Teitl Casgliad: Abergavenny Chronicle

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Mae hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn eiddo i Tindle Newspapers

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
26 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
OUR LONDON LETTER i a I

OUR LONDON LETTER, i —— .a- I [From Our tS'pectCf! Correepmdent.] If the Session of 1314-16 has not seen any Parliamentary reputations new ly made, it has seen some grow, and others, always high, triumphantly maintained. Mr. Lloyd. George, Mr. McEenna, Mr. Bonar Law, and Mr. have all done great serv ice., and there ca.) be no doubt that they stand higher with the House of Commons and the country than ever before. Mr. Lloyd George has worked almost a. miracle at the Ministry of Munition" and as Chancellor of the Ex- chequer Mr. McXenna hss 'been a great success. There must be quite a number of people who hav<; had their view's en Parliamentary men and things formed for them by certain newspapers who are rather surprised to nnd Mr. Asquith still at the head of the Govern- ment. There is, botv.c-cr, no mystery about it. The Prime position was never stronger than it is at present. His influence in the of Commons is greater than ever, and it open to doubt -whether any other man could have kept a Coalition Ministry together and received such Icyal support as Mr. Asquith has been able to count upon during the dinicult months we have been passing through. Many times since last May, when the Coalition Govern- ment was formed, there have been attacks on the Prime Minister. Thp.e attacks have been made in the hope of somehow bringing about his resignation, but all of them have failed, and Mr. AFcluith remains at the head of the Government, the trust and conSdence which members of all parties in the House of Commons repose in him quite unshaken. No doubt the journalictic attacks will con- tinue, but the general opinion in political circles aid in Fleet-street circles, too, is that "thev can't upset the old man." The decision of the authorities to close the museums and picture galleries is meet- ing with very strong criticism. The Govern- ment justifies its action, of course, en the ground of economy, but it seems that only ;E50,000 a.t the outside can be saved out of the quarter of a million or so which the in- stitutions cost annually. Of course, P-50,000 is worth saving, but was it worth saving in such a way? Our national treasure-houses were visited last year by five millions of persons, which is ample proof that they supply a need. That need is more insistent at such a time as this, when there is so much to depress people, than when life is running on normal lines. It might,; have been better if the authorities, instead of closing the museums and picture galleries, bad tried the experiment of making a. small charge for admission. Economy is to be practised in the parks as well as in the picture galleries. The usual display of blooms which in the Spring make the London parks veritable gardens of delight will not be in evidence this year. Last year no fresh bulbs were bought, and only in certain of the County Council parks, where the old bulbs have been planted, will tne tulips and daffodils bloom. In Regent'3 Park, Hyde Park, and the other Royal central parks, the beds will be bare, and in the suburbs, though the old bulbs have been used, the space for cowers hAs been cut down by about ktlf. I wonder how much will be saved by robbing London's great open spaces of Spring nowers. I wonder, too, whether some wounded soldier, just out of hospital on a sunny spring day, would not feel the better for seeing daffodils grow- ing in the Park. Up to the present the efforts to persuade the people with small savings to put their money into the War Loans have not met with anv great success. Another effort i& cow to be made. An interesting scheme has been recommended by the Committee on War Loans for Small Investors. Its chief feature is that for every deposit of 15s. 6d., or for every accumulation of savings to reach that sum, the subscriber shall receive ,E1 in five years from the date of the deposit. This amounts to a five per cent. investment. It is to be free of income tax, and may be taken advantage of by persons with less than .2300 income. The amount deposited is to be repayable at any time during the five years, though if withdrawn during the first twelve months no interest will be paid. It is proposed to establish col. lecting agencies and investment societies throughout the country. These, it is sug- gested, may be of two types—agencies whose work would be confined to the collec- tion of direct subscriptions to Government securities; and investment societies in the full sense, themselves accepting subscrip- tions from their members and investing them in Government securities to be held by the society. The latter bodies would be amiiated to and under the control of a strong central com'nittee. The plan offers an excellent investment, but it will have to be very clearly and carefully explained to the people it is desired to attract. The most interesting of the familiar works performed at the Queen's Hall Symphony Concert on Saturday was Dvorak's "From the New World" Symphony. This very striking and beautiful composition has for its leading subjects melodies beloved of the American negroes, and first made known to many people in this country by the Jubilee Singers from Fisk University. The Symphony was magnincently played. The eoloist of the afternoon was Mile. Lena, Eontorovitch, who played the Brahms Con- certo very finely. The "Good Friday" music from "Parsifal," Saint-Saens's "Le R&uet d'Ompha.le," and Liszt's First Rhapsody completed the scheme of the con- cert. A. E. M. I

KINGS SPEECH IN PARLIAMENT I

KING'S SPEECH IN PARLIAMENT. I Parliament w¡:s prorogued by Royal Com- mission on The Lord ChapceIIcr read the King's "Speech, which was aa follov.'s:— My L.ORDS, AKD GENTLEMEN, t For eighteen months My Navy and Army have been engaged in concert with brave and steadfast Allies, in defending our common liberties aud the public law of Europe against the unprovoked encroach- ments of the enemy. I am sustained by the determination of My people at home and overseas to carry our Hag to a final and decisive victory. GENTLEMEN OF THE 11 S USE OF COMMONS, j I thank you for the ungrudging liberality I with which you have made provision for the I heavy demands of the War. My LORDS, AND GENTI/EKEN, t In this struggle, forced upon us by thcoe who hold in light esteem the liberties and 

No title

A New Zealander, William Brown, who was rejected in that colony because he failed to come up to the height standard, concealed himself in a homeward-bound eteamer and worked his passage over. He is now a member of the bantam battalion raised in Leicester—hi

BOMBS DROPPED OVER SIX IENGLISH COUNTIES

BOMBS DROPPED OVER SIX ENGLISH COUNTIES. —— < t—— ? 54 {HLLEB:  67 INJURED. I The biggTat raid yd attempted by Zeppe- hns took place on Monday night, when six German airships dropped 220 bombs in six counties, killing' fifty-four persons and in- juring sixty-seven. The material damage was not considerable, and the military dage was nil. The earliest public announcement of the raid was made ;n the following statement issued by the War OSice at 1.40 a.m. on Tuesday:— "A ZeppcHn raid by six or seven air- ships took place la=t -night over the Eastern, North-East-ern, and Midland Counties. A number of bombs were dropped, but up to the present no considerable damage has been reported. "A further statement will be issued as soon as practicable." I "EXTENSIVE SCALE." No further news was forthcoming until six o'clock in the evening-, wh2n the sub- joined statement was issued :— "The air raid of last night was attempted on an but it appears that the raiders were hampered by the thick mi,;t. "After crowing' the coast the Zeppelins various courses, and dropped bombs at several towns, and in rural districts, in Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, and Staffordshire. "Some damage to property WM cau<-ed. "No accurate reports were received unit! a very late hour. "The casualties notined up to the time of issuing this statement amount to: Persons killed, 54; injured, S7. I 220 BOMBS DROPPED. At 7.55 p.m. the War Omce issued the following further communique:— "Further reports of last night's raid show that the evening's air attacks covered a larger area than on any previous occasion. "Bombs were dropped in Norfolk, Suffolk, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire, Staffordshire, and Derbyshire, the number being estimated at 220. "Except in one part of Staffordshire the material damage was not considerable, and in no case was any military damage caused. "No further casualties have been reported, J and the ngurps remain as: Killed, 54; in- lured. 67." I FORMER RAIDS. I I The following' is a list of the Zeppelin I rf.ids which have taken place during the I war: 1915. K'ld. Inj. Jan. 19.-Yarmouth, Sheringham and King's Lynn 4. 9 Feb. 21.—Colchester, CoggeshaH,and Braintree —— April 14.-Tyneside — 2 April 15.—Lowestoft and East Coast — April 16.-Faversham — — April 29.-Ipswich and Bury St. Edmunds — MaylO.—Southend I. 1 Mavl6.—Ramsgate I. 3 May 27.—Southed 2 4 Mav 31.—Outer London 6 — June 4.-East and South-East Coast 24 40 June 6.—East Coast 5.40 June 15.—North-East Coast 16 40 July 3.—Harwich —— Aug. 9.-East Coast 14.14 Aug-. 12.-East Coast. 6.23 Aug. 17.-Eastern Counties 10 36 Sept. 7.-Eastern Counties 13 43 Sept. 8.—Eastern Counties and London 20.86 Sept. 11.—East Coast. — Sept. ]2.—East Coast — Sept. 13.-Kentish Coast 7 Oct. 13.—London and Eastern Coun- ties 56 .114. (soldiers) 15.13 On June 7 Flight Sub-Lieutenant R. A. J. Warneford, R.N.. destroyed a- Zeppelin, which he attacked in the air between Ghent and Brussels at 6,000ft. During the raid on August 9 a Zeppelin was seriously damaged by land defence gun- nie, and, being attacked by aircraft from Dunkirk, was completely destroyed.

A PLUCKY SKIPPER I

A PLUCKY SKIPPER. I A thrilling story of a trawler skipper's heruism wa.s told at Grimsby on Monday upon the arrival in port of the trawler Pelican. On Thursday night last, during fishing operations in the North Sea, the gear was being hauled up, and upon reaching the side of the vessel it was Been that a German mine waa embedded in the net. Before the haul- ing couid be stopped the mine became jammed to the after part of the gallows. As there was danger of its exploding at any moment, owiug to the heaving of the vessel, the skipper, Frederick Firth, ordered the crew to launch the small boat and get away to safety. This they did, taking with them a compass, rockets, provisions, and water. A further order was given to the crew to crui se about after reaching a safe distance, and if anything happened to the ship to search for the skipper's body, dead or alive, as it was his intention to free the mine if pos6ibl< Left alone on the vessel, the skipper donned a life-jacket, acd then, with the aid of a small light, set about hia self-imposed and dangerous task. He managed to dis- lodge the mine from its fastening, after which he sank it in fourteen fathoms of water, and then worked the winch to pay out 120 fathoms of wire warp, to which the gear was amxed, in order that the traveler tcight drift clear of the danger zone. This done. he signalled to the crew to come on board again. As they were doing this the mine exploded with such force that a bii-C column of water wa

INFANT IN ARMS IN BOCK I

INFANT IN ARMS IN BOCK. I An infant in arms, aged three months, was charged at Tower Bridge Police-court with living in an improper house. The child had been placed out to nurse, and was handed to its mother, who had been traced. No fewer than nfty-nve juveniles—a re- cord number-were before the magistrate. This wave of juvenile crime ie attributed to fathers being at the Front and to the darkened streets, which facilitate shop thefte. At the Tottenham Juvenile Court there were twenty prisoners and it was reported that all the homes for bad boys were full.

A COUNCILS GAS BIU I

A COUNCIL'S GAS BIU. I The Leiston-cum-Sizewel! Urban District Council were ordered, in the King's Bench Division on Tuesday, to pay the Leiston Gae Company J6157 15e. 9d., three quarterly payments for street lighting, and costs. The council's view was that, as the mili- tary authorities had forbidden street light- ing-, the contract with' the gas company came to an end, but Mr. Justice Low held otherwise, and commented on local authori- ties spending ratepayers' money on litiga- tion at the present time. A stay of execution was granted pending an appeal.

No title

A Merthyr milk vendor was fined 20s. in respect of milk being acid by a boy from an unbred milk can at Penydarren, where, the Town Clerk mentioned, the rate of in- fant mortality was 149 per thousand, and compared with 119 in other parts of the borough. The King has appointed Mr. Walter —M. Gibaon, M.V.O., I.S.O., to be one of the Scents-at-Arms in Ordinary to Ins MajeBty in the place of the late Captam GeorseA. Broad, M.V.O., B.N.

THIRTEEN BOMBS ON WORKING CLASS DISTRICT

THIRTEEN BOMBS ON WORKING. CLASS DISTRICT. -— — I TWENTY-FIVE KILLEB. Paris was visited on Saturday night by a Zeppelin, which, travelling at high epeed and at a. great height, dropped thirteen bombs on a work-ing-class quarter of the city. Twenty-five persons were killed, and thirty seriously wounded, most of the victims being women and children. A squadron of thirty aeroplanes rose in pur- suit, but the airmen were hampered by fog, which also prevented the searchlights locat- ing the raider. According to the Paris correspondent of the "Telegraph," the Zeppelin was actually seen only by five aviators. One of these was a plucky young pilot, whose name we do not know, and who alone was able to attack the pirate airship. It seems to have been he alone who single-handed drove the Zeppelin away. Shots were exchanged between the Zeppelin and the aeroplane in what must have been one of the most weird encounters, even in this war, at a height of 12,000ft. in the dense darkness over fog-shrouded Paris. I PARIS IN DARKNESS. I No sooner was the alarm given than, of course, all Paris flocked into the streets, which had been completely darkened. Crowds gathered in the pitch black Place de la Concorde, the Place de 1'Etoile, the Place de FOpera, and especially on the Montmartre heights, whence the best view was expected, but none was obtained owing to the mist. In the working district, where nine houses were more or less demolished, involving the death of or injury to nearly sixty poor workers, the alarm during the few minutes of the bombardment was naturally consider- able. Beyond that Paris is absolutely un- moved. The bombardment lasted only a few minutes, but this sumced for the infernal machines to do considerable damage. One bomb burst through a tunnel, and the train which bad left the station a moment before had a lucky escape. Several workmen's dwellings were shattered. One still pre- served its frontage, but when one entered the courtyard all the back part seemed to be in ruins. The bomb literally sliced off all the back of the house, leaving the facade. Here the casualties were severe. In another workmen's dwelling-house one family had a wonderful escape. Though living on the top noor, they are safe and sound, whereas the family on the ground 6oor were killed. One old man, picked out of the wreckage and thought to be dead, suddenly came to, though still confused in his mind, and said to a iireman: "HuHo! are you the pompier? I thought you might be the Bochp." Then be saluted the captain of the brigade. A policeman Wat; just dressing to go on night duty when he was killed. ALL VICTIMS INDOORS. I The correspondent of the "JJauy Chronicle" says it is a curious fact that not one was struck in the streets, and that all the victims were under cover. Describing the damage, the correspondent savs: In a narrow twisting street two bombs fell, completely destroying two houses side by side. Six corpses were found here. One was that of an elderly workman. A woman and her two small children were also over- whelmed, and among the other victims were a boy of twelve, who had two legs broken, and a soldier who had only just home for a short holiday, and his daughter, aged fif- teen. Next door a wall was broken down, killing two women and a child, who did not live there, but who had entered the building panic-stricken to find a shelter. In another populous street two bombs burst near together, the first bursting in a wall and the other completely destroying a small dwelling-house, in which a man and woman were killed. The man's wife was blown by the force of the explosion some yards away, but waa not seriously hurt. REFUGEES KILLED. I In a small street, where a number of the French civilian refugees from the invaded Departments returned from Germany during the last few days have taken refuge, two bombs fell. A four-storey building was gutted, and here the mutilated bodies of a man and his wife were found, while a young man wae rescued shockingly injured. The other projectile exploded in the court- yard of the building opposite where many women and children were wounded. Near here there is a.c short passage, where three houses were smashed in, a woman and her young son being killed, while her husband suffered terrible injuries. In one of the houses struck a girl of five years was sleeping in her little bed. On hearing the first alarm her aunt went down into the street. When the explosion occurred ehe rushed back, and on finding the child still sleeping peacefully she burst into tears. In another house a soldier of the First Zouaves, who had just reached home from hospital, was killed with his wife. There was another raid on Paris by & single Zeppelin on Sunday night, but the airship was received with a hot fire from the anti-aircraft guns of the outlying forts and from aeroplanes, and did no damage, the bombs falling on open ground.

INTRODUCED THE BARREL ORGAN I

INTRODUCED THE BARREL ORGAN. I The death hae occurred at Newport (Isle t of Wight) of Cosino di GIcca, aged eighty- four, who claimed to be the nrst Italian to come to England with the barrel organ. He landed at Bristol in 1854, and had been in the Isle of Wight for nearly half a century. In the days when Queen Victoria resided at Osborne House he was permitted to go into the grounds, and was patronised by her Majesty. He never became naturalised, and although so long a resident in this country spoke English very imperfectly.

DEATH OF SIR C ROYDS I

DEATH OF SIR C. ROYDS. I Sir Clement Molyncux Royds, C.B., for- merly chairman of Williams Deacons Bank (Limited), and Conservative member for Rochdale from 1895 to 1906, has died at St. Asaph. He was at one time Colonel Com- manding the Duke of Lancaster's Own Im- perial Yeomanry, Hon. Colonel of the 2nd Volunteer Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers, and a Knight Justice of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem in England. He was born in 1842.

LORD SELBORNES SON WOUNDED I

LORD SELBORNE'S SON WOUNDED. I Captain the Hon. R. S. A. Palmer, second son of the Earl, of Selborne, is otEcially re- ported to have been wounded in Mesopo- tamia. Captain Palmer joined the 6th (Tern. torial) Battalion of the Hampshire Regi- ment in 1913. Lord Selborne is honorary colonel of the 3rd Battalion of the same regiment.

ISR G PILKINGTON PBAD I

S!R G PILKINGTON PBAD. I The death has occurred at Southp>:r, in his sixty-eighth year, of Sir George Pilking- ton, twice M.r. for the Southport Division of Lancashire. Sir George Pilkingtpn had also been High Sheriff of Lancashire, and was a director of the Lane,-xhire and York- shire railway, and of the Manchester and County Bank.

No title

Mr. Patrick J. Whitty, Dublin, naa beon selected as the Irish party's candidate for the vacant constituency of North Louth. Sergeant Williim Whiting, who served through the Crimea war with the 17th Brigade, Royal Artillery, has died in his ninetieth year at Bacton, Sunolk. His wife, who died in 1894, went through several en- gagements with hr husband, ai.d was named in despatches for her courage.

No title

Bedding- Lobelias.—These a,re favourites with most flower lovers, the blue lobelia edging being popular for beds and borders. They are quite easy to raise from seeds. Prepare a level surface to t-ha pot and scatter the seeds thinly over it, 

No title

Mr. Tennant states that a soldier who ia deemed to be enlisted und<;r the Compul&ion Bilt will not be deemed to have oonseuted to be vaccinated. No business had suffered owing to the war like laundries, said a man in the trade at Clerlcenwell County-court. HWe are eight million double collars short every week,"} he added.

GERMAN LINE VIGOROUSLY BOMBARDED

GERMAN LINE VIGOROUSLY BOMBARDED. On Saturday night the Pr&ss Bureau issued the following despatch from the General Headquarters in France: "Yesterday evening, fitter a heavy bojn- bardment, the enemy entered some of our snp3 near Carnoy. Counter-attacks early thi.9 morning drove them out. The enemy left some dead and v.'cunded behind. "The hostile shelling in this area. has con- tinued to-day. "Hostile bombing- attacks about the Quarries and near Givenchy were repulsed last night and this morning. "The shelling about Loos has been very heavy,, but has now diminished a little. Our artillery has replied vigorously to the enemy's fire, and has in addition carried out bombardments of other points of the line, doing considerable damage to the hostile trenches." On Sunday the Press Bureau issued the following despatch "Last night there v.-as considerable artil- lery activity about Vaux. "Three of our patrols successfully bombed German trenches near Serre, ind a hostile patrol which was encountered was driven off. "To-day has been generally foggy. There ha. been some artillery work about Fricourt, but othcrwi &e there is nothing to report." I ATTACK ON GERMAN TRENCHES On Monday night the following despatch was is&ued: "Laet night a party entered the German trenches about the Kemmel-Wyt<-chaete road. These trenches were found to be full of men. "About forty casualties were inflicted on the enemy, three prisoners were brought back, and two cf their machine-guns de- stroyed. "During the day there has been consider- able artillery activity about Fricourt and north of Loos and to the north of Wulver- ghem.

ITRADING WITH THE ENEMY

I TRADING WITH THE ENEMY. William Alfred Wil-son, a dealer in chemi- cals, of 5, Bevis Marks, Ijondon, was sum- monad at Guildhall Police-court, on Mon. day, for having committed a. breach of the Trading with the Enemy Act by trading In carbonate of potash coming' from Germany. Mr. E. Wilde, K.C., representing' the defen- dant, pleaded not guilty. Mr. Travers Humphreys, prosecuting, said the defendant was the sole partner of a nnn trading as Wilson and Co. On November 4 last ho wrote to the Board of Customs a.sk- ing permission to import &omc carbonate of potash. The matter was referred to the Home OSce, but it WIS thought that before dealing with it, it would be desirable that inquiries should be made, for it was known that German carbonate of potash was being eo!d. It appeared that the defendant had bought a ton of the carbonate of potash from an American nrm, Don D. Lewi.s, of New York. The correspondenc'e began on September 29, and it would be eeen that Mr. Lewis clearly indicated that the chemical was of German origin, and as the defendant attended to his own correspondence he must have been aware of it, because he had put down written comments against each article. The defendant gave evidence on oath, and said that he had no idea that he was doing anything illegal in giving the order. He did not, as a matter of fact, know that the potash was of German origin. He admitted that he had been careless in neglecting his correspondence owing to his staff being de- pleted on account of the war. Sir John Baddelcy considered that the de- fendant must have known the goods were German goods. This sort of oncnce rnilst be dealt with severely, but he would take into consideration the defendant's high ch aracter and the fact that he had his nve eons serv- ing the country and also that he was look- ing after two 'Belgian women refugees. He should therefore only impose a mitigated penalty of .E50 and X10 10s. costs.

GALLANTRY AT SEA

GALLANTRY AT SEA. For gallantry displayed in escaping from the attacks of German battleplanes and aeroplanes near the West Hinder Lightship on October 30 and November 4, Captains Brannel and Eelly, of the steamers Avocet and Dotterel, of 'the Cork Steamship Com- pany, were ni Liverpool on Monday pre- sented with cheques for one hundred guineas ea.ch. "When the war started, said Sir Norman Hill, "there were 1,050 vessels entered in the War Hi.sks Insurance Company.. The enemv have d£",troyed sixty vessels, but we have added seventy-two. The tonnage of vessels destroyed was 34.8,000 tons, but we have added 458,000 tons. "During- the whole of the eighteen months, so far as I am aware, not a single ship has been kept for a single day in port by reason of the omcers or crew refusing to take the risk." It was mentiomd that Captain EeHy's vessel had since been struck by a. mine.

A CROWDED HOUSE

A CROWDED HOUSE. ? When Mrs. Rose Annie Hatcnctt, of Staveley-road, Ashford, was sunmoned at Feltham Police-court on Monday for failing to abate nuisances at her nou6e caused by overcrowding, Mr. C. Rogers, the sanitary inspector, said he found thirteen children and se.-en adults living in Mrs. Ratchett's four-roomed cottage. Mrs. Hatchett, who pleaded that there were only fourteen people in the house now, was ordered to abate the nuisances in seven days.

CORONER AND MOTOR ACCIDENTSI

CORONER AND MOTOR ACCIDENTS. At 

NO BED FOR FORTY YEARS I

NO BED FOR FORTY YEARS. K farm servant named Owen Williams, who has died at Mansel Farm, Bishopaton., near Swansea, had not, it is stated, been to bed for more than forty years. Williams, who was over seventy years old, was eccentric. Many years ago, he told his friends, he was "crossed in love," and then swore he would never lie on a bed again. Since that time he has slept chiefly in stablea. He was drying himself after a wash when he fell dead. No

KILLED BY MOTORBUS

KILLED BY MOTOR-'BUS. Two soldiers. Privates A. Abbotts and J. Airee, belonging to the Northampton Regi- tnent, were knocked down and killed by a motor-omnibus at Strood Hill, near Roches- ter, in the darkness on Sunday night. The driver pulled up immediately on realising that he had run over something, and both men were removed to hospital, but Abbotts died before reaching the institution, and Aires succumbed while undergoing surgical examination. The omnibua was on its wav to Chatham.

No title

Mr. C. Roberts, for the India Omce, said recently that German nrma had control of aome of the 'wolfram mines in India since the war. The Indian Government hae taken powers to work the mines and prohibit ex- port to any pl&ce except the United Kiag- dcm. Wolfram consists of iron-manganese tf.ngatate.

No title

If the hands are thoroughly greased witt vaseline before using' dye.s it will preveat the stain penetrating deeply into the ekim. To remove Snger mark? from a door rub with a flannel dipped in pnramn oil, then wipe with a clean cloth wrung cut in v<

No title

A. report of the London Insurance Com- mittee makes it clear that panel doctors can only enlist when they are able to make ar- rangements for the fulnlment of their panel agreement at home. In order to meet the heavy demands on the Exchequer, the Dutch Government has introduced a Bill for raising the inland post- age rates and the charges for telephone calls and urgent telegrams.