Teitl Casgliad: Abergavenny Chronicle

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Mae hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn eiddo i Tindle Newspapers

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
27 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
BATTLE NEAR ARRAS

BATTLE NEAR ARRAS. f OFFICIAL FRENCH EXPOSURE OF GERMAN LIES. Tha followi; g oScial Preach oommunicti(lJl has1Jecn i:s lH d by the Pre&s Bureau:— "la contradiction to the allegationB of th< German communique, it is on our initiative that nearly all the actions on their we-sterr frontiers have taken piacc. Their communiques do not mention in- fantry actions in the region north of Arraa, although the battle there has in no way dimiilii;hc¿ in intensity. The struggle ii: being""pms\lcd v.ith the grenade, and, in fact; a great 1-i oloi-li:- ou, in the course oi which the Germans have never ceased theii retreat and are suffering considerable losses; known to us on the spot or confessed by pri- mmers. They have only attempted one 

TURKEYS TROUBLES I

TURKEY'S TROUBLES. I Ell's EXPLOITS AT CONSTANTINOPLE A vivid description of the appearance oi the Ell at Constantinople (for which fe. Lieutenant-Commander Nasmith has gained the V.C.) is given by an eye-witness in the "Stam3).-L. of Turin. We quote the transla- tion of the "Manchester Guardian":— "I was at a window in Pera watching what went on in the harbour just below me and in the courtyard of Top Hane, occupied by two batteries of old 77 dismountable Xrupp guns. All at once a razor-blade shot into the harbour, and the people began tc :rm hither and thither on the quay, making strange and grotesque gestures. The razor- blade came from the open eea. and coursed acroae the harbour like a thing of intelli- gence, slightly raised above the water. which it cut through, leaving only two thin streaks of foam to right and left. The sol- diers on the Mahmond and the Bosphorua (two transports) began foolishly to discharge their rifles into the water. Then a bunch of humanity dressed in yellow garments jumped into the sea.; another followed; others jumped on to the quay, which in a short time was crowded with panic-stricken a o I d i, r. THE THING IN THE HARBOUR. I "But the live thing in the harbour pur- 

BABY AS ACCOMPLICEI

BABY AS ACCOMPLICE. I TWELVE MOXTHS FOR WOMAN HOUSE- I BREAEER. ) Described t-y the pcEcc as an expert hou.3-:br:aker, Latty Williams, 27, who&e husband -ra6 said to be in the trenches, watj sentenced at the London Seo-sions to twelve montiLg' hard labour for breaking into the bousf cf Mrs. Kate Hainef.. Mr. Haines said the prisoner got into conversation with her in W€r W.a.3 an expert hOUL1£'bre,Ù,er, and could climb aa weH as any riale criminal. 'When com- mitting a burglary, for which she wait ordered mne months' hard labour on a pre- vious occasion, she negotiated several fences live t'cet hi?h, and broke a window with her &st in c.rdcr to get into the house. She was strong enough to "force" furniture like men .burglars.

No title

As a sequel to the trial of Prinzip (the murderer of the Archduke Francis Ferdi- nand), a court-martial in Tra.vmk has passed prison sentences on vuirty-one students for violating the peace. Farmers in the vicinity of Rugby have gladly availed themselves of the offer made by Dr. David (Headmaster of Rugby; to aend o-ne squad of boys to assist in securing the bay crops. The beys employed in this worJk, belong for the meet part to lite, School Cancers' Training Corps, and reports from all quartern agree- that they are moing thir worl- satisfactorily. L

THE PEOPLE DESIRE PEACE

"THE PEOPLE DESIRE PEACE." GERMAN SOCIALIST JOURNAL'S I MANIFESTO. The "Vorwarts" has dropped a homb,,vh&N by the publication, in defiance of the censor, of a manifesto demanding that the Gerjitcn Government shall at once declare its willing. nesa to enter into peace negotiations. Tba journal has been promptly suspended (ays the Rotterdam correspondent of the "Daily News"}, but its action, coming &t a time when it is known that there is unreal amongst the Socialists, and following the scene in the Prussian Diet during the week, has created a great impression in Germany, where, as the "Vorwa.rts" claims,, people de- sire no extension of territory, bet only peace. In the course of its long manifesto the Vorwarts says: "For nearly a year war fury has raged over the world. Hundreds of thousands of lives have been lost, irreplaceable revolts of culture destroyed, and a fearful destraction of the people's strength has taken place. Millions of mothers, wives, and children weep for sons, husbands, and fathers. "Social Democracy saw this worM catas- trophe coming and prophesied it. In al! countries it has struggled against the policy of imperial expansion and its consequences. It h&s struggled against armaments, which have called forth this fearful world war. Up to the last moment German Social Demo- cracy set its whole strength for the mainten- ance of peace. But when the Tsar's Cos- sacks crossed our frontiers, plundering and burning, the Social Democrats kept their word given to the German people and put themselves at the service of the Fatherland. The council of the Social Democrat Party and the party in the Reichstag has continu- ally and unitedly striven against the policy of conquest and annexation. NO ANNEXATION. I We raise anew the sharpest protests against all efforts and declarations in favour of the annexation of & portion of a foreign country and the suppression by force of another people, as suggested in the speeches of certain political personages. The mere expression of such a policy pushes further and further off a realisation of the fervent desire for peace. The people desire no annexations. The people desire peace. If the war, which daily demands new sacrinces, n not to go on indennitely, until all nations have been completely exhausted, one of the Powers taking part must stretch out its hand for peace. Germany has already proved itself unconquerable, and can therefore take the nrst step towards peace. "In the name of humanity and culture, supported by the bravery of men in arms who have created a favourable situation, we demand of the Government that it shall announce its willingness to enter into nego- tiations for peace, in order to make an end of the bloody struggle. We expect that our members in other warring countries will use their influence in the same way upon their Government."

ADMIRALTY AWARDS SKILfUL CAPTAIN

ADMIRALTY AWARDS SKILfUL CAPTAIN. It haa become known that one of our transports was attacked by a submarine on April 22, when on the way to France. The captain of the transport was John Bees Jones, and on board his vessel, in the Royal Edward Dock, at Avonmouth, he has been presented by the Armiralty with a gold watch and an inscription on vellum. The presentation was made by Captain Lucas, chief transport omcer, in the presence of a large number of naval and military oScers. It was stated that on April 22 Captain Jones sighted a German submarine a short distance oil the vessel, and a torpedo wae nred at the transport, passing just astern of her. By skilfu navigation the captain managed to evade the submarine. The inscription bore the worda: "The Lorr! Commissioners of the Admiralty are pleased to express to you their marked appreciation of the manner in which you carried out your duty when attacked by a German submarine on April 22, 1915." TUG MASTER REWARDED. I For eluding a German submarine off the of Wight when he was in charge of a targe French grain ship the Admiralty have awarded the master of the tug Homer (Cap- ta'n Gibson) a gold watch. A letter has been received by the Town Clerk of South Shields from t"L Admiralty stating that they intended also to give each member of the crew .63 in recognition of their bravery. The tug was attacked with A hai! of bulleta. but it and the grain ship both escaped.

LETTERS F l ADI

LETTERS F" l A'D. I On Saturday the Press Bureau issued the following': ? "The War Omce nnds it nece-ssary to re- mind the public that all correspondence be- tween the United Kingdom and foreign countries should be easily legible and as brief as possible. Letters which are of great length and bartly legible are liable to be delayed, and may, in extreme cases, be de- tained, or returned to the sender. "Letters or telegrams containing any in- formation which may be directly or indi- rectly useful to the enemy render the writers liabLe to prosecution, and the public should bear in mind that their letters and tele- grams will he less likely to be delayed if they avoid altogether topics which call for the special scrutiny of the Censors. For example, no particulars are permitted to bo communicated about the strength, move- ments, or distribution of the British or Allied naval or military forces, or about Zeppelin attacks, or the localities visited by hostile aircraft. "Letters intended for foreign countries must not be sent under cover addressed to the Pcatal Censor, but must in all cases be posted to the intended recipient in the ordi- nary way."

TIME ON THE SIDE OF THE ALLIES

TIME ON THE SIDE OF THE ALLIES. Colonel P. N. Maude, in lecturing upon the war at the Shaftesbury Theatre, said the Atliea did not want to invade Germany until Germany had been made to produce her last reserve. When the Germans were forced back they would fall back with such rapidity thai the would be practically no opposi- tion inside the country. Germany could not have had more than 8,500,000 fit and avail- able men at the beginning of the war. If tiM rate at which they were killed up to January had been kept up—and it has pro- bably increased—the Germans would bo accounted for by the beginning of November next. "We are In no hurry," continued Colonel Maude. "There is 'no need to be in a hurry, because every day that passes ammunition is being brought forth, and the loader we wait the greater will be the jstorm. But the commanders will not wait for another winter campaign. I bcl:eve you will have the great point in a few weeks. And we have a good chance of victory now." There were 15,000,000 Russians ready to serve, and the Allies outnumbered the armiea of the Germans by about five or six to one.

No title

Stating in the Honae of Commons that the Lord Chancellor'a salary and the pensions of his three predecessors amounted to .635,000 a year, Mr. Asquith added that he was not prepared at present to consider any change. Mrs. Mary Mitchell, a widow, of Old Brompton, Chatham, who celebrated her 100th birthday on Sunday, is granddaughter of a centenarian, and was nrat Wesleyan Bible woman to visit the homes of the Royal Marines in 1832. l death has omorr-ed at .Scarborough <)f William Claybourn,no 'Was:' for thirty. ft-ven years second coxswain of the Scar- borough lifeboat. He was in his sevehty- ioarth yewr.

1THE WAR LOAM

1 THE WAR LOAM. CHANCELLOR ON THE DUTY OF ALL CLASSES. Mc?jMfi?eeaA reoe?ved a< ?e Treasury a 4'oijff,Aiv,a AeputMMQ cf lafge employer.; t??a?(M)f"'?

TWO BRITISH QUALITIES I

TWO BRITISH QUALITIES. I THE POWER TO FIGHT AND THE POWER TO STAY?.' i ,,I 1ft a speech at Dulwich, Mr. Bonar Law said up till now the superiority in the mechanical appliances of war had been on the side of our enemies. But they had no capacity whidh gave them the opportunity to continue that superiority. We had recognised the position and not only the Government or the House of Com- mons, not only the country, but the men directly concerned in making these muni- tions had realised it too, and every week Mid every month that superiority on the part of our enemies would tend to diminish until the time came when the scale was on the other side. Though there was no cause 'fov despon- dency, there was no cause for over-ooTin- denoe. Victory would come; but it would not come of it.1f We had got to win it and the whole nation had got to win it. We could trust our soldiera. In the past our race had shown two greaft qualities: the qualities which had given ua our position among the nations of the world —the power of nghting, and staying powet as well. We had shown—our soldiers had shown—that the nghting spirit waa never in our whole history stronger or better than to-day. The staying-power had not bn tested to the same extent, but he was sure that It was there and that we as a nation would endure, as our soldiers, to the end, until we had secured the reward for which we were nghting.

AIRMANS THRILLING EXPLOIT I

AIRMAN'S THRILLING EXPLOIT. I An exploit unsurpassed for cool daring is told in a letter which M. Abel Herjtnant haa received from the Eastern front (says a Paris correspondent of the "Daily News"). A French pilot writes: — "I have been able to make two good flights by moonlight. The second was the most terrible experience I have yet known. I started at 11 o'clock with Captain M—— as look-out, with eighteen gallons of petrol and four melinite shells. We climbed 2.MO feet, dodging all the timo two Austrian projectors which were searching the heavens. Then, circling over the barracks on the river bank, we took careful aim and dropped our bombs. We could hear the mufHed roar of the explosions. "As luck would have it, our third bomb failed to get clear and became entangled in the landing gear of our machine. What were we to do? To descend waa impossible, for the bomb was primed and would have blown us into the next world directly we touched the ground. We were then 7,000 feet up. It's my fault,' said M-. So I'M go down and unhitch it.' So we eased ourselves of the fourth bomb, and then started to plane down towards our aero- dronte. "At 3,500 feet M- climbed over the tank, threaded his way through the wires, and. on his knees, hanging over the, abyss, with an icy wind blowing at the rate of seventy miles an hour, bent over and dis- entangled the bomb, which dropped into a deserted neld. Then he crept back to his seat and soon afterwards we were in port. "M—— was mentioned in dispatches, and is to have the Cross of thq Legion of Honour for his plucky exploit."

OFFICERS PAY IN THE NAVYI

OFFICERS PAY IN THE NAVY. This ranges from .223 to .24.3 a year for able, ordinary, and leadings seamen, to .82,190 for an Admiral of the Fleet, exclu- sive of allowances, command money, etc. Here are a few of the principal annual rates of pay for other omcers: Admiral, Xl,825; vice-admiral, .61,460; rear-admiral, commo- dore (nr&t classy and captain of the neet, .81,095 each; captain (nrst 80), JB602; cap- tarn (second 80), £502; and the remainder. X-ill; engineer captain..8638 to .B730; st&p surgeon, .8365 to <,8438; commander, JE401; chaplain..2219 to .6401, which is aiso the pay of a naval instructor; lieutenant, 9162 to .S292; commissioned warrant omcer, .&163 to JB219; gunner, boatswain, carpen- ter. and head wardmaster, .8100 to J6164; cub-lieutenant, <.891; midshipman, JB32; and naval cadet, JE18.

No title

Women in long blue uniform coats are em- ployed by the South Metropolitan Gas Com- pany to read customers' meters. They are equipped with electric torches to light them down the coal cellar stairs. Cardinal Vaughan paid a visit on Sunday to the Polish Church in Mercer-street, Shad- well. which for many years has been the place of worship of London Poles. Trooper Michael Maddocks, 2nd Reserve Regiment of Cavalry, was buried beneath 5ft. of sand while digging in the Aldershot sandpits. In returning a verdict of "Acci- ??ry itMel a rider that a .oompetent:an should Tae-'im charge of the pita during ,llg qpumtious.

BRESS OF THE DAYI

BRESS OF THE DAY. I I A SMART LITTLE SHIRT BLOUSE. I Among the most attractive blouses shown during the last faw weeka ar.e the plain shirt models intended for everyday morning wear. These are carried out in various material, such aa lawn, Jap silt, crepe do Chine, voile, cwepe, handkerchief linen, pique, etc. Of all these materials nae, thin, tlandkereikief linen ie, perhaps, the newest and smartest fabric for the summer shirt. Here ia our sketch is an original and ex- tremely up-to-date model, which is carried out in this cool and pretty material, a UtMio which, by the way, launders as no other material will. This shirt wraps over well to the left, the upper edge being 'carried in a sloping line to just about the tevel of the armholes, below which point' the [Refer to X 609.] I edge is cut away a trifle towards the right. Both edg;ea are defined by a row of machine stitching. Three large pearl buttons, each with an attendant buttonhole which is bound with the linen, are placed in a line across the bust and form the ostensible fastenings, but the real fastenings consist of small press-studs placed beneath the edge of the front. The neck is cut out in a small point, and is Snished by a collar of particu- larly pretty shape, which is carried out in organdy muslin. A slightly sloped seam is carried from the armhole to the waist on each aide of the front. It is overlaid and neatly machined down. The sleeves are of moderate size and are set into a seam at the ehouMer, which sleeve is machined in exactly the same way as the sleeve of a man's shirt. These sleeves are gathered at the wrist, where they are set into neatly stitched cuffs which button at the b&ck of the arm. A PRETTY AFTERNOON FROCK, j This is a season when one must take what materials are offered, for gowns, costumes and wraps, and must not gad about looking for impossible creations in silk, satin, or woollen mixtures. It is fortunate, however, that war conditions have not materially affected the output of dainty and charming cotton fabrics, and many of the newest "beat" gowna are being contrived from such inexpensive fabrics as fine white voile, spotted, printed, embroidered or plain, while plainer frocks for morning wear are made of homely yet pretty gingham, delicately tinted cotton crepe, or striped and nowerpd cambrics. Our sketch shows a dainty little [Refer to X 610.] I gown for smart wear, carried out in a white voila powdered with wee blossoms printed in two shades of blue with just a touch of black. The over-bodice is made in bolero style and hangs quito loose over a full blouse of the same material. The bolero is slit up on each side of the front and each side of the back, and all the edges are finished by a band of Valenciennes insertion, and a frill of inch-wide Valenciennes lace. Thd neck and armholes are trimmed in the same way. The high collar is of white cTgandy muslin edged with lace. The full sleeves of the under-blouse are gathered at the wrist and set into cuffs made of bands of insertion. The skirt is cut in four pieces I of graduated depth, and these are united by inaertton, the top of ea<;h piece lsei gathered to the lower edge of tho band-of huM. 'the botOM width falls looao in a 6trgt noupce. I NEW BELTS. Belts form a very important part of our toilette this summer, and need almost as careful choice and adjustment as the gown or Mouse witA which they are worn. Tholigh, coloured belta of every description are worn,; there,,isi a distinct preference noticeable fop belts of black, white, or mingled black and white materials These belts are shown in nil aorta of fabrics, but are at their smartest in patent leather, soft kid, or silk. For in- stance, a very smart example shown by one of the best Paris houses was carried out in checked black and white taffetas ribbon. The belt was very wide, perfectly plain, and it finished in a rounded end which was orna- ment ed by three large buttons covered with b!aek tanetas. All the edges of the belt were nniebed by a crossway binding of the black taffetas. Of quite a different type is a btoad belt of black patent leather which ia lined throughout with soft white kid. The belt..is sUt. at intervals to show the lining of white kid, and fastens with a very large patent-leather covered buckle. Paper patterns can be supplied, price 6}d. WTien ordering, please quote n l?re 61d. cloeo remittance, and acwrei$s to Mies LislOt e., La Belle Sauvage, London, E.C.

No title

Middlesex Education Committee agreed to I tMke a yearly gra;it to county schools hav. in.ca.d?t corps recogaiaod by the Countv Tefrttona.l AiismiatiOID .1L ,,L-

BRITISH PRISONERSI

BRITISH PRISONERS. REPORT BY AN AMERICAN SURGEON. The American Ambassador has aent to the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs a copy of a letter he has received from the Embassy at Berlin, dated the 12th inst., transmitting' a copy of a. report made by Dr. Earl Ohnesorg, Surgeon, United States Navy, of a recent visit made by him to a hospital where British prisoners of war are undergoing treatment for their wounds. Dr. Ohnesorg's report is as follows:— "June 12, 1915. "Sir,—On my recent visit to the Wesb Front in inspecting a base hospital in the village of Iscghem, in West Flanders, I found twenty- two wounded English prisoners. Iseghem is situated about twenty kilometres northwards of Ypres. All of these men had been wounded and taken prisoner during the nghting around this latter place. The building was modem— ten years old-in times of peace used as a tech- nical school under the control of Catholic monks. It was admirably adapted for hospital purposes—one main, larger hall with tiled noor, good natural light, and ventilation. Two long rooms opened on of this main hall were also used as wards—one for omcers and the other for soldiers. "In the latter place were quartered these English and Canadian prisoners. The com- mandant who accompanied me on my visit re- quested me to speak to each one of these men in hie own tongue, which I did, greeting him and asking concerning the treatment, food, and nursing which he received. They all re- ceive the same professional care, diet, and nursing which is given the German wounded in the hospital, and were satisned, and of their own accord spoke in praise of the surgeons and attendants. The professional abaS of the hospital consisted of a chief surgeon with three assistants, female nurses, and Catholic sisters, with orderlies from the Bed Ceosa organisa- tion. "The building had two hundred beds, some of the standard neld pattern in use in the German army, the majority, however, being constructed of pine boards with wooden slats and supplied with a straw mattress. The linen was clean, and the whole building was free from odour and scrupulously clean. These prisoners were permitted the same liberties in writing as in prison camps, the sisters supply- ing the necessary writing materials. I was in- formed that when their condition permitted they would be transferred to hospitals in Germany.—I am, Sir, your obedient servant (Signed) KARL OnNEsoBG, Surgeon U.S. Navy, Assistant Naval Attache. "His Excellency the American Ambassador."

THE GRETNA DISASTER

THE GRETNA DISASTER. MANSLAUGHTER VERDICT AGAINST THREE RAILWAYMEN. Three men were committed for trial at the close of the inquest on the twenty-seven vic- tims of the Gretna troop train disaster -who died at Carlisle. After deliberating for nfty- nve minutes, the jury found Signalmen Meakin and Tinsley and Firemen Hutchin- son guilty of manslaughter. The signalmen were in charge of the signal-box at Quintins- hill, close to which the catastrophe hap- pened, and the fireman belonged to the stop- ping local train, with which the troop train collided. The coroner remarked on the responsibili- ties of men engaged in railway work. When a man had undertaken a duty which he knew was essential to the safety of others, and particularly when he knew that a disaster such as this would inevitably result if he failed, the law counted on extra care and vigilance on his part, and did not permit him to regard any part of that duty lightly or with indifference. At present the Mock system was the safeguard against a horror such as they had investigated, and the jury should consider any infringement of it with very great care. They could not but be of opinion that if the human element necessary to the working of the system only carried out the duties assigned to it no acci- dent such as this would be possible. They haJ to consider whether tTiat element had fulnlled its trust. The jury's verdict was "That the accident was caused by the gross negligence of Sig- nalmen Meakin and Tinsley and Fireman Hutchinson/* The coroner said that was a verdict of manslaughter. A juryman said twelve of the nineteen jurymen were in favour of finding Hutchin. son guilty and seven were not. Was that sumcient? The coroner replied that it was. The coroner said that the only course he had to adopt according to the law was to commit these tnrce men to t;ie Cumberland Assizes at Carlisle. He proposed to admit them to bail.

SIR E CASSEL AND SIR E SPEYER

SIR E. CASSEL AND SIR E. SPEYER. RIGHT TO ACT AS PRIVY COUNC!LLORS CHALLENGED. In the King's Bench Divisional Court, before the Lord Chief Justice and Mr. Justice Ridley, Mr. Powell, E.C., moved, at the instance of Sir George Makgill, Bart., as "rela.tor," for an order nisi directed to Sir Edgar Speyer and Sir Ernest Cassel to show by what authority they claimed to be and acted as members of His Majesty's Privy Council. Counsel said that Sir Edgar Speyer was bom in New York on September 7, 1863, and not of English parents. He was naturalised on Feb- ruary 29, 1892, and was afterwards created a baronet of the United Kingdom. On Septem- ber 22, 1909, he was made a member of the Privy Council and took his seat at the Board. Sir Ernest Caaeel was born at Cologne, not. of English parents, and swom of the Privy Coun- cil in 1903. Mr. Powell said his submission was that these gentlemen ware not and never had been {awfully members of the Privy Council. The ;'rdator" was moving in respect of these two gentlemen, but he had Tie animus against either. The application was baaed upon the Act of Settlement of William III. on the ground that both these gentlemen were "born out of the kingdoms of England, Ireland, and Scotland, and the dominion thereof, and were not born of English parents." The Lord Chief Justice said the Court would :l'rant an order nisi, in order that there might be argument upon the matter and that a decision might be pronounced, but, of course, it must be understood that they were expressing no opinion at all either as to the effect. of the statues to which counsel had called attention, M* aa.to the order of procedure adopted. All q.pesQns as to that m'be open to those who ahowed cause on the' further hearing.

SKIERS FATAL ZEATI

SKIERS' FATAL ZEAT, I A Hull coroner'a jury returned a verdict "Th.ak Mr. uyp4,. a manufacturer of tfull, died fr

No title

With a view to encouraging thrift among school children and assistin? the Govern-I ment \to raise the War Loan the Stafford- shire Education Committee have decided to appoint a Committee to consider the giving of lessons to scholars on the subject. The municipality of Antwerp has re- peatedly requested the German authorities to take measures to dredge the Scheldt, which is becoming filled up with sand. The Germans refuse, as it is evidently their plan to allow, the port to get in such a state that ultimately a very large sum will have to be spent in clearing it out.

ITHE BLOCKADE

I THE "BLOCKADE." I U BOAT FLIES UNION JACK. A. German submarine attacked a number of vessel off Yougha'1 Harbour 4n S- sinking the schooner Edith, of Bamniiir, bound from Silloth for Cork. T.hc arat (tf three men were landed at Yonghai. liiry--Dr. Orpen's motor-boat. They stated that when ten miles sood)h- eaat of Cable Island a submarine a'P on the surface 100 yards off. She was l gorey, with no number, and new the 'Umo'n Jack. The submarine called on them t« Leave their vessel, giving them five minatea to escape. They got into their punt, and the submarine nred four shots and sank the schooner.

IMUNITIONS BILL

I MUNITIONS BILL —— BOARD OF TRADE TO SETTLE LABOUR DIFFERENCES. The Munitions of War Bill, the text of which has been issued, is divided into three parts and consists of seventeen clauses. The following are some of the more impor- tant provisions:— In causes of labour differences the Board of Trade shall take what steps seem to them expedient to promote a settlement, and the award shall be binding and may be retro- spective. An employer shall not declare a. lock-out unless a month has elapsed since he reported the difference to the Board of Trade. The Minister of Munitions may make an order that any excess of the net pronts of a controlled establishment over the amount divisible under thia Act shall be paid into the Exchequer. No change in the rate of wages shall be made without the consent of the Minister. Any rule, practice, or custom not haying the force of law which tends to restrict pro- duction or employment shall be suspended iM the establishment, and any question. arising on the subject shall be referred to the Board of Trade, whose decision shall be conclusive. Owners guilty of noncompliance with any reasonable requirements of the Minister as to information shall be held to have com- mitted an offensive. A part of an establishment in which muni- tion work is not carried on can, if neces- sary. be treated as a separate establish- ment. The standard, amount of pronta for any period shall be taken to be the average of the amount of the net profits for the two corresponding periods completed next. before the outbreak of war. An owner, if he thinks the average may afford an un- fair standard of comparison, may have the matter determined by a referee. No person shall be given employment unlc&g he holds a certinoate from his last em. ployer that he left with his consent. Under Part HI. of the Bill power is taken to amend Section 1 of the Defence of the Realm—Amendment No. 2—Act, 1915. and to make owners, if required, give such in- formation as to the numbers of em- ployees, machines, nature of work, etc., as the Minister may require. Certain penalties are specined for offences under the Act. The Munitions Tribunal is to consist of a person appointed by the Minister and twe or more assessors, one-half chosen from a panel cocetituted by the Minister of persona repre- senting employers, and the other half from a panel representing workmen, and the Act i$ to have effect only so long as the Ministry of Munitions exists

VC FOR SUBMARINE HERO

V.C. FOR SUBMARINE HERO Ell's DARING RAID INTO SEA OF MARMORA. The following is an extract from tha London Gazette ":— "The King has been graciously pleased to a-pprove of the grant of the Victoria Crosa to Lieut.-Commander Martin Eric Nasmith, Roya.1 Navy, for the oonapiouom bravery Kpecined below: "For most conspicuous bravery in com- mand of one of his Majesty's submarines while operating in the Sea of Marmora. "In the face of great danger he suc- ceeded in destroying one largo Turkish gunboat, two transports, one ammunition ship, and three store ships, in addition to driving one store ship ashore. "When he had safely passed the most difficult part of his homeward journey he returned again to torpedo a Turkish transport. "The King has further Ueen graciously pleased to approve of the award 01 the Dis- tinguished Service Cross to the nndermen- tioneft omcers of the same submarine: Lieut. Guy D'Oyly-Hughes, Royal Navy. Acting-Lieut. Robert Brown, Royal Naval Reserve. "Approval has also been given for the award of the Distinguished Service Medal to eacn member of the crew." Lieut.-Commander Nasmith is the ocer who' made the daring raid on Constanti- nople in May, the most audacious and skil- ful operation performed by a submarine. In the Ell, According to the official announce- ment at the time, he entered the Turkish capital and discharged a torpedo at a transport alongside the a;rsenal. It will be remembered that the incident created a panic at Constantinople. The new V.C. is a submarine specialist who has been employed in this branch of the service for some years, and bie was in charge of the D4 when King George went for & submerged cruise in that vessel. This is the third V.C. awarded to sub- marine commanders for exploits in the Dar- danelles.

ITRADING WITH THE ENEMY I

I TRADING WITH THE ENEMY. I MR. BONAR LAW'S ANSWER TO A QUESTION. In the House of Commons, Mr. Ginnell, the Nationalist member for Westmeath, N., asked the Prime Minister whether any mem- ber of the Government held now, or until recently held, a financial interest in the arm of Jacks and Co., recently convicted of trading with the enemy. Mr. Bonar Law 4Colonial Secretary): As this question refers to me, perhaps I may be permitted to answer it my&elf. I was for many years a member of the firm referred to in the question, and I was still a partner in it when I entered the House in 1900. For some months afterwards I continued my con- nection with it, but came to the conclusion that I had to choose between business and politics. At the end of 1901 I gave up my business, and I gave it up absolutely. Since then I have had no control over the busi- ness, and no knowledge ot the way in which it waa conducted. Although I have from time to time put money on deposit with them at a nxcd rate of interest, I have had no share, direct or indirect, in the pronts or losses of the concern. Sir A. Markban! (L., Mansnelct Division) asked if an inquiry would be held into the mind of the hon. member who asked these .,¡ questions. #

ISOVEREIGNS IN BOOTHEELS

I SOVEREIGNS IN BOOTHEELS. At Grays three German women were fined .£25 each for concealing gold when leaving Tilbury for the Continent. The evidence of a Scotland Yard detective showed that one woman had .644 concealed in the heels of her boots and in her clothing. Two other women had over .B153 and zEllO respectively hidden in various parts of their baggage.

No title

Canon Letchworth has resigned the living of St. John's, Spring-grove, Kingston on- Thames, after forty-Sve years* service. Mr. W. T. Groom, political cental Hi?h Wy combe, has dug up in .agout at Hich cannon-ball which is aatd to te one of the missilea 6red during skirmIshes between the Cavaliers and Parliamentary forces, which occurred in that town in the yeaM 1642.43. )