Teitl Casgliad: Abergavenny Chronicle

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Mae hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn eiddo i Tindle Newspapers

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
21 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
OUR LONDON LETTER j

OUR LONDON LETTER. j [Yrmn Our Special Correspondent.] I People do not seem to be taking much in- terest in holidays this year. In August in normal years the first question, when men meet one another after an interval is "Have you been away?" or "When are you going awav?" Sometimes it was, "I see you've been away," though the tanned complexion might be a very superficial affair, the result of a week-end at Margate. This year, how- ever, people's minds are occupied with thoughts of other things, and holidays are only secondary subjects of conversation. Many people of all classes are working harder than usual, and are unable to leave town for an extended holiday; others who have the time are doubtful about the wis- dom of spending the money. All of us are being appealed to to cut down our expenses in every possible way, and to cut down holi- day expenses offers an easy means of saving a few pounds. The result is that a good many of those who usually go away to the seaside or the country in August are spend- ing the holiday month at home exploring London and discovering new beauties in their own suburbs. Talking about economy, I noticed while reading those excellent articles published by the Parliamentary War Savings Committee, which tell 118 all how we can effect economies for the good of the country, the following paragraph: "If we have any ground, every foot that we can use for growing or raising food in the form of vegetables, wheat, chickens, rabbits, beef and mutton, etc., is a gain to ourselves and the country." It is a' very interesting and very sensible recom- mendation, and I could not help wondering why the Government and the County Council and other municipal authorities do -not act upon it. So far as I can discover, Hyde Park and Regent's Park have not yet been converted into wheat-fields, and while sauntering on Sunday through two large and beautiful suburban parks, I saw no potatoes or cabbages, no chickens, and no flocks and herds. I do not know that I have any desire to see these things, but still, when we are told that we should raise vegetables on every- foot of ground we possess, one cannot help noticing that in the public parks utility plays second fiddle to beauty. 4 That once-famons hotel, the Star and Garter at Richmond, is to be converted into a permanent home for soldiers disabled in -the war and unable to help themselves. The old place has been purchased and presented to Queen Mary by the auctioneers and estate agents of the country. The Star and Garter was for many years certainly the best-known hotel in the kingdom. It was just at a convenient distance from London. It made a pleasant drive in the days before the motor-car, and the house on Richmond Hill was highly popular with young and dashing amateur whips who drove their lady friends (also young and dashing) down in style. A trip to the Star and Garter, dinner there for two, and a drive back to London in the warm summer night, have been described in innumerable novels, and people in all parts of the world who have never seen Richmond know that the Star and Garter is t) ere. Its glories began to decline when motor-cars came in, making a run to Brighton as easy as a trip to Rich- mond was in the old days. That is an interesting disclosure of a bit of secret history which Prince Louis of Battenberg has made. One of the most dramatic of the incidents crowded into the few days preceding the outbreak of war be- tween ourselves and Germany was the despatch of the British Fleet to the North Sea after the great Spithead review instead of the ships feeing demobilised, as usual after such an event. How the Navy at once secured the command of the sea, how the German ships were penned in the Kiel Canal, and how the enemy's flag soon dis- appeared from the seas of the world—these are things that will never be forgotten. It aow appears that the order to which this great achievement must be attributed was given by Prince Louis of Battenberg, who vras then First Sea Lord of the Admiralty. Prince Louis did inestimable service to the Empire by his action, and the facts which have now been made clear ought to prove an interesting study for the editors and pro- prietors and "patriotic" correspondents of those journals which conducted a disgraceful campaign against Prince Louis, and were not content until they had got him out of the Admiralty. Probably Mr. Tribitsch Lincoln, the ex- M.P. spy who failed to deceive the British Admiralty, is not looking forward with feel- tigs of pleasure to taking a trip to this country. He has been arrested in America, though not on a charge of spying, and .cr,tradition proceedings axe being taken. Lincoln, it will be remembered, wrote an account of his experiences in one of the New York papers a few weeks ago, telling how he was baffled in hie attempts to secure information. He has had a remarkable career, having been. among other things, a curate in the Church of England, and mem- ber of Parliament for Darlington. And this although he could not even speak the King's English correctly. His candidature for Darlington was not sanctioned by the Liberal headquarters, and the story of how he managed to persuade the local associ a- -tion to adopt him ought to be verj- interest- ing, if it should come out. Parlours, I fancy, have gone rather out of fashion, and a good thing too. I have seen them, those places; one room set apart, not for use but for show, in cottages too small anyhow for the number of persons who had to live in them. I can close my eyes now and see the ugly, highly-polished furniture, the antimacassars over the chair- backs, the cushions, the wool mats, the stuffed birds, and the wax prints in a glass case. And to keep that room in its splen- dour the family had to use the kitchen as living-room, dining-room, and sitting-room, There are still some parlours of that sort, I do not doubt, but there are not so many as there were. I am glad to see that there are to be no parlours in the new cottages on the Duchy of Cornwall estate at Kenning- ton. It had to be either a parlour or an extra bedroom, and, very sensibly, a bed- room it is to be. W A. E. M.

ON YOUR WALLSI

ON YOUR WALLS. I Probably, when you throw your old boots in the dustbin, or give them to a passing tramp, you believe their lives are practi- cally.over. The tramp may wear them for a bit, or it is conceivable that part of the leather is used again for the manufacture of cheap slippers or boots. But that is as far as your imagination carries you. Don't be startled, however, if you are told that your old boots are now doing duty as wall-paper Extraordinary as it may seem, it is never- theless a fact that manufacturers of wall- paper buy up quantities of old boots. These are thoroughly cleaned from every scrap of dirt, and then taken apart. All the nhils and threads are removed and the leather that is left is ground into a fiae pulp. Those stamped leather wall-papers which have 'attracted your fancy are only ordinary thick papers which have been covered over with a layer of leather pulp-old boots, in fact. Embossed leather paper is very fashionable for papering libraries and dining-rooms. v The better the class of leather the better will it take the gold colour with which it is so often decorated

I OTIJEB AND HOME

OTIJEB AND HOME. -— Do women advance? "Certainly they do," answered a lady who is a close observer of the times, "for this is essentially a woman's era.-woman is having her day. It is not only that modern women are taller, stronger, and healthier than were their mothers and pandmothers; they are coming to the front in all departments of active life, and their influence is having a marked effect on the world's thought. Since women showed that they could live useful lives and maintain their independence without having to fall back on matrimony as a means of support, their position has changed. Parents row educate their daughters with as much care as their sons, and altgether the lot of women is far happier and more dignified than it was. In my opinion, indeed, women are progressing far more rapidly than men." FOR PROSPECTIVE BRIDES. I "God made you, but you marry yourself," wrote a witty author who had no belief in love's young theory that marriages are made in Heaven. This is a point well worth le- membering and taking to heart, for you will find much of life's success depends upon a happy marriage. Still, there are many amongst us who believe that falling in love is one of the matters over which we have little or no control, the part of life that fate predestines for us, the one time when we lose control of ourselves and are exalted to something above this humdrum existence, to a state of beatitude that the gods might mvy. So much for high romance. But beautiful and ideal as this theory sour.ds. .;ueh a state of bliss cannot last f(.r ever. There comes a time when it must sink to lower levels, when the lovers have to descend from their dream-castles in the clouds to prosaic earth, and all its everyday practi- calities. It is then that you find the test of iffection really comes. This is the crisis when it rests with you to prove that love and marriage need not be one whit the less ideal for being combined with a grain of common-sense, which, after all, is a far more profitable commodity than romantic musings though it is very much doubted if there is one lover in a hundred who will agree with this theory. NOT A BED OF ROSES. I This is the time for action, the time to pull yourself together and to begin to realise :hat, if you would make a success of matri- oaony, you must not wasu; all your energy in blissful contemplation of what marriage is -roincr to mean to you. Rather be up and ioing, preparing yourself for the practical lot that is far more likely t'b fall to your 3hare, and be ready to meet what marriage may really be going to mean for you. For Mitside the realm of fiction and poetic romance it is given to few to play the part >f hero or heroine. In the majority of cases experience must teach you that happy and delightful as married life may be, it is at the best a tame, placid affair compared with the roseate dreams which the romantic amongst us cherish, and which poets have sung about from time immemorial. Don't run away with the idea that matrimony is. a bed of rose leaves, when over and over again yoa have watched it prove itself a daily battle for existence, a fight not only for one's own happiness, but for the happiness and well-being of others equally concerned. lbED NOT BE A FAIMTRE. I This is the part you must meet and circumvent. It may not be nearly so exalted ar so heroic as the role that your favourite sharacter in fiction has been destined to play; but, nevertheless, you will find that it calls for all the devotion, the patience, the forbearance, and the high courage that the most passionate love can inspire. Moie- over, the task, though presenting difficulties, is one that can always be accomplished by perseverance and loving patience. For, given a capacity for affection, a eense of re- finement, consideration, and good temper, there is no reason why matrimony should prove the failure that it has in those cases where it found its origin in romantic bliss, and was based upon ideals, whose ,.nly fault lay in the fact that they were far too eulted for the average mortal to live up to. WHEN LOVE WANES. I There is one thing, and one thing only, to do when a man's love is dead, and that is to let him go. To "win back his love" is next to an impossibility. It is a pathetic sight to see two people, one madly in love with the other, and the other unable to re- ,ciprocate. And yet, "try to forget is the only advice that can be offered. The silliest thing a woman can do is to cling to tha man who wants to have done with her, and to try to bring him round to reciprocate her affection. If he is a sentimentalist he may be influenced, and vow that he really does love her, just to please her. But this will not alter his affections. He will shirk the marriage and put it off. Should he go as far as the altar, she is no better off, for doubtless, after marriage, he will state plainly that he doesn't careefor her, and that he only married her because she wor- ried him into it. It is not wise to surmise that a man's love is dead. The girl should make quite sure of it before acting accord- ingly. Bring him to the point of saying so. It will pay the ill-treated maid to do this, much as she may regret the parting, for a man in love can be gentleness itself, while In who loves not can be cruel as the grave. I CONSIDERED IDBAII. I The following are the measurements ot the ideal woman's hand: Round the wrist, where the first button of the glove meets, 5! inches; round the knuckles at the base of the fingers, 61 inches; round the hand at the ball of the thumb, 7! inches; from the base to the top of the thumb, 41 inches; from the top of the second finger to the fork, 3k inches; and the other fingers in proportion. As will be seen, this is not the very small hand; in fact, such a hand would wear a" 6t glove; that is con- sidered the perfect size, if the foregoing measurements are preserved. SUNLIGHT AND HEALTH. Sunlight is Nature's most powerful drug. But, as in the case of all drugs, we should remember to use it discreetly, for, although it contains. many health-giving qualities, it also contains many that are dangerous. Sunlight is composed of various coloured ravs, of which the most important are the red, the blue and, the ultra-violet. The latter rank with radium and the X-rays among the most remarkable known physical phenomena. They destroy animal tissues with astonishing rapidity. Most of us, when on holiday, immediately try to get sunburned, regarding a good, rich tan as a sure sign of improving health. As a matter of fact, there is nothing particularly healthy about a tanned skin. The tan is merely Nature's sunshade against the ultra- violet rays; and, if the City man has a white face, it is merely because the soot in the air serves to filter the sunlight. Red light in moderation is a splendid tonic for faded nerves, but only when taken in small doses. The red rays in sunlight are the cause of sunstroke. Blue light is very soothing, and often brings relief in cases of rheumatism or neuralgia; but when taken in large doses it tends to cause depression and melancholia. To REDUCB A DOUBLE CHIN. I Massage is most effectual for this, witii I the tips of the fingers massage with a rotary motion towards the ears, so that the flesh is formed in that direction, and not down the neck. A good exercise for re- ducing a double chin is to drop the chin to the chest and keeping the face straight roll the head slowly and with a relaxed motion, first to the left, then to the right, describ- ing a circle with the head. When the face is in an erect position. practice making the ear touch the shoulder, first the right, then the left, holding shoulders in their normal condition. High, tight collars should never be worn.

No title

Major-General Sir Percy Girouard has been re-elected a director (on returning to the company after helping the War Office and the Munitions Ministry), and Colonel A. G. Hadcock and Lord Sydenham have been elected directors of Sir W. G. Arm- t,trnnz. Whitworth and Company, Limited.

No title

Pruning Evergreens.—Evergreens that re- quire to be cut back every year to keep them in shape can now have attention. Hard pruning should not be practised, and merely the removal of the current season's Erowth is desirable at this time of year. Laurels, yews, and hollies can be treated like this, especially when they auf planted as hedges. Do not clip laurels with shears, but use secateurs, to avoid cutting the leaves in half. This is the best time to clip yew hedges, for if carefully trimmed they will-not make any more growth after this date. Take care to keep them true and even in shape, and use sharp shears for the purpose. < < Lilies of the Valley.—It may be necessary to have a few of these in flower before long, and up to the New Year retarded crowns will be found by far the most satisfactory. They should be obtained about three weeks POTTING LILIES OF THE VALLEY. A, potful of crowns ready for forcing. B, a good crown. before the flowers are needed, and ought to be potted up on arrival and placed in a warm frame, where they can be supplied with moisture and the crowns kept damp. « • Midseason Vifies.-As the grapes are cleared, have the vines thoroughly cleansed by syringing with an insecticide, following this the next day with a heavy syringing of clear water. Give ample ventilation night and day, and if from any cause there appears to be a possibility of the canes not ripening satisfactorily, allow a gentle heat in the hot water pipes. The laterals may be shortened somewhat, according as they are strong or weak; in any case, all sub- laterals may be cleared away. Muscats that are hanging ripe will need some care, as during the heat we sometimes experience in A.ugust it is quite easy to allow the bunches too much sunshine. On the other hand. during a spell of dull, damp weather it may he needful to turn on fire heat to allow a jirculation of air through the house. Red and White Currant Bushes.-Towards the end of summer it is advisable to thin out some of the branches on these bushes so as to admit all the light possible to the buds. Both red and white currants will bear a full crop of fruit every year if the buds are thoroughly matured. The buds form in clusters on spurs on the main stems of trees which are properly cared for. When finally pruned there is only one shoot left a few inches long; the others are cut back to within a bud or two of the base. On many bushes there are shoots which bear a number of leaves in bunches near the point; these are the ones you are advised to cut off. In the sketch they are shown at the letters a, and should be cut off part of the way down, as shown by the bars. Their removal will make a vast difference to the appearance of the bush; and light and sunshine will be freely admitted to the bada and the other branches. < < The Week's Work.—Tall-growing plants in the herbaceous border or elsewhere, includ- ing chrysanthemums, dahlias, sunflowers, rudbeckias, pyrethrum uliginosum and gladioli must have supports and ties to pre- vent damage by winds or being snapped off by weight of foliage. M. dissitiflora and other varieties of forget-me-nots may yet be sown, scattering the seed thinly on a par- tially shaded border. Unless the seedlings crowd one another they will not need trans- planting until they are ready to lift for planting in beds and borders. Cuttings of iresines, coleuses, alternantheras and mes- embrvanthemums should be inserted in 4.tin. pots "filled with sandy soil, and stood in a close frame until rooted, and afterwards placed on a greenhouse shelf. When all the fruit has been cut from the earliest vines examine the border, and, if necessary, give it a good watering. Rampant growth of laterals may be restricted, shortening them to half their length. Freely ventilate the house to ensure a well-ripened condition of the wood and plump buds near the base. Midseason vines should De well advanced in colouring and ripening. Fire heat is essential to success in cool, damp weather, with ample ventilation at all times. Keep the' soil moist, and apply stimulants occa- sionally. A mulching of light manure pre- vents evaporation of moisture. With the late vines good root action leads to the best results, and bunches will swell, colour and ripen more readily when these condi- tions can be maintained by the judicious use of water and liquid manure. Keep a temperature of 65deg. at night. Peaches and nectarines, both outdoor and under i under glass the borders containing the roots are better for mulching. Water and liquid manure may be applied. Hang nets under trees to catch ripening fruit which may fall. Make a sowing of prickly spinach to stand the winter. Sow the seed thinlv in shallow broad drills, which have first been watered copiously in very dry weather. The ground must be well broken up, but not heavily manured. A succession sowing of cabbage seed may be made, the plants from which will be useful to supplement an earlier raising. Seedlings of the latter may, as soon as large enough, be pricked out to strengthen. Growth being now com- pleted, lift the shallots and lay them out to thoroughly ripen in a sunny position. Store them in a cool, dry place. Figs.—These should now receive some at- tention in the rtlatter of thinning, stopping, and general regulation of growth. Fasten up strong shoots securely, as with the great weight of the foliage the branches are easily blown from their supports. < < < Strawberries.—Get old plantations cleared of runners and the usual crop of weeds to be found when the fruiting season has ended. Cut round each plant with an old knife to sever the runners, and the whole are then easily hoed off and raked up, Where new plantations are required, care should be taken that a sufficient number of plants are left for the purpose.

No title

Two Territorials are reported at Peter- borough to have been drowned. Driver Charles J. Phillips, R.F.A., while fishing in the Nene at Castor, jumped in to secure a fish, which took the line once round his neck. Private Geo. Beasley, A.S.C., a non- .clwinlmer, while bathing in the Welland at Newborough, stepped into a deep hole. Trooper Frank Cecil Powell, Norfolk Yeo- manry, died in the Diss Military Hospital as the result of injuries received :n a collision with a military motor-car while motor cycling.

MILLIONAIRE NAVVIESI 0

MILLIONAIRE NAVVIES. I —— 0- WITH THE COLONIALS IN GALLIFOLI I In a despatch from the Dardanelles Mr. Ellis Ashmead-Bartlett speaks of the amaz- ing physique of the Australian and New Zealand troops. Certainly (he says) no European nation has anything to compare with them. The Prussian Guard may be picked men, but they are fat and ungainly, whereas the Colonials are great, big-limbed athletes, without a pound of superfluous flesh among the lot after four months of active service. They are not so much an army as a community who had come to- gether for a certain job, and have framed their own code of laws to'ensure its being carried out. They work as a rule in little groups drawn together by home ties or mutual regard which has sprung up in the trenches or on the battlefield. These groups discipline themselves. Supposing stores have to be carried up from the beach or water taken to the trenches. A group told off for this pur- pose will not march smartly down under an officer or N.C.O. and carry out his orders as to how it shall be done. They saunter down slowly and sit down and light a pipe, contemplating the work before them. There is very likely a millionaire, a cowboy, a doctor, and a clerk present. Each gang has its unofficial leader, who has come to be re- cognised by the others, and after a time he will rise slowly and say, "Well, boys, it's got to be done, so the quicker we get it over the better." Then they start in and work like niggers, never stopping or slacking until it is finished. The other day a group of four millionaires were working at a mine-shaft. The task was not done when another regi- ment came to relieve the one to which they belonged. These four men refused to go down with their battalion until they had finished their job. as they wished it to be known as their job and no one else's. Another peculiarity of the Colonial soldier which distinguishes him in a marked degree from our own men is his dislike of clothes. Some on(f remarked very truly the other day that this campaign at the Dardanelles has only been rendered tolerable by the ex- cellent bathing. I do not suppose any other factor has counted so much in keeping the troops healthy and clean, and in restoring tr zrp ts their spirits after days and nights in the stuffy, dirty, smelly trenches. Especially do the Australians and New Zealanders love their periodical dips. To them the sea and the sun bath are as the breath of life. No sooner is a Colonial released from duty than he makes for the water, no matter the snipers and the bursting shrapnel. For -here, in far-off Gallipoli, for a short period each day, they imagine themselves once more under the southern sun, and return in- vigorated and refreshed to the stern work on the hills above.

I BOMBARDMENT CLAIM DISMISSED 1

I BOMBARDMENT CLAIM DISMISSED. 1 At West Hartlepool County-court judg- ment has been given by Judge Bousey in a case in which John George Cooper, an engine driver, claimed compensation from the North Eastern Railway Company for injuries sustained during the bombardment of the Hartlepools by German warships on December 16 last. Cooper was leaving the engine to take shelter when he was struck by a shell and his left arm was fractured. Judgment was given for the respondent company. The point at issue was whether the in- juries by an enemy shell could be regarded as arising in the course of employment. Several cases are affected by the decision. Judge Bousey said the mere fact that a man was on an engine shunting trucks at a place halfway between towns did not, in his opinion, expose him to any peculiar I danger due to the nature of his employ- ment. He had come to the conclusion that the accident did not arise out of employ- ment, and that firsts which had been proved did not bring the case within the law as stated in Craske v. Wigam by the Master of the Rolls and Lord Justice Buckley. So far as he knew, that view of the law had never been disturbed.

I WHY EXCURSIONS WERE STOPPEDI

I WHY EXCURSIONS WERE STOPPED. I A resolution protesting against railway companies for not running excursions to Bangor in connection with National Eistedd- fod last week evoked an interesting speech from Mr. Lloyd George at a meeting of the Eisteddfod Association. If a mistake had been made, said Mr. Lloyd George, it was made in the interests of the country, and railway companies were not to blame. Excursions had been stopped because they wished to have workmen at theL- work, and not attending football matches and races. They might say there was a difference between football matches and the Eisteddfod. Perhaps so, but if they started making distinctions where would they stop? If excursions had been run to Bangor people would have said, "Of course, Lloyd George did it. He got at the Presi- dent of the Board of Trade." It had been the policy of the Government from the start not to run excursions. It was not the time for excursions. What they wanted was the spirit of work and sacrifice, and not the spirit of excursions. The resolution was withdrawn.

I MUNITION WORKERS FINED I

I MUNITION WORKERS FINED. I At Jarrow, Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Company (Limited) took proceedings against eleven steel workers for absenting themselves from work, and claimed X2 per shift damage. Mr. Mundahl, for the firm, withdrew the charge against two of the men, and the others were ordered to pay damage. It was stated that the men were engagedon important Government contracts. The chair- man of the bench said he regretted that munition workers were lacking in duty at such a time. At Glasgow 16 men engaged on munitions work by Messrs. Charles Glasgow and Co., coach and van builders, of Paisley, were charged before a General Munitions Tribunal with having left their employment on July 23 and taken part in a strike in contravention of the Munitions of War Act. After lengthy evidence ten men were fined jB5 or five days' imprisonment, the charge against the remaining six men being with- drawn.

I USE PAPER MONEY

I USE PAPER MONEY. In view of the importance of strengthen- ing the gold reserves of the country for exchange purposes the Treasury have in- structed the Post Office and all public de- partments charged with the duty of making caish payments to use notes instead of gold coins whenever possible. The public gene- rally are earnestly requested in the national interest to co-operate with the Treasury in uhis policy by e (1) Paying in gold to the Post Office and to the Banks. (2) Asking for payment of cheques in notes rather than gold. (3) Using notes rather than gold for pay- ment of wages and cash disburse- ments generally. j

FATAL EXPLOSION AT WOOLWICHI

FATAL EXPLOSION AT WOOLWICH. An inquest was held at Woolwich concern- ing the death of William Henry Howey, an assistant foreman in the Royal Arsenal, who wis killed while testing hand grenades in a bomb-proof shelter. One of the bombs ex- ploded as he was about to throw it, and a large part of his hand was blown away. and he was filled from head to foot with frag- ments, death being instantaneous. Major Elliott, of the Inspection Branch, said the occurrence was probably due to a premature explosion, rather than to neglect on the part of the deceased, and a verdict of "Death by misadventure" was returned. Howey had been employed at the Arsenal for 35 years.

No title

While James Hardy, a native of Godal- tning, Surrey, was in the dock at Jersey Police-court. he was taken ill, and on being removed to the cells died within a few minutes,, v 0

CRUELTY TO A SERVANT I

CRUELTY TO A SERVANT. I BEATEN ALMOST EVERY DAY FOR SIX MONTHS. An extraordinary story of a young domestic servant's life of terror was told at the Banbridge (Co. Down) Petty Sessions on Saturday, when Mrs. Margaret Bethel, a farmer, was sentenced to a month's im- prisonment for cruelly beating Bridget Murphy, aged nineteen, a girl employed by her. Robert Gray, another servant in the em- ploy of Mrs. Bethel, was fined 40s. and costs, with the alternative of fourteen days' imprisonment, for aiding and abetting his mistress. The girl stated that she was beaten almost every day for six months with sticks, the handle of a pitchfork, and reins. On one occasion she was beaten so severely that her ears bled, and Mrs. Bethel cropped her hair with a horse-clipping machine. When she tried to run away Gray brought her back and looked on while she was beaten. The girl eventually managed to escape, and was found by two Banbridge policemen wandering aimlessly in a country road. "If we had not been told about her beforehand," said the head constable, "we should not have known whether she was a boy or a girl. Her hair was closely cropped, and her only clothes were an old bag with holes cut out for her head and arms, a jersey, and an under-garment. She wore a pair of boots, but no stockings. "Her arm was swoliell" from the wrist to the elbow, she had two lumps on her head, her mouth was swollen, and she had a mark on her left shin." The head constable had the girl conveyed to the local hospital, and a doctor found that her body was covered with weals and bruises. Some days later the head constable met Mrs. Bethel in Banbridge. She said she could do nothing with the girl unless she "kppt the stick over her." The head constable read a statement by Mrs. Bethel in which she said the girl told her that no one except the .devil knew any- thing about her. "I asked her to go down on her knees and have nothing more to do with the devil," said Mrs. Bethel. "She would- not answer me. I then caught her and said: 'Go in there and strip every stitch off you, 'and I'll beat you until you say you'll have nothing more to do with the devil.' She- made off, and I never saw her again until I saw her in the infirmary. "Many a time I lifted the potstick and flung it after her, and I may have hit her. I could hav* done nothing with her if I had thrashed her until I had killed her. I gave her no wages at all." Notice of appeal was given on behalf of Mrs. Bethel and Gray.

FROM OFFICER TO PRIVATE

FROM OFFICER TO PRIVATE STORY OF MAN WHO WAS ANXIOUS TO FIGHT. The remarkable story of how an officer fought and died as a private is told in the following statement issued by the Press Bureau:— In the "London Gazette" of August 6 a notice appears cancelling the removal from the service of Capt. H. S. Smart, Indian Army, which was notified in the "Gazette" of June 4 last. i The circumstances of the case are as fol- lows :— Capt. H. S. Smart, 53rd Sikhs, attached Xhyber Rifles, was granted short leave in December last, and did not rejoin on its ex- piration. All inquiries failed to trace him, and he was therefore removed from the ser- vice. It has since been ascertained that his action was due to his strong desire to join the force in France. It appears that he came to this country and enlisted, in the name of Thomas Ilardy, into the 2nd Batta- ion Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment. While serving with this battalion as a private he was killed in action at Festubert on May 17, 1915, where he displayed sucb gallantry that he would have been granted the Medal for Distinguished Conduct in the Field had he survived. In view of the special circumstances of the case, the Secretary of State for India, with the concurrence of the Army Council, decided to submit to His Majesty that the removal from the service of Capt. Smart should be cancelled, and His Majesty has been graciously pleased to approve this pro- posal. Capt. Smart appears to have taken part in the advance following the successful at- tack between Richebourg L'Avoue and Festubert, where the enemy's line w a,- broken over the greater part of a two-mile front. On May 17 Sir John French recorded that all the German trenches on this front had been captured.

IDEFRAUDING THE WAR OFFICEI

DEFRAUDING THE WAR OFFICE. Mr. Halkett, the Woolwich magistrate, heard a number of summonses on Saturday sgainst, soldiers and their relations for "attempting to obtain by false pretences from the regimental paymaster, Woolwich, a sum of money representing a soldier's separation allowance." Mr. E. F. Barker, for the Director of Public Prosecutions, said that all the cases arose out of false statements made by soldiers' mothers, and sometimes by sol- diers, regarding their earnings before they enlisted and the amounts they allowed their mothers before the war. "Scores of these cases will be brought before the Woolwich magistrate in the near future," said Mr. Barker. "There are hundreds of cases in which money has actually been -obtained in this way, and thousands mote in which such attempts have been made all over the country. It is very necessary to stamp it cut, especially in such times as these, when the country is paying £3,000,000 a day for the war." Mr. Hay Halkett said that separation allowances had been paid on a most lavish scale—far in excess of what had been in- tended-and in many cases the money was not used as it should be. "The duty of magistrates," he added, "is to deal most severely with women who do this sort of thing when the resources of the country are so heavily taxed. I wish it to be made known that in further cases of this kind I shall inflict imprisonment." One woman was fined .£3, another £ 2 108., and a third .£1 10s. A fourteen-year-old soldier who helped his mother to commit a fraud was fined < £ 1.

ISEVERAL SMALL VESSELS SUNKI

I SEVERAL SMALL VESSELS SUNK. The trawler Ocean Queen, A 175, was sunk on Saturday, and the master, H. G. Dunn, and the crew of ten men have been safely landed. Crews of the following vessels have also been landed, their vessels having been sunk: The trawlers Challenger and Heliotrope; the smacks Hesperus, Ivan, C. E. S., and Fisher- man; the steamer Glenravel, of Belfast; and the Swedish steamer Malmland. The Glenravel was a steel screw vessel of a little more than a thousand tone, built in 1906 by the Ailsa Shipbuilding Company, of Troon, and was owned by the Antrim Iron Ore Company, Limited. The Malmland was a steel screw steamer of 3,676 tons, built by W. Duxford and Sons, Limited, at Sunderland in 1904, and owned in Gothenburg.

No title

An old lady who suffered from the delusion that she was being persecuted committed suicide at Pimlico, London, by hanging her- self with a pair of stockings behind her bed- room door. It was stated at the inquest that she believed people in Westminster Abbey were talking about her. Mary Ann Graffunder, thirty-fpur, the 12nglisli-born wife of a German, was bound over at North London Police-court on a charge of attempting suicide with coal gas. It was stated that she had become low- fpirited because of her husband's intern- ment, and had an idea that relatives sneered f.t her as the wife of a German.

No title

I OUR CHILDRENS CORNER

I OUR CHILDREN'S CORNER. I BY I UNCLE RALPH. I My DEAR CHILDREN,— I have been thinking that as so many of you are away enjoying your holidays and may not see this column for a week or two, I will keep our big competition open until Wednesday, the 25th. This will give every- body a ood chance of solving the pictures. I have already received quite a number of solutions, but am looking every post for YOURS. With all good wishes for a lovely holiday, wherever you happen to be when you read these lines.—Ever your affectionate UNCLB RALPH. THB CHILDREN'S CORNER UNION. FOUNDED BY UNCLE RALPH. (Open to Boya and Qirle under 15 yeara.) Please enrol me as a Member of the C.C. U." I My age it years. N affte. Addrcoo Lale When tigned post to T-TNC 4 RALPH, 9, La. BaLLa SAUVAGE, LOHDO*, B.C. Members deslrini an Illuminated membership card, suitable tor framing, should oncloss ptany stamt with thi* form. I THE BOY WHO WOULDN'T. John was in a very bad temper. "Look here, John, I want you to——" began Tom, who was sitting on the table swinging his legs. "1 won't," said John, stamping his foot. "But, John, you really must try-" con- tinued Joan. "I shan't," said John putting his hands in his pockets and staring at his brother and sister, who both laughed at him. "I'm not going to do all you tell me," he shouted; "I'm not ai baby. I'm not going to fag for you all the time. You're both too, lazy for words. You think because you were born before I was that you can put on airs and lecture me. I'm not going to stand it." "Take a seat then," interrupted Tom, still laughing. "Oh, yes, you can laugh and try to be funny," John went on, growing more and more angry. "You can tell me that you want me to do this, and that I'm to try to do that, but I'm just not going to—so there!" "What's the matter with the kid?" said Joan. "It's not anything very dreadful we're asking you to do." "Rather not!" answered Tom. "He had to get out of bed the wrong side this morn- ing because I threw the wet sponge at him, and he's been like this ever since." "That's all nonsense," said John. "The sponge never hit me; you can't throw straight." "You made as much fuse as though it had, then," said Tom. "But. anyhow, that all happened long ago. Don't be stupid now, juBt-" "No," screamed John, "I won't. I've said so before, I won't. "If he'd only let us finish what we're try- ing to say!" sighed Joan. I shan't," said John, "I don't care what it is, so there!" "Very well, then," said Tom, "we won't. Come on, Joan, we'll finish them for our- Rclves," and he drew a bag out of his pocket. "We only wanted you to try this new sort of chocolate creams I got in the village," he said, as he put a large one in his mouth, and handed the bag to Joan. John gave one loud yell of rage and dis- appointment, rushed out of the room, and slammed the door hard. CLEVER ELEPHANTS. The gardenr to the Rajah of a place called Kuttapur Was a somewhat lazy Scotsman named McKay, I 'm tired of watering so many Who said, "I'm tired of watering 80 many thirsty plants, And so I think a new plan I will try." He got three sturdy elephants (you wish to know their names? Well, Ahmed," "Ranjit Singh" and "Rustemjee "). Who blew the water from their trunks through nozzles made of brass.- The gardens now are quite a treat to see. THE SURPRISE. The Jacksona lived in the country, and their father went to the city every day by train and came back at night. On Satur- days the train brought him home early, and Maud and Ethel and Tom and Mary looked forward to his coming, because he; always had oome surprise for them in his pocket. Now one day Maud had a splendid idea. 3he said, "Let's give father a surprise." They all agreed, and after thinking of a great many things they might do, they made up their minds that the best surprise would be to meet him at the station. So they started at once, as the station was a very long way off. They did not tell their mother what they were going to do, and she called after them that' they were to keep near the house, as there would be rain soon. But when they looked up at the sky they could not see any signs of rain, so they went on. Now when they had gone about half way to the station they felt some drops of rain, and they thought it would be better to take a short cut. So they turned up a lane that looked as if it would bring them straight to the station in no time. But the lane had a great many turnings, and though they a great many turni- l?"i on, they got no walked on, and on, and, on, they got no nearer the station. Then the rain began to fall more heavily, and their clothes became wet and sticky, and water trickled down their backs and went squishy-squash in their shoes. On and on they went, and every minute they got wetter and wetter, till at last the lane turned suddenly into a wood, and they found the way barred by a gate. What were they to do? They thought they had seen some place like -this before, but could not remember where, and they felt that they had walked at least ten miles. Tom said that the only thing to be done was to go back the way they had come; but then Mary began to cry, and said that sho was so tired that she could not walk another inch. They were. just wondering how they could manage to carry her, when they heard a voice that they knew, and who should appear at the other side of the gate but father! When they told him what had happened he laughed a great deal and said, "Do you mean to say that you did not know the wood at the back of your own house?" Then they all laughed, for now they knew where they had seen the gate before. And wheirt e wz father that gave the surprise after aD. — <

No title

The Home Office, having been approached by the National Association of Master Bakers with regard to the shortage of labour, has issued special regulations under which boys over beventeen may be em- ployed at night work in bakehouses for nicf hours each night and boys of fifteen an over may start work at 4 a.m. Through tht Belgian Minister, the Queen of the Belgians has sent her thanks to tile Lord Mayor of London for the birthday con- Sratulations sent by him in the name of tbØ City of London. Mr. Walter Long, at Trowbridge, said h8 was confident that as the forces were de- veloped a place would be found for the National Guard, and that the country woultl recognise them. Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Robert T.mb-ill Engineer and Railway Staff Corps, general manager of the London and Western Railway, has been gazetted gon- Colonel of the Western Sienal Companies-