing his divided forces together somewhere in the neighbourhood of Most- niska. This double flanking movement so far succeeded that both to north and south his troops reached a point sixteen miles in the rear of Permysl. Now, if the Russians had been at all anxious as to the fate of their troops in and around the fortress they would naturally have withdrawn them long before things had reached this pass. But they did nothing of the kind, which is the best evidence that their position in that quarter is one of unusual strength. At any rate, Permysl remained the point of a wedge projecting into the enemy's line. Immediately to the south of the railway which bisects this sixteen-mile belt on its way to Lvoff the country is a good deal broken up by irregular ridges of low hills, interspersed with patches of forest, and these topographical conditions, which were part of the original strength of Permysl as an Austrian fortress, have now stood our Allies in good stead. They have, no doubt, also been assisted by the outlying works which they captured before the siege of the fortress commenced. But however that may be, the advancing waves of Austro-German. troops have broken again and again on the Gussakof position, and for the last two or three days the enemy has apparently sus- pended his efforts in that direction. If this check has been final, the southerly envelop- ing movement may be considered at an end. I THE MIGHTY PHALANX. On the north of Permysl Mackensen a "phalanx," which is estimated here to con- sist of 1,000,000 fighting men, burst across the San in a north-easterly direction, and then executing a difficult manoeuvre, turned towards the south-east and advanced until its front reached the line Naklo-Kalnikof, and here, as last night's official news yteils us, it has been stopped by the Russian fire. Kalnikof lies north-east by east of Permysl, and between thirteen and fourteen miles distant from it. Naklo is situated rather more than a mile to the south-west of a straight line joining Permysl and Kalnikof, and is ten miles distant from the fortress. The spearhead of the "phalanx" is acoord- ingly about four miles in breadth. The direct eastern front of the "phalanx" has not been heard of further east than Tukhla, which is eight miles from the San, and between three and four miles south of the latitude of Jaroslau. Thus the space occupied by the "phalanx" is apparently an arc, of which the chord is formed by the San from the in- fliix of the Liubatchevka to a point four miles to the north of the latitude of PermysV To the north-east of this arc our Allies have for some time past been pushing forward with a considerable degree of success, and the salient feature of the latest official report is that they have fought their way across the Liubatchevka, and captured I th, village of Monasterz, a mile to the east of the point at which it flows into the San. ,Th.se, tiie "phalanx," crowded together in an area so limited that anything likq broad manoeuvring is impossible to it, has been checked., and is being driven back into a still higher state of congestion from the north. Indeed, it is hinted by a semi-official writer that the Russians have assumed the aggressive along the entire front. THE WAY BACK. In these circumstances it is difficult to be- fieve that Mackensen's hordes are i ?t already streaming back towards the we&t. And for this purpose they have only one really first-class route open to them. That is formed by the highway and railroad run- ning parallel from Jaroslau to Rzezou. Leaving Jaroslau these lines of communi- cations at first follow a north-westerly direc- tion, and when they pass through Przeworsk are only eight miles from the junction of the Liubatchevka with the San. The only other first-class high road con- necting Jaroslau with the west passes through Permysl, and is consequently not open to the enemy. In the intervening space between these two routes there is, it is true, a network of roads, but most of them are mere country tracks. In view of the many uncertain factors in the situation, it would be imprudent at the moment to draw large conclusions from these facts, but they will serve to show that the development on the San are at the moment well worth watching.

TRANSPORTS

TRANSPORTS, At the outbreak of war hundreds of ships were commandeered for transport work, cargo boats, cattle boats, steamers, and emigrant vessels being pressed into service. Each transport has been fitted so as to carry horses, guns, motor-cars, aeroplanes, and the hundred-and-one necessities of war which are required on the Continent. Great cranes on the quay-side hoist the guns, with their waterproof covers, on to the transport, and they are nrmly stacked in the hold with other heavy objects where weight does not perceptibly interfere with the balance of the ship. When possible, horses are led on to the transports through covered-in gangways, but those who prove vicious are coaxed- into a wooden cage and are slung on board by cranes. Each horse on the vessel is placed in a narrow stall only 2ft. Sin. in width. It is not possible for the animal to lie down in his narrow prison, so, to provide the horse with some means of resting his legs, a canvas sling like a hammock is placed under his body. On this the animal can rest his whole weight and can sleep without falling. The captain of a transport has to convey the troops on board safely to their destination, and there his responsibility ends. The feeding of the soldiers is in the hands of the Government, who supply the food and drink necessary for men and horses during the voyage. A military commander sails with every transport and controls the troops. In the present war the troop- transports cast off from the English shore with little excitement or fuss. There is no shrieking of sirens, playing of bands, or crowds of hand-waving friends to give the ships a "send-off," as was the case in the South African War, when voyages consider- ably longer than that across the Channel bad to be negotiated. •

No title

The Secretary of the War Office announces that letters for enemy countries or for places in the occupation of the enemy en- closed in letters for neutral countries will not in future be forwarded unless the inner cover containing the letter for an enemy country or place occupied by the enemy is left open by the sender. The Copenhagen "Ekstrabladet" pub- lishes the following letter from Berlin: "When the Kaiser was last in Berlin he seemed exceedingly dismayed, and it was ap- parent how greatly the war had affected him. The Kaiser, during the last ten months, has changed into an old man, and now walks with his head bending forward. His fcair is completely grey. The people of Berlin are tired of the war."

WHITE STAR LINER CRRASID BY SUBMARINE

WHITE STAR LINER CRRASID BY SUBMARINE, I THREE STEAMERS SUNK. I German submarines had an active week- end. They sank three British steamers—the Illder Dempster liner Ethiope, 3,794 tons, of Liverpool, the Tullochmoor, 3,520 tons, owned by Messrs. Walter Runciman and Co., | Newcaetle-on-Tyne, and the Glenlee, 4,140 tons, of Glasgow. They also chased the White Star liner Megan tic, but were de- I feated by her superior speed. The Megantic encountered the submarine about sixty miles south of Queenstown on Sunday morning. The liner, which left o Liverpool on Satur- day for Quebec and Montreal, had a large number of passengers on board. The "S.O.S." wireless message was sent out by the captain to the Admiralty officials at Queenstown, and at the same time the liner put on full speed and steered a zigzag COUMe. The enemy gave chase, and a second message received at Queenstown asked that assistance be sent. In a little time, how- ever, the Megantic circulated a third mes- sage to the effect that the submarine had disappeared. The Megantic is a steel twin-screw steamer of 14,878 tons. I SOUTH OF THE EDDYSTONE. I The Ethiope bound from Hull and London for Calabar, West Africa, was attacked by the U24 a little to the south of the Eddystone. The crew of 34 were rescued. Two lifeboats were launched, and one of these, containing the master, Captain Mc- Donald, and 16 men, was picked up by the British steamer Saxonian and landed at Fal- mouth. The other boat was picked up by tho steamer Wiltshire and taken to Havre. The sailors stated that a shot was fired across the steamer's bows. They then saw a submarine about 300ft. long just ooming to the surface. Two more shots were fired, the second going across the bridge. Within another five minutes the submarine fired a torpedo which, striking the Ethiope amid- ships, caused her to founder in three minutes. Seventeen. of the crew got into one boat and the remainder into the other, and they cleared the vessel just in time. I SUNK BY SHELL FIRE. I The crew of the Tullochmore- were landed at Barry. The steamer was homeward bound in ballast from Genoa to South Shields, and was attacked off Ushant. A shot was fired, and Captain J. H. Calford saw a submarine not more than fifteen yards distant. A second shot struck the steamer, and then came about thirty-five more shells, all of which took effedt on the hull. Although riddled, the vessel kept aftoat for an hour. The crew of the submarine made no attempt to board, nor did they ask foi any ensign or proof of nationality, but kept firing into the ship until she went down. Three hours later the crew were rescued fcy the Spanish steamer Olazarri and brought into Barry. The sailors believe the sub- marine was the U15 or the U75. The num- ber was partly painted out. The French vessel Dixi saved the crew of the British steamer Glenlee, bound from Cardiff for Aden, which has been sunk by a German submarine. The Glenlee was a steel screw steamer of 4,140 tons owned by the Western Steamship Company of Glasgow (Messrs. J. Gardiner and Co., managers). I RUSSIAN SHIP SET ON FIRE. I The Russian sailing ship Mars, of Pernow, fell a victim to a German submarine on the North-East coast of Scotland. The crew, eight in number, reached Aberdeen on Saturday evening in small ship's boats. They bore traces of hardship and fatigue. The Mars was bound from Halmstad to Ayr with a cargo of pit props. When about forty miles north-east of the Farroe Islands the crew were startled by the firing of a shell at the vessel. Soon the submarine came alongside the Mars and the German captain ordered the crew to take to their boats. A number of the submarine's crew meanwhile boarded the Mars, saturated the cargo with oil, and set the vessel ablaze. Soon the ship was burning furiously, but to make her destruction doubly sure the submarine fired three more shells into the hull, while the enemy crew furnished the small boat with fresh "water and some brown bread and butter. They attached a towrope to the boat and towed the Russian crew for about forty miles. Then, without warning, the rope was cut and the submarine dived out of eight, apparently in pursuit of another vessel. The small boat continued its voyage towards Aberdeen. Heavy seas were running and constant bailing was necessary. I SUBMARINE DISGUISED. I The London steamer Dixiana has been sunk off Ushant. Her captain and crew, twenty-six hands all told, were landed at Barry by the Greek steamer Zanos Sifnios, which picked them up in their boats. The master of the Dixiana was deceived by the appearance of a small craft, which bore sails. This turned out to be a submarine with sails hoisted in order to deceive shipping. A shell was fired from the submarine, and then the occupants of the steamer were ordered to get off without delay. In half an hour the Dixiana disappeared. After having received eight shells in her hull she was still afloat, but the submarine fired a torpedo, which finished the task of destruction. The vessel was bound from Savannah to Havre with cotton, but there was on board a quantity of pig iron for Swansea. I THE PIRATES' PROGRESS. t According to the usual Admiralty sum. mary issued on Monday night the submarine pirates between May 19 and 26 succeeded in scuttling one British steamer, whereas there were no fewer than 1,323 possible targets in the shape of steamships of all nationalities entering and leaving home ports within these seven days. They also sank a fishing vessel. Our total shipping losses, exclusive of fish- ing vessels, from the beginning of the war down to May 26, are as follows: Sunk by cruisers, 56; sunk by mines, 12; sunk by submarines, 62.—Total, 130. Within the same period 56,311 oversea steamers of all nationalities have arrived at or sailed from ports in the United Kingdom.

THE MACE I

THE MACE. I I Not one person in a thousand probably I knows that when they see the mace borne in civic state before the Lord Mayor of London, or indeed the mace of any city or corporation, it is carried upside down. The glorified head, with its ornate scroll work, carving, gilding, and decoration, is really the bottom and not the top of the mace, for the narrow end, which used to bear a spike, is really the top, and in the presence of the King the mace is always carried with the small end upward. The base, which used to be first only a small knob, so grew in years both in size and ornamentation, that it be- came too big to hold in the hand with any degree of comfort. Hence the reason of the reversal, as, for greater ease, the heavier end or base was carried over the shoulder, and in course of time came to be regarded as the top. The most curious base for re- versal is on a mace in one of the districts of the City, which has for its ornamentation a model of a tower, presumably the Tower of London, which, when the circumstance of a Royal visit arises, baa to be held up- side down.

No title

Trooper Pollard, of the 3rd (King's Own) Hussars, writing to his sister at Eastbourne, says: "They have nicknamed our regiment God's Own' instead of King's Own, owing to its light casualties." William Harry Cooper, "young Cannock miner, who onlisted in the 5th South Stage E?ent, has been commissioned as a E-lieutenant. Another Cannook miner, Sergeant J. Pitt, has been recommended for the D.C.M. In response to a letter from Great Mas- singham, Norfolk, to which seven signatures were attached, intimating that the writers dsired to enlist, the district recruiting officer journeyed to the village, only to find that the letter had been sent without the knowledge of any of the men whose names were attached. As the result, however, of a meeting which he addressed, seventeen men came forward and were enrolled.

CLEAR AND URGENT CASE OF NATIONAL NECESSITY

"CLEAR AND URGENT CASE OF NATIONAL NECESSITY." Mr. Asquith has addressed the following tetter to Mr. J. W. Gulland, M.P., the Chief Whip under the Liberal Government: 10, Downing-street, Whitehall, S.W. May 28, 1915. My dear Gulland,—The Government cl I which I have been the head for more than seven years has been reconstructed on a new basis. It has hitherto been recruited entirely from among members of our own party. In its altered form it contains representatives of the regular Opposition and of the Labour party. It was my wish, which, for reasons I fully understand, has not been realised, that our Irish Nationalist friends also should have participated ia it. The transformation implies a temporary abandonment of the system of party Government which has ever since 1832 dominated our political arrangements, and which I hold to be, under normal condi- tions, the best adapted to our national re- quirements. It is natural that such a pulden and fundamental upheaval of our traditional practice should create astonishment, and even arouse misgiving, among a large number of those upon whose loyal devotion and strenuous efforts I, like my predeces- sors in the leadership of the Liberal party for generations past, have always relied. There is one reason, and one only, which Could justify or explain such a new depar- ture a clear and urgent case of national necessity. It was only because the convic- tion was forced upon me that a non-party Government would prove the most efficient instrument for the successful prosecution of the war that I have taken a step which has caused me infinite personal pain. I cannot in the public interest enter at present into any details, and I must ask my friends to rely for the moment on my judgment. Meanwhile, the pursuit of our special aims in the sphere of domestic politics is not abandoned, but suspended, and when the national cause has been vindicated against the enemy we shall take up again the unfinished tasks to which the Liberal party has set its hand.—Yours very faith- fully, H. H. ASQUITH. I

THE PATRIOT I

THE PATRIOT. I Enthusiastic Scout (referring to name on cap band): "'Ero be blowed! Why you're I only a bloomin' civilian!

THE SPLENDID STAFFORDSHIRES I

THE SPLENDID STAFFORDSHIRES. I Brigadier-General S. Lawford has in- epected the 1st Battalion South Stafford- shire Regiment at the front, and, address- ing the men, raid:- "South Staffordshires, when I asked you • last week to do your best, I knew what your answer would be. You have done splendidly. No regiment could have done better. You went through the German trenches and took them, and, what is better, m&de the Germans run, and, I feel sure, will make them run again. You have reason to be proud of yourselves. For two days, when under heavy shell fire, which is much harder than chasing Germans, your behaviour was splendid. I congratulate you all, and thank you for what you did. I feel proud of you."

I ATOOK EVERYTHINGI

» I A TOOK EVERYTHING. I Farmer (giving information about a rob- bery): "Two eets of harness, three halters, and a curry-comb Bobby: "Did the thief leave any traces of-" Farmer: "No. he took traces an* all!" -0

HER HUSBANDS DEPUTY I

HER HUSBAND'S DEPUTY. I A remarkable instance of a wife'fl patriotism, Tesoiircefulness, and ability is that of Mrs. Kendall, wife of a Primitive Methodist minister of the Windsor circuit. Her husband was recently appointed Chap- lain to the Forces in France, and, with the consent of the Connexional authorities, Mrs. Kendall is discharging all his ministerial and pastoral duties. She travels round the circuit and preaches at the Sunday ser- vices, and conducts week-day meetings at all the churches, large and small.

WOULD SUIT HIM I

WOULD SUIT HIM. I "Y ou're not afraid of early hours, I sup pose? "Not me, eir; you can't close too early foi me, sir!"

No title

Up to the present, says a Canadian Govern- ment memorandum to the Press, nearly 50,000 officers and men have been sent over- seas. It is anticipated that By July 1 the number will reach approximately 70,000. More than 500 nurses have also gone. So many men from the mining town of Bhirebrook (Derbyshire) have joined the colours that the Blackwell Rural Council has considered that it is not necessary to pro- ceed with their echeme of providing 100 dwellings for the working classes, for which the sanction of the Local Government Board had been obtained.

ALLIES PROGRESS

ALLIES' PROGRESS. now THE FRENCH TOOK ABLAIN ST. NAZAIRE. ATTACKING < THE LABYRINTH." The Field Marshal Commanding the British Forces in France reports as follows, under date May 30:— "Since my last communique of the 26th inst. we have made further small gains east of Festubert. Otherwise all has been quiet on our front. "Yesterday one of our aeroplanes brought down a German aeroplane in the neighbour- hood of Moorslede." The French advance continues. Sunday night's official communique states that the whole of the German trenches on Hill 17 in the Pilken region on the right bank of the Yser CajrM have been carried, fifty prison-ers and three quick-firing guns being taken. Considerable progress has also been made in the attack on the great German work known as "The Labyrinth," south-east of Neuville St. Yaast. To the north of Arras a German attack on the French trenches at Ablain St. Nazaire was repulsed, and afterwards the French took the offensive and carried the village, annihilating or putting to flight three Ger- man companies. The German official report states that the Germans withdrew from Ablain Nazaire in order to avoid useless bloodshed! "THE LABYRINTH." Describing "The Labyrinth" a Special Correspondent of the "Daily Chronicle" CorrespoInt denie t typical of the kind of works eays:—" built up by the Germans to fortify their positions, which the high explosive shell alone can destroy. West of Neuville-St. Vaast, and east of the Arras-Bethune road- i.e., between the village and the road and parallel to the road-the Germans have con- structed fortifications, consisting of narrow, cemented trenches, connected by kilometres of corridors, chiefly subterranean. Big guns have been placed under armoured cupolas, and Maxim guns have been established every 25 yards, not only along the length of the trenches themselves, but also in the corri- dors. Barbed wire entanglements give the finishing touch to these formidable works. "So intricately are these corridors arranged that during the French attack of May 10, for example, German troops ap- peared suddenly behind the Frenchmen and shot them from behind, and then disap- peared again in the labyrinth, and could not be pursued. "Through prodigies of bravery on May 9 the French troops of the right wing cap- tured a goodish piece of the labyrinth and established themselves strongly therein. The Germans have made several vain attempts since then to recapture this." "NOT A WALL STANDING." The capture of Ablain St. Nazaire (says the "Chronicle" correspondent) closes the first act of the forward march of the French on Lens and their point towards Vimy. It required not less than three weeks of con- tinued efforts to enable our Allies to occupy this important place, which arrested their advance through the valley of the Souchez, and may be considered the most strongly de- fended position in the region after Notre Dame de Lorette. Ablain and the trenches which surrounded it had some 2,000 defenders, and about a hundred machine guns, of which a certain number have been destroyed, and the re- mainder carried off by the enemy or broken by high explosive shells. The struggle which took place at Ablain from May 9 onward has had consequences of the most sanguinary character. In the first days the French succeeded merely in over- powering the houses on the east of the vil- lage, which was reduced house by house. The Germans had connected the houses by underground ways, in which they hid during the heaviest bombardments, and from which they issued to fire with Maxims our the French as they advanced with the bayonet. In these conditions it was necessary to"hlow up the houses one by one, and not to leave a wall standing, for every heap of bricks might be an ambuscade. From Ablain to Lens is only a few miles. If we suppose that the Allies are able to continue their forward march in the same conditions, they will be at the gates of Lens in a few weeks. But it must not be over- looked that the hills which dominate the River Souchez have been defended and forti- fied. Moreover, numerous factories and col- liery works to the west of Lens have been transformed into veritable blockhouses. These difficulties, when overcome, will render still more brilliant the success of the Allies in this region.

DELAYED TRANSPORTS

DELAYED TRANSPORTS. "Work is seriously delayed through mem- bers of the crews drinking," said a transport officer during a prosecution at Bristol on Saturday, "and ships are sometimes held up. The remark was made during the hearing of a charge against Thomas Dorman, aged fifty-five, of Dublin, of absenting himself from his ship and disobeying orders. The captain stated that after the ship's arrival on Monday last Dorman went ashore each morning after refusing to do his work, and returned each night the worse for drink. Defendant had been in a state of intoxication all the week and was no good to anybody. Dorman told the magistrates he was ill, but he admitted he told the constable that he had been drinking for four or five weeks. The Chairman said it was a very- serious case. Men like the defendant were making everything difficult for the military authori- ties, instead of every man doing his best. Dorman was sentenced to twelve weeks* hard labour, without the option of a fine.

SIGNALLING BY NIGHT

— —* SIGNALLING BY NIGHT. Frederick Dale, a marine engineer, was charged under the Defence of the Realm Act at Sunderland, on Saturday, with being in possession of a lamp capable of being used for signalling. He resides at a house abut- ting on the seashore. Officers and non-com- missioned officers of the Sherwood Foresters stated that on the night of May 20 they watched Morse code signals for an hour coming from the upper window of the house, and upon entering they found a photograph developing lamp with an orange glass shutter which could be used for signalling. The lamp was cold. Major Wise said that when watching flashes he turned about and noticed signalling from Whitbum village, two miles distant, but could not say whether they were answering. Dale denied the charge. The lamp, he said, belonged to his brother, and had not been lit for a couple of hours. On the night in question he sat smoking in his room and used w vestas to light his pipe. He was fined £ 5.

TOBACCO AND POISONOUS GAS I

TOBACCO AND POISONOUS GAS. I A corporal of the Canadian Artillery, writ- ing to the Rev. C. R. Durrant, of "Freeton Rectory, Suffolk, says:—"What hurt us most was the gas they turned loose. It made the air green and yellow and it at chokes and poisons a man where he stands. Tobacco saved many a boy's life in that battled We began to feel pretty choky at the guns and wondered if tobacco would help as. We thought we would try it, and put a big chew in our mouths, and it made us spit the gas up. Now, when we notice the ga8 in the air, we put tobacco in our mouths, and it helps us a lot."

No title

Ameebury Abbey, Wiltshire, is to come under the hammer in September. The Abbey stands on the site of the former monastic house, and the 6,400 acres of the estate includes Stonehenge. Fifty people were drowned when the steamer Maximiano Errazuriz struck a reef and was wrecked in the Pacific. While attempting to rescue a dog from a canal lock at Tipton, Staffordshire, a man fell into the water and was drowned. It is proposed that airmen shall be em- ployed to locate the seals for the fleet when the season opens in Newfoundland.

Advertising

.4 II It j WORK | I HANDBOOKS. t t A series of Practical Manuals by Experts ■ = and experienced teachers. Jllustrated with; I numerous useful drawings wtd diagrams. t LATEST VOLUMES. m t Motor Cycles. I  Dynamo and Electric Motor | N Building. I B I Photography SimpUfied. 1 ALREADY PUBLISHED. < Gramophones and Phonographs B, I Cycle Repairina and Adjutttn? ? ? The Handyman's 1000 Practical Receipts B W Conjuring Apparatus B Z Wireless Teleaphy S I How to Write Sig" Tick:b and Posten I g G!M.W.rtM< I M Wood Finishinc B ■» Decorative Designs of ?U A?e< &ad for all • N Purposes I ■ Building Mod1 Boats I Bent Ironwork (including Elementary Art B Metal Work) I Basket Work S  Knotting and Splicing Ropes and Cordage I N Clay ModeUint and Pht?er Casting B I It. net each, post free 1/2 each. I  Of all BooKMtters. B N Complete List ?o?< Pru ma oppHco?on. B I CASSELL & CO., Ltd.. LA BELLE SAUVAGA B • LODO. E.C..I: IBIMHBBI —mJ Dear Meat Problem Owing to the price of meat being raised, many will have to economise. To all such we recommend IF Vegetarian Cookery BY A. G. PAYNE A splendid manual of cheap and wholesome diets, giving the different methods of economising, with also great advantages to their health. Cloth, 1/- net. OF ALL BOOKSELLERS or post free 1/3 from CASSELL & CO., Ltd., La Belle Sauvage, LONDON, E.C. CASSELL'S I GARDENING HANDBOOKS Useful Manuals for all classes of Horti- culturists. Fully Illustrated throughout. Paper covers, Is. net; cloth, is. 6d. net. Pictorial Practical Gardening Pictorial Practical Fruit Growing Pictorial Greenhouse Management Pictorial Practical Vegetable Growing Pictorial Practical Rote Growing Pictorial Practical Bulb Growing Pictorial Practical Chrysanthemum Culture Pictorial Practical Flower Gardening Pictorial Practical Carnation Growing First Steps in Gar- dening Pictorial Practical Potato Growing Little Gardens: How to Make the lIoat of Then Sweet Peat, and How to Grow Then Gardening Difficul- tiet Solved Garden Planning and Planting Perpetual Carnations Indoor Gardening Garden Work for Every Day I Of aU Booksellers, or post fret 3d. extra from I CASSELL & CO., Ltd., LA BELLE SAUVAGE. LONDON. E.C. Write for complete Gardening Boote Catalogue. HOW TO MAKE A SMALL BUSINESS PAY A BOOK which, feeding a man's ambition, points out the way to succ-ss. Sotmd business method that is what the aathor has aimed at presenting, aM be bw doae to with success. Extra Cram 8n, 12.8 pages. Paper boards. Is. net or ALL BOOKSELLERS. CASSELL A CO, Ltd, LA BELLE SAWAGE, H LONDOIL F-C ———— ■ CAGSZLLIS WORK BOOKLETS OOfHPLSTB UBT. BOOT tm mm BBMUBMC. «A tt IMMMI MOMUTNM or Tm HMMt. w?7 m??M— EUCntiOTT m THE BOM?. Wttb tt Hhrtnta niwa;=m BCNOVATWG. wttt w molriHm mrnnwi wm mmmmwtM. wnm tm mutaam. «m v ai ut»«w«« OXTJS PENY M off iwMcn, or ft fret IK pmm u