Teitl Casgliad: Barry Dock news

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

™BACK WARNS « -I THEK)AU K It#ARNSYOUI  Ever'1/ Picture tell8 a Story. I Any Stubborn Pain in the Small of the Back is good cause to suspect your Kidneys, for that is where the Kidneys are. Do you suffer from shooting or continuous pains in the back ? Or from a heavy, tired feeling on rising in the morning ? Heavy, throbbing backaches, and sharp twinges when you stoop, bend or give your back a sudden twist, tell you of swollen, inflamed kidneys, kidneys sore, overworked and tired. The kidneys have enough to do when you are in good health, to filter the blood free of uric poisons. Colds, fevers, overwork, or excesses of any sort, congest and overwork the kidneys. The kidneys weaken, and unless promptly relieved, what was at first a simple inflammation, will turn, in time, to uric, poisoning, gravel, dropsy, rheumatism, or I Bright's disease. A kidney and bladder medicine is needed to help the kidneys throw off this poisonous waste. That is what Doan's Backache Kidney Pills are for. They are solely for the kidneys and urinary system. They do one thing only, but they do that one thing well. They regulate the kidneys and bladder like ordinary medicines regulate the bowels. They are guaranteed to contain no poisonous ingredients or injurious drugs whatever, and they have no bad after- effects. I,i 0 boxes only, six boxit 13/9. Neve)- int(i 1,nse. Oj all rhemlils and 8IQre,, 0'" fiom Fosler-MrCUU

CADOXTON OLD BOYf I ENTERTAINED j i

CADOXTON -OLD BOYf" I ENTERTAINED. j Through the kindness of Councillor ,T. Felix WiHimn-. the pMsidcnt, the r members and friends of the Cadaxton-Barry Old Boys' A.F.C. were entertained to dinner at the Royal Hotel, Cadoxton, on Saturday even- ing last, and an exceedingly interesting time was spent. Mr. Felix Williams pre.s-ided, and expressed pleasure at the suceesses of the Old Boys Club since its inception three years ago. They had, he said, always played a sporting game, and their opponents always regarded them as a tough handful. He wished them every success in the future. Mt-. H. Waters gave The Cadoxton Old Boys A.F.C. and in. response Mr. R. Jones, the captain, said that so far this sea- son the club had played fourteen matches, won ten. drawn two, and lost two, whilst thev had scored 31 goals, compared with 15 gols against. They held the top position in the Cardiff and District League, and were 4 in the third rounds of the South Wales Junior and Ninian Cup competitions. They were a:"() to appear in the bccond ronnd of the Barry A.S.R.S.Can. Other toasts were, the President and Offi- cers (proposed by Mr. A. K. Knill. res- ponded to fev Mr* T). Matthews), the artistes, and the host and hostess. A mu ■• ical programme was rendered hp Messrs. C. J. Waters, R. J. Hemming*, F. Biss, and C. B. Griffiths.

STRUCK BY STONE I

STRUCK BY STONE. 13.\ HH\- LAB' )'I.UprrS FH,\í 'TI -liE]) ¡ ?- -1 ? ?- 1) l? [ T 1-,l I William French (->9), a Iah"m'?-. d .!s, I Kath!epn-stropt. B?rry, was working at Rhoos? Cement Works oil Friday la,t, when a. ]zir,,(, fell' and struck h?m on the hcad. French was ren d ered unconscious, -and rarrtpd to the Barrv Town Accident Hospital, where it was found that his skull had been fractured. At the ho?p?al he ?as attended ?y Dr, ?n?s?? Jones, M.D. '1'110 injured man succumbed to his injuries at the Barry Hospital on Monday. )

Advertising

  alum a! ???—?? Ila  ?  Facsimile oj One-Ounce fadtá. Archer"a Golden Returns I ft. feffMtioit of Ptpa TobaaMe CoOL. Bwrrr, Ata Ffacf iky.

j TWENTIETH CENTURY CLUB BARRY

j TWENTIETH CENTURY CLUB, BARRY. This Club expects a great treat on Fri- day, January 23rd, at 8 p.m., at St. Mary's Hail, Barry Docks. They have been able to arrange to have a lecture from Miss Raw, M.A., the newly-appointed principal of the Glamorgan Training College at Barry, which opens next September. Miss Raw's subject is particularly interesting, and should ap- peal to a large number of people in Barry. It is Education.—Yesterday, To-day, and To-morrow." As a rule a small charge is now made for admission to the Club lectures, as these are free only to n-Lzrtibers, but on this occasion no charge will be made, and the L'dnre will be open to all citizens over 14 years of age. It is hoped- that the sub- ject and the speaker will appeal to the fol- lowing classes of citizens—1st, All those actually engaged in teaching; Miss Raw will, no doubt, refer to some of the newest de- velopments in education. 2nd, All those who are concerned in the administration of edu- cation, e.g., the Education Committee, Even- ing Classes Committee, Scoutmasters, etc. 3rd, All those who have children to be edu- rcated. 4th, All those who pay the educa- tion rale. Tf all these attend, we shall have a crowded audience. Most of us believe in a democratic form of administration in edu- cation, but this makes it necessary" that pub- lic men should understand education. Most of us believe in giving a good deal of liberty to parents in matters educational, but this necessitates that parents should understand education. Barry has beep chosen as the location of th3 Tlà ining College partly because of its good schools and the liberality and interest of its citizens in educational matters. We hope a crowded audience on the 3rd will wel- come the first Principal of the College.— 1 P. Hughes, President.

I EARiri RED CROSS DETACHI MENT WOMEN rJ

EARiri RED CROSS DETACH- MENT (WOMEN). .r'.J' \). Lectures on First Aid by Dr. King, Jan. 15th and 22nd, at 8 p.m. i Red Cross Examination, Jan. 29th. Mem- ber.* must he in their places at G.lo p.m.— J E. P. Hughos, Hon. Sec.

KNOCKED DOWN BY RUNAWAY CART

KNOCKED DOWN BY RUNAWAY CART. II \!)TI\'  NIJ-1" r\.J'TnEJ) I IL\m?.' I f? !N?J i -P?,E 1). 1 Whilst a .horse attached to a lorry was be- ing driven in Subway-road, Barry Docks, on Friday las:, the animal took fright and bolted. A ship's painter, named Edward Elli- Kjn, who was on the road at tho time, at- tempted to run to safety, hut he was caught and .it-ruck by the shaft of the veihicle, and knocked down. Ellison sustained severe in- juries to his hack, and his legs and arms were hadly bruised. He was taken home. I

THE COST OF EDUCATION AT I BARRY I

THE COST OF EDUCATION AT I BARRY. INTERESTING STATISTICS BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE II N.U .T. BRANCH. THE STATE AND THE CHILD. I MR, EDGAR JONES. M.P., ON THE NEW IDEAL. I MORE SECONDARY AND HIGHER EDUCATION NEEDED. Some interesting statistics regarding the cost of education at Barry were given at a public meeting at St. Mary's Hall, Barry Docks, on Monday evening last. The meet- ing, which was largely attended, was under the auspices of the Barry Branch of the National Union of Teachers, and an address on "The State and the Child" was delivered by Mr. Edgar Jones, the senior M.P. for Merthyr Boroughs, who regarded the coming, of secondary education as one of the greatest historical events in the history of Wales Elementary Education was the most impor- tant of the three branches of education. The chair was occupied by Mr. A. W. Storey, the president of the local branch of the National Union, and amongst the large audience of teachers and others interested in the education movement were Professor Tom Jones, M.A. (secretary of the "Welsh National Insurance Commission), Messrs. J. Lowdon, J.P., Edgar Jones, M.A., Evan Davies (member of the N.F.T. Executive). T. J. Lewis (secretary of the Barry N.U.T.), J. O. Davies, E. T. Bees, etc. On behalf of the Barry N.U.T., and on behalf of the population of Barry, the Chair- man welcomed Mr. Edgar Jones. If Mr. Jones had a rival there that evening, said the Chairman, which might outbid him in popularity, he thought it must be the sub- ject, because in Barry especially anthing con- nected with education always claimed the at- tention and sympathy of the townspeople. (Cheers.) Many of the obligations of the State to the child had been, and could be. fulfilled by a mere stroke of the pen, and when they came to consider the demands of the child upon the State, from an educational point of view, they had a very much more difficult position. No matter what they might d&siro for the child, or in whatever direction they moved, they were at once met by the ominous word cost. Therefore the principal and obvious duty of the State was to render financial assistance to the child through the parent. If education was growing in the slightest degree unpopular, or if the enthusi- asm for education was in any way waning, it was due, not to any lack on the part of the teachers, or those engaged in the profession, or even those responsible for the administra- tion, but the growing cost of education. In Barry in particular this need for financial assistance was very strong, because of its peculiar position. Many people had a rather peculiar way of regarding any figures relat- ing to the cost of education, and, as a rule, one glance was sufficient. The cost of educa- tion, as put before the people, was certainly very large, and some people, who were par- ticularly adept, and had a very simple form of arithmetic, were rather fond of putting before them the total cost, and one eonse- quently thought that these figures constituted the amount they had to expend upon educa- tion. With regard to Barry, if they took a casual glance at the education estimates for the year ending March 31st, 1914, they would see that they were credited with spend- the enormous sum of £ 51,000 on elementary education. It had been published in the Press that the total cost per child in this town for education was JG7 16s. But did they really pay this sum? In Barry they were paying with respect to loans something equal to £1 3s. per child, which left the cost of education at jE6 13s. Higher education cost 3/6 per child, but inasmuch as it was not a charge incurred in the elementary schools it should not be included. There was another small sum of 3/2 per child for officials, seldom or never in the schools. Therefore, the total cost of education was brought down to t6 6s. 4d, which was the actual cost of adminis- tration of elementary education in the schools. This, he regarded as a kind of in- vestment. In the first place, grants were earned amounting to t2 3s. 6d. per child- ordinary grants. Then they had the special grant, which brought in another L2 per child. With regard to this special grant, of which so little was known, but which played such a great part in the nnances of Barry, it was a grant which was only given to those Educational Authorities which, realising thl importance of education, were willing to spend a reasonable amount upon the educ* tion of the children. Many neighbouring towns, where the rate was lower, did not get this special grant. Barry got the grant be- cause here a reasonable amount was spent upon education, and thus secured the special grant* of £ 12,500, equal to £ 2 per child. That brought the total down to C2 3s. 4d. It was stated in the Press recently that the total amount spent on teachers' salaries in this town amounted to £5 5s. 3d. per child. These figures might be correct, but taking the year lie had referred to, the amount was £ 5 3s. Gd. per child. Supposing, for instance, they engaged an intelligent creature for £ 5 3s. Gel. per annum, and that creature, being intelligent, had an earning capacity, and brought them in a revenue of £4 3s. 6d. What would business men and women then say was the actual cost? Naturally, it would be a difference of £ 1 per annum. Therefore, the teachers cost them £ 5 3s. 6d. per child. But having the earning capacity—not a very large one for themselves, lie must admit- but they earned for the town L4 3s. 6d. per child per annum. Therefore the cost of teachers was £1 per head per year, the re- mainder paid them having been earned by grants from the State. Barry stood as a special example of a town which had to pay a huge amount of loans. Mr. Edgar Jones, M.P., was accorded a warm welcome on rising to address the meet- ing. At the outset he referred to the pro- gress of education from the early days, until gradually a new conception of the child had grown up. But they had started in the wrong way in this country. It had taken them years to realise what they had to do with the child, and, therefore, teachers and everyone concerned were face to face with a new situation. It would certainly be pre- sumption on his part, he said, to endeavour to give them anything like a proper or ade- quate definition of what education was. But he would say that education regarded the child as being wonder-made, with infinite pos- sibilities, and like a bud which had just opened. It might be in many respects blasted and ruined by an interference in wrong ways, or it might be allowed to expand and develop into all fulness. That was what the child was in the new conception. It was a remark- able conception. inasmuch as it involved a lot of things. It was necessary that the teacher should become thoroughly acquainted with the psychology of the child's mind, regarding the child physically. intellectually, and morally as a mysterious angel in disguise. a great genius sent to transform the whole life of man. and to recreate humanity, a delicate bloom that might be blasted by a false touch. Looking at it in that way, the teacher's occupation, in that light and relation, was tho most awful in its responsibility of all the professions and occupations of the country. The medical man's occupation, after all, re- latod to the body, and if in his treatment ho might make a mistake, he might destroy a i limb, but if the teacher, by his or her method, did anything to stultify or pervert the mind of the child, it would be an irre- trievable disaster which nothing in after life could put right. That was why it was abso- lutely necessary that the teacher should be properly trained for his task. There were I good teachers, though, who had never been trained, but who, by a kind of instinct, did not do much ha:.? io the ;?: i!?n. They I were simply groping in the dark. 1'egarding I higher edl1(,:1+ion. Mr. Jones said if this coun- try wa? to continue as the leading commer- cial nation of the world, competition de- manded University education of the highed type, and h" d:d "nt behove they conki spend money more profitably thin upon increased University education. The speaker regardeel the coiiiiri,,? of ?,-f one of the greatest historical events in the history of Wales, and that would undoubtedly be the verdict of the historian in the days to come. He was in favour of spending a considerable amount of money upon secondary education, but if the child had been spoilt in the elemen- tary school he' could be tinkered with as much as they liked in after life, but he would still not be worth much. Therefore it was neces- j sary that when the child went to the second- ary school or university, he should go with the maximum development of his faculties according to age. had to regard elemen- tary education, lie said, as the most impor- taut of the three brunches of education. The early life of the ('hiJd was the most impor- tant in its history. Modern teachers were becoming vevy so vrco; m fact, the scarcity was becoming a very serious and alarming: problem. It was seiyous* because the cliildren of the present feneration would not receive that competent instruction and that chance to become what they otherwise would become if this scarcity did not exist. Why was it that there was such a scarcity of qualified teachers? There were many answers, and the Board of Education would tell them that it was because they killed the old system and the new system would not work. They blamed the system because they could not say it was their own fault. Another reason was that teachers were not paid a sufficiently high salary, so that they might be attracted to the profession. The hon. gentleman referred to the question of a State minimum salary for teachers. To that he had no objection; but if it was going to imply that all the teachers of the country would be made a kind of civil servant, he would raise his pro- test most emphatically. If they were go I ng to have all the teachers of the country a sort of product of Army officers, with their book of instructions, walking down to the school with the King's regulations, to administer scientific doses to the children, the day would come when the prophet would arise to curse those who had afflicted such a system, more appalling than were the excesses of the priest- hood of Europe in the Middle Ages. The Board of Education had been interfering too much, and trying to compel all the teachers of the country to conform to one condition. The teacher wanted more freedom in his own individual centre. There were too many in- terfering to-day—people who did not under- stand the work, and who had never been trained for it. That was because the old conception still prevailed. Concluding, the speaker urged all educationists to bestir them- selves. An educated democracy was a mounted infantry in the world of competi- tion. "Be true to your own children," he added, and remember that Wales is under- going a great change." (Applause.) At the close, Mr. Evan Davies moved the hearty thanks of the meeting to Mr. Edgar •Tones for his address. Mr. Davies referred to the question of the scarcity of teachers. It would be nothing short of a national loss if the schools of this country had to be staffed with men and women who failed to, find positions in other walks of life. If educa- tion was so important, it was absolutely essential that the best type of men and women should be obtained to administer it. (Cheers.) Barry should be proud that they had taken a lead in the provision of primary education in this country. In Barry they had the best system of primary education in either England or Wales. (Cheers.) Wales had been credited with an unbounded zeal for education, but if they examined the con- ditions in the primary schools throughout the country they would, finel that they did not altogether deserve that compliment. But this could not be said of Barry. Tn return for the generous provision made by the Barry Education Authority in its primary schools, the Government paid a larger grant per child to Barry than to any other authority in Eng- land or Wales. (Applause.) The Barry child received t)! more than the child in Cardiff, simply because the people of Barry had been wise in making proper provision for these children in the primary schools. -Unless the foundation was properly laid in primary schools, Mr. Davies idded, tl-it- work in the higher branches of education could not be successful. Mr. E. T. Rees. in seconding, remarked that he was pleased to see that there was an awakening in the minds of the workers. Upon all the Education Authorities there should be teachers' representatives. (Cheers.) The vote was enthusiastically carried; and a like comnliment was passed to the Chairman for presiding.

Advertising

(Bronchitis 1 and rOlljJ (úre is undoubtedly Dr. I'ow's Liniment, the never-failing remedy with 80 vc.irs' reputation. BRONCHITIS, CSiQ'JP, 1 WHOûPiMG COUGH, quickly yield to its p curative influence, and no home in which there arc children should be without a bottle of this marvellous preparation which far surpasses other specifics in healing virtue. It not only checks tliQ ailment but removes the cause and pre- vents serious consequences. RHEUMATISM, LUM8AS0, SCIATICA, etc., Safe, aro Quickly ianishi-d by Dr. Bow's Liniment. Saf¡', sure and speedy. See narao and trade mark on label. Of all Chemists, 111% and 2/6 per bottle, Proprietors: Dr. Bow's Liniment, Ltd., 8 Union Marine Buildings, 11 Da!. Street, Liverpool.

BARHY DOCK TIDE TABLE

BARHY DOCK TIDE TABLE, The fcl'owing is the Tide Table for Biriy Dock for the week commencing tc-morroR (Sat'ird&y) Morning. Afternoon. h.m. ft. in, h.m. ft. in, Friday, 1G 9-45 :()-: 10-10 34- 7 Saturday. ] 7 10-23 85- 1 10-49 33- 1 Sunday, IS 11- 3 33- 2 11 20 31- 1 Monday, It) 11-47 :31. Toeeday, 20 M 18 29- (i 04fi Wednesday, 21. 1-25 28- 5 2- 6 28- (j Thursday, 22 2-54 28. 6 3-40 29- 2

THE BROTHERHOOD MOVEMENT i

THE BROTHERHOOD MOVE- MENT. i GREAT RALLY AT BARRY, I "I)-DDE'S Bv -;1D I)f:JIT II> ADDRESS BY MR. PHILIP I SNOWDEN. M.P. RESPONSIBILITY OF THE I MOVEMENT. I THE PROBLEM OF INTER- I NATIONAL PEACE. I I Three thousand men filled the Theatre Royal. Barry, on Sunday afternoon last, to hoar an address by Mr. Philip Snowden. Labour M.P. for Blackburn. It was a great rally of P.S.A. Brotherhood members, and as Mr. Philip Snowden, in the course of his address, remarked, it was a most encourag- ing sign of the times to see such a large gathering present. The Rev. C. H. Shave, president of the united Brotherhood move- ment in the town, was in the chair, anel supporting him were Mr. PhH;p Snowden. M.P., Profe?or Tom Jones. M.A. (sccretar' of the Welsh National Insurance Commis- sion) Rev. 11. Silyn Roberts, M.A.. Councillor F. E. J. Murrell, Mr. John Jones (Bristol House), and Mr. E. Blackmore (the local j secretary). After the Chairman had extended to Mr. Snowden a cordial welcome on behalf of the Brotherhood men of Barry. Mr. Philip Snowden, M.P., entered upon an eloquent and inspiring address, which was listened to with rapt attention throughout. "I believe that of all the agencies that are now at work. aiming at making this world a better place," saicf the speaker amidst ap- plause, none are doing more useful work than is the Brotherhood movement." (Ap- plause.) It was a particularly encouraging sign to see such an assemblage of men, all, he took it, inspired by a desire to do what was in their power to make their own I'ves worthier, and the lives of their fellows hap- pier. Those who were associated with tho Brotherhood movement had a special respon- ¡' sibility. The profession of human brother- hoods carried with it a good deal of respon- sibility. When a man joined the Brotherhood movement, he admitted a belief in the great effect of human brotherhood, and if they professed a belief. it was their duty to try to give practical expression to it so far as lay within their power. T herefore, Mr. Snowelen saic1. it was the duty of all who were con- nected with such a movement to do every- thing possible to help their fellows, and to remove from the world everything which was inconsistent with the condition of human brotherhood. No man. he said, would be premreel to admit that to-day their society. their politics, and their industrial conditions were based upon a recognition of the effect of human brotherhood. But he believed the I world was getting better, and he said he could not continue in the work in which he had been engaged for a good many years if he did not think—and did not feel certain—- that the day would come when righteousness would be universal. That the world was growing better he must admit again, but before righteousness became universally es- tablished a great deal of work had to be done, and a great many evils which existed) had to be abolished. It was the purpose of the Brotherhood movement to help that. (Hear, hear.) Proceeding, Mr. Snowden said it Y,is impossible to go about without finding I some evidence of the spirit of strife at work— ) so inconsistent with the practical belief in the principles of human Brotherhood. "Men make money to-dav," he added, "and desire to make it, not for the mere elesiro of pos- sessing wealth, but because the possession of money gives man power in his social posi- i tion." Thev saw the world turned into a gambling den, he said, and imperial wealth was manipulated, not for supplying men's needs, but to plunder the many for the bene- fit of the few. (" Shame.") The Brother- hood had to work to change that condition of tilings, which were totally in discord with the belief of human brotherhood, for if they reallv did believe in human brot1wrhond, and considered that men were brothers, they should treat a!! men as brothers. (Applause.) Wh en they declared the great effect and principle of human brotherhood, they were not giving expression to any mere sentiment, hub were stating what was a great and vital truth. The Brotherhood movement had not been the first movement to emphasise the great truth of human brotherhood. It was the es- sence of the teaching of Jesus Christ, and no- where could they find such a beautiful, and at the same tinN; perfect, scientific exposition of human brotherhood as in the wonderful figure of St. Paul, where lie described the body and its members. Human brotherhood meant that they were all part of one whole. I have no sympathy or patience," he went on, with the individual who excuses his own immoralities and his own wrong-doings* and puts the blame upon everybody hut him- self." (Hear, hear.) It was the duty of every individual to co-operate to make it dif- ficult for^people to do wrong, and easy to do right. (Cheers.) Recognise your indi- vidual responsibility of the sin, suffering, and injustice which exist in the land to-day," the speaker said, was the main appeal in his address. He had always refused to divorce politieis from religion. (Applause.) He wanted politics which were fit for religion, and religion which was fit for politics. He knew of no more holy work than the work of politicians engaged in removing slums from tho land, and in doing something to lessen tho appalling evils resulting from tho cursed drink traffic. There was no more iioly or religious work than the work of statesmen engageel in trying to promote goodwill, and a better understanding be- tween the nations of the earth. (Cheers.) Don't put the responsibility for evils which exist iil,)n yotr li, pro- ceeded. Don't blame Parliament for national evils which are not righted. The responsibility is yours." (Applause.) There were thousands of children horn into the world who were never given an opportunity to develop the God-endowed gifts. "The responsibility for that is yours. The respon- sibility for any man who is unable to ob- tain by honest labour the means to support himself and those who are depending upon him, is your responsibility," eleclared Mr. Snerodon. Bad housing existed because the people allowed it to exist. What was the use of wonderful discoveries and improve- ment unless they were going to he useel to raise tho moral condition of tho people? There was no more pathetic sight in tho worlel than to see the able-bodied roaj; tramp- I ing from factory to factory, from dock to dock, and mine to mine,, begging for the op- portunity to earn an honest living by honest labour. He hoped that when the next trade depression came—they did not want it, but he knew it would come—the Brotherhooel movement would raise its united voice, and demand that Labour should be organised by the State, and manipulated so that no man should starve, nor his wife too, because lw' was unable to obtain employment. In con- elusion, Mr. Snowdon. referred to the quos- tion of international peace. This, he said, wari the most •important of all questions. After nearly two thousand years of professed Christianity, they had Christian Europe j armed to tho teeth. (" Shame.") It was the duty of the Brotherhood to alter that. but before it could he aexxxmplished they had to change their ideal of national greatness. He trusted that the day vs oulel corn-o when men would brothers be. (Cheers.) During the afternoon a chorus was ren- dered by the Barry Brotherhood Male Voice Party (conductor, Mr. George Phillips), and a musical selection was played by the Barry Dock Brotherhood Orchestra, under the leadership of Mr. John Davis.

Advertising

The Danger of Influenza. A warning is necessary to all who have been attacked by Influenza, because of the perils of its after-effects, which leave the system dangerously debilitated. the nerves and heart enfeebled, and the blood laden with noxious germs. New strength, with new vitality and steady nerves are recoverable after Influenza only by making the blood pure and red. This is readily accom- plished by Dr. Williams' Pink Pills, which by their power of renewing the blood,have cured many cases of Influenza's after-effects. Miss M. Heywood of II Deictor Street, Burnley, mentions In the early part of last year I had a bad attack of Influenza. I lost much strength, and one doctor said that I was dangerously weak and bloodless. Then Bronchitis followcd, and I had to remain in bed. But besides the cough and weakness I had pain all over me. My digestion was too weak to manage -anything better than beef-tea or milk. I got little sleep at nights, and my blood seemed like cold water. Ordinary Medicine useless for the After-effects. Also, I suffered from headaches and was often faint. Though I took medicine after medicine, the Influenza seemed to have mastered me, and my nerves were shaken to pieces. One friend recommended me to take Dr. Williams' Pink Pills. A few doses of these Pills awakened an appetite and day by day improved my blood. Then steadily my strength grew; the cough left me, and my nerves were r braced up. Soon all headache went, and all pain left my limbs. "After taking only a few more doses of Dr. Williams' Pink Pills I was completely cured, though I had given up hope of ever being strong again." FREE HEALTH GUIDE. Send a postcard to Dr. Williams' Co., 46 Holborn Viaduct, London, for the helpful Health Guide, Diseases of the Blood." Dr. Williams' Pink Pills have cured countless cases like the above, also Anaemia, Indigestion, Nervous Disorders and Rheumatism. Of dealers; also of Dr. Williams' Medicine Co., 46 Holborn Viaduct, London, E.C., post free, 2s. tjd. one box, or 13s. 9d. for six. Substitutes will not do you good; Miss Heywood only Found New Strength In ] Dr. Williams 1 Pink Pillso I

PICTURES OF BIRD LIFE I

PICTURES OF BIRD LIFE. I INTERESTING HfNTS TO NATURE 1 STUDENTS. -i- LECTURE BY M?. J. OWEN J DAVIS AT DINAS POWIS. ? MAJOR-GENERAL LEE ON THE J RED CROSS -AfON'E-NIENT. -i —— With pleasant recollections of Mr. J. J Owen Davis' previous lectures on bird life. I there was a large audience of ladies and gentlemen at the Parish Hall, Dinas Powis, j on Tuesday evening last, when Mr. Davia ] delivered another extremely interesting lan- 1 tern lecture on Bird-Life." It was in connection with the Dinas Powis Branch of the British Red Cross Society, and Major-General H. H. Lee, J.P., D.L., who presided, said the Red Cross movement v was doing a vast amount of good throughout the country. It was accomplishing a splen- did work in the home and out of the home. (Applause.) The more people learnt about Red Cross work. the more enthusiastic they became in it. (Cheers.) I Mr. J. Owen Davis' lecture, which was il- lustrated by more than seventy lantern 1j slides, taken from Nature by himself, was ] particularly interesting and edifying, and the 1 audience passed its full measure of admira- tion upon the excellent slides which werff thrown on the screen in illustration of a j masterly and gifted address. The past sea- 1 son, said Mr. Dai-ies, had been a more or less unfortunate one for him. for the enhtusiam Ij of others interested in bird life had caused J them to follow his f6ot??teps, and rob the nests which he was watching. The main POT- Jj tie>n of the lecture was centred in Mr. 0:1 observations of bird life, whilst on holiday on the Cower Coast. This coast, ho said, Has simply infested with herring gulls, and he seemeel to hear the yell of the hireI as it floated down the stream on a calm summer's evening. Ha gave the life-story and the peculiarities of the ringed plover, merlin, trc^ and meadc-w pipits, wag- tail, sky-?u-k, ,d¡iuchat, lapwing, blue-tit, and-pipeJ', anel many other British birds. Regarding the pheasia-nt, Mr. Davies said tbÜ from a young student's point of vi? it was a most disappointing bird. It was so pampered, well-fed, and cared for. The car- rion crow was the pheasants' great enemy. It was a. regular in fact, it would rob or kill anything. In these utilitarian elay: the lecturer went on, everyone was apt to ask, What was the use of birds?'* Day after day, season after season, and morning till dark, they were always to ho found, delighting and charming people, but nothing was done for them in return. They had tiie.r nature students, and some killed and stuffed I)ii-&, to try a.nd learn something from the mangled remains. Others collected' tho eggs of the hircls-and that, Mr. Davie.s snbinitt-:el. was almost as bad. Nothing was ever gained, he considered, by a mero collec- tion of empty egg-shells. "Go into the- woods and fields with your note-hooks." he advised, "and try and learn something of the habits of birds." They then would be- -i come nature worshinpers. and would cr,-n.'e \1 to C()\p! (,f the birds, and trv and help them in .ill their little parts. The hearty thanks of the audience were convcypd to tim Ic?iurrr bv General 1??. who was also thanke:! for. prp?ding, on ?TO I^ ivilo 11??'a! of Mr. T. Vivian Roes. 

Advertising

I- C0?Fpor Cakes, Pastry,    ? fl ?? II Puddlng(?s and :)  I IBORWIGK'Sj flS 1^—BAKINn —POWnFP Jt "I