Teitl Casgliad: Barry Dock news

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
11 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
i EXHIBITION BUILDING IN i BRISTOL

i EXHIBITION BUILDING IN BRISTOL. EXPENDITURE OF £ 300.000 ON i GKEA.T SUM.}]EL! UIXTUKE. On the 2S.U of M.«y tj-.e 1 liter- national Exhibition, wlitch may easily he des- cribed as "tÍle event of l'Jl l so far as the West of England is concerned, w ifl open its as a c?nt:r? for amusement during t his sum- I gates at A.?'to? Avenue. Ih'isto?. intact, mer it will be without par.el, for it is OEe UitiiL'hu?-Ht Exhibitions .vr organised in I thePi'.?incc. it juis been dci. gned upon the same iinos as the S?'eat Exhibitions of .London and the Continent, and will be thoroughly representative of home manufac- tures and commerce as well as of the indus- tries of the Overseas Dominions. The Exhi- bition grounds extend over an ares of forty acres on the banks of the River Avon, with the magnificent Clifton Suspension Bridge and Leigh Woods in the background. The exten- sive grounds are studded with beautiful ex- hibit palaces. Although amusements of every .suitable description will be provided in ample quan- tities, education is the grand purpose of the whole enterprise, and from all parts of the globe have been gathered exhibits of the things of paramount interest to visitors. Art is displayed in a magnificent pavilion, and illustrates what the artists of to-day are doing; manufactures are demonstrated by working exhibits of the processes and methods of production; and mineral wealth and metallurgy are displayed in a very ef- fective manner. The lighting of the grounds is going to he one of the great features of the Exhihition. Two days a week for two months music com- petitions upon a national scale will he held in the spacious concert pavilion. Choirs comprising a total of lo.OoO voices have al- ready entered, and tins number will pro- bably be increased to 24,000 before the eon- tests begin. The/-heirs are coming from all parts of the Kingdom, and include the largest combinations. Dr. Charles and hi.; Imperial Choir of 1,200 voices will come down from London the lath June to give a concert. Lavish arrangements have b;x>n made for the general scheme of music. The Dominions Gardens will contain a wealth of floral beauty. A most elaborate pavilion housing the Australian Government display, and individual exhibits from the Canadian Pacific Railway, the Canadian Nor- Ra i lii-, thern Railway, and the City cf Toronto, will 1,) found in the Dominions Gardens. The In- ternational Pavilion will dominate the Exhi- bition so far as its imposing b-ri'dings are concerned. The reconstruction of Bristol Castle, which was destroyed by ord er of Oliver Cromwell, will be another striking fea- ture of the Exhibition. About :2.000 people tti?-e of t l i(-, Ex l il will take part in the Pageant of Bristol, which will be produced upon Monday. the 22nd June, and each following evening until the 4th July, after which the pageant ground will be available for all ssort* of purposes. Another feature of this great Exhibition will i be Shakespeare's England, Elizabethan lic,ii,ie.i Ni-' 'th a village green where Morris and folk dancing will take place, ard a cle- n'onstratlcn of old-fashioned sports, pas- times, and dresses. There will also he a lull- | Mzed reproduction of Drake's flagship, the "Revenge." The public will be able to wan- der at will between the decks of the vessel as it lies alongside Old Plymouth quay. There will be a daily parade of fashions, and twenty mannikins have been engaged to show off the very latest things" in ladie. wearing apparel. At the present moment 2,000 men are at work erecting all the magnificent buddings, upon which alone a sum of £ 6,000 is Inking spent. Altogether the total expenditure of the Exhibition Company, (?i' which rh-gen-, ?ral director is Mr. Leolyir G. Hart, "Jw had a g" reat deal to do with the organisation of theFestival of Empire at the Crystal Palace in 1911, will be not le:s and the exhibitors may bo expected to spend an ■oqual amount.

I BARRY POLICE OFFICER I PROMOTED I

BARRY POLICE OFFICER PROMOTED. SERet\ complimented by the Chief Constable and t,I e County Justices for zeal and keen- ness. He was one of the first constables to commence the raids on card-sharpers and roulette players, and by the discovery of n secret spring in the gamblers' tables was able to demonstrate to the magistrates how the roulette was manipulated for the benefit of the possessor and against the person who laid the money. Inspector Toye is to be congratulated upon his well-deserved promotion.

A RUNAWAY HORSE

A RUNAWAY HORSE. EARRY COUNCILLOR INJTREI) IN EXCITING INCIDENT. There was an exciting incident in Holton- road, Bari7y Docks, on Saturday evening last. The main thoroughfare was congested with pwplo, when there was a sudden warning of the approach of a runaway horse. The ani- mal which was attached to a wagonette owned hy Mr. Isaac Lovell, 44, Regent- street, Barry Docks, was, it appears, frigh- tened hy a dog. Darting off, it careered madly down the road. People ran to safety, and-several men made. unsuccessful attempts to stop the runaway. But the animal con- tinned its pace, and when at the bottom of tho street came into violent collision with a bread van, belonging to Councillor E. Ash ton, of Plymouth-road, 'Barry Island. Mr. Ash- ton, who was in the van, was thrown out, and badly injured his knee, in addition to j sustaining other bruises. The runaway horse was stopped, and fortunately no one else was injured."

PRETTY WEDDING AT BAIIIIY I i i

PRETTY WEDDING AT BAIIII-Y. I MR. T. W. LEWIS AND MISS i KATIE EDWARDS. i An interestIng and pretty wedding took j place at Trinity Presbyterian Church, Barry, on Saturday last, when the contracting par- ties were Mr. Tom W. Lewis, Penza nee, assistant manager of the Penlee" Stone Quar- ries, Newlyn, Cornwall, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Lewis, Hawarden, Fi;iit- shire, and Miss Kat'.e Edwards, only daugh- ter of Mr. and Mrs. David Edwards, relic v- ing officer, Penybryn, Harbour-road, Barry The officiating minister was the Rev. R. Norman Edwards, B.A., B.D., Lanca-tei-, j brother of the hride, assisted by the Rev. Christmas J. Lewis, B.A., pastor of the 'churc'h. Mr. John Edwards, Martock, Somerset, also brother of the bride, was best mail. A large number of relatives and friends assembled at the church to witness I the ceremony, and appropriate music and a wedding march were played on the organ by Mr. J. M. Lloyd, the organist and choir- master. The bride, who was given away by her father, was attired in becoming white satin, with a crepe-de-chene overskirt, and an embroidered veil fringed with orange I blossoms. She carried a sheaf of white Eas- ter lilies, and was attended by two brides- | maids—Miss Edith Norman, Cardiff, cousin of the bride, who wore a blue eolienne dre, with flowered tunic, and Miss ?tiev Lewis, who was attired iu a mauve tafetta dress, both carrying'bouquets of carnations. After the wedding breakfast the newly-wedded couple left for London to spend their honey- moon. The wedding presents were:—Bride's parents, piauo and household linen Rev. R. N. and Mrs. Edwards, silver cake basket; Mr. John Edwards, cheque; Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Lewis, Shotton, cheque; Mr. Alun Lewis, cheque>; Mis, LeIYÚ;, Hawardpn, tea set; Miss Carrie Lewis, dinner and dessert knives and serviette rings; Miss Lucy Lewis, Liverpool, silver teaspoons; Mr. and Mrs. Neild, Hawarden. silver spirit kettle; Mr. and Mrs. Trevor Jones, Raven glass. cheque; Rev. and Mrs. John Roberts, Wrexham, cheque; Mrs. Norman and Family, Cardiff, plush curtains and tablecloth Miss Norman, i afternoon tea cloth Mr. and Mrs. Davies, I Mold, cheque; Mr. and Mrs. James Edwards, Cardiff, damask tablecl'oth; Mr. Lewis Ed- wards, grandfather's clock; Mrs. L. &1- wards, blankets; Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Jones, Swansea, fish knives and forks; Mrs. and Miss Howell, oil painting: Mr. and Mrs. Bryn Jones, Swansea, silver butter dish Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Evans, Gorseinon, wool hearthrug; Mis. Albert Edwards, Cardiff, s ilver toast rack; Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Davies Cardiff, linen sheets; Rev. C. J. Lewis, B.A., selected poems; Mrs. C. J. Lewis, picture: Rev. Cuthbert Thomas, B.A., Cardiff, flower pot; Captain. Mrs., and Miss Jones, Pontycelyn, silver fruit stand; Mr. and Mrs. Dan Jones, Hillsboro, cheque; Miss Jessie Blacklock, Dalbeattie, eiderdown quilt; Miss Mary Blacklock, tea cosy; Misses Queenie and Alice Jones, Cardiff, tea knives; Miss Thomas, Brynawel. quilt; Miss Boaler, flower vase; Miss Olive Morgan, B.A, silver egg stand; Mr. and Mrs. A. B. James, tea knives; Misses Gwladys and Gwcn James, cushion: Mr. and Iohii James, silver sauce tureen; Mrs. John Lloyd and family, silver pic servers Mrs. W., J. Williams and Miss Freda Davies, sil- ver marmalade dish; Mrs. W. R. Hopkins, silver sugar stand and sifter; Mr. and Mrs. Basil Lewis, silver nower stands; Mr. and 13a.-?; Mac-coy, picture; Miss Harpur, Cardiff, picture; ML-. and Mrs. R. T. Evans, j silver photo frame Mrs. and Miss Olivers, teapot and water jug; Mrs. D. Jenkins, cake stand; Mrs. Jones, Llandogo, pen- painted mats; Mr. and Mrs. J. 1). Evans, flower pot; Misses M. and K. Snell, rose hmd: Mis. A. C. Waite, picture; Mr. and Mrs. Theo. Evans, silver photo frame Miss Muy Daniet. painted cloth; Mrs. Bock, counterpane; Miss Clara Williams, cushion; Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Gard, Martock, dinner forks; Mr. and Mrs. Qui Iter, dessert forks; Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Paull, table centre; Mr. hs., and Miss Lye, table centre; Mrs. Ed- wards towels; Mrs. Edwards, counterpane; Mr. Edward Williams, Cardiff, cheque; Mr. P. B. Covin, Penzance, silver tea&poons; Mrs. Roberts, cake stand and d'oyley; Mrs. Carter, Hawarden, clock; Miss Gwen Jones, Penzance, silver candlesticks; Mr. and Mrs. j R. Williams, tablespoons; Messrs. J. and F. Pool, Hayle, copper fire screen; Mr. G. Maxev, saucepans; Mr. Jones and Mr. Herbert Jones, Little Mancott, brass coal scuttle; Mr. and Mrs, Bryant, Drybrook, cake knife; Mr. and Mrs. Billington, New- hn. fruit dish; Mr. and Mrs. Beckerleg, Newlyn, salt cellars; Miss Clark, V, igan, butter dish; Mr.'W. Garcia, ?Veston-s?per- Mare, picture; Directors and Employees, Pen lee Quarries, Newlyn, bureau; Mr. Thomas and Family, London, dinner cruet; etc.

I CHILDREN ALL LIKE ZAMRUK i i

CHILDREN ALL LIKE ZAM-RUK. I'XKOEALLED FOR SOOTHING 

CARETAKERSHIP OF BARRY COUNTY GIRLS SCHOOL i I

CARETAKERSHIP OF BARRY COUNTY GIRLS' SCHOOL. POSITION OFFERED TO NON- COMS. OF THE ARM Y OR NAVY. Mr. J. Lowdon, J.P. (chairman) presided at a special meeting of the Barry County School Governors on Thursday evening last, the members present being Colonel J. A. Hughes, C.B., Dr. P. J. O'Donnell, Coun- cillors S. R. Jones. J. Marshall, and J. R. Llewellyn. The Chairman pointed out that the meet- ing had been called because the caretaker of the County School had resigned, and desired to leave on April 24th. I Mr. Marshall: When does the school re- open ? The Chairman: On the first Tuesday in May. Colonel Hughes pointed out that this was a special [iort of appointment, requiring spe- trial qualifications, and was the most impor- tant caretakers hip in the town. They wanted a lllilll and wife, with no children. The wife should he able to cook, and the man of goorl address to the teachers and girls. A good caretaker in the school would make a deal of difference. He had two suggestions to make; one, that they ask the Chair- man, the three lady members, and the head- mistress to make the appointment; the other, that they write to the Corps of Com- missionaires, who had a list of non-commis- sioned officers and petty-officers. Those who governed this body knew the character of everyone in the list, and from this list ti good appointment coukl be made, for they were men who had had special training, and were disciplined. Dr. O'Donnell: A Navy man would be best. Mr. S. R. Jones: What wages do we pay? The Chairman: He would be paid 35/- a week, with hous?, coal, and gas. Mr. S. R. Jones: There is a great deal in I what Mr. Hughes says, but I would rather we made the appointment locally if we had suitable applicants. Dr. O'Donnell: Where have we had a good caretaker from Barry? Mr. S. R. Jones: For the local schools. Colonel Hughes: I move that the Clerk write to the Corps of Commissionaires, ask- ing them to recommend suitable names, and that the selection be left in the hands of the Chairman, the three lady in em be i s of the committee, and the headmistress. The Chairman: I think that would be the wisest course. The school is the best in the County, and probably in Wales, and we should get the best caretaker possible. Mr. J. R. Llewellyn: How did we get the caretaker of the Boys' School? The Chairman: It was left to the head- master. Mr. Llewellyn: We have a good man there. Mr. Marshall: Are there any local men who are members of the Corps? Colonel Hughes: If so, they7 will. recom- mend them. The Chairman: There is a great deal of trouble with local men as to the nature and extent of their duties. Mr. Marshall: Could we not apply to the Corps of Commissionaires and advertise as well for local applicants? Colonel Hughes: That would be rather un- fair. Dr. O'Donnell: Would you advertise only for Army and Navy men? Colonel Hughes: Yes. Mr. S. R. Jones: I do not care for that idea. I would like the position to he open. Colonel Hughes: Petty-officers and non- commissioned officers are more accustomed to obey orders, and if they did not give satis- faction they would be placed on the Com- missionaires' list again. Dr. O'Donnell seconded Mr. Hughes' pro- position, conditionally that they advertise locally for applicants of the same type. Mr. S. R. Jones moved as an amendment that the local advertisement be open to any- one, but there was no seconder, and the original proposition was agreed to, the mat- tet- of selection and appointment being left to the committee named, with the addition of Colonel Hughes.

VISIT OF ROYAL ITALIAN CIRCUS TO BARRY

VISIT OF ROYAL ITALIAN CIRCUS TO BARRY. This circus, which has lately been acquired by Mr. E. H. Bo stock, sole proprietor of Bostock and Wombwell's world-famed Mena- gerie, is visiting Cadoxton-Barry on April 22nd and 23rd. This circus is really the first circus that has ever travelled this country, having per- formed by Royal command on five occasions before his late Majesty King Edward VII.; also King George V. It is difficult to say which is the best part of the performance, for the animals and the performers are trained to perfection. When the circus visited Buckingham Palace, the performances were a great success from start to finish, and the hearty applause showed conclusively how much the Royal party and guests en- joyed the entertainment. A temporary ring was placed in the Palace grounds, and a large collection of elephants, ponies, bears, mon- keys, goats, zebras, dogs, seals, sealions, etc., was housed in an exquisitely shady spot near the ornamental water. Contrary to ex- pectation, the monkeys behaved with exem- plary restraint, and though they cast long- ing glances upwards towards the overhang- ing soft green branches of the elms, they were quite content to carry out their per- formances without making any endeavour to play even in such an ideal playground. The Royal Italian Circus certainly justifies its reputation of being the most remarkable show of its kind in existence.

NEW BRANCH OF THE BARRYI iSEA SCOUTS

NEW BRANCH OF THE BARRY SEA SCOUTS. I I THE FIRST OF ITS KIND IN THE KINGDOM. I The Sea-Scouts of the Barry district havQ decided to form a Troop of Cub-Sea-Scouts. The formation of such a Troop is one of the most recent improvements in connection with the Scout movement, and will be the first of its kind at Barry, and the first of its kind in connection with the Sea-Scout movement throughout the Kingdom. The age at which a boy can now join the Troop of Sea-Scouts is 12, but owing to the fact that a large number of boys under this age have made application to join this Troop, it has been decided that a step should be taken to cope with these applications). Boys between 10 and 12 years of age can now become members of the Troop of Cub- Sea-Scouts, which will be carried on in con- nection with the Barry Y.M.C.A., in a simi- lar way to that of the present Troop of Sea- Scouts. This Troop, however, will be under separate control, and will meet for instruc- tion, games, etc., at a different time to the Sea-Scout Troop. Two of the Patrol-leaders of the Sea-Scout Troop, namely, Win. Jenkins and Charles Jessey, have been appointed scoutmaster and assistant scoutmaster respectively, and all boys wishing to become members of this Troop of Cub-Sea-Scouts should attend at the Barry Y.M.C.A. on Friday, the 17th instant, at 7 p.m. sharp, to be initiated as members, and to take the scout oath.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED THE HEART OF A GIRL

[ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.] THE HEART OF A GIRL BY HENRY FARMER, Author of "The Money-Lender," 12a, Quiltry Street," Bondage," &c. CHAPTER XIV. (Continued). Joynson Palmar, fearful of tragedy, was on Stanmore's heels; but Stanmore had the start of him, and now two men who had left another compartment of the stationary train appeared to join in the chase. Stanmore seemed blind to the woman he loved and deaf to her scream—only con- scious of one man, Michael Thome, and that man his objective. It was all very quick. | Michael Thome crouched back in a defen- sive attitude, his expression and colour ghastly. Swift as it all was, there was time for many crowding, vivid thoughts during tho&e brief, breathless seconds. Thorne had played, and lost. He knew that marriage bonds, family obligations, were as powerless as wisps to bind Queenie to him now. and as his brain reeled it flashed upon him madden- ingly tint lie had been robbed of his revenge on the woman I)y only a small margin of time. "Stop him!" cried Palmer. A couple of poí-ter, fhmg themselves on Stanmore. It was too quick to follow with the eye; but he flung them ofT, right and left, and one of them trying to save himself clutched hold of a spectator and both went down to the platform. Staumorc was rushing on he did not seem to have paused. T!K- crowd on the. platform might have been butter, and he a knife cut- ting through it. Michael Thome, still on the defensive, an expression of terrified anticipation on his ghastly face, was backing unconsciously. Again a woman screamed—Queenie. In the confusion-nothing very distinct- men and women saw her spring. Stanmore's course was arrested. She had flung her arms round him—twined them round his neck. "Hilary—Hilary!" she screamed. Don't you know me don't you know me— Queenie I It would have been as hard to break away from the clutch of a drowning woman as from hers. Everything for the moment in her mind was subordinate to an impulse to -avert- a tragedy. "Let me Staniiui-e did not finish. The remaining words-H get at him! "—were unspoken. lie seemed to come under the influence of the eyes staring up into his face. He went docile suddenly; a choking sob broke from his lips; he bowed his head till his lips touched hers. And that was the last Michael Thorne saw of his wife pnd the man he had wronged, and had all but wronged beyond repair; that was his last, picture—Stanmore's head bowed, Queen ie's grey, quivering features upturned, and their lips together. Neither Stanmore nor Queenie saw what happened. They were mercifully spared a gliastly sight. Nothing was very distinct to them at this moment; not even their con- sciousness, each of the other. Two men, who had sprung from another compartment of the stationary train-, had swerved and skirkd round the little crowd congested about Stanmore and Queenie, and had come upon Michael Thorne, one on each side of him, as he crouched back in a de- fensive attitude, not yet relaxed, his eyes receiving their last impression of a man and a woman. He had retreated almost to the brink of the platform. One of the two men touched' him on the shoulder. He seemed to wake suddenly, with a start, to a consciousness of their presence and their purpose. He sprang back. One- foot trod on nothing- ness. They grabbed at him; tried to save him, but his coat slipped from their grasp. A hoarse, chorussed, horrified cry went iii) and mingled with it, the harsh grinding and scrunching of brakes jammed on to their fullest power. But the monster locomotive of the Dover- train crawled on a yard or so. Michael Thorne struggled to rise, but, the wheels of the bogie were on him-crushed over him. Men and women on the platform covered their eyes suddenly with their hands. Plastered to a window of a first-class com- partment was a label proclaiming the fact that the carriage was reserved for Michael Thorne, Esq., and' the guard, who had oeen given to understand, that it was re- served for a bride and bridegroom, had' been anticipating a handsome tip at the, journey's end. But the bridegroom now lay mangled under the locomotive's wheels, and the bride was clinging to another man, an ex-convict. They heard the hoarse chorussed cry; they heard the scrunching of the brakes, but they did not see. Everything about them was in- distinct and unreal. They were hardly yet conscious of each other's reality. A man gripped their arms, It was Joyn- SOli Palmer. "Come away!" he whispered. "Get into the waiting-room. It's awful—ghastly The monster locomotive was backing. Porter and railway offioials had sprung down from the platform. But Joynson Palmer's merciful intention was bamed. An ashen-faced porter—the porter who had been told off to attend the bride's and bridegroom's luggage—came up, his gait unsteady. "I'm afraid it's your husband, ma'am! he stammered. Then Queenie fainted. CHAPTER XV. I The family was gathered together in the delightful sitting-room at Southbonrne, over- looking the promenade. Mr. Gordon Price, who had consumed large quantities of cham- Eagne since the departure of the bride and ridegroom and the suppression of n te)c- gram, was inclined to restlessness, and had iust announced his intention of obtaining a breath of fresh air and asked Philip to accompany him. The shadows of evening were deepening. Mrs. Price was on the 6ofa. Already she had complained dolefully of missing Queenie, and had been told by her husband—with in- tense irony—not to exhibit selfishness. She ought to be thankful that her daughter was happily married to a worthy fellow- Michael, to wit, and God bless him! Beryl sat in a shadowed corner, thankful that no one as yet had suggested turning; on the lights. When the ne'er-do-well son and the ne'er- do-well father reached the front door, a man on the other side was about to ring the bell. When Mr. Price opened the door he found himself facing Joynson Palmer. He waf; acquainted with the Hasted solicitor; had met him on the occasion of a visit to Queenie at the home in London. Mr. Gordon Price's mouth went loose sud- denly; his jaw dropped. The young solicitor's face was grave and set; his eyes stern and contemptuous. "A word with you alone," he said, without preliminaries of any kind. Mr. Price's collar seemed a size too small for him. Philip slipped out slinkingly on to the pavement. Palmer closed the door. Mr. Price tried to moisten his lips with his tongue. "A glitstly thing has happened," said ii riier. Mr. Price supported himself against the wall. "An accident at Sandlees Junction this afternoon. Michael Thorne run over-killed by the Dover train." | "Oh—my—God Mr. Price was trembling, like an aspen. Yet even now lIe played the hypocrite. "My—poor—Queenie—my poor che-ild—her husband! Where is slw-let me go to her! Palmer gripped him by the shoulder and shook him. "You infernal scoundrel!" he whispered hoarsely. "Stay where you are. A tele- gram was delivered here last night for Miss Price and never reached her. It was given into your liaidi! Don't deny it—I've just been making inquiries at the post office. A letter should have reached her this morning, but she never got it. You-or you and the dead man between you—conspired to keep them from her; keep from her the news that Stanmore's release was imminent. I'm almost tempted to forget myself, and give you a good hiding Joynson Palmer was just a man for the time being. Spittle was oozing from the corners of Mr. Price's mouth, over which he appeared to have lost all control. "You asked me just now," went on Palmer, "where your daughter is. She is at an hotel at Sandlees, and with her, comfort- ing her and doing his best to keep at arm's length the horrors of shock and revelation, is the man she love3, Hilary Stanmore-a free man now, and proved innocent. I've gathered enough to know the part you've I)Iayed-atid you ought to be shot. I'm not mincing words now. De mortuis nil nisi bonum—be hanged. Had Michael Thorne lived he would have stood in the dock, and been shown up for the scoundrel he was, and you would have deserved a place beside him, though your offence— sale of your' own flesh and blood--isn't art indictable one." "You—this is libel—you "Shut up Listen!" A newsboy was racing along the pro- menade shouting out something about the Hasted bank robbery, a miscarriage of jus- tice, arrests made and arrests anticipated, something about a warrant issued for the arrest of a well-known financier. "Hear that!" went on Palmer grimly. "Thome wa-s accessory after the act. He knew Roy Stannard to be alive, and the woman who went into the witness-box at Sil- t e rAssizes, and turned the hovering scale against Stanmore, committed perjury at Thome's instigation. She was a cast-off sweetheart of his—daughter of a ludging- house keeper with whom Thorne lodged formerly—who afterwards took up with Stannard "Out—out of my way Mr. Price had torn his collar from its stud, and was groping towards the front door. It looked doubtful whether he would get into the open before being stricken apopletically. But he gained the pavement, lurched across to tli2 promenade, and hung on to the rails, staring blankly seawards and mumbling stupidly to himself. He might have been very drunk indeed. He could expect no mercy from Hilary, very little from his daughter, and he knew it. The man on whom lie had sponged was dead and dishonoured. What was going to become of him? Who was going to keep him now? Even Beryl would be turned against him, and Philip was nobody's money! Mr. Gordon Price thought for a moment of the end of the pier; but he lacked the requisite courage. He gave a start. Joyn- son Palmer was beside him. "If she's well enough, recovered enough, your daughter will return to-night with Stanmore. There's only one thing for you- make yourself scarce, clear out!" "I-r haven't go-got my fare to Lon- don!" mumbled Mr. Gordon Price. Palmer did not begrudge the money. Mr. Price crept back for his liat, Palmer close on his heels. "My—poor—wife he mumbled. "You've made her life a hell for years. Get!" Mr. Gordon Price obeyed—to reach Lon- don, to cadge, to sink lower, and ulti- mately to die of delirium tremens and be accorded a pauper's funeral. So he passes from the story. Joynson Palmer watched him from sight, summoned a servant, and was conducted to the delightful sitting-room. Beryl had gone to her bedroom and locked herself in. Mrs. Price was alone with the nurse-companion. She had heard the broken cries of the news- boy, and was pleading with the nurse to fetch her a paper. "Something has happened," she was say- ing plaintively. "Something was bound to happen;. I knew it couldn't la<;t "Something has happened said Palmer. Something for the best! ft was not all told in a single issue of an evening paper—the story of the conspiracy —but it reached the public by sensational instalments: how the bank robben" was the work of an international gang who used Roy Stannard as a tool; how a motor-car- part of the gang's stock-in-trade—deposited Roy Stannard in the immediate neighbour- hood of the bank and whisked him away afterwards with his spoil and the confede- rate who was subsequently admitted; how the secret of the combination lock was obtained from the highly respected cashier —with wife and family—and the notes hidden in Stanmore's bedroom so as to dis- tract suspicion from the liighly-respeeted cashier—to whom subsequently, with ironi- cal justice, a judge meted out ten years' penal servitude; and how Michael Thorne, the Copper King, who escaped arrest tragic- ally, had suborned the woman whoso dramatic evidence clinched seemingly incon- trovertibly the case against an innocent man; how the death-certificate, granted by the doctor who claimed to have attended Roy Stannard in his last illness, had been granted without viewing the body on the statement of the widow that her husband had died during the night, a ruse to enable a criminal to start afresh. But all this rather belongs to the annals of crime and sensation; and we who pen these lines are more concerned with the heart of a girl. Let us take our last glimpse of Queenie Price. Hilary Stanmore was holding Queenie very closely to him, as if to ward off horrors. They were alone, and for a long while had been silent. "You understood!" she whispered at last, her eves hidden on his shoulder. "I understood," he answered, "your noble I flpirit of self-sacrifice-tlic horrible pressure —but we won't talk of that now. Only )' this: I understood. And you and I—we're going to forget the in-between in the fulnes3 of time, Queenie. The future is before us— we're going to look forward, not back, beloved She could not help a shudder; but the man's arms tightened and comforted her. He could be depended on to bring happiness back into her life. She had always loved him; her faith had never wavered, and he —though twice on the verge of madness, in the prison cell and on the railway platform —had never lost faith in her. "You remember," he whispered, "that night in Regent's Park? How we planned the future—the home over the bank—your mother with us—Beryl—there's been a gap —a break—but we hold the thread in our hands again. It'? going to be-God willing —as we planned it that night!" She raised her head from his shoulders, and looked into his eyes. Their lips met. the unborn future pro- mised l to be as fair as the dead yesterday of their lives was dark. [THE END.1

I MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING

I MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING. "I ain' t got no home, and I ain't got !lothing else. I haven't got nothing to do, and nothing don't come mI "'&1. oWd a BnaoMr ? Wood Gio?, -a.

Advertising

I FOR j "■■j Printing. ,1 OF EVERY DESCRIPTION • -J 11 TRY THE j j ;1 'Barry Dock News, HOLTON ROAD, BARRY DOCK w    THE 4 THE •/) > I • '.1 A Barry ]Dock News' .1 1 IS PUBLISHED *1 I i [8 PU.BLISH:ED> .1 EVERY THURMY • 4 PRICE ONE PENNY • j THE Barry Dock News' IS ON THE IS ON THE • LIST FOR < PARLIAMENTARY ADVERTISEMENTS. j