Teitl Casgliad: Abergavenny Chronicle

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Mae hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn eiddo i Tindle Newspapers

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
23 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Court Leet Dinner at Crickhowell

Court Leet Dinner at Crickhowell. The annual Court I-cet dinner given by the Duke of Beaufort was held at the Bear Hotel, Crickhowell, on Thursday. Mr. R. H. A. Davies, Steward of the Manor of Crickhowell, presided, and he was supported by his son, Pte. W. A. Davies of the Hon. Artilery Co., Messrs. Penry Lloyd (Ledbury), F. J. Hurley, James Edwards, (agent to the Duke of Beaufort), and J. V. Richards. There was a large company present. The loyal toasts were drunk with much enthusiasm. irr. Penry Lloyd gave The Army, Navy, ■Territorial Forces, and Allies," remarking that each branch of the service was serving the Empire herociallv in this great war. It was a great thing for the country that the cry of those people who wanted to cut down the Navy had not been listened to; if they had succeeded, Great Britain would have been in a very un- fortunate predicament that day. Their Allies were doing splendid work, and gallant little Belgium by her heroic defence had kept the Germans back. Referring to the creation of new Armies, and the amount of munitions re- quired, Mr. Lloyd said Lord Kitchener had done much in that direction, and it was very re- grettable to find a section of the Press attacking a man who was doing his best for his country. It was not British, and deserved condemnation. (Loud atjplause). He coupled with the toast the name of Pte. W. A. Davies, son of the worthy chairman. (Cheers). Pte. W. A. Davies, who was accorded an ovation and musical honours on rising to re- spond, said he felt it was his duty to reply, but lie confessed he would prefer to be in a German trench than make a speech. (Laughter and applause). Their regular Army had suffered a great deal, and there was very little of it left, but that little was incalculably good. (Hear, hear). They were engaged in a war which re- quired tremendous effort to win, and he feared that as a nation we did not yet realise how much was required of us. Some time ago they were told the Germans were on the run well, he had been out with his regiment for nearly seven months, and for that length of time he was practically in the same place. More men were wanted,and when they came General French would soon shorten his line and drive the enemy back. He wished to emphasise very strongly the need of more men. If he had his way he would send every man to spend a few days in the trenches, to see how things were. They would be able to get their information first hand, and he ventured to say they would -not be long without the men. A trench was about the most uninviting place they could spend a day in. There was mud in front, mud behind, and mud beside you, and he saw very little except mud for weeks together. Yet there was danger everywhere, and the soldiers underwent hardships which were sometimes scarcely allevi- ated by the depressing news in some of the papers which were sent out. There was abso- lutely no difference between Territorials and Regulars each underwent the same dangers and suffered in the same way. Their spirit was admirable, and they were equal to everything but more help was required. According to a census taken the other day, there were several millions of young men, unmarried, in this country, and out of this number a big per- centage ought surely to be serving their country at the front. Depend upon it, compulsion was going to come if the response was not very much greater than it was to-day. He was very glad to think that he went out when he did he should be very sorry to think that he had been dragged into it. (Loud applause). The British Empire had got to win, or go under, and there must be no thought of defeat. We had got to triumph at all costs, and the way to do it was by helping the man with the gun. Let them see to it that our soldiers had help which would enable them to vanquish the foe and add to the lustre of national renown. (Applause). Mr. R. H. A. Davies proposed the health of th Duke of Beaufort, who, he said, was an excellent sportsman, and but for age would be taking a hand in the great struggle on the Continent. They would like to, express their great sympathy with Her Grace the Duchess, upon the death of her eldest son, Capt. Maurice De Tuyll, whose brother was also serving at the front. Referring to the Court Leet held that day, the Chairman said some people might wonder why they were meeting that day, in the face of a great national crisis-. Well, it was felt that as there was some very important business to transact they could not dispense with the meeting, and if the dinner was dropped the attendance at the former would be very thin. (Laughter). Mr. James Edwards said Mr. Glyn Price, the Duke's agent, was unable to attend, owing to the state of his health, and he read from him a letter of apology. He was very glad to know that Mr. Glyn Price was improving in health. With regard to the Duke of Beaufort, he was in very good health, and he would be able to convey to him next week, when he saw him at Badminton, their very good wishes. (Hear, hear). His Grace took a great deal of interest in his Brecon- shire estate. At Brynmawr there was a good deal of concern felt because the Duke was selling leasehold interests there, and it was thought that he was going to lose interest in Brecon- shire, but he could assure them that it would be a very long time before he parted with the mineral and agricultural parts of his properties in the county. (Loud applause). The Duke was giving leaseholders a chance of acquiring property on fair and reasonable terms, but reserved the mineral rights. In a number of cases houses had been built by the leaseholders themselves, and although the right of ownership passed to His Grace on the falling in of leases, he gave leaseholders the opportunity of purchase, the latter agreeing to pay any reversion duty payable, and other terms which in the circum- stances he thought was quite fair. (Applause). Proceeding, Mr. Edwards said the Duke was allowing employees on his estate who enlisted, half wages, and one of his properties had been converted into a hospital for wounded soldiers, who were also taken for drives in motor-cars. (Hear, hear). He then proposed the health of the Manor and Borough Juries, coupling with the toasts the names of Mr. Roger Howells and Mr. John Leonard, who responded. The toast of The Host and Hostess was proposed by Mr. G. F. Loam, and responded to by Mr. Cyrus Thomas, proprietor of the Bear Hotel. A toast to the memory of all who have fallen in action was drunk in silence.

MOBILIZING THE NATION I

▼ MOBILIZING THE NATION. I IMPORTANT CONFERENCE AT CARDIFF. I NEED FOR A REGISTER. I A conference on the question of National Registration, called by the Lords Lieutenant of Clamorgan and Monmouthshire, was held at Cardiff on Wednesday. The Earl of Plymouth presided, supported by Major-General Sir Ivor Herbert, Lord Pontypridd, the Bishops of Llan- daff and Bangor, Mr. T. P. O'Connor, M.P., and many prominent Welsh employers, workmen's leaders, and well-known edcationists. The Chairman said there was no question of the adoption of conscription as a settled policy or for permanent political reasons, but the question was how best to organize, and if neces- sary to mobilize, the able-bodied population for useful work. Major-General Sir Ivor Herbert said that they could not separate the supply of men from the supply of material. To take note of the men for service instead of withdrawing them from their occupations was the sound way to build up an army. They must have definite data to go upon, and take stock of their male population for in- dustrial and fighting requirements. They would mark off at once those young men who had not been doing their duty. If they still remained uninfluenced by local feeling towards them, and were blind to any sense of honour, the resources of civilisation were not exhausted, and it would be time to tell those who hung back that they must go. Wales had done its duty well. On the motion of the Bishop of Bangor, seconded by Lord Pontypridd, the following resolution was unanimously passed That in the opinion of this meeting the Government should without delay register the male popula- tion of this country, with a view to the most effective prosecution of the war and complete organization of the national resources." ————

Advertising

THE GREAT SKIN CURE. BUDDEN'S S.R. SKIN OINTMENT rwfll JD cure Itching after one aphlication destroys every form of Eczema heals Old Wounds and Sores: acts like a charm on Bad Legs, is infallible for Piles prevents Cuts from lestering; will cure Ringworm in a few days removes the most obstinate Eruptions and Scurvy. Boxes 7id. and is. ild.-Agent for Abergavenny: Mr. Shackleton, The Pharmacy, Agent for Pontypool, Mr. Godfrey C. Wood, Chemist.

With the 3rd Mons I

With the 3rd Mons. I ABERGAVENNY MAN READY TO GO I BACK. Pte. J. Booth, of the 3rd Mons., who was wounded in the recent fighting, writing to a friend at Abergavenny says :—" I am quite well again, and only waiting for new equipment and then I shall be ready to go back to the trenches. I have been in five different hospitals. They don't keep us long in the same place, but I am now at Rouen, in France, miles away from the trenches. We came here on Saturday morning and travelled all night to get here. They put us in cattle tracks. I wish they would send us to Abergavenny again. I suppose you have seen the papers about the 3rd Mons. I am sorry I have not written before, but I have been in so manv places. I have had a good time of it the last two weeks. The nurses in the hospitals are very good to all the wounded soldiers. There is plenty of good food and new underclothing and everything that we require. We are not allowed out at night, but it is a fine big camp and we have been sleeping under canvas for the past fortnight. There are plenty of places in which to spend our time, and we get some fine concerts in the Y.M.C.A. I went to Divine service on Sunday and also Bible Class in the evening. I suppose you have heard of a place called Ypres, in Belgium. I came through there about two weeks ago-five of us and a corporal,—and we were shelled the whole of the way. How I came through I don't know the shells were bursting all round us. It was awful to see the fine buildings blown to pieces. You see, we stopped in Ypres four days for a rest, as we were in the trenches about a month—the record for Terri- torials. It is lovely out here just like mid- summer. We have nice walks in the park and down the avenues."

IA TRAGEDY OF THE WAR

A TRAGEDY OF THE WAR. SAD BEREAVEMENT FOR MR. F. MILLS, J.P. Mr. F. Mills, J.P., of Ebbw Vale and Llwyndu Court, Abergavenny, and his daughter have sustained a sad bereavement through the death of Engineer Commander Stanley John Reed, R.N.R., which provides one of the tragedies of the war. The circumstances of Lieut. Reed's death in the service of his King and country are particularly tragic. Only as recently as Satur- day, May 22, he was married to Miss Grace Mills, the daughter of Mr. Fredk. Mills, J.P., and an ex-High Sheriff of the County, of Llwyndu Court, Abergavenny, and Ebbw Vale, leaving almost immediately after the ceremony to join his ship, the Princess Irene, which was blown up in Sheerness Harbour last Thursday morning, the 27th May. The greatest sympathy will be felt with the families throughout the whole of the county. Lieut.-Commander had already made a name in the engineering world. He was the younger son of the late Henry Wilson Reed, of H.M. I Civil Service, and received his engineering train- ing at Barrow, where he specialised in turbines and submaries. He joined the staff of Sir John Biles, and was associated with him in the design and construction of the geared turbine engines of the English Channel passenger service boats. Later he was employed by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company in the supervision of the ill- fated Princess Irene and her sister ship, the Princess Margaret. When these vessels were taken over by the Admiralty, he was appointed senior engineer on the Squadron Commander's staff, the Princess Margaret, to which he was attached, being the flagship. He was only temporarily employed on the Princess: Irene. Mr. Reed was an authority on turbines, on which he recently published a work, and was awarded the Telford Medal by the Institute of Civil Engineers for a paper on the subject. ▲

IGerman Use of Burning Liquid

I German Use of Burning Liquid. I REPRISALS BY THE FRENCH. PARIS, June i. The Temps publishes the text of a Memo- randum communicated by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to foreign Powers on the subject of the use by the Germans of inflammable liquids in trench warfare. The Memorandum quotes in full the Order issued from the Headquarters of the Second German Army at St. Quentin. From this Order it appears that the fire-squirts ejecting in- flammable liquid on October 16 had just been introduced into the Army as a new weapon, handled exclusively by a special Corps of Pioneers, who were attachable to any unit which might need them. The Order gives directions for their use. It explains that they will squirt a distance of 20 metres a flame which causes mortal injury, and which, owing to the heat generated, will drive the enemy to a con- siderable distance. The liquid will burn from a minute and a half to two minutes continually, or can be ejected in short jets. The instruments are recommended particularly for street fighting. The Memorandum remarks that no Govern- ment could allow its troops to remain without protection against such refinements of barbarity and that, consequently, the French Government intends using whatsoever means seem fit to prevent the German soldiers and authorities from committing further murders. -i

No title

———— Victoria Cottage Hospital-The Committee beg to acknowledge, with thanks, the following receipts, per the Hon. Treasurer :-Hanover Church, Llanover, per Mr. Wm. Lewis, II is. Pandy Presbyterian Church, per Mr Geo. Watkins, ty 6s. Llanarth Parish Church, per the Rev. J. W. Osman, Zi is. Llanover Kil- geddin Parish Church, per the Rev. H. J. Fish, £ x is. Christ Church, Abergavenny, per Mr. Wm. Horsington, £ 3 is. 5d. Llanvapley Con- gregational Church, per Mr. D. B. Lewis, £ 1 is. Also the following gifts during May, per the Matron :—Flowers, The Marquess of Aberga- venny, K.G., Mrs. H. H. Matthew, Miss Craw- shay (Ty Mawr), Miss Bretherton, Mrs. A. R. Williams; vegetables and rhubarb, Hon. Mrs. I E. B. Herbert, Miss Crawshay ITy Mawr), Mrs. H. H. Matthew, Mrs. S. R. Young, Mrs. Duck (School House), Miss Parnell Jones child's cot, Hon. Mrs. E. B. Herbert; bed cover, Mrs. H. H. Matthew case of lemonade, Mr. L. Cartrr; razor for men's ward, Mr. R. J. Harrhy; game for ward, Rev. Jos. N. Davies; illustrated papers and magazines, Rev. Basil Jones, Miss Bretherton, Hon. Mrs. E. B. Herbert; toy and book, Miss Bretherton; papers, Mrs. S. R. Young, The County Club, Mrs. Matthews (Rag- lan-terrace) Daily Telegraph," The Editor magazines, Mrs. Thomas (Vainor) butter, Mrs. Phillips; water cress, Mr. Pritchard (late patient).

Monmouthshire TerritorialsI

Monmouthshire Territorials. I PETITION TO ALLOW THEM TO COME I HOME AND REST. At the meeting of the Tredegar Council on Tuesday evening Mr. S. Filer, the chairman, threw out the suggestion that an appeal should be made to the military authorities that the 3rd Battalion Monmouthshire Regiment now serving in France should be allowed to come home for a rest. They had been engaged in very severe fighting, and a rest would be greatly appreciated by them. Mr. Bosley, who has one son killed, and one wounded in the regiment, agreed with the suggestion. Mr. W. North, who has two sons in the regi- ment, expressed himself as heartily in accord with the proposal. It would be very acceptable to the men and to their relatives if they could be brought home for a short time. Mr. Dd. Morgan associated himself with the suggestion of the chairman, who formally moved that the Territorial Association of Mon- mouthshire, or any other proper authority, be petitioned to allow the regiment to come home for a rest, and that other Councils and public authorities in the area be requested to join in the petition. Mr. North suggested that the three battalions should be included. Mr. Filer agreed, and the resolution was adopted. AL

No title

▼ I Correction.—In the list of comforts for the 3rd I Monmotithshire Regiment, published last week, the item three day shirts should have read, three dozen shirts." These were sent by the j Red Cross Workers at the Town Hall. 6

Advertising

4 The. Welshman's Favourite. I MABON Sauce I I vaT As good aa its Name. I X DON'T FAIL TO GET IT. M I St. Pater St., Cardiff. 1—im-i-iin-i-m-m-rn-nnJ1

IRONWORKERS DOWN TOOLS I

IRONWORKERS "DOWN TOOLS." I WAR BONUS NOT RECEIVED. J More than one thousand men employed at the Blaenavon Ironworks downed tools on Saturday morning on account, so it was said, of the failure of some of the men to receive the war bonus to which they claimed they were entitled. Among the men who ceased work were the electricians, and the result of their striking was that no light or power were obtainable for the adjoining collieries, and consequently a con- siderable number of men employed at those collieries were also obliged to stop work. The effect of the stoppage was serious, inasmuch as the bye-products from the Otto ovens used in the manufacture of explosives was not obtain- able, and the coal now being used for Admiralty purposes could not be dispatched. A meeting of the workmen was held on Satur- day morning at the Forge Hammer Assembly Room, Mr. Rees Price presiding, and being supported by Mr. Hayward, secretary of the Workmen's Association, and Councillor William J ones, who represented the miners. The whole position was discussed at length. It was stated that some time ago the employers and workmen had agreed to a certain war bonus being paid. This war bonus was arranged through the instrumentality of Sir George Askwitli and other representatives of the Board of Trade. It was arranged that each man em- ployed at the iron and steel works should receive 3s. per week war bonus. It was now alleged that when some of the workmen received their wages the war bonus was not paid in cases where the men had not worked full time. One case was cited of a man who had lost one quarter of a day, but had worked two overturns in the course of the week, making a total of 7- turns for the week. The Company, it was alleged, had withheld the war bonus in that case. A deputation was appointed to see the manage- ment, and they reported at a meeting held at two o'clock in the afternoon that when seen by the deputation the management had made certain suggestions. These overtures to the men, however, were unanimously rejected. I MEN AGREE TO RETURN TO WORK. I The stoppage of the Blaenavon Works and Collieries continued on Monday. At a conference between the representatives of the company and the local representatives of the men, the company pointed out that the award of the Government Committee on Pro- ductions was evidently not clear on certain points, and if there had been a difference in the reading of the award by the two parties con- cerned the best course was to submit the point to the Committee who had made the award. In the meantime work should be resumed, so that no further delay should occur. The company's representatives further offered, pending the decision of the committee, that they (the men) would be paid the war bonus as inter- preted by the men provided they returned to work at once, and on the understanding that there would be no further stoppage of work without due notice. At a meeting of the men on Monday afternoon it was agreed that all men should return to work at the earliest possible convenient moment, the company agreeing to pay every man His full war bonus, whether he works his full week or not, as stated by the Award Committee. In the morn- ing a deputation from the workmen waited upon the management. The deputation were in- troduced by Councillor W. L. Cook. The management were represented by Messrs. Clements, Jolley, and Waplington, Mr. Cook acting as chairman. The meeting held in the afternoon was presided over by Mr. Rees Price. Addresses were de- livered by Issac Hayward, the local secretary, who explained the position, and Mr. W. L. Cook, who advised the men to return to work. He stated that all men receiving from 2ss. to 50s. wages would receive 3s. war bonus, and that all boys would receive is. All men receiving less than 20s. a week would also get 3s. war bonus. Some of the men returned to work at 6 o'clock on Monday night, and there was a complete resumption on Tuesday.

IBLAENAVON POLICE COURT rI

I BLAENAVON POLICE COURT. r Tuesday.—Before Colonel P. G. Pennymore and other magistrates. "GERMAN RUI^E."—James Edwards and Isaac Jones, farmers, Blaenavon, were sum- moned for allowing sheep to stray on the high- way at Blaenavon, on May 22.—P.C. Evans (246) stated the sheep were straying in the streets of Blaenavon. Edwards had been convicted before.—The Chairman It is a great nuisance, Edwards, and you will be fined 40S.-Similar facts were stated against Isaac Jones, who was fined a like sum.—Isaac Jones That's German rule. AFTER CONIEs.-Henry Tipton, collier, Blaen- avon, and Thomas Hill, collier, Brithdir, were summoned for trespassing on land in the day- time in search of conies belonging to the Blaen- avon Co., Ltd., on May 22. Hill did not appear, but wrote admitting the offence. Evidence was given by the Blaenavon Company's gamekeeper that he saw the men set a net. Hill was fined 40s., Tipton 20S. The Magistrates ordered the nets and- ferrets taken from defendants to be confiscated. DISMISSED.— J ohn Morgan, collier, Blaenavon, was charged with assaulting George Watkins, collier, Blaenavon, on May 22. Dismissed.

BLAENAVONI

BLAENAVON. I GASSED.—Mr. Henry Davies, of 16 Martin- street, Forge Side, Blaenavon, has been officially informed that his son, Private John Henry Davies, of the 2nd Mons., was gassed at Hill 60 and died on May 7. Private Davies, who was the oldest son of Mr. Davies, joined the 2nd Mons., on September 21, two days after his 18th birthday. He was a regular attendant of the Wesleyan Sunday School, and was highly respected. ————

FILL UP THE GAPS f

"FILL UP THE GAPS." f COLONEL CUTHBERTSON'S CALL TO I MONMOUTHSHIRE. Writing from somewhere in France under date May 18, Colonel E. B. Cuthbertson, C.M.G., M. V.O., commanding officer 2nd Battalion Mon. Regiment, says "I am deeply grateful for the honour paid me in re-electing me a vice-president of your club (Pontypool Conservative Club) and hope that as soon as we have beaten the enemy I will have the pleasure of meeting my many friends there again." I cannot tell you how proud I am to be in command of Monmouthshire men. The bat- talion has been in some fairly heavy fighting lately, and I much hope that your members will do all they can to assist in getting recruits to filII the gaps of those who have so gallantly given their lives for the honour and freedom of their country. Wishing you all the best of luck.— Yours truly, EDWARD CUTHBERTSON." _A.

BRYNMAWR POLICE COURT

BRYNMAWR POLICE COURT. Monday.—Before Messrs. W. Roberts (in the chair), L. Pritchard, J. Watkins, J. Bloor and J. Morgan. No LICENCE.—Arthur Atkins, of Spring Cottage, Abergavenny, was summoned for driving a locomotive without a licence.—De- fendant admitted that he had not at present got a licence.—P.C. Kidd gave evidence, and said defendant, when asked for his licence, produced a licence issued in Monmouthshire.—Defendant was ordered to pay costs, 7s. 6d. no conviction. I

I BRYNMAWRI

BRYNMAWR. PRESENTATION.—The Rev. F. J. White, for the last four years pastor of Calvary Church, Brynmawr, was on Monday evening, on the occasion of his leaving for Swansea, presented by the members of the Church with a set of theological works. Mr. John Rogers presided, and eulogistic addresses were delivered by leading ministers and laymen of the town and district. BELGIANS' UNAUTHORISED TRIP.—Two Bel- gian refugees, named Henri Pieters and Jonna Pieters, were charged at Newport on Saturday with being found in a prohibited area without the permission of the chief-constable of Mon- Monmouthshire. It was explained by Supt. Porter that the two Belgians were living at Brynmawr, in Breconshire, and on May 27 they entered the county of Monmouth by going to Risca without permission. The chief- constable of Monmouthshire had publicly stated that the order must be enforced or the offenders were liable to a fine of £100 or six months' im- prisonment.—The Magistrates decided to hand the prisoners-who appeared to have acted in ignorance of the regulations—over to the Belgian Refugee Committee with a warning to others that if such cases occurred again they would be seriously dealt with.

Cheaper Bread in Prospect I

Cheaper Bread in Prospect. I Wheat prices have been falling steadily during the past few days, and are now 55. or 6s. per quarter below those current just before Whit- suntide. Grain dealers foresee that a reduction of the present extraordinarily high prices for bread cannot long be deferred. The main influence at the moment is the prospect of a splendid new crop in the United States. This crop should begin to reach here in the course of next month, and is now being dealt in at a substantial discount off the old crop prices. Holders of old crops realise that they cannot hope to get better prices by retaining them until the new crops begin to be harvested, and so a great deal of wheat is now being offered. France, Italy, and the Belgian Committee, all of which have been large buyers, are understood to have now acquired sufficient supplies to last them until the end of the season, and to have withdrawn practically from the market. The present month.is admittedly a critical one for the North American wheat, but unless violent weather intervenes a bumper crop is I assured. The Indian Wheat Committee has been willing to meet buyers' revised ideas of prices, and as compared with 67s. per quarter obtained for the first white wheat, 61s. gd. was on Wednesday accepted. Speculators were on Wednesday sell- ing parcels of the wheat at 6os. per quarter. As according to the official statement issued to- wards the end of April, there should be an ex- portable surplus from India of at least 2,000,000 tons, and only a small proportion of this is believed to have been sold, the disposal of the bulk during the next few weeks may be ex- pected to exert a favourable influence upon prices. Another favourable factor is the easier ten- dency of freights. The rates for grain from South America especially have declined during the past few days, but the various freight markets are so closely interlaced that any im- portant change in rates on one route is usually quickly reflected on all the others. Thus, leaving out of account the forthcoming opening of the Dardanelles, various indications point to lower prices in the near future for wheat, flour, and bread. Dealers fully expect that, though there may be comparatively little grain at the ports of South Russia, large quantities will be brought down from the interior of Russia as soon as facilities are provided for shipping them.

V IThe Supply of Shells I

"V The Supply of Shells. I CLYDE FIRM'S PATRIOTIC OFFER. I A patriotic offer by G. and J. Weir (Limited), engineers, Cathcart, to produce unlimited quantities of shells at net cost was made on Wednesday to the Glasgow and West of Scot- land Armaments Committee. The letter, which was signed by Mr. W. Weir, pointed out that it was proposed to establish a national shell factory in Glasgow, but that his firm had the nucleus organization and the necessary experience, so that it would be much simpler to increase their production than to organize an entirely new producing unit. It also quoted the following resolution, which had been unanimously adopted by the directors of the firm It is hereby agreed that until the conclusion of the war all profits arising from the manu- facture of shell under present contracts, after deduction of the necessary allowances for establishment charges and capital expenditure, shall be handed over to certain of the various organizations carrying out relief work or Red Cross work which the war has necessitated, and which are supported by voluntary subscription. When the contracts in question are completed, the different shell plants will be available to produce shells for the Government at net cost, and if required all such future production shall be carried on in conjunction with the proposed Glasgow National Shell Factory." The firm also offered to extend their plant and machinery for shell production, and on com- pletion of present contracts to devote machinery and labour to the machining of shell produced by the proposed Glasgow National Factory, or generally to work in conjunction with the same under whatever conditions might be suitable. The Committee expressed its high appreciation of this spontaneous offer, and decided to bring it before the notice of the various interests con- cerned. Detailed information in regard to the proposed national factory was submitted to the Committee, and the scheme was remitted to the Shell Sub-Committee for investigation and report.

IThe Horse of Troy

I The "Horse of Troy." DETAILS OF THE LANDING FROM THE RIVER CLYDE. Reuter's Correspondent, writing under date May 10, sends further details of the landing at Sedd-el-Bahr beach, when the transport River Clyde, nicknamed the Horse of Troy," was designedly run ashore with the troops on board. We had seen the River Clyde run herself aground on Sedd-el-Bahr beach, according to programme. It was a curious sight to see her cooly steaming for the beach, as if running them- selves aground in broad daylight were the ordinary business of ships. The Turks must have thought that her commander had taken leave of his senses. As soon as the lighters were in position our men, headed by their officers, began to pour out of the ports and down the plankways into the lighters. It was running to almost certain death. The short-range fire of the Turkish machine-guns swept them off the planks as they ran, mowed them down in the lighters, knocked them over in the water, and took a ghastly toll of those who reached the beach as they ran to cover under the sand ridge. Of those who fell wounded into the water during the desperate race down the plankways and across the lighters many were drowned. Wounded and weighed down by their packs and full cartridge-belts, there was little chance for them unless a helping hand was near. Miracles of courage were performed in rescuing the wounded and getting them under the shelter of the sandbank or into the boats to get them away to ships. Often the rescuer was himself struck down. Sometimes the wounded man would be shot a second time as he was being hoisted into the boat. A seaman from the River Clyde went about the beach getting the wounded into safety, unconcernedly smoking a pipe amid the hurricane of bullets. A boat bringing in ammunition was struck by a shell, and every man in her except the officer in com- mand was killed or wounded. The Maxims were now turned on the ports in the ship's sides, and to show oneself in them was to court certain death. All that could be done i to help the wounded was done, and the rest of the men were kept in the ship pending further developments. In the ship they were safe. There was little shell-fire. One shell passed clean through the ship without damaging anything but the main steampipe. Another burst in the ship and caused a few casualties. But the enemy's guns were inactive all day. They could not open without attracting the fire of our ships, and the guns on the Asiatic shore had enough to do with the French landing. At night:the merit of the 'wooden horse'scheme became manifest. After troops were ashore the enemy perceived that something had been happening, and opened a furious rifie fire on the ship, which was kept up all night, but it was too late to do any mischief. In the landing and in the subsequent fighting the Turk has shown himself a tough and cour- ageous enemy. He sticks to his trenches until he is either blown out of them or bayoneted in them. Furthermore, he is fighting with a cleverness which is not his wont, and which he certainly did not show in the Balkan War. For the improvement in his methods we have doubtless to thank the German officers, of whose presence and activity we have abundant indica- tions. Numerous stories of the tricks of the German officers are making the round of the trenches. One day during a fight a German officer suddenly jumped down into a British trench and called out to the soldiers in excellent English, Now my men, you must surrender; you are surrounded and outnumbered." He was promptly knocked on the head by a business-like Tommy with a shovel. On the landing day the Australians were attacking a Turkish trench when a German officer jumped on to the parapet, shook his fist at the Dominion troops, and yelled out in English, Ah, you -s, you're not fighting Turks now." A bullet put an end to his discourse at this point. .&.

1 3rd Monmouthshire Regiment I

1 3rd Monmouthshire Regiment I Memorial Service to tiie FaHefi. j VICAR OF ST. MARY'S AND COMPULSIO There was a large attendance at a inew0lip- service at St. Marv's Church on Sunday af noon for the members of the 3rd Monmouths?- Battalion who have fallen in the service of tbgo King and country. The Mayor (AldermaO? Wheatley), wearing his chain of office, atted J. and was accompanied by Councillors N? i. Meale and W. Horsington, the Town Clerk 30 W. H. Hopwood), and the Borough SI,,r,ve)? (Mr. F. Mansfield). Colonel W. D. Steel, ?- P" commanding the 3/3rd Monmouthshire B? was also present. The service was conducted by the Yicaf, tw Rev. H. H. Matthew), and the form of sefV,:t-e „h. used at the burial of the dead was gone  Psalm 90 was chanted, and the special OIJ15 j sung were A few more years shall roll,"  t the Resurrection Morning," 0 God o? 11, and Holy Father in Thy mercy." The "\be read impressively the wonderful verses frol? tbt 15th chapter of the 1st book of Corinth ?. commencing Now is Christ risen froO? dead." ? During the service the Vicar Tead a l01^^ of the members of the ?rd Monmoutbs ? Battalion who had been killed in action or 0 to had died from wounds. We are not abl'to report these, as, while probably authentic, the have not all been officially passed for pt.lb 1 tion. tV The Vicar preached from the text 1?? ? ?. now praise famous men (Ecclesiasticus 4?},o The rev. gentleman said that every ma? had shed his blood or had even risked 111s had done something and had had some sb? g ? the 7eatest cause in which England ad evef the greatest cause in which England had be struck a blow. They had come together oJ3 occasion of that memorial service in the ci Parish Church where for so many hundred ? ? years past men and women had come toge L to worship on public occasions of sorroo m rejoicing, a church within whose walls .t ? beneath whose floor were buried so many P^ warriors, a church which was con-ecraiedfor many of them by constant weekly wors^$, They had gathered together not merely to mourn those belonging to the noble 3rd gool mouthshire Battalion whom in this war \lId, had called away. Mourn they must nd sbooa., They could not help mourning when tjlc thought of the widow and the orphan an d?e parents who were bereaved and wheC  ? missed for themselves the touch of a N',qlOsb hand and the sound of a voice that is 'tio. They must mourn, but they mourned ,lotiol the dead. They thanked God for them.  for had been accounted worthy to give their A s their country, and they thought of that J great and glorious privilege. They were P ?? to-day of those who had so worthily repfese ? them on the stricken field. We did not ot yet, and it might be long before we did kn°^ full story of what they had done, but they read in their papers what Sir John French ??J said to many who were engaged in the action. General French told them that eeØ& fighting of the last few weeks, though it s ?c in their eyes to have no very great resuslte$iP made all the difference possible in the °n y,);. If the Germans had broken through with tremendous efforts and made a further ad*?t towards the coast, our last Ally, the Jr.? country of Italy, would perhaps have hung ^e- instead of coming forward in the great C aoe, Our men had done a great thing and stfoic?lto great blow for the cause which they belie\ £ jjef be the cause of right and of God Himself. ? knew that there was not one of them wlO not willing to lay down his life for that c We had not heard yet the full tale of what ? endured, but there kept coming home some stories which showed the spirit tba in all of them. They read, the other da/' oØe one of the officers, 2nd Lieut. Sor'by -?notooe who was born and bred there, but who from a Vicarage in the North—display^ spirit and devotion by exposing himself a$ screen between a wounded man and the G"olj'oWf, shells and bullets. What they had been qcP' him they had been told of some who, thau?P50,? were still alive, and of many who had away. They were ready to help their co??' and risk everything. And so that was "t?; memorial service rather than a service of  ing-a service in which they comme%00fa those who had thus been found worthy. T? $e God for the spirit and courage that was es hearts of every one of them and was in the ■■ of that little band of survivors who I well and able to strike another blow *° $(f country. Thank God for them and ? ach■ had done. But, after all, was not tll4e%? memorial a willingness and readiness to do.1?, they did, and give ourselves, as they gave ef"d selves, for their country's ?cause ? on fft side they heard how great was still the ??-'? j??' men to take their places, not only in the ?< regiment, but in others. All up and do".1, country they were coming to the end of the 19ee' they had to send forth to fill the vac t P-j?, in the battalions. There had been a 910'i response, a response beyond the dreams of ev,d one of them when the war broke out lastA'L' $t; but there were yet others who could go od der ought to go before they were fetched, alli {? go the necessary training to fit them-se^ e fI the same great work. There were othe!' ? had been glad to go, and as to those w? J 9!' not go, what were they doing ? They ..J ? read the letter from the Bishop of Pret?o? -9,t? which he spoke of his visit to the front f^cplz way the men felt that England was not bO them up. That might possibly be not  representative of the feeling of all t??  There were many doing a great deal of W '? their neighbours knew little, but w'h3 allowances they made did they feel that nation they were backing up the men who 4?# daring so much for them ? How could ? 11 them up ? He thought, in the first place'tJt,' by constant criticism of the powers that tiC!' the Government or those in authority.  of our criticism was criticism without know ?' and of little value. It was no good to say tp$? the Government ought to have done this Or 00? six months ago, or that it ought at this 01010. ePt to put into force the principle of 1{| He personally thought they ought to iot? ?jo that principle, and others might thic? # ought not, but those who had to nio, M decision knew the facts and were actu^t  ?i$e the highest motives to do that which WO' and right. The way to back the men up att)' front was not to call upon the Govern? Ot do this or that, but for each to be ready t? ^0pel the call whenever it came. Great Britain oO', be ready to respond loyally at whatev^ To every one of them there was an oppo f of doing something and doing more tha? had probably done up to the present. This England never did (nor never siojp Lie at the proud foot of a conqueror, But when it first did help to wound itself-, Come the three corners of the world in ar::e And we shall shock them: Nought shall us rue If England to itself do rest but true."  That which our great national poet *? O l?e I sure of we were equally certain of to-day, ?it' knew that, please God. we should go on a?tv a 0 ot ever cost till the fight was won. We sho^ tK grudge anything that we had to give t It.4 t -oDet flag might fly unfurled and that the wofl???<<- be purified and cleansed from that evil Po' il? that threatened our country and all the 10 f freedom. r c? Prayers were afterwards offered fo'? 01 soldiers and sailors, for those in sof?o t?? anxiety, and for the nation that it might Dettoo to itself. At the conclusion of the service, the ? f"!?? Mr. W. R. Carr, A.R.C.O., played t?? 4 March in Saul," and Chopin's lvf Funebre." J3ritJ.o£ The collection was on behalf of the pt?'? Red Cross Society and the British pris° war in Germany.

VII DISCLOSURE OF KEWI

V I I DISCLOSURE OF KEW& I GOVERNMENT AND THE FR^CTI^ .4;fcc tio,15 I The Press Bureau has received Hie r, of the Government to place the fc,ilowl. o g  noun cement at the disposal of the re5s fo? public information The Government have had under ro? o? ation the 1,,est mears of preveilt i ng disclo'tlreof ation the best means of preventing dis information, or publication of statem" ? ?? Press, which might assist the enemy ° ?e?' "C with the successful prosecution of Uie jni It has been decided that the Director o,e 1., Prosecutions in England and Ni'al?c,- the I,(?t Advocate in Scotland. and tl,e Atto ney- Geii fot Advocate in Scotland, and the Attor? ,G?-t!' ?  in Ireland, shall henceforward be ch, » rged the duty of instituting proceedings ?? the? of infractions by publication in the F? Ofro, hibited matter. _?--?  0.0 —" rf1' C ø Punted ?uo Pnbt.ah?? by M. V?OUGA v^jiD C° at 26, Frogmore Street, Ab-reavOT'n 9  Coom? of Monmouth. FRIDAY, JUN'

Advertising

ustai f\ ewsr "Oman -V Soret; r.B E- (' zein (¡ I ù 0 res. Y'tYoulld. Ringworm, C,it,% }:l1rJs. Scurf, or any sIdn send to Maurice S'nitli ft Co.. Kkidenninster, for a free sample of llEACO Ointment. It copts vou nothing, and y.?, ,ill not re"rd it. Try it, vou need not ?,.d for a I.rg? box. A Shifnal Lady says it is worth £ 5 a bo*. H?t? alIays all irritation, reduces i.fl;?,,tin. prevents festering, soothes and heals 3)' had l?gs. Don't say your case is h.p?l?..?,tl?.utt?yi.,?lliEALO. Boxes 1/1? & 2.?9 LOOAL AGENTS Shackleton, Chemifl', Aberjra venny; Evano, Chemist, Bryumawr; Thoraton, Chemist, Blaenavon.

BLAENAVON SENSATION I i

BLAENAVON SENSATION. I i Co-op. Official Sent to Gaol. I SOLICITOR'S BAIL ESTREATED. A large percentage of the residents of Blaen- avon are members of the Blaenavon Industrial Co-operative Society, and therefore great interest was manifested in the Police Court proceedings at Blaenavon on Tuesday when Arthur Edward Marfell Constance, formerly manager of the boot department at the Blaenavon Co-operative Society's Stores, was brought up in custody charged with stealing one pair of boots, value is., the property of the Blaenavon Co-operative Society, between January 13 and April 29. He was further charged, as amended by the prosecutors when prisoner was before the magistrates at Pontypool a week ago, with stealing 61 pairs of boots, value £ 26, between the dates mentioned. Added interest was lent the proceedings because prisoner stated that failing to get the more substantial bail he had been advised bv his solicitor to secure, he absconded, having a dread of the cell." Moreover, after the Police Court prisoner made a sensational dash for liberty, and, as already reported, he left the Charge Room at the Pontypool Police Station and escaped into the street where he was pur- sued by a crowd and several constables, who re-captured him. Prisoner had spent the period since the previous Tuesday at Usk Prison. He was con- veyed to Blaenavon for the Court proceedings by a prison warder. The prosecution was conducted by Mr. Lvndon Moore, solicitor, Newport The Court was crowded with residents of the district, many people failing to enter the Court- room. Several representatives of the Co- operative Society were present. In consequence of Constance having failed to appear at the Blaenavon Police Court a fort- night ago to surrender to his bail, Mr. Harold Saunders, solicitor, Blaenavon and Pontypool, was summoned to show cause why a £ 10 surety entered into by him as bail for the prisoner, should not be estreated. The magistrates were Col. P. G. Pennymore (in the chair), Messrs. Geo. Dando, H. M. Davies, James Jones, and Dr. A. H. James. Constance was not asked to plead. Prisoner was not legally represented. Skilled System of Fraud: I Mr. Moore, in opening the case, said that Constance had for some time perpetrated a deliberate and skilled system of fraud, and had stolen a considerable amount of property be- longing to his employers. He was formerly employed by the Society as a boot repairer, and he was later promoted, having ob- tained the confidence of his employers, to be manager of the boot department. Prisoner was originally appointed in the name of Marfell, but on being promoted he confided to Mr. Bryant that his proper name was Constance. To the railway officials he was known by the name I of Marfell, and in that name he sent boots to persons m London. This firm carried on a wholesale and retail business in a large way, advertised their willing- ness to purchase job lots of boots to be sent to the residence of one of their employees. Con- stance got into touch with the firm, and later dispatched numerous consignments of boots to them. He had carried on a great business with impunity, and it was only through a consign- ment going wrong that the whole of the frauds were discovered. What prisoner meant by saying when arrested that he would make a clean breast of it," he did not know. Prisoner had deliberately and somewhat cleverly robbed his employers. London Discoveries. 1 Wm. Bryant, managing secretary of the 1 Blaenavon Co-operative Society, said prisoner entered the employ of the company as a boot repairer in November, 1913. He was promoted as manager in May, 1914. His wages to start were 38s. per week, and latterly had been 39S. 1 id. per week. In May the stationmaster at the Blaenavon Great Western Station, Mr. Lewis, brought him a consignment note in which there appeared a mistake. The goods sent by the consignment note were boots, and were sent to a man named Smith." The counterfoil of the consignment book was torn out. Other counterfoils torn out referred to consignments of boots sent to Smith Bros., 34 Gold-street, Stepney, London." Prisoner was later arrested, and witness went to London, and paid visits to various shops with detectives. He visited the premises of Messrs. Salamon's, at 28 White- chapel-road, and there saw two pairs of baby's boots, which witness identified as the property of the society. On May 14, in company with P.-S. Baker, Blaenavon, he visited London, and they were told by the police that another box of boots had been delivered at the residence of the man, Charles Thomas Smith, 24 Gold-street, Stepney, and he found that there were 29 pairs of boots in the box, the property of the Society. Later he went to Paddington Station. In the detective office he saw a box. The label on the box was in prisoner's handwriting. There were 17 pairs of boots in the box. Witness again identified those as the Society's property. Frank Hall, carman in the employ of the Great Western Railway Co., who resides at Blaenavon, said that on May 10 he received from prisoner a consignment of boots for Smith Brothers, Stepney." Witness knew prisoner as Marfell. The smaller box (produced) was the one he received. John Lewis, stationmaster, Blaenavon, said that when the mistake arose in the consignment' prisoner saw him and asked him that if any further inquiries arose in connection with the matter he should see witness, and not go to the Society's office, respecting the matter." Wit- ness had had many consignments of goods from prisoner. Made a Clean Breast of It. Chas. Thos. Smith, of Gold-street, London, said he was in the employ of H. Salamon and Co., wholesale boot and shoe dealers, of 28 White- chapel-road, London. He had received several consignments of boots from A. Marfell on behalf of his firm. Witness kept no books. Money was paid from the head office. For the last four months the transactions had gone on. He could not say why the business was carried on at his address instead of at the firm's addess, except that his residence was a branch. David Salamon, one of the principals of the firm named, said he had received from Smith the boots Smith received from A. Marfell, whom witness did not know. His firm carried on a big business, and were Government con- tractors. If the goods bought amounted tomore than £ 5 the account would be paid by cheque. Mr. Moore mentioned that prisoner had been selling goods to this firm, through Smith, since last August. P.-C. Evans (246) said he apprehended prisoner, who, when charged, said, I will see Mr. Bryant and make a clean breast of it." Later he went to prisoner's house, and found ) boots and other goods, the property of the Society. P.-S. Baker (no) said that on searching prisoner he found two counterfoils of consign- ment notes which related to boxes of boots sent to London by prisoner. Prisoner said he had some things at the house, which his wife would show to witness. Prisoner asked, and was allowed, to see Mr. Bryant, to whom he made a signed statement, now produced. Prisoner was cautioned, and pleaded guilty. The Chairman The sentence of the Court is that you be imprisoned for six months in the third division. I Solicitor Ordered to Pay. I I When the case against Mr. Harold Saunders was called, he said I admit the recognisance." P.-S. Baker said that Constance was at Ponty- pool Police Court admitted to bail in a sum of £ 10 and in a surety of £ 10. Mr. Saunders being the surety. At Blaenavon Court prisoner failed to appear. Addressing the Court, Mr. Saunders urged the right of all persons to bail if they were respectable householders. Prisoner gave him a feasible and plausible explanation of his conduct. He wrote the explanation, and, on the entreaty of the prisoner and his wife he entered into the recognisance. Replying to the Clerk, Mr. Saunders said the only relationship existing between himself and prisoner was that of solicitor and client, and that there was absolutely no reason in the world why he should have gone as surety for him except the statements he now believed to be false that were made to him. The Magistrates' Clerk said he had never known a solicitor act as surety for a prisoner before. Superintendent Davies said he was instructed by the Chief Constable to press for the £10 to be estreated. If it was not, the granting of bail was a farce. The Magistrates ordered Mr. Saunders to pay the £ 10 into Court, but refused to mulct him in the cost of that day's proceedings.